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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Classical Civilization


This page was created at 7:38 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


The Department of Classical Studies believes that the literature, monuments, and social institutions of the ancient world, together with the reflections of the Greek and Roman thinkers about their own cultures, are of unique value in themselves, well worth our contemplation and understanding; and that as we attempt to learn about and appreciate classical civilization, we necessarily learn as well a variety of contemporary methodologies and disciplines.

The department offers three groups of courses for distribution, those in Classical Civilization (introductory courses that require no knowledge of Greek or Latin), courses in Classical Archaeology, and upper-level language courses in Greek and Latin authors or genres. While only a few courses are repeated in yearly or biennial rotation, most courses are offered less regularly. This system guarantees that the instructor approaches the subject each time with fresh impetus. We believe in a healthy change and variation in our course offerings.

Classical Civilization offerings include the general surveys of Greek and Roman civilizations (CLCIV 101 and 102), which provide (through readings, lectures, and discussions) a broad understanding of the literatures, thought, and social development of ancient Greece and Rome, and thus provide the student with knowledge of and appreciation for our cultural origins, as well as an acquaintance with modern methods for understanding an ancient culture. These courses are taught each year. CLCIV 101 is offered in the Fall and CLCIV 102 is offered in the Winter. Other courses provide understanding of particular aspects of the ancient world, approached from a variety of disciplines and studies — literary, philosophical, historical, sociological, and so on. Some students (particularly those who have already developed special interests in such disciplines) may wish to explore one of these topics without having had a broader introduction.

Classical Archaeology offerings include the broad surveys of the archaeology and monuments of Greece (CLARCH 221 — offered in the Fall) and Rome (CLARCH 222 — offered in the Winter) and a general introduction to archaeological field methods (CLARCH 323). Other courses use the material remains of specific cultures both to introduce students to the diversity of the ancient world and to demonstrate how, through a variety of multi-disciplinary approaches, the archaeological record can be used to reconstruct the life-ways of past societies.

Courses in this division do not require a knowledge of Greek or Latin. They are intended for students who wish to acquire knowledge of ancient literature, life, and thought, and of the debt modern civilization owes the Greeks and Romans.


CLCIV 102. Classical Civilization II: The Ancient Roman World (in English).

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Benjamin W Fortson (fortsonb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/clciv/102/001.nsf

What did it mean to be Roman in the Ancient World? Was it all about togas, orgies, and world conquest? Or anxiety, violence, and a propensity for self-destruction? This course will approach the issue of Roman identity from a variety of social, political, and philosophical angles. Using selected Roman historians (e.g., Livy and Tacitus), poets (e.g., Catullus, Vergil, and Ovid), and other writers (e.g. Cicero and Petronius) as our guides, we will explore who the Romans thought they were, what position they felt their society occupied in the Mediterranean world and in the universe, and how their self-definition changed over time. We will discuss the ways in which the Romans constructed their past in order to understand who they were in the present. Particular emphasis will be placed on five periods of Roman history: the mythohistorical foundations of Rome; the Punic Wars and the spread of Roman power throughout the Mediterranean; the Catilinarian conspiracy and the end of the Roman republic; the Augustan "peace"; and Rome of the emperor Nero. There will also be some presentations of special topics (slavery, violence, religion, and entertainment), and some attention will be given to daily life through slide lectures. Grade will be based on exams, papers, and participation in discussion sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CLCIV 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities).

Section 001 — Roman Myth.

Instructor(s): Netta Ruth Berlin (berlin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Ancient Rome was a "mythless" society — or so it has been claimed. The popular and dynamic stories of Aeneas, Romulus and Remus, Hercules and Cacus, and Lucretia suggest otherwise. This course will explore the meaning and making of myth at Rome in relation to two facets of Roman culture: religion and history. What significance did Roman ritual attach to myth? How was myth used in accounts of the invention and reinvention of Rome as a state, a republic, and an imperial power ruled by a single man?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities).

Section 002 — Constructions of Identity in the Ancient World. Meets with HISTART 194.002.

Instructor(s): Emma Cameron Blake (ecblake@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From piercings to Prada labels, turbans to team logos, we are surrounded by material expressions of identity. Has this always been the case? How did ancient peoples define themselves and others, and express those identities through their appearance and actions? This course examines the ways in which the ancient Greeks and Romans constructed and manipulated their image and identity according to such categories as age, gender, social class, religion, occupation, and ethnicity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 120. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities).

Section 003 — Homer.

Instructor(s): Ruth S Scodel (rscodel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This class will study the Homeric epics primarily as stories about death, anger, greed, sex, monsters, friendship, gods, and embarrassment, With the help of narratology and oral theory, we will discuss characterization, suspense, pathos, type scenes, relations to other versions of the stories, and any other relevant questions that grab our interest. There will be some comparisons to the stories of the Hebrew Bible. All reading in English. Reading: Iliad, Odyssey, selections from Bible. Other requirements: Hour exam on theory and method. 2 20-minute presentations. One short (4-page) paper, one longer (8-10 page) paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 385(462). Greek Mythology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Arthur Mfw Verhoogt (verhoogt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/clciv/385/001.nsf

Greek Mythology comprises a group of traditional stories that discuss a number of universal themes such as creation, death, gods, heroes, the Other, family feuds, local history, and — not to forget — sex and cannibalism. In this course we will study the development of these tales in Greek literature and art. We will look at the myths themselves but also consider the context in which they have come down to us. We should realize that while we see Greek myths largely as a form of entertainment (Disney's Hercules for example), in antiquity myths also offered the Greeks valid explanations of the universe, mankind and society. Our focus will be on the interplay between myths and ancient society in both its contemporary and modern interpretations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 386(463). Greek Drama.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth S Scodel (rscodel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine all the genres of Greek drama (tragedy, Old Comedy, New Comedy, and satyr-play), including both the most famous works (Agamemnon, Oedipus the King) and some less familiar ones (Euripides' Cyclops, pseudo-Euripides' Rhesus.) We will mainly consider the original social and intellectual context of the dramas, but will not ignore their later history in reception and how they have been read, adapted, and produced up to the present. We will watch and discuss some videos of productions. Each student will write one short (6pp.) paper on a single play and do a presentation individually or in a group, on a later translation, adaptation, imitation, or production. There will also be a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 403 / POLSCI 403. Greek Political Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Arlene W Saxonhouse (awsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 101 or 302. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See POLSCI 403.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5, Permission of Instructor

CLCIV 460 / WOMENSTD 460. Theorizing Women in Antiquity.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sara L Rappe (rappe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/clciv/460/001.nsf

  1. To familiarize students with the broad spectrum of ancient theories concerning the meaning of gender, sex, and sexuality. By the end of the course, students will have studied philosophical, medical, religious, and literary discourses originating in the ancient Greek world, all of which present theories about the social, moral, and even metaphysical potential of women.
  2. To familiarize students with modern responses to central philosophical constructs that originated in the ancient Greek world. By the end of the course, students will have read contemporary theorists including Irigaray, Foucault, Lacan, and Butler. The course will be topical (art, drama, philosophy); historical (Classical, Hellenistic, Late antique) and theoretical.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 478. Roman Family Law.

Section 001 — Meets with LATIN 642.001.

Instructor(s): Bruce W Frier (bwfrier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Not open to freshmen. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

During the past two decades, our understanding of the Roman family has been revolutionized by scholars who have sharply questioned the realism of the law that governed these families. Roman law is uncompromising in two main respects: marriage is not only easy to enter, but easy to end, to such an extent that the marriage bond appears too weak to be socially sustainable; on the other hand, the male head of the Roman household (pater familias) has such absolute power over his descendants, no matter their age, as to make them seem little more than his servants. Modern historians have critically reexamined whether these sources amount to what they seem, particularly when they are juxtaposed with literary sources describing Roman private life. This course will take up the debate, allowing students to decide for themselves regarding a lively and on-going dispute. In the process, students will learn how to think about the social implications of legal sources — an issue of some significance also in the modern world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

CLCIV 480. Studying Antiquity.

Section 001 — Festivals and Festivity, Rites and Revelry.

Instructor(s): Sara L Forsdyke (forsdyke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CLCIV 101 or 102, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/clciv/480/001.nsf

From the feasting of Homer's epic poems to the circuses of imperial Rome, the ancients were constantly gathering together to eat, drink and enjoy various types of entertainment. This seminar will examine the role of these collective rituals in the formation, articulation and transformation of social organization and social values over time. We will examine a number of different types of religious and social rituals in the Greco-Roman world including sacrificial rituals, Greek drinking parties (symposia), Roman dining parties (convivia), civic cult, athletic competitions, gladiatorial combat, and other major and minor festivals on the Greco-Roman calendars.

In the first half of the course, we will examine various theories regarding the social role of collective ritual. Readings will be drawn from anthropological theory and historical studies of medieval and early modern societies. We will also examine one Greek and one Roman festival in light of our theoretical and comparative reading.

The second half of the course will consist of student presentations and class discussion of specific Greek and Roman festivals and rites chosen according to participants' interests.

This is an advanced undergraduate seminar intended primarily for Juniors and Seniors pursuing a concentration in Classical Studies. Prerequisites include Classical Civilization 101 and 102 and the permission of the instructor.

Requirements will include weekly participation in discussions, a major class presentation and a final paper (10-15 pages).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

CLCIV 481. The Classical Tradition.

Section 001 — Classical Tradition in the Kelsey Museum.

Instructor(s): Susan E Alcock (salcock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CLCIV 101 or 102. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This small undergraduate seminar is designed to introduce students to the world of museums their public mission and their many constraints ? with a special focus on the Kelsey Museum of Archaeology at the University of Michigan. Part of class time will revolve around:

- reading and analysis of general works on museum theory and practice

- the history and development of the Kelsey Museum in its University context

- visits (individual or class) to other available museums for autopsy and analysis

- autopsy and analysis of other museum web pages and electronic resources

A significant component of the seminar, however, will involve activities that bring students into thoughtful contact with the Kelsey galleries and collections. The class will meet once a week for three hours; a range of both individual and group projects will be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of Instructor

CLCIV 499. Supervised Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of Instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of CLCIV 499, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Undergraduate supervised reading in Classical Civilization.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor


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This page was created at 7:38 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.


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