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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Comparative Literature


This page was created at 7:38 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



COMPLIT 122. Writing World Literatures.

Section 001 — Cultural Translation.

Instructor(s): Alina M Clej (aclej@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will explore the ways in which translation can open new paths for understanding a writer's personal meanings, and particular background. By re-creating poems, short stories, or plays in a different voice, depending on the students' interest and previous knowledge, we will ask how gender, class, race, and historical circumstances affect the way writers write. How would Burns have written if he had been a landowner rather than a farmer, and how would Emily Dickinson's poems be crafted had she been an 18th century Catholic priest? Can one imagine Huckleberry Finn as a narrative written by an escaped Black slave? And how would Death of A Salesman be produced in today's economic world? Examples from other literatures may be chosen to take into account cultural specificities and differences.

Students will be asked to produce new versions of sample texts by re-translating them into a different English or American English idiom, dialect or idiolect. We will then compare semantic and stylistic differences between versions of the same text, and analyze, where possible, the aesthetic and political motivations for choosing one linguistic form over another. Students will also be asked to write brief essays motivating their linguistic choices. These writing exercises are meant to improve students' writing skills through creative involvement in literary practice, and sustained engagement with the theoretical issues that explain it. Excerpts from modern and contemporary literature, translation studies, and literary criticism will be combined in a course-pack. Students of all backgrounds are welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMPLIT 122. Writing World Literatures.

Section 002 — Writing as Thinking.

Instructor(s): Abraham I Acosta (acostaa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Not too long ago, Nietzsche remarked that grammar provides the metaphysics for every (linguistic) community: "Philosophy for the masses". Writing, it seems, might be more of an accomplice to our perspective of the world than just a way to simply describe it. One could even argue that writing is the sole structure through which thought can emerge. Syntax, nominalization, verb tense, i.e., writing, creates the manner in which things, places and people are perceived, categorized, understood; that is, (thought to be) known. In other words, it might be that language thinks and speaks for us rather than the contrary.

This college writing course will take as its point of departure that genre of writing that most clearly exposes the linguistic basis upon which those things most natural to us rest: travel narrative. Through travel, one encounters different geographical regions, different "races", different cultures, different social organizations, different histories, and different cosmographies. While in travel, what one thinks one knows comes into conflict with what one encounters. It is at this point where writing, usually the only form available to record these travels, is both at its most fragile and most resilient in maintaining a stable world order for both the recorder and its reading public. Translating what one sees into what one knows will seem essential and almost inherent within the logic of travel. Through a selection of presumably disparate texts ranging from royal charters, juridical decisions, imperial proclamations, state policies, philosophical and scientific manuscripts to be read alongside with the narratives of Columbus, Amerigo Vespucci, Olaudah Equiano (Interesting Narrative ), J.L. Borges ("Tlon, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius" ), Alejo Carpentier (The Lost Steps ) and from films such as The Time Machine, we will be able to see the significant role that translating the unknown into the known plays in creating and maintaining the orderly and stable habitat we ourselves call "the world". The writing requirements for this course (four papers in total, ranging from four to eight pages) will ask students to consider, evaluate, and critique the roles of writing and linguistic "truth" to the idea of travel and the production of knowledge about what has been encountered in the beyond.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 122. Writing World Literatures.

Section 003 — Translation and Interpretation.

Instructor(s): Clara Hong (seunghei@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Whether from one language to another, from one situation to another, from one speaker to another, or from one medium to another, we constantly face mediation in telling and re-telling our stories. What kinds of translations do we make in this process? What words do we choose to use or not use? What meanings do we lose or gain from this very choice? And what are the implications of such choices in understanding our own culture and other cultures? In this course, we will consider these questions by combining readings from a range of times and places (Shakespeare rewritten in the Caribbean of today, Indian folktales in older and newer versions, Proust adapted as screenplay, etc.) with creative translation assignments that encourage you to travel imaginatively in your own writing. In doing so, we will connect the problem of translation to the task of writing. Because there are no equivalent matches between words of different languages, a translator must constantly make choices. These choices add up to a kind of interpretation of the text. In producing a new text, the translator combines the critical and the creative and becomes the text's most intimate reader. In this course, we will be both critical and creative as we become intimate with texts and attempt to build bridges across languages and cultures. Through reflection upon these texts as models of thinking, speaking, and writing we will strive to improve our own analytic and communicative skills and become more self-conscious about how the ways in which we write (and think and speak) affect both ourselves and others. You will be graded on your active participation in class discussion, writing assignments, and creative translation assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 241. Topics in Comparative Literature.

Section 001 — A Mystery to Me: The Puzzle, Desire, and Meaning. [Honors].

Instructor(s): Catherine Brown (mcbrown@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMPLIT 240 recommended. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/complit/241/001.nsf

The stories we will read in this class are woven of mysteries and enigmas. They want very much to answer questions of life and death (what went wrong? who done it? why?), but often pose more questions that they answer. Some of our questions, then: What makes a detective? What does she or he want? What does it mean to solve a problem? How do we know when it's completely solved? We will explore these questions, working under the hypothesis that asking questions is as important as answering them. Readings will include:

  • Paul Auster, City of Glass
  • Patrick Chamoiseau, Solibo Magnificent
  • Agatha Christie, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd
  • Arthur Conan Doyle, The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes
  • Sigmund Freud, Dora
  • Henry James, The Turn of the Screw
  • Sophocles, Oedipus the King tr. Berg and Clay
  • Jonathan Spence, The Question of Hu

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 241. Topics in Comparative Literature.

Section 002 — American't Ourstory: Performing Perspectives on Race.

Instructor(s): Nicole Aimee Roux (naroux@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMPLIT 240 recommended. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course contains graphic & difficult material, and requires intense creativity and openness.

American history has been coded and shrouded in mythical legends of glory and vanquish. When told from a white male perspective, as it so often has been, people of color and white women often become the backdrop and props for this Great American Fiction. But when we examine the truth(s) behind the fiction and the lives sacrificed to maintain it, the (his? her? their? our!)story becomes increasingly complex and far les glorious. In this course, we will figure out what to do with information that runs counter to the national master narrative, how to synthesize and grow from it. Without hatred, without anger (though they have their place as well), we will ask ourselves- how can we learn from these lessons and create something beautiful from them? This line of inquiry will lead us into several different ways of looking at "what is".

This class will be a place that privileges not just facts and concepts, but emotions, intuition and the body. We will write scenes individually and in groups, exploring the themes, feelings, and ideas that arise from the readings and films, then perform these scenes in class. There will be a final project.

Some of the texts we might read:

  • The Good Neighbor: How the United States Wrote the History of Central America and the Caribbean, George Black
  • Reinventing Nature? Responses to Postmodern Deconstruction, Michael Soule and Gary Lease, Eds.
  • Walden Two, B.F. Skinner
  • A Gradual Awakening, Stephen Levine
  • Race Matters, Cornel West
  • Why We Can't Wait, Martin Luther King, Jr.
  • Mostly True & Still Mostly True: Collected Stories & Drawings, Brian Andreas
  • Brave New World & Island, Aldous Huxley
  • Bobos in Paradise, David Brooks
  • The Leaf and the Cloud, Mary Oliver
  • Excerpts from 100 Love Sonnets, Pablo Neruda
  • 100 Selected Poems by E. E. Cummings, e.e. cummings

    Some films we might watch:

  • Rosewood
  • Roots
  • Africans in America
  • What I've Learned About US Foreign Policy
  • Eyes on the Prize
  • Ethnic Notions

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    COMPLIT 241. Topics in Comparative Literature.

    Section 003 — Translating Asia.

    Instructor(s): Ronit Ricci (rricci@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: COMPLIT 240 recommended. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    What does it mean to translate another culture? Is it possible?

    To translate means "to carry across". In this course the term translation will be examined in its broad, multi-dimensional sense. How can a story written in one language (which has certain unique features) be carried across to another? How can an author describing a distant culture, never experienced directly by his or her readers, convey something of that culture's flavor and depth to those who can only imagine it? And how can people who have themselves been "carried across" cultural and linguistic barriers through migration or exile express the ways in which their experiences in the new culture form a kind of translation of self?

    These and other questions will be addressed and discussed through reading a variety of texts (mostly fiction, with the addition of several theoretical articles) focusing on Asia. We will examine how Asia has been carried across to readers during various periods and from different viewpoints. For this purpose we will explore three kinds of texts: colonial novels written about Asian societies (India, Burma, Indonesia), describing them to a European audience; fiction translated from Asian languages (Vietnamese, Bengali, Indonesian, among others) into English; and novels/short stories by Asian-American writers, who discuss the ways in which individuals struggle and adapt as they find themselves translating and "being translated" to a new context.

    For an additional perspective on the course's themes we will also view several films.

    Readings will include, but are not limited to: Burmese Days (Orwell),The Hidden Force (Couperus), Kim (Kipling), Paradise of the Blind (Duong Thu Huong), This Earth of Mankind (Pramoedya Ananta Toer), Arranged Marriage ( Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni), and The Joy Luck Club (Amy Tan) as well as essays by Ramanujan,Becker and Rafael.

    Students will be evaluated according to the following criteria: class attendance and active participation, several short (1-2 pages) papers in response to the readings, a mid-term and a final paper.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    COMPLIT 241. Topics in Comparative Literature.

    Section 004 — Reading and Healing.

    Instructor(s): Madelaine A Hron

    Prerequisites & Distribution: COMPLIT 240 recommended. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/complit/241/004.nsf

    The concept of healing through books goes back as far as ancient Greece, where the door to the library in Thebes bore the telling inscription: 'The Healing Place of the Soul.' Most people recognize the soothing effect of a good book, and turn to books as a means of inspiration, enlightenment or escape. In this class, through engaged reading and self-examination, we will explore the healing power of the written word. We will probe how writing defines our place in the world, how it creates identity, gender, or ethnicity and what it conveys about relationships, memories, character and the meaning and purpose of life. Most importantly, we will delve into what books have to teach us when things go wrong; we will confront such issues as loss and grief, depression and madness, illness and disability, old age and senility, discrimination and sexual abuse and violence and terror. Most of our readings will be short stories or excerpts drawn from major writers from all over the world; they will include some essays by thinkers on the subject of healing and writing and reflections by doctors and patients. We will complement our class discussions with films, documentaries, radio excerpts and art available on-line on the class web-site. Readings may include selections from Aristotle, Nietzsche, Elie Wiesel, Toni Morrison, Oliver Sachs and movies such as Iris or Girl Interrupted. The writing requirements will include short personal reflections weekly, a midterm and final essay. Class attendance and participation will be vital.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    COMPLIT 260. Europe and Its Others.

    Section 001 — Sources of Self.

    Instructor(s): Asli Gur (agur@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://ctng.ummu.umich.edu

    When suicide bombers kill civilians, we question how such complete annihilation of the self for any social cause is possible. When we view a good science fiction movie, a beautiful painting, or a deeply moving novel, we wonder about the origins of creativity. Our constant amazement in the face of human capability to destroy and create drives us to search for the source of the self we presume exists "behind" such human activities. Whenever and wherever we witness creation or destruction, we take for granted that there is a self involved — a self that informs what we opt to create and how and why we opt to destroy. Yet where does this sense of self come from? How does it relate to the societies we live in? What allows someone to see and experience him/herself as the same person over time? Same body, same consciousness, same memories? How and why do we form our sense of self as belonging to particular communities? How do societal institutions shape our ways of being? If we are indeed products of our times and institutions, then where do creativity and social change come from?

    As we consider these questions in the context of specific narratives, mini-lectures will familiarize students with various conceptualizations of self in social science and humanities. Students will be invited to think critically about everyday categories — such as "normal/abnormal", "woman/man", "Black/white", "homosexual/heterosexual" "indigenous/foreigner", "patriot/traitor", "Muslim/infidel", "Western/non-Western", "American, German, Turkish, etc." We will look at how these categories mark and shift boundaries of a self, exclude others from the symbolic and political comfort zones of that marked self, and distribute power among collectives and individuals.

    The coursepack will include historical and cultural studies of institutions and their relationships with identities in different geographical locations — in particular Middle East, Caribbean, North America, and Europe. We will also watch films and documentaries related to these regions. The fiction and non-fiction life narratives we are going to read may include excerpts from Borrowed Time: An AIDS Memoir by P. Monette; Middlesex by J. Eugenides; A Small Place by J. Kincaid; and Reading Lolita in Tehran by A. Nafisi.

    Students are expected to attend the class regularly and be prepared to participate in class discussions. There will be a midterm and each student will make a presentation on one of the readings. For final, students will do a creative project exploring the interfaces between their own sense of self and the institutionalized social representations of the identities and categories with which they define themselves.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    COMPLIT 280. America and Its Others.

    Section 001 — HIV/AIDS and the Diseased Body.

    Instructor(s): Claire Decoteau (cdecotea@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    HIV/AIDS is many things to many people: a political cause, a Western bio-medical construction, an 'epidemic of signification,' a discourse, an effect of colonization, a tool of neo-colonialism, an effect of global capitalism, a killer, a lived reality. This course explores these various meanings and experiences of HIV/AIDS through an exploration of social theory, personal narrative, political analyses, movies, and live performances and presentations. This course will focus on the relationship between text/discourse/ideology AND the lived reality of the diseased body itself. A battle over the power to define, name and symbolize HIV/AIDS has been waged since its inception in the early 80s; however, in addition to this symbolic struggle, people are suffering from a horrific disease, the experience of which may be impossible to communicate. This course, then, explores these various representations of the virus and questions whether or not it is possible to communicate the experiences of a 'body in pain.' In an attempt to address this debate, this course will explore the following themes: theories of the 'body in pain,' activism, denialism, AIDS as discourse, AIDS as a lived reality, AIDS in the 'third world,' and 'traditional' or indigenous conceptualizations of HIV/AIDS in Africa.

    Overall, the course will ask the students to explore both theory and the experiential and existential components of HIV/AIDS. Therefore, I will encourage the students to engage in experimental and innovative projects and thereby push the boundaries of conventional analyses of HIV/AIDS and its effects on the body. For their final project, I will ask students to engage in some kind of 'experiment' in which they explore or challenge hegemonic corporeality in some way (in relation to HIV/AIDS and/or disease), and then analyze that experience with the theories we have explored throughout the course.

    Requirements

  • 20% = Attendance and Participation: Students will be expected to attend every session and participate in some capacity each week
  • 40% = Weekly Response Papers: Students will be asked to submit a weekly response paper outlining their questions about and views on the readings for the week. These papers will allow the GSI to address confusions and misunderstandings arising from the reading material, but it will also insure that students are actually reading the course material each week. Finally, these response papers will facilitate and improve the discussion in class because the response papers give students a chance to analyze their weekly readings before coming to class to discuss them.
  • 40% = Final Paper: Students will be expected to write a final paper in which they engage in some kind of experiential exploration or challenge to the hegemonic Body, particularly surrounding the issues of disease and HIV/AIDS. This final paper will be two-fold: the exercise they choose to perform, conduct, or undergo and an analysis of this exercise, using the theoretical materials from the course.

    Course Materials

    Course Pack.

  • Foucault, Michel. 1979. Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison. New York: Vintage Books.
  • Scarry, Elaine. The Body in Pain.
  • AIDS: Cultural Analysis/Cultural Activism. ed. Douglas Crimp. Cambridge: MIT Press, 1996.
  • Gena Corea. The Invisible Epidemic: The Story of Women and AIDS. New York: HarperCollins, 1992.
  • Monnette, Paul. Borrowed Time: An AIDS Memoir. New York: Avon Books, 1988.
  • Michaels, Eric. Unbecoming. Durham: Duke University Press, 1997.
  • Farmer, Paul. AIDS and Accusation: Haiti and the Geography of Blame. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992.
  • Mendel, Gideon. A Broken Landscape: HIV and AIDS in Africa. M&G Books.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    COMPLIT 340 / MODGREEK 340. Travels to Greece.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Artemis S Leontis (aleontis@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/modgreek/340/001.nsf

    See MODGREEK 340.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

    COMPLIT 350. The Text and Its Cultural Context.

    Section 001 — Re-membering Landscapes: The Territory of Caribbean Identity. Meets with CAAS 358.004.

    Instructor(s): Seanna S Oakley (ssoakley@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Paradise or plantation? Spring break and honeymoon or narcotics way station? First World host or IMF delinquent? Where do we locate the Caribbean? From Columbus' journals to Terry McMillan's How Stella Got Her Groove Back, the Caribbean has been buried beneath the sedimentation of imagery by and large cultivated by non-Caribbeans, including colonial governments, settlers, international tradesmen, tourist agents and their clients. Caribbean peoples have had to re-member the islands which they eventually called home — "broken ground" in poet Edward Kamau Brathwaite's words — haunted by a history of slavery and still the site of exploitation. A unifying trope of Caribbean literatures, landscape serves as metaphor, emblem, symbol, or even character. This course will explore how landscape articulates in Caribbean writing (in translation) across Anglophone, Hispanophone, and Francophone traditions. Is the landscape ever merely a setting? Can it be merely a setting? Will its ceaseless shifts in meaning allow us to locate it? How does it relate to memory, belonging, and desire? These questions will guide our investigation of how landscape figures in the conception of Caribbean identity.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    COMPLIT 364. Comparative Literary Movements and Periods.

    Section 001 — MODERNISM, MAGICAL REALISM AND POSTMODERNISM.

    Instructor(s): Kader Konuk (konuk@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This seminar is devoted to the study of literary works that are inextricably linked to specific literary movements such as modernism, magical realism and postmodernism. We will compare novels and short stories across various geographical regions and discuss some of the shifts in the literature of the 20th century. Special attention is paid to Marcel Proust, Gertrude Stein, Virginia Woolf, Franz Kafka, Jorge Luis Borges, Gabriel García Màrquez, Toni Morrison, Orhan Pamuk and Italo Calvino. We will discuss topics such as constructions of reality, representation in literature, artistic and literary experiments in form and style, intertextuality, deconstruction, feminism, 'Third World literature' and the political uses of literature.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    COMPLIT 376. Literature and Ideas.

    Section 001 — Freud.

    Instructor(s): Tomoko Masuzawa (masuzawa@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course will introduce you to some of the major works by Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis and a masterful writer in his own right. It may lead you to appreciate him as an innovative theorist of interpretation, a skillful reader/interpreter of anything ranging from hysteric symptoms to the so-called great works of literature, including the Bible. In the course of reading Freud, you will become familiar with certain widely circulated but poorly understood, highly technical psychoanalytic concepts — for example, "the unconscious," "repression," "perversion," "Oedipus complex," "penis envy," and "fetishism."

    The reading will include: The Interpretation of Dreams; Totem and Taboo; Moses and Monotheism; Case History of the Wolf-Man; Screen Memories; Moses of Michelangelo; The Uncanny; Dreams and Telepathy; and others.

    We will also view several feature-length films from the latter half of the 20th century in order to explore the impact of psychoanalysis on popular culture of our time: "Spellbound" (Hitchcock film; a murder mystery is solved by psychoanalysis); "Seven-Percent Solution" (Freud treats Sherlock Holmes' drug addiction); "Zelig" (Woody Allen film about "human chameleon" and his lovely analyst).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    COMPLIT 376. Literature and Ideas.

    Section 002 — Socrates and Nietzsche.

    Instructor(s): James I Porter (jport@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.lsa.umich.edu/j/jport/www/courses/cl/Socrates-N.html

    This course is designed as an introduction to two major personalities in the history of philosophy and literature. In it we will consider "the Socratic method," or the method of inquiry into ethical truth (truth about one's self and one's community) that was made famous by the Socrates of the Platonic dialogues and then later challenged and modified by Nietzsche. The first part of the course will be focused on the question of whether Socrates is a literary figure or a biographical reality, and whose version of Socrates we have today. We will approach this by looking at ancient Socratic literature: Platonic dialogues, other Socratic writings (Xenophon's Memorabilia), "minor Socratic" literature (chiefly, the "mad" Socrates of the Cynics), and later explorations of the dialogue-form in a comic, Menippean vein (Lucian). Then we will turn to Nietzsche, who said that Socrates was his greatest, and closest, philosophical rival. How Socratic is Nietzsche's writing? How does he construct his public persona in antagonism with his own "interlocutors" (playing both the part of Plato, as writer, and the part of Socrates, as verbal pugilist)? And how does he construct his philosophical persona in relation to the Socrates of the tradition (which includes Diderot, Hamann, and Kierkegaard) and in his theories of ethical self-fashioning (how to live one's life). Students will be introduced to a rich body of primary writing as well as related literature in the modern theory of self-fashioning and ethical discourse, from Plato to Xenophon, Aristophanes, Diogenes Laertius, Lucian, Diderot, Hamann, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Bakhtin, Hadot, Derrida, Foucault, Vlastos, and Nehamas.

    Requirements: two short papers, the second to be presented in preliminary form to the class (class size permitting), and one short Socratic-style dialogue. Please send inquiries/questions to the instructor at jport@umich.edu.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    COMPLIT 436. Comparative Studies in Drama.

    Section 001 — Jealousy.

    Instructor(s): Anne Carson

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

    Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    We will examine the structures, uses and representations of this most operatic of emotions — jealousy real and metaphorical, erotic and religious, in the body and beyond the body, in humans and in gods — and will culminate in a staged reading (by the class) of an opera libretto called Decreation. Authors to be read include Sappho, Homer, Marguerite Porete, and Simone Weil.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    COMPLIT 490. Comparative Cultural Studies.

    Section 001 — Buddhism & Romanticism. Meets with ENGLISH 482.002.

    Instructor(s): Santiago Colas (scolas@umich.edu), Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    We envisage this course as an exploration of the overlap between Romanticism's critique of (Enlightenment) rationality (with special attention to its efforts to undermine, set aside, or volatilize the subject-object binary: e.g., Hegel, Marx, Marcuse, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Keats, Shelley) AND, the uniquely pre/post/ or non-critical thought-style and presuppositions of Buddhism. Although the body of scholarly work that studies this conjuncture (e.g., work by Antonio Negri, Niklas Luhmann, Eleanor Rosch, Francisco Varela) is powerful and productive, the course will focus on primary texts and on practices of knowing (as in, poetry, fiction). Course requirements will consist of weekly short exercises rather than the standard critical/research essay, and the overall purpose of these assignments is to advance understanding of the models of knowing/being (i.e., philosophical models) discussed in class, and to cultivate the students' self-awareness with respect to their own intellectual/social/psychic formation.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    COMPLIT 490. Comparative Cultural Studies.

    Section 002 — Stoicism: Fate, Uncertainty, Persistence. Meets with INSTHUM 511.001.

    Instructor(s): Denise Riley

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Ours is a world of deepening uncertainty and political malaise, where the old kinds of optimism for a steadily improving future are impossible to sustain. Stoicism offers a hope of enduring with dignity; it may indicate how without having recourse to religious faith, we can find stability in a relativistic world. We will investigate Stoicism as a system of ideas about living well, and as a set of linked understandings of the natural world, and we'll think about how these are, or could be, played out today as well as in historical terms. How can uncertainty be tolerated, or even enjoyed? We'll look at gambling, for instance, as a kind of protected risk-taking. Our concerns range from early Stoical understandings of the physical universe and its ideas of atomism, materialism, and the nature of space, to some Renaissance literary rereadings of Stoicism, to Nietzsche as a stoical moralist, and to modern reworkings of Stoical philosophy and ethics within postwar critical thought, including that of the philosophers Foucault and Deleuze.

    Our core reading will be:

    Lucretius, On the Nature of the Universe Marcus Aurelius, Meditations ; The Epicurus Reader ; Epictetus, The Discourses , and as a commentary, Pierre Hadot, Philosophy as a Way of Life .

    [Knowledge of Latin and Greek is certainly not expected.]

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    COMPLIT 496. Honors Thesis.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: COMPLIT 495 and Honors concentration in comparative literature. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    In the Honors Thesis course the Honors student typically develops the seminar work done in Comparative Literature 495 (Senior Seminar) into a longer, more thorough study under the auspices of a faculty thesis director. Students who need help in arranging for a thesis director should contact the Comparative Literature office, 2015 Tisch Hall, 763-2351.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

    COMPLIT 498. Directed Reading.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This course is intended for Comparative Literature concentrators. It offers a student the opportunity to work closely with a faculty member associated with Comparative Literature on a comparative topic chosen by the student in consultation with the professor. Together they will develop a reading list; establish goals, meeting times, and credit hours (within the range); and plan papers and projects which the student will execute with the tutorial assistance of the instructor. The student will be required to submit a written proposal of his or her course to the Program office. For further information, contact the Program in Comparative Literature, 2015 Tisch.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department


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