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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in English


This page was created at 7:56 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.


ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 001 — Narratives of Liberation. Meets with CAAS 104.001.

Instructor(s): Arlene Rosemary Keizer (arkeizer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The theme of human liberation has appeared in literary works from around the world and across centuries. This course will examine a variety of narratives that foreground the attainment of physical, spiritual, and political freedom for individuals and groups. Beginning with the Book of Exodus and traveling through African American slave narratives, British proto-feminist novels, Latin American testimonios, and contemporary films, we will examine how a wide range of writers and filmmakers have conceptualized the goal and the process of liberation in their works.

Requirements for the course will include two papers/projects and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 002 — Civic Literacy and Reading Lives.

Instructor(s): Joyce A Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did we learn to read? What enhanced or inhibited that learning? How is our interpretation now shaped by our identity and background? We will address these questions self-reflectively by tutoring area school children,and writing about our own reading and community experiences. Assignments will incorporate related research (i.e., on bilingual education) and "literacy narratives" (in which writers such as Frederick Douglass, Mary Antin, and Richard Rodriguez describe their first reading/writing experiences).

Students will write a number of short reflective essays, and a longer essay incorporating research. Rough drafting and peer review are integral to this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 003 — Late 19th-Century African American Fiction. Meets with CAAS 104.003.

Instructor(s): Xiomara A Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The last decades of the 19th century (the 1880s and 1890s) is known in African American history as "the nadir" (lowpoint), because it witnessed the nation's post-Civil War retreat from black equality and the escalation of violence against African Americans. In this course we will study how black writers addressed racial inequality and violence in their short stories and novels, and how they viewed the role of literature in national debates over the possibilities of African American citizenship. Authors include Charles Chesnutt, Anna Julia Cooper, Pauline Hopkins, Paul Laurence Dunbar and Sutton Griggs.

In addition to class participation, class assignments will include short responses, peer review of drafts and paper revisions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 004 — Euripedes and Beckett: Experiments in Drama and Depression.

Instructor(s): Anne Carson (carsona@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will study a number of the plays of the ancient Greek tragedian Euripides (in English translation) and also a number of the plays, TV scripts, theatrical projects and experimental productions of the 20th-century Irish writer Samuel Beckett. Euripides and Beckett were artists who attempted violent innovations in dramatic form; each has been regarded as either a genius or a really bad playwright or both. Their plays are hard to read — depressing, arguably hopeless — but also often hilarious and at times uplifting. We will explore the intersection of tragedy and comedy and study how these two dramatists use theatrical invention to negotiate despair.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 217. Literature Seminar.

Section 001 — The Presence of the Gay Male Past.

Instructor(s): David M Halperin (halperin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course reviews recent gay male historical fiction. That is, it surveys contemporary literature that treats gay male historical figures, that portrays important events in gay male history, or that describes what gay male life was like in the past. A striking feature of recent literature on gay male themes over the last fifteen years has been its focus on the historical past: much of the best work seems to be preoccupied with situating gay male life in historical perspective or with rewriting history so as to bring out in it (or restore to it) a gay male presence. What explains this turn to history in recent gay male writing? How does this literature reinterpret the past? How does it change our sense of history, both official history and minority history? At the same time as it attempts to alter our notions of where we come from, this literature also redefines who we are. Why do so many writers look to history in order to reinterpret gay male life in the present? What new images of contemporary society does this historical fiction produce? What are the political implications for the current gay movement of different versions of the past? Who wants this history, whom does it serve, what purposes does it advance? In addition to the assigned reading, the seminar will include a film series on Monday evenings.

Readings: Tony Kushner,Angels in America; Alan Hollinghurst, The Swmming-Pool Library; Jamie O'Neill, At Swim, Two Boys; Mark Merlis, American Studies; Annamarie Jagose, Slow Water; Marguerite Yourcenar, Memoirs of Hadrian; Neil Bartlett, Mr Clive and Mr Page; Christopher Marlowe, Edward II.

Workload: one oral report and three essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 001 — Paying Attention.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Kostova (ekostova@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Paying attention to our surroundings--places, people, conversations--and to our memories is one of the most important skills that informs creative writing. In this course, you'll work on honing that skill and applying it to your own short stories and poems. We'll write extensively in those two genres, in and out of class, and will do writing exercises that build up to polished pieces of work. We'll also read a variety of thought-provoking works in each genre. Although our study will be a structured and disciplined one, your own creativity is the most important component of the work we'll do together. No one style or kind of voice will be favored over any other in this course; I'm interested in helping you explore your own inclinations.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 002 — Finding your Voice in Poetry & Fiction.

Instructor(s): Travis Holland

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Stories matter. Poems matter. They help us understand ourselves as well as others; they tell us who we are, even when they are telling us about people and places that we may never see. They are, like the worlds they seek to create, both beautifully simple and powerfully, dauntingly complex, just as life is both simple and complex. It is their simplicity, their seeming artlessness, which inspires us to try making them ourselves. We read a compelling story or poem, and we tell ourselves, "I want to do that. I can do that." But how? Where do we begin? We begin by going back to the stories and poems that move us, that inspire us. Writing a good short story or poem is inextricably tied to understanding how short stories and poems work. Writers, in my experience, are generally readers first. And the best way to become a better writer, outside of simply sitting down every day and writing, is by reading — for our purposes, short stories and poems. By closely, critically reading these texts, we begin to see how they work, and perhaps begin to understand why they have such influence over us. And as we become better acquainted with the elements that make short stories and poems, we can begin to slowly incorporate these same elements — be it character or tone or plot — into our own short stories and poems. And then we can make our own worlds. NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 003 — The Self Made Whole: Intro to the Writing of Poetry & Short Fiction. CSP departmental permission required.

Instructor(s): Geoff Bankowski (bankwski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introductory workshop in which students will study and practice the craft of writing poetry and short stories. And while each person's expression has a value all its own, for it to become poetry it must be crafted. For this reason there will be extensive calls for revision and re-writing. The course will include the reading and discussion of poetry and short stories to expand our understanding of what successful literature does, and we will also look into the relevant world of archetypes and mythology. This will be a serious, but potentially satisfying course and is recommended for students who are willing to dedicate themselves to the challenging task of discovering and artfully expressing their emotional truths.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 004 — The Self Made Whole: Intro to the Writing of Poetry & Short Fiction.

Instructor(s): Geoff Bankowski (bankwski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introductory workshop in which students will study and practice the craft of writing poetry and short stories. And while each person's expression has a value all its own, for it to become poetry it must be crafted. For this reason there will be extensive calls for revision and re-writing. The course will include the reading and discussion of poetry and short stories to expand our understanding of what successful literature does, and we will also look into the relevant world of archetypes and mythology. This will be a serious, but potentially satisfying course and is recommended for students who are willing to dedicate themselves to the challenging task of discovering and artfully expressing their emotional truths. NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 005 — Open if enrollments warrant

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 006 — Engaging the Writer Within.

Instructor(s): Jessamon Wiese

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will develop the creative writer lurking inside. In this pursuit, we will read anthologized poets and fiction writers such as, Lucille Clifton, Robert Hass, Sharon Olds, Anne Sexton, James Baldwin, Mary Gaitskill, and Sherwood Anderson and an abundance of lesser known artists. You will be required to write and revise 8-10 poems and 15-18 pages of prose. A writing portfolio will be due at midterm and at finals to give you practice compiling a body of work. This will be an intensive exploration of poetics and prose and is not for the faint of heart. It will best serve students serious about investigating and advancing their craft. NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 007 — Form Is Meaning.

Instructor(s): Daniel Rivas

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Think of the lodgepole pine: straight and tall, a sparsely-boughed arrow pointing at the sky. Its leaves are not leaves but needles. Compare the oak: solid, branched wide and full, thick with peninsular leaves. The old oaks are as tall as they are wide. Trees have form, though the forms vary. They are similar according to broad categories that define trees, but each type is also unique and best suited for particular climates and uses. In this class we will examine poetic forms and fictional constructions to discern how the forms writers choose are integral to the story or poem and create meaning in the work. We will cover a wide range of forms, from the traditional to the experimental, and each of you will be asked to write using these. NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Megan Newell

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Marianna Green

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 010 — Into the World's Tumult, Into the Chaos of Every Day.

Instructor(s): Michelle Turner (mmturner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, students will be encouraged to enter the world's tumult while remembering the importance of their own emotional landscapes. We might view the world the way the poet Charles Wright does when he writes, "How deeper than elsewhere the dusk is in your own yard." The primary aim of this course will be to write poems and short stories that are well crafted, confidently individual, and meaningful to others. Along with content and theme, we will consider craft issues such as voice, character, plot, and rhythm. Students will read and discuss the works of established authors, complete informal writing exercises, and maintain a writing journal. Above all, this course will be structured around the workshop of students' own poems and short stories. Requirements include — but are not limited to — a mid-term portfolio of five fully revised poems and a final portfolio of one fully revised story (10-20 pages). p>NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Alethea Raybeck (araybeck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Obviously, this is a course about writing -- poetry, fiction, and the non-fiction of our daily lives that we weave into our creative work. It is also (equally crucially) a course about reading: how we read the work of writers we like (and don't like); how we read our own; what we steal from other writers, deliberately and unconsciously; our fabulous successes and our intriguing failures. Along the way, we'll pay attention to all the familiar facets: tone, form, voice, rhythm, metaphor, etc. Readings will focus principally on contemporary writers, with a respectful nod given to "the canon." Our time will be divided evenly between poetry and fiction with some attention given to those annoyingly ambidextrous authors who write both with skill and beauty. The majority of class time will be dedicated to workshopping original student writing, but we will also discuss the work of various established authors and poets. We will attempt to come to some sort of truce with that persistent demon: revision. To that end, over the course of the term, students will submit two revised portfolios, one of fiction and another of poetry. Grades will be based on attendance, thoughtful participation in class workshop/discussion, and the effort and improvement shown in final portfolios.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 012 — Open if enrollments warrant

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 013 — Arranged Life: Craft Concerns in Poetry and Short Fiction.

Instructor(s): Beth Chimera

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/223/013.nsf

In this course you will be both a student and a practitioner of narrative and poetic technique. The majority of class-time will be devoted to workshopping student writing, but you will also be asked to analyze the work of published writers and to complete in-class exercises addressing specific problems of craft. In the poetry unit, we will consider the relationship of form to subject and will work toward sharpening aural skills — experimenting with sound effects, lineation, and rhythm." In the short story unit, we will pay close attention to what writer Frank O'Connor identifies as "the three necessary elements in a story — exposition, development, and drama." Points of particular concern will include: significant details, active verbs, and effective dialogue; conflict and characterization; subtext; and effective story openings and endings. In both genres you will concentrate on finding your own unique material and voice, avoiding cliché, and taking creative risks. At the end of the semester, you will be required to submit a final portfolio of 35 to 50 pages of revised work.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 014.

Instructor(s): Sara Houghteling (shoughte@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A final portfolio of revised finished work of 35-50 manuscript pages will be required. Class texts may include Carole Maso's The Art Lover, Vikram Seth's An Equal Music, Cole Swensen's See, and Jeanette Winterson's Art Objects.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 015.

Instructor(s): Marika Ismail

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 016 — The craft of fiction and poetry and where they touch.

Instructor(s): Matthew Hittinger

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the craft of fiction and poetry and where they touch: the prose poem and the "short-short." We will devote a portion of the semester to the short story form: characters, dialogue, narrative structures, scene and setting construction, plot development, etc. The poetry portion of the term will cover formal technical matters (rhyme and meter, syllabics, "free" and fractal verse) as well as different "types" of poems (lyric, narrative, ekphrastic, political, dramatic monologue, etc.) The class will discuss each other's work in a supportive yet rigorous workshop setting, as well as look to the work of published authors as models of inspiration and sources to imitate.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 017 — Seeing.

Instructor(s): Carrie Strand (csstrand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a hands-on exploration of the craft of writing. We will spend the first half of the semester on poetry and the second half on creative prose, where the latter term encompasses mostly fiction, but also a bit of creative nonfiction. I hope to equip you, over the course of the semester, with effective tools for writing. This means that we will approach the craft from a variety of angles: numerous in-class writing exercises, study and discussion of published works, discussions on the technical aspects of writing (what makes a good rhyme? why do poems have line breaks? how do you organize the plot in a short story?) and peer workshops. Everyone in the class will have ample opportunity to share writing, and in fact, this constitutes a major requirement of the class. We will learn from everything: each other, great published authors, experiments designed to push us past the boundaries of imagination, and even a few field trips. Above all, this class should serve as a personal exploration of your imagination — this means that no matter your (perceived) talent as a writer, you will have much to learn and even more to contribute to the subject at hand.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 018.

Instructor(s): Phil Crymble (pcrymble@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~pcrymble/syllabus.html

See website.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 019 — Real Toads, Imaginary Gardens: Writing as Field Trip.

Instructor(s): Donovan Hohn

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/223/019.nsf

When he was no older than a Michigan undergrad, the Russian writer Isaac Babel became a war correspondent, taking detailed notes and fashioning them into horrifically beautiful short stories. Other writers become correspondents of the imagination, investigating the world without leaving their bedrooms. Most seek out material whereever they can find it — in libraries and museums, wetlands and waste lands, memories and dreams — and so will we. Unlike other sections of 223, this one will not be conducted in two generic acts. Instead, we will study short fiction and poetry simultaneously, organizing our efforts around the various sources and forms from which good writing in either genre can be made. In the process you will become students as well as practitioners of literary craft, carefully reading and shamelessly imitating a diverse selection of stories and poems. By the end of the semester you will have scavenged, composed, and revised between 35- and 50 pages of original work.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 020 — Love, Murder, God & Mama: Oh, the Tales We Can Tell.

Instructor(s): Rachel Richardson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 021 — Open if enrollments warrant

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 022 — Open if enrollments warrant

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Valerie Laken

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 002 — Advocacy and the Ethics of Argumentation.

Instructor(s): Angela Balla

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How can you speak-on behalf of-an Other--someone, some group, some thing or concept--without speaking-over- or -around- that Other? When events conflict with what you and others think is true, right, or best, what argumentative options do you have for voicing your concerns? And given our increasingly pluralist culture within this university and the nation, how can you express your beliefs in ways that compel rather than alienate your audience? In this class, we will explore what it means to argue ethically as we write in response to the plight of others. The relationship between ethics and argument is complex, for it requires that you think about a larger moral problem while keeping your own core beliefs firmly in mind; that you write in a way that does justice to those you represent; and that you address fairly the criticisms and values of those who disagree with you. Throughout the course, we will experiment with sophisticated uses of evidence, logic, and style as we consider how writers across a range of disciplines (including philosophy, law, politics, journalism, business, and medicine) argue for their visions of justice. Drawing on the conventions of sound argument and the underlying assumptions of various audiences, you will practice appealing to appropriate authorities such that your voice--and most importantly, the voices of those on whose behalf your speak--are heard.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 003, 004 — CSP.

Instructor(s): Charles Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Having polished the basic skills required for college-level writing in your earlier composition course(s), you will find in Argumentative Writing a higher level of expectation. This course will require you to create formal essays that exhibit a more advanced standard of logical organization. We will learn the various forms (or "classes") of argument, and how to avoid corrupting your theses with logical fallacies. I will ask that you support the assertions in your essays with well-researched data (documented using the appropriate citation format), and that you submit work that presents an overall "positive image." (Positive image refers to papers calculated to persuade your audience in the most effective manner possible, with both impressive physical appearance and sophisticated arguments.) The "standard essay form" will still comprise the basic argumentative framework upon which to build your papers. We will, however, explore ways to expand your understanding of that basic format.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Alethea Raybeck (araybeck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Ever feel like all you do is write the same paper over and over again? In this class, we will investigate how to make an argument that is not only effective, but also interesting and individual. Although the principal focus of this course is on writing (and students should expect to do significant writing and revision), arguing well also means reading well. With this idea in mind, we will read and discuss the arguments of published writers, ferreting out their weaknesses and stealing their best tricks of technique. In analyzing student writing, we will rely heavily on the workshop model. I believe strongly that workshop provides one of the most productive environments for learning about writing. In order for workshop to succeed you must come to class prepared and willing to talk, and talk a lot. Active participation is crucial as we will do our concerted best never to be bored or boring. Learning how to provide strong analytic feedback on each other's work will help you with your own writing and will further supplement your critical thinking skills. You will also be encouraged to be creative and original in your approach both to your subject matter and your writing process.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 006 — Basic Forms in Argumentation.

Instructor(s): Hilary Thompson (hthomps@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Although our course will survey major types of argumentative writing, including essays that present definitions, make evaluations, explain causes and effects, propose solutions, or put forward ethical claims, I'd like us to consider it a class focused more on persuasive writing than strictly argumentative writing. In addition to considering the basic importance of argument, organization, evidence, audience, and voice, we will discuss logical fallacies and some classic figures of speech and writing (or tropes and schemes). We will also discuss proper use and documentation of sources and take time to refresh our understanding of grammar and style. Four essays, a revision, and several response papers will be required. In class we will concentrate on critically interpreting readings, brainstorming for future essays, and reviewing classmates' rough drafts. Freewrites and the occasional quiz are not out of the question.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 007, 025 — Leadership Without Easy Answers.

Instructor(s): Gene Laskowski (point@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course is designed for students seeking to refine their leadership abilities with the skill of critical thinking. These sections of English 225 define leadership as the ability to walk into a new situation, determine what the important issues are, and listen to and evaluate differing responses to those issues. Three central assumptions follow: (1)An argument entails differing points of view around a question about which reasonable adults might differ. (2)Convincing arguments require evidence, and gathering evidence requires library research. (3)Arguments improve with feedback. Every student essay will receive peer review. NOTE: This is NOT a course in simply and persuasively developing opinions that you already have. The course entails identifying questions to which you do not already know the answer and debating differing points of view in response to those questions.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Angela Balla

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How can you speak-on behalf of-an Other--someone, some group, some thing or concept--without speaking-over-or-around-that Other? When events conflict with what you and others think is true, right, or best, what argumentative options do you have for voicing your concerns? And given our increasingly pluralist culture within this university and the nation, how can you express your beliefs in ways that compel rather than alienate your audience? In this class, we will explore what it means to argue ethically as we write in response to the plight of others. The relationship between ethics and argument is complex, for it requires that you think about a larger moral problem while keeping your own core beliefs firmly in mind; that you write in a way that does justice to those you represent; and that you address fairly the criticisms and values of those who disagree with you. Throughout the course, we will experiment with sophisticated uses of evidence, logic, and style as we consider how writers across a range of disciplines (including philosophy, law, politics, journalism, business, and medicine) argue for their visions of justice. Drawing on the conventions of sound argument and the underlying assumptions of various audiences, you will practice appealing to appropriate authorities such that your voice--and most importantly, the voices of those on whose behalf your speak--are heard.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Janice Leach

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/225/009.nsf

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Angela Balla

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How can you speak-on behalf of-an Other--someone, some group, some thing or concept--without speaking-over-or-around-that Other? When events conflict with what you and others think is true, right, or best, what argumentative options do you have for voicing your concerns? And given our increasingly pluralist culture within this university and the nation, how can you express your beliefs in ways that compel rather than alienate your audience? In this class, we will explore what it means to argue ethically as we write in response to the plight of others. The relationship between ethics and argument is complex, for it requires that you think about a larger moral problem while keeping your own core beliefs firmly in mind; that you write in a way that does justice to those you represent; and that you address fairly the criticisms and values of those who disagree with you. Throughout the course, we will experiment with sophisticated uses of evidence, logic, and style as we consider how writers across a range of disciplines (including philosophy, law, politics, journalism, business, and medicine) argue for their visions of justice. Drawing on the conventions of sound argument and the underlying assumptions of various audiences, you will practice appealing to appropriate authorities such that your voice--and most importantly, the voices of those on whose behalf your speak--are heard.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Christine Modey

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 012 — Seeing and Believing.

Instructor(s): Ian Fulcher (ifulcher@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From early illuminated texts to modern documentary, tools of argument and persuasion have been used in every aspect of media. Our class will examine approaches used by written and audio-visual texts, using both classic and modern rhetorical models. We will track the components of each argument down to their prime contentions and discuss their viability, as well as question an entire genre of illustrated literature. Written work will consist of both analysis and creation of written and/or visual argument.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 013 — The Craft of Persuasive Argument.

Instructor(s): Maureen McDonnell

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 014 — Basic Forms in Argumentation.

Instructor(s): Hilary Thompson (hthomps@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Although our course will survey major types of argumentative writing, including essays that present definitions, make evaluations, explain causes and effects, propose solutions, or put forward ethical claims, I'd like us to consider it a class focused more on persuasive writing than strictly argumentative writing. In addition to considering the basic importance of argument, organization, evidence, audience, and voice, we will discuss logical fallacies and some classic figures of speech and writing (or tropes and schemes). We will also discuss proper use and documentation of sources and take time to refresh our understanding of grammar and style. Four essays, a revision, and several response papers will be required. In class we will concentrate on critically interpreting readings, brainstorming for future essays, and reviewing classmates' rough drafts. Freewrites and the occasional quiz are not out of the question. NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 015 — Seeing and Believing.

Instructor(s): Ian Fulcher (ifulcher@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From early illuminated texts to modern documentary, tools of argument and persuasion have been used in every aspect of media. Our class will examine approaches used by written and audio-visual texts, using both classic and modern rhetorical models. We will track the components of each argument down to their prime contentions and discuss their viability, as well as question an entire genre of illustrated literature. Written work will consist of both analysis and creation of written and/or visual argument.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 016 — Writing in the Community. Service Learning Section

Instructor(s): Jean Borger

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a "service learning" section of English 225: Argumentative Writing. Students in the course will do volunteer work in pairs at a number of designated community sites as part of their class work. All students will be asked to do some real-world writing related to their work in the community, either contributing to a needed project at their site or writing on a related topic for a local publication. In addition, they will keep a weekly journal of site reflections and write formal essays designed for both academic and public audiences. A culminating research/argumentative essay will provide students with the opportunity to reflect on their work over the course of the semester and to place it in a larger context. Potential volunteer sites include the American Friends Service Committee, HIV/AIDS Resource Center, Natural Area Preservation Division of the Ann Arbor Parks System, SOS Community Services, and Motor Meals of Ann Arbor. NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 017 — Sentences, Ideas, and Logic.

Instructor(s): Aric Knuth (aknuth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course in essay writing will use the workshop model of teaching writing to help you become a better reader and writer of nonfiction prose. Though the title of the course is Argumentative Writing, we'll take up the idea that all good writing is in fact argumentative insofar as it is persuasive, and that the powerful writer has a unique vision and set of beliefs that he or she wants to help readers see similarly. Essentially, I care about three things when it comes to teaching and thinking about writing: sentences, ideas, and tools for logical development. This means that, in class discussions, our conversations may be alternately provocative and tedious, depending on your particular fields of interest: we may spend half an hour talking about the difference between the words however and but, and we'll be just as likely to spend half an hour talking about the difference between killing babies because they're disabled or because they're non-white, female or predisposed to gayness (see the work of contemporary philosopher Peter Singer for more on this). In any case, if you're like me, discussions of conjunctions and conjunctive adverbs and discussions about infanticide can be equally enthralling; regardless, both may lead to important discoveries about what makes writing good. Students will write three essays of 5-7 pages each, two of which will be workshopped by the entire class and later revised. I do not assign topics for these essays, which means that you bear all the responsibility for determining what is interesting and important enough to write about indeed, I think this is the first important lesson all writers need to learn: what is worth my exploration and analysis. We will start class each day with an in-class writing in response to a question posed by a student (any question, really any question that makes us think), after which a student will teach us a handful of new words; at least once during the term you will have to ask the class some important question, and at least once during the term you will have to teach us some vocabulary. In addition to the essays, questions and vocabulary, I expect full and active participation from all students in the workshop as we discuss one another's writing in order to make it sharper, clearer, more fully developed, and more provocative.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 018 — Alternative Dispute Resolution Strategies in Argumentation.

Instructor(s): Lindsay Ellis

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Are you interested in the growing field of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR)? Now a thriving branch of legal studies, the ADR methods of arbitration, mediation, and negotiation are surprisingly effectively writing strategies. In this class, we will write and workshop three papers — first writing as neutral, evaluative arbitrators of a conflict; second as neutral, exploratory mediators looking for common ground in a conflict; and third as not-neutral but interested negotiators working to resolve a conflict. We will explore the history and tactics of arbitration, mediation, and negotiation to understand how they can help us take argumentation in a direction that is both academically responsible and socially sustainable. We will work to carefully understand several conflicts in the humanities, and — not less importantly — to try to understand and to articulate our own needs and to look for mutually beneficial paths forward out of places of impasse.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 019 — Exploring Argument.

Instructor(s): Matt Nelson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to be an exploration of argumentative writing. Over the course of the semester you will have the opportunity to read, write, and discuss a number of arguments about a broad range of issues. This course is structured in such a way that it is highly dependent on what you produce and contribute. You will be choosing the texts we read and discuss and you will guide the discussions based on what you find to be interesting and compelling. My goal is that we emerge from this course as better writers and readers of argument.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 020, 021 — CSP departmental permission required.

Instructor(s): Randy Tessier

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 022 — Approaches to Reading & Writing Arguments.

Instructor(s): Jeeyoon Lee

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/225/022.nsf

This writing course introduces you to key approaches to reading and writing short, detailed arguments. We will examine the logic of argument, counterarguments, and fallacious reasoning. The course grapples with current controversies presented from different perspectives, and promotes arguments that seek to persuade others with evidence and opinion (not those that emerge from overt prejudice or emotion). As you learn to identify the main elements of argument, you will be presenting your own arguments--in both oral and written form--and putting into play the rhetorical strategies necessary to persuade. Topics under the purview of this class include terrorism, the environment, hate crimes, and Internet censorship.g

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 023.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

p>NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 024 — Sentences, Ideas, and Logic.

Instructor(s): Aric Knuth (aknuth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course in essay writing will use the workshop model of teaching writing to help you become a better reader and writer of nonfiction prose. Though the title of the course is "Argumentative Writing," we'll take up the idea that all good writing is in fact argumentative insofar as it is persuasive, and that the powerful writer has a unique vision and set of beliefs that he or she wants to help readers see similarly. Essentially, I care about three things when it comes to teaching and thinking about writing: sentences, ideas, and tools for logical development. This means that, in class discussions, our conversations may be alternately provocative and tedious, depending on your particular fields of interest: we may spend half an hour talking about the difference between the words however and but, and we'll be just as likely to spend half an hour talking about the difference between killing babies because they're disabled or because they're non-white, female or predisposed to gayness (see the work of contemporary philosopher Peter Singer for more on this). In any case, if you're like me, discussions of conjunctions and conjunctive adverbs and discussions about infanticide can be equally enthralling; regardless, both may lead to important discoveries about what makes writing good.

Students will write three essays of 5-7 pages each, two of which will be workshopped by the entire class and later revised. I do not assign topics for these essays, which means that you bear all the responsibility for determining what is interesting and important enough to write about indeed, I think this is the first important lesson all writers need to learn: what is worth my exploration and analysis. We will start class each day with an in-class writing in response to a question posed by a student (any question, really any question that makes us think), after which a student will teach us a handful of new words; at least once during the term you will have to ask the class some important question, and at least once during the term you will have to teach us some vocabulary. In addition to the essays, questions and vocabulary, I expect full and active participation from all students in the workshop as we discuss one another's writing in order to make it sharper, clearer, more fully developed, and more provocative.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 025 — Leadership Without Easy Answers.

Instructor(s): Gene Laskowski (point@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ENGLISH 225.007.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 026.

Instructor(s): Alethea Raybeck (araybeck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Ever feel like all you do is write the same paper over and over again? In this class, we will investigate how to make an argument that is not only effective, but also interesting and individual. Although the principal focus of this course is on writing (and students should expect to do significant writing and revision), arguing well also means reading well. With this idea in mind, we will read and discuss the arguments of published writers, ferreting out their weaknesses and stealing their best tricks of technique. In analyzing student writing, we will rely heavily on the workshop model. I believe strongly that workshop provides one of the most productive environments for learning about writing. In order for workshop to succeed you must come to class prepared and willing to talk, and talk a lot. Active participation is crucial as we will do our concerted best never to be bored or boring. Learning how to provide strong analytic feedback on each other's work will help you with your own writing and will further supplement your critical thinking skills. You will also be encouraged to be creative and original in your approach both to your subject matter and your writing process. p>NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 027 — Engaging Arguments.

Instructor(s): Crystal Summers (cksummer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

p>NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 028 — Seeing and Believing.

Instructor(s): Ian Fulcher (ifulcher@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From early illuminated texts to modern documentary, tools of argument and persuasion have been used in every aspect of media. Our class will examine approaches used by written and audio-visual texts, using both classic and modern rhetorical models. We will track the components of each argument down to their prime contentions and discuss their viability, as well as question an entire genre of illustrated literature. Written work will consist of both analysis and creation of written and/or visual argument.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 029.

Instructor(s): Louis Cicciarelli (lcicciar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 030 — Living a Writer's Life.

Instructor(s): Anne Berggren

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

  • What do professional writers do and how do they do it?
  • Where does their material come from?
  • How do they use diaries or journals?
  • How do they develop their ideas?
  • What advice do they give to other writers?
  • How do they deal with editors and audiences?
  • Are they creative geniuses or do they just revise more carefully than those who aren't professional writers?
  • And what is creativity anyway?
  • How do you discover it and develop it in yourself?

In this course, we'll explore how writers such as Margaret Atwood, Ernest Hemingway, Alice Walker, Joan Didion, George Orwell, Patricia Williams, and others live with and answer these questions. We'll analyze their work and try out their strategies and techniques as we develop essays, sketches, creative non-fiction, investigative articles, experimental forms, and mixed genres.

Requirements:

  1. Commitment to writing.
  2. Extensive journal writing, drafting, experimenting, and revising
  3. Engagement with other writers through class workshops
  4. A portfolio of 35 pages of revised and polished writing at the end of the academic term.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 031 — Learning Argumentive Writing through Student-Chosen Projects.

Instructor(s): Robert Cosgrove

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to facilitate an exploration of argumentative writing. How do you make an effective argument? How do you produce good argumentative prose? These are two of the questions that we will consider in this class. Your hard work in this course should lead you to more questions and some useful, satisfying answers. Of course you'll be thinking, writing, rethinking and rewriting. Thirty to thirty-five pages of your writing will be formally graded, but you'll be producing a good deal more than that, both in writing and non-writing work. This is a course that depends on what you produce and contribute; we will mostly structure our work around the projects and texts that you choose, and we can also focus on other particular issues/activities that you find to be compelling and useful for (your) individual and (our) collective objectives. p>NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 032.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/225/032.nsf

p>NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 033.

Instructor(s): Patrick O'Keefe

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this section of ENGLISH 225, we will read a selection of essays from The Bedford Reader; these will serve as templates for your own essays and guide you toward specific writing topics. We will also pay close attention to local and national newspapers for issues that you may wish to discuss and write about. In the last few weeks of the academic term, we will read Mystic River, a crime novel written by Dennis Lehane. Writing requirements: four essays, weekly written responses to readings, and in-class writing. p>NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 034.

Instructor(s): Peggy Adler (adlerp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 226. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 001 — Miracle Grow for Your Career.

Instructor(s): Barbara Orhstrom

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In an email, your supervisor summons to a 7:30 a.m. meeting. That night, angst possesses you. You sleep fitfully and wake at 5:00. After dressing carefully in clothes you had frantically picked up the evening before from the dry cleaners, you leave home and arrive at work; at precisely 7:25, you walk to your supervisor's office, where she is bent over her desk, intently scribbling on a yellow pad. Another sort of anxiety grips you as you leave the meeting ten minutes later. She has designated you the leader of a collaborative team charged with creating a business proposal to bid on a graphic design contract for the City of Ann Arbor. What had you learned in that technical writing course 5 years ago? You had developed writing skills for business communication, written reports, created employment communication, and worked with a team to research, write and present business proposals. >NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 002, 008 — Writing for the Real World.

Instructor(s): Patrice Rubadeau

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Although this course is entitled "Technical Writing," it is actually directed more toward business or professional writing. We will talk about the differences between academic discourse and technical writing, keeping in mind that the two most important points of academic writing¡ªaudience and purpose¡ªalso apply here. To achieve the result you want from a business communication, you will need to know your audience and your purpose, and you will need to design your document(s) with your audience and purpose in mind. Class discussions and peer evaluations of your drafts will help you produce effective documents. This course will focus in part on professional examples and in part on student writings which will be discussed in a workshop format. I do not plan to lecture at any great length, and you will not have to laboriously scribble notes during each class. Rather, we will have a semester-long discussion about writing and, more importantly, about rewriting¨Dthe key to successful writing. Because the class has a workshop component, be prepared to talk (when it's your turn, of course). Your participation in class discussion is vital. Vigorous (that is, helpful and friendly) discussion is not only fun but also a relatively painless way to learn. From our discussions, we (and I do mean we because I will be learning from you, my students) will learn not only about writing well but also about how our opinions and our styles of writing affect others in ways we might not previously have considered. The class also focuses very strongly on the visual aspects of business writing. You will be expected to pay great attention to how nice your documents look in addition to their content, grammar, and mechanics. Additionally, to successfully communicate, you must write with clarity and authority. To do so, you need to boost your receptive and productive vocabularies. In order to increase word recognition, all of you will periodically bring to class words from your various readings, words that have stumped you or that you needed contextual clues to understand. We as a class will define and discuss these words so that they may become a part of our working vocabularies. I urge you to think of this class as an opportunity to learn everything you need to know before you go out into the real world. In what other class can you write your personal statement, your r¨|sum¨|, your cover letter, and get credit for them? The Requirements * Fifteen to twenty business documents * PowerPoint presentation * Participation in workshop discussions * Mandatory attendance

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 003, 006 — The Art & Architecture of Professional Writing.

Instructor(s): Kirk Davis

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students in this course will be instructed in the writing concepts and strategies necessary for effective business and professional communication. Coursework will emphasize the practical, and involve a heavy emphasis on role-playing to recreate various real-world professional scenarios. We will discuss the formal elements of resumes, application letters, proposals, and business messages and reports; students will exercise their ability to create these and other documents using economical and effective language. >NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

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ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 004 — Technical Writing.

Instructor(s): Therese Stanton (theresem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to introduce students to the major concepts of technical communications for the workplace (including audience analysis, international commutations, ethics, collaboration, graphics and design), the major kinds of documents (letters, memos, e-mail correspondence, instructions, proposals and reports), and oral presentations. Throughout the course, deliberate problem solving activities are presented to simulate a variety of writing assignments students will encounter in the workplace. The learning objectives of the course are designed to inspire students to communicate passionately, efficiently, and elegantly through understanding and mastering the theories informing professional communications. Students will customize their work to their specific field of interest. The second half of the course is dedicated to researching professional opportunities and conducting informational interviews with leaders in identified professions. Students prepare resumes, application and follow-up letters, and hold in-class "mock interviews" in preparation for interviews.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 005 — The Adaptable Writer.

Instructor(s): Paul Barron (pdbarron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to provide students (who may have diverse professional goals) a thorough grounding in the principles and practice of professional writing. You will have the opportunity to become experienced in all stages of the writing process--including planning and development, drafting and revision, collaboration, and research. In the creation of professional documents, you will find it necessary to make choices about audience and purpose, rhetorical strategy, organization, ethical and legal considerations, document design, and style. Written assignments are designed to prompt you to produce the sorts of documents you will encounter in business and industry, such as: letters, memos, emails, job application materials, proposals, reports, instructions, manuals, and oral presentations.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 006 — The Art & Architecture of Professional Writing.

Instructor(s): Kirk Davis

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ENGLISH 229.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 007 — Strategies for Professional Writing.

Instructor(s): Michele Dunnum

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/229/007.nsf

Cast aside the idea that writing is simply a way to prove to your professors that you have been paying attention in lecture and doing the assigned reading! This course challenges you to think of your college writing as a way to insert your own ideas into public discourse — to participate in larger conversations among scholars. The four major writing assignments this term are designed to help you try on different "scholarly voices," so that you will be able to adapt your writing to the conventions of different disciplines. Our readings will provide you with rhetorical models for your own essays. Through implementing the techniques you see others use, you will learn how to use language to shape ideas and thoughts. Through the semester-long process of reading, discussing, drafting and revising — and revising again — you will learn how to refine your control of the written word, enabling you to present your ideas in a clear, sophisticated, and powerful way. >NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 008 — Writing for the Real World.

Instructor(s): Patrice Rubadeau

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/229/008.nsf

See ENGLISH 229.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 009 — The Adaptable Writer.

Instructor(s): Paul Barron (pdbarron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to provide students (who may have diverse professional goals) a thorough grounding in the principles and practice of technical writing. You will become experienced in all stages of the writing process — including planning and development, drafting and revision, collaboration, and research. In the creation of technical documents, you will be required to make choices about audience and purpose, rhetorical strategy, organization, ethical and legal considerations, document design, and style. Written assignments will prompt you to produce the sorts of documents you will encounter in business and industry, such as: letters, memos, e-mails, job application materials, proposals, reports, instructions, manuals, and oral presentations. Regular attendance and active participation are required.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 229 / LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 010 — Technical Writing.

Instructor(s): Therese Stanton (theresem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to introduce students to the major concepts of technical communications for the workplace (including audience analysis, international commutations, ethics, collaboration, graphics and design), the major kinds of documents (letters, memos, e-mail correspondence, instructions, proposals and reports), and oral presentations. Throughout the course, deliberate problem solving activities are presented to simulate a variety of writing assignments students will encounter in the workplace. The learning objectives of the course are designed to inspire students to communicate passionately, efficiently, and elegantly through understanding and mastering the theories informing professional communications. Students will customize their work to their specific field of interest.

The second half of the course is dedicated to researching professional opportunities and conducting informational interviews with leaders in identified professions. Students prepare resumes, application and follow-up letters, and hold in-class "mock interviews" in preparation for interviews. >NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 001 — Traveling Americans.

Instructor(s): Madeleine Vala

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the theme of travel in American literature. Why is the image of the journey such a consistent and powerful image in American literature? What effects do journeys create, both structurally and thematically? Who travels and what may this tell us about the structures of class, race, and gender? In order to answer these questions, we will study examples of travels to foreign countries, within the United States, and even across the street. We will examine how Americanness becomes constructed both through the act of traveling and through settings visited; we will also address how spiritual, psychological, and otherwise metaphorical journeys often accompany literal travels to a place. Texts will include short stories by Hawthorne, Poe, Wharton, James, Hemingway, and Wright. Novels may include Steinbeck's Travels with Charley, Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, and Cather's My Antonia. >NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

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ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 002 — Imagining (Wo)men, Imagining Society: 19th & 20th-Century Fiction.

Instructor(s): Sumiao Li (sumiaol@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Madame Bovary, c'est moi [that's me]," said Gustave Flaubert when asked about the identity of the title character of his first novel. Flaubert's answer not only points to the possibility of a male author's identification with a female character but also speaks of the versatility of the woman figure in literature: it registers male as well as female desires; it suggests social aspirations and anxieties; and it also serves as a site for aesthetic pleasure — so much so that the death of a beautiful woman becomes, in Edgar Allan Poe's words, "the most poetical subject." This class will explore (wo)men figures in literature via the lens of gender studies. We will address these questions, among others: How does gender, class, race, or nationality play into the making of (wo)men figures? How does the making of (wo)men figures, in turn, contribute to the construction of gender, class, race or national ideologies at different historical moments? We will read a number of short stories by Poe, Faulkner, Joyce, Atwood, etc. and four or five magnificent novels — probably Pride and Prejudice, Scarlet Letter, Beloved, and Like Water for Chocolate. As an introductory course, this class also aims to solidify your knowledge of the fictional form — its narrative techniques (narrator, voice, point of view, etc.) and its capacity for experiments. Much of class emphasis will fall on close reading skills and critical thinking ability — fundamental to literary and other kinds of analysis commonly practiced in LSA disciplines. Class requirements include active participation in class discussions, a class presentation, weekly one-page responses, and three analytical essays (5-7 page). >NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

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ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 003 — Gothic Fiction from Romance to Realism.

Instructor(s): Charles Pierre La Porte

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will explore the contributions of the Gothic mode to the evolution of Anglophone fiction in the nineteenth century. Gothic tales of terror and horror were not considered high art in the nineteenth century, but they were as popular then as they are today. This course is designed to consider the serious contributions of the Gothic to the philosophical discourses of nineteenth-century fiction. We will begin with early Gothic romances in eighteenth-century Britain, and proceed to the international genesis of the short story (including Poe in America, and Gogol in Russia), through the sensation fiction of the 1860's, until we arrive at the conventions of late-century realism. Proposed works include texts from some or all of the following authors: Horace Walpole, Ann Radcliffe, Jane Austen, Charlotte Dacre, Mary Shelley, Nicolay Gogol, Edgar Allen Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Emily Brontë, Charles Dickens, Ambrose Bierce, Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Wilkie Collins, Robert Louis Stevenson, Thomas Hardy, Mary Augusta Ward and Charlotte Perkins Gilman. >NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

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ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 004 — Ekphrasis: Fictions of Art and Artists.

Instructor(s): John Cords (jcords@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Ekphrasis" is a literary device in which a text responds to or describes another work of art, very often painting or sculpture. In this class we will use this term far more liberally, defining an "ekphrastic" story or novel as one that meditates on what writers or artists do. We will look at a broad range of fiction that encourages us to examine how style, characterization, narrative structure, and setting interweave to construct a fictional world. We will discuss how our texts represent this process and the position of the creative individual in the modern world. The readings may include Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray, Kafka's "The Hunger Artist," Melville's "Bartleby, the Scrivener," Borges' "The Library of Babel," and "Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote," and Joyce's The Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man.>NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 005 — Short Stories of the Fat-Novel Period.

Instructor(s): Meilee Bridges

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/230/005.nsf

Although the 19th century saw the "golden age" of the long, serialized novel, the short story nevertheless proliferated and flourished. We will read a number of short stories and five fat novels clustered around shared themes or similar sub-genres dominating 19th-century fiction: the comedy of manners; the Bildungsroman; the social commentary; the story of crime and detection; and the plot of upward social mobility. The fat novels will be Austen's _Pride and Prejudice_, Eliot's _The Mill on the Floss_; Dickens' _Bleak House_; Collins' _The Woman in White_; and Thackeray's _Vanity Fair_. Short fiction will include tales from popular authors of the period: the Brontës, Gaskell, Conan Doyle, Dickens, Hardy, James, Scott, Stevenson, and Oliphant. Students will apply their close reading skills and sharpen their techniques of literary analysis by participating actively in class discussion, writing two 5- to 7-page papers, presenting an oral report, and completing a take-home final exam. >NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 006 — Issues of Identity in Literature.

Instructor(s): Andreea Boboc

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

As Mark Twain once shrewdly remarked, a person who chooses not to read has no advantage over a person who is unable to read. Fortunately, almost everyone is able to read in our day and age. But what does it mean to be able to read critically? In this course, we will discover that critical reading depends upon the ability to master basic techniques of analyzing prose fiction. The concept of identity is useful for exploring such techniques because a character's identity depends upon the author's choice of setting, style, voice, plot development, and means of characterization. We will read short stories by Melville, Parker, O'Connor, Kafka, Maupassant,Yamamoto, West, Dahl, and Faulkner along with three novels: Joyce's Portrait of an Artist as a Young Man, Ann Radcliffe's The Italian, and Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey. Three essays, weekly response papers, and enthusiastic participation are required for this course. >NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 001 — Survival Stories. [Honors].

Instructor(s): Ilana M Blumberg (blumberg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will examine the survival stories presented in autobiographical slave narratives and Holocaust narratives. We will consider how these texts address the power of writing to stem suffering and reconstitute a broken or forgotten self; the problem of representing what can never be adequately represented; and the possibility (or impossibility) for narrative to forge links between writers and readers. We will also look at some fictions of Holocaust and slave experience in order to analyze the claims made by imaginative representations of historical experience. Finally, we will consider the way that all literary works, autobiographical or fictional, organize human experience into structures of meaning. Texts may include: Harriet Jacobs' Narrative in the Life of a Slave Girl, Toni Morrison's Beloved, Primo Levi's Survival In Auschwitz, Cynthia Ozick's The Shawl.

Course requirements: regular attendance and participation, three 5-7 page papers, and short assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 5 Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 002 — What is American Literature?

Instructor(s): Sara B Blair (sbblair@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The United States is home to many literary traditions, sometimes seen as separate but all interconnected and intertwined in a variety of ways. The "classical" American literature that originates in New England is just one part of an ongoing dialogue that includes Native American, Latino American, and African-American traditions older than the United States itself, and Asian Pacific American and "ethnic" European traditions that reach back well into the nineteenth century. This course offers an introduction to these literary cultures of the United States, starting from the assumption that there are multiple points of entry to the full richness of its range and variety. The course is meant to serve students interested in learning how to read and respond to this country's literature from a twenty-first century vantage point.

Enrollment in each section of the course will be capped at 30; each section will be taught by a Professor. The separate sections will meet together once a week for presentations to the group as a whole on themes and issues of general interest.

Authors to be studied will include Ralph Ellison, Toni Morrison, Herman Melville, Walt Whitman, Chang Rae Lee, Gish Jen and Maxine Hong Kingston; requirements will likely include three essays, in-class writings and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 003 — Global English Literature.

Instructor(s): Hilary Joan Thompson (hthomps@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

As English becomes an increasingly global language, English literature knows fewer and fewer bounds. What happens to traditional conventions and conceptions of English literature when works are written in dramatically divergent cultural settings? How have old forms been bent to new purposes? If the spread of the English language is due to both the current predominance of US cultural and political influence and the past history of British colonialism, how have writers around the world come to terms with these importations and impositions? To puruse these questions and explore the ways complex identities and histories can give rise to new modes of writing (and suggest new modes of reading), we will turn to texts from Africa, Asia, and the Carribean.

Three essays, a presentation, and regular participation will be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 5 Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 004 — Telling Stories: The Art of Narration.

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will want, in this course, to think about the power and the connectedness that the act of telling stories might provide. For example a character in Ursula Hegi's STONES FROM THE RIVER, thinks: "Every time I take a story and let it stream through my mind from beginning to end, it grows fuller, richer, feeding on my visions of those people the story belonged to until it leaves its bed like the river I love. And then I have to tell the story to someone."

Our readings will often focus on the dynamics of the imaginative process — our own as well as the authors. We will want to begin by trying to uncover the strong need of each individual to tell his or her story. Moreover, as the academic term continues and we discuss various 20th-century literature (mostly), we will find ourselves grappling with issues as basic as what defines the dimensions of a character and the place that character makes in his or her world. We want to pay particular attention to the narrators of each story we read. Ultimately, I hope we can understand how an author has prepared these amazing creations to "speak" to us. Although the final syllabus decision has not been made, I am sure we will want to listen to one of John Irving's narrators as well as Gloria Naylor's variety of narrators telling us the story of Mama Day. There will be two essays, and final exam required.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Brenda K Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Our method throughout the semester will be to approach the question "What is literature?" by asking, "What is [it we talk about when we talk about] literature?" 'Family' (and how that concept may vary) is the thematic lens through which we will study several contemporary novels. We will interrogate as well the notion of "home." We will begin by practicing our interpretive skills through "close readings" of Toni Morrison's Sula. This will be followed by an investigation of how earlier "literary" texts-e.g., Joseph Conrad's The Secret Sharer and Tennessee Williams' The Night of the Iguana -affect our reading of a novel, in this case Ron Hansen's Atticus. With Edwidge Dantidat's The Farming of Bones we will turn our attention to the relationship between representations of history and subjectivity in historical fiction. We will enhance our reading of Marilynn Robinson's Housekeeping through a study of selected critical essays, and in the process practice identifying what is at stake in the arguments presented. Finally, we will put it all together in our discussion of Michael Cunningham's Flesh and Blood.

There will be two one-page position papers, two exams, and one five-page paper due. Class attendance and participation are essential.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 007 — What is American Literature?

Instructor(s): Joshua L Miller (joshualm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The United States is home to many literary traditions, sometimes seen as separate but all interconnected and intertwined in a variety of ways. The "classical" American literature that originates in New England is just one part of an ongoing dialogue that includes Native American, Latino American, and African-American traditions older than the United States itself, and Asian Pacific American and "ethnic" European traditions that reach back well into the nineteenth century. This course offers an introduction to these literary cultures of the United States, starting from the assumption that there are multiple points of entry to the full richness of its range and variety. The course is meant to serve students interested in learning how to read and respond to this country's literature from a twenty-first century vantage point.

Enrollment in each section of the course will be capped at 30; each section will be taught by a Professor. The separate sections will meet together once a week for presentations to the group as a whole on themes and issues of general interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Susan Y Najita (najita@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to key terms and practices in the study of literature. In this section of "What is literature?" we will combine the study of various literary genres such as poetry, short story, novel, play, and film with an introduction to critical approaches to literary analysis. We will read Whitman, Blake, Keats, Cisneros, Joyce, Wharton, Morrison, and Mann and view the films Bladerunner and Death in Venice. We will familiarize ourselves with issues relating to form, gender, sexual, and ethnic identity, colonialism, and commodity culture.

Expectations: 3 papers, weekly quizzes, presentations, enthusiastic participation, and regular attendance.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 009.

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What does it mean to be an author, to create a story? To figure that out, we'll be authors ourselves a little and ask about our own responses as readers. We'll read texts closely, attempting to understand their less accessible meanings, the effect of the social and economic context in which they are written and read, and what's at stake for us, if anything, in the content. We'll be interested in the social purposes of literature and in questions of authors' responsibilities. We'll read or view The Official Story; Interviews with My Lai Veterans; Wiesenthal's The Sunflower; Coetzee's Age of Iron; Thomas' The White Hotel; Kingsolver's Pigs in Heaven; Baca's A Place to Stand, Cervantes' Emplumada; and excerpts from Abbey's Desert Solitaire and Matthiessen's The Birds of Heaven. Class participation will be important, and you'll write 25 pages worth of essays and literature, the nature of which we'll determine together. No exams.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 010 — What is American Literature?

Instructor(s): Alisse Suzanne Portnoy (alisse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The United States is home to many literary traditions, sometimes seen as separate but all interconnected and intertwined in a variety of ways. The "classical" American literature that originates in New England is just one part of an ongoing dialogue that includes Native American, Latino American, and African-American traditions older than the United States itself, and Asian Pacific American and "ethnic" European traditions that reach back well into the nineteenth century. This course offers an introduction to these literary cultures of the United States, starting from the assumption that there are multiple points of entry to the full richness of its range and variety. The course is meant to serve students interested in learning how to read and respond to this country's literature from a twenty-first century vantage point.

Enrollment in each section of the course will be capped at 30; each section will be taught by a Professor. The separate sections will meet together once a week for presentations to the group as a whole on themes and issues of general interest.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Michele L Simms-Burton (mlsimms@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Our method throughout the academic term will be to approach the question "What is literature?" by asking, "What is [it we talk about when we talk about] literature?" 'Family' (and how that concept may vary) is the thematic lens through which we will study several contemporary novels. We will interrogate as well the notion of "home." We will begin by practicing our interpretive skills through "close readings" of Toni Morrison's Sula. This will be followed by an investigation of how earlier "literary" texts — e.g., Joseph Conrad's The Secret Sharer and Tennessee Williams' The Night of the Iguana -affect our reading of a novel, in this case Ron Hansen's Atticus. With Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones we will turn our attention to the relationship between representations of history and subjectivity in historical fiction. We will enhance our reading of Marilynn Robinson's Housekeeping through a study of selected critical essays, and in the process practice identifying what is at stake in the arguments presented. Finally, we will put it all together in our discussion of Michael Cunningham's Flesh and Blood.

There will be three one-page position papers, and two 4-page papers due. Class attendance and participation are essential.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Brenda Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The United States is home to many literary traditions, sometimes seen as separate but all interconnected and intertwined in a variety of ways. The "classical" American literature that originates in New England is just one part of an ongoing dialogue that includes Native American, Latino American, and African-American traditions older than the United States itself, and Asian Pacific American and "ethnic" European traditions that reach back well into the nineteenth century. This course offers an introduction to these literary cultures of the United States, starting from the assumption that there are multiple points of entry to the full richness of its range and variety. The course is meant to serve students interested in learning how to read and respond to this country's literature from a twenty-first century vantage point.

Enrollment in each section of the course will be capped at 30; each section will be taught by a Professor. The separate sections will meet together once a week for presentations to the group as a whole on themes and issues of general interest.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 020 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Blair, Miller, Portnoy

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 001 — [Honors].

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The first part of this course will concentrate on prosody — the techniques of verse, how poems are put together, how they work. The second part will undertake a mini-history of English poetry, concentrating on some of the major poems from the Renaissance through the Modernists. There will be two exams and short daily writing assignments (a paragraph or so). The text will be the Norton Anthology of Poetry.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 002 — What is Poetry?

Instructor(s): Julian Arnold Levinson (jlevinso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An opportunity for students to study various types of poetry from various different perspectives. Specific topics include: poetic form, voice, figurative language, and allusion. We will also consider broader themes such as perception, introspection, and communication. Some of the poets we will concentrate on are Li Po, George Herbert, Walt Whitman, Elizabeth Bishop, García Lorca, and Sharon Olds.

Students will write a number of short papers analyzing specific poems. There will also be a final exam.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 003 — [Honors].

Instructor(s): Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is introductory insofar as it presents the basic terms of critical discussion about poetry and the basic period-concepts. Presentation of these terms and concepts will follow from the examples of the poems (and, of the poetic kinds and periods) studied, in lieu of a more abstract and categorical method of proceeding. The chief difficulty of the course will be the work of synthesis expected of the students both in class and in their written assignments.

Materials: to consist of a poetry anthology representing an array of poems written in English, early modern through contemporary; technical handbook (reference: meters, verse forms, tropes)

Requirements: six short papers on assigned topics;possible in-class presentations; possible final

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Richard K Hilles (rhilles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

My aim for this course is to enrich your understanding and love of poetry by introducing you to — and asking you to meaningfully engage with — a range of influential poems written in English. Toward this end, we will focus on major poems written from the Renaissance to the present time. Through close readings — class discussions and written explorations of these texts — we will examine how poems achieve their power. Because seriously engaged classroom discussion is vital to this course, regular attendance and active participation are required. The Norton Anthology of Poetry will be our primary text, in addition to handouts.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 007, 010.

Instructor(s): Sadia Abbas (abbass@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will learn to read (and enjoy) poetry. The pleasures of poetry are considerable, but they are pleasures that are enhanced by careful attention to the details of poetic texts. We will focus on how poems generate their meanings, how sound affects sense, and the ways in which the form of a poem tells us how to read it. The emphasis of the course will be on learning to close-read poems of varying (mostly short) lengths. Readings will be from the Renaissance to the present.

Several short assignments, 2 (4-5) page papers and an oral report. Students will be required to participate in class discussion; attendance is mandatory.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Lyall Powers (lhpowers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Poetry at its best is a mode of human communication, both vocal and scriptural, the aim of which is not the imparting of information per se — like "Directions" on a soup can or "Instructions" for an erector set — but rather intellectual and emotional engagement with some important human concern like love, folly, death, fun, etc. We will begin by looking at kinds of poems and how they work — like learning the rules and techniques of basketball or chess or dancing (and other pleasurable activities); then we will look at the range of treatment given those "human concerns" in poems written over the centuries. We will consider particularly how poems communicate what they want to engage us in and entertain us with. We will discuss these matters in class, write about them in a few short exercises (2 pp. each) and a couple of little essays (5 pp. each), and commit some good poetic example (say 50 lines) to memory. The course has little practical use: it just helps you understand human creatures (including yourself) and how they interact with each other — merely educational. Text: The Norton Anthology of Poetry, shorter ed.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Richard Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the art of poetry so that you can read and discuss any poem with understanding and delight. During the term, we will move from a general survey of poetic techniques and forms to a more detailed study of the work of a selection of authors from the Renaissance to the present. For the former, we will use Western Wind by John Frederick Nims. For the latter, we will use a course pack of selected poems.

Formal writing will include three (ungraded) exercises in poetic analysis and four (graded) papers (3-5 pages) on individual authors and poems.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Sadia Abbas (abbass@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ENGLISH 240.007.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 011.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 245 / RCHUMS 280 / THTREMUS 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jane Westlake (jewestla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jewestla/

See THTREMUS 211.001.

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ENGLISH 267. Introduction to Shakespeare.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of Introductory Composition. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will read six of Shakespeare's plays both as poetic texts and as scripts for performance, comparing these Elizabethan plays with diverse modern interpretations. Readings, lectures, discussions, in-class writing assignments, in-class performances, video selections, and attendance at a production of Othello will all contribute to our understanding of Shakespeare. Because our reading depends crucially on the comprehension of poetic features, we will pay special attention to these, beginning with a close reading of several great sonnets. Plays will include A Midsummer Night's Dream, Twelfth Night, Romeo and Juliet, Othello, Richard III, and King Lear. All participants should expect to gain a greater appreciation of poetry, drama, and the creative power of well-wrought language.

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ENGLISH 270. Introduction to American Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will cover some of the classic works of American fiction: The Scarlet Letter,Billy Budd, Huckleberry Finn, Daisy Miller, The Red Badge of Courage, The Awakening, The Age of Innocence, The Great Gatsby, As I Lay Dying, and Their Eyes Were Watching God.

There will be frequent short informal writing assignments, two 4-5 page papers, and two exams.

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ENGLISH 280. Thematic Approaches to Literature.

Section 001 — Chicago in Literature.

Instructor(s): Rosemary Ann Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Chicago is frequently depicted as working class, rough and tough, the "City of the Big Shoulders" to quote Carl Sandburg's famous phrase. Other phrases come to mind when thinking about Chicago, too: "the machine," the Mob, racial tensions, ethnic neighborhoods, the Stockyards, the Loop and Lakefront to name a few more. Students in this class will explore what Chicago writers have written about these iconic images and other features about their city. Writers may include Theodore Dreiser, Nelson Algren, James T. Farrell, Richard Wright, Saul Bellow, Stuart Dybek, Sandra Cisneros, Sara Paretsky. We'll also be looking at some poets (Carl Sandburg and Gwendolyn Brooks), a playwright (Lorraine Hansberry), and a film or two ("the Untouchables" and, of course, "Chicago").

The class is primarily discussion, so all students are expected to fully participate every day. Requirements include weekly reading responses, a final and a end-of-term paper or web project.

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ENGLISH 299. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

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ENGLISH 305. Introduction to Modern English.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard W Bailey (rwbailey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Recommended for students preparing to teach English. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/305/001.nsf

Though a requirement for students seeking certification as secondary school English teachers, English 305 appeals to a broader audience interested in the structure of English and its varieties. Topics to be discussed include: gender-based differences in American English and regional and social dialects in the United States, including African-American English, Appalachian English, Hispanic English, and Native American English; and English as a rule-governed language, shaped by its history, and the history of ideas about good (and "bad" English). English 305 is designed for native-speakers of English (with no prior study of the language or of linguistics) who are curious about the language community of which they are a part.

A midterm and final examination allow students to demonstrate the ability to make well-founded generalizations based on the material studied. Short papers invite explorations of domains of language.

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ENGLISH 308. History of the English Language.

Section 001 — Satisfies the requirement for a course in language for English concentrators in the Teaching Certificate Program and satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Our language has changed dramatically in the twelve hundred years of its recorded history. We would not recognize speech (Old English) of the first Germanic peoples who migrated to post-Roman Britain in the fifth century; Chaucer's Canterbury Tales (Middle English) might seem to be written in a foreign language; even Shakespeare's (early Modern) English requires special efforts. Our main task will be to understand something of sounds, words and structure of English at each of these earlier periods, but especially we will work to understand why and how a language changes (or doesn't). Course work will consist of frequent short assignments, group tasks, in class workshops, a midterm and final. The major prerequisite is that you come prepared to have fun.

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ENGLISH 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 001 — Ancient Greece and Modern Gay Identity. Meets with WOMENSTD 484.010.

Instructor(s): David M Halperin (halperin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For centuries, homosexually-inclined women and men have looked to ancient Greece for a prestigious example of a society that not only tolerated but even celebrated same-sex love and desire. Even today, ancient Greece, as well as ancient Greek authors such as Sappho or Plato, continue to represent important sources of lesbian and gay pride. But what did such authors actually say, and what exactly did the Greek approval of homosexuality come down to? Was ancient Greece really a world without homophobia? What was the relation between the ancient Greek acceptance of some kinds of homoerotic behaviors and other features of ancient Greek society, such as slavery or the subjugation of women? What are the political stakes in different interpretations of ancient Greek sexual life and what, if anything, does an understanding of ancient Greek sexual attitudes and practices have to offer queer politics or queer culture today?

In an effort to answer these and other questions, we will read in modern English translation a wide selection of ancient Greek (and a few Roman) texts that deal with same-sex love, desire, and sexual behavior. Some of these texts are classics, so to speak; others are almost unknown. We will also read some modern scholarship on the topic. We'll conclude by studying recent English-language fiction by lesbian and gay male writers that focuses on ancient Greece and that indicates the range of possible re-uses of ancient Greek materials by modern lesbian and gay male culture.

Readings: works by Homer, Sappho, Sophocles, Plato, Lysias, Aeschines, Nossis, Strato, Ovid, and Seneca; also, James Merrill, Olga Broumas, Mary Renault, Mark Merlis, Frank Bidart, and Marguerite Yourcenar.

Workload: three essays.

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ENGLISH 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 010 — Science Fiction.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~esrabkin/313SFw04.htm

We will examine both the history and the diversity of science fiction prose by reading a representative international sampling of some of the best examples written since the beginning of the nineteenth century. Generally, we will approach each primary text in three ways: through a consideration of its backgrounds (scientific, mythic, and so forth), through specific questions the text raises (moral questions, questions of plausibility, and so forth), and through the traditional discipline of criticism (what is science fiction? what is the relationship of character to theme? and so forth). Authors studied include Mary Shelley, Poe, Hawthorne, Wells, Zamiatin, Capek, Stapledon, Bradbury, Clarke, Miller, Dick, LeGuin, Lem, and Gibson.

The written work for the course will revolve around weekly, short papers, and two longer papers. There are no exams.

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ENGLISH 315 / WOMENSTD 315. Women and Literature.

Section 001 — Being a Heroine.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Despite the fact that a woman sat on the throne of England for most of the 19th century, Victorians were generally unable or unwilling to change their views about what women couldn't do and shouldn't do. The great novelists of the day, however, had no difficulty imagining strong, ambitious, brilliant, adventurous women and making them the heroines of their texts. Women's lack of power in 19th century life is well-known and well-documented. We will note it too, but our focus will be on the qualities with which writers from Jane Austen to Virginia Woolf endowed their heroines, who railed against the narrowness of their lives, sought choice in the midst of choicelessness, questioned what was deemed "unwomanly," and attempted to subvert the rules. We will read Emma, Jane Eyre, Wuthering Heights, The Portrait of a Lady, Middlemach, and To the Lighthouse. We will also read about the culture that set restrictions on women and the lives of the authors who managed to break through. (This material will be collected in a course pack.)

Requirements: a take-home midterm and final; a 10-12 page final essay; regular attendance, class participation, and a question a week on the readings.

The syllabus and other instructions pertaining to the course will appear on my website as they are completed. http://www-personal.umich.edu/~merla/

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 001 — Religious Dimensions of Modern Jewish Literature. Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Julian Arnold Levinson (jlevinso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How do modern Jewish writers engage with the religious traditions and texts of Judaism? What elements of the tradition do they draw upon? How are these elements transformed or reshaped to meet the concerns of modern writers? How do Jewish writers straddle the divide between the modern world and the religious tradition? How have these writers made use of religious vocabularies in order to respond to the Holocaust? Using a broad definition of "religious," this course provides a context for addressing these and other questions. In order to explore the multiple voices that have shaped modern Jewish culture, we will consider texts written in Yiddish, Hebrew, German, French, as well as English. All of the readings will be in English. Two papers, midterm, and final.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 003 — The Radical Thirties: The Art & Politics of U.S. Narrative. Mets with AMCULT 301.003.

Instructor(s): John H McGuigan (jhmcguig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An attempt to "think historically" motivates this course, an attempt we'll engage both in theoretical terms (What can it mean to think historically?) and in practical terms (How can one do it?). In some ways, we can change the past, and do so every day — not in terms of what happened but in our understanding of it. Using the University's Labadie Collection, we'll confront these issues by exploring the complex relationship between art and politics, discovering the concrete artifacts that surround and inform politically-minded U.S. literature written in the 1930s. Each looks back over the first forty years of the century, a particularly rich period that saw an explosion of oppositional European art movements (Cubism, Dada, Surrealism, etc) and political movements (Anarchism, Socialism, Fascism, etc.) find fertile ground in this country. Studying novels alongside art works of various media, contemporaneous reactions, and primary documents from radical political movements lets us examine not only relationships between specific art trends and specific political positions of the past, but also the politics of identifying and analyzing such relationships — in effect, the making of history. By adding a political dimension, our searches may lead us to consider the extent to which a given historical economic situation promotes a specific range of political and artistic expression. How do these modes of expression speak to each other or to the historical moment?

Assignments for this class include two short papers, a reading journal, and a modest (5-7pp) research project. Some of this class' workload comes from treasure-hunting in the University's library and museum holdings. Course readings will include novels such as For Whom the Bell Tolls (Hemingway), Blood on the Forge ( (Attaway), Jews Without Money ( (Gold), The Big Money ( (Dos Passos), and Nightwood (Barnes); news clippings, pamphlets, and other archival materials; and short theoretical pieces.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 005 — Shakespeare on Screen. Meets with FILMVID 366.008.

Instructor(s): Barbara C Hodgdon (hodgdonb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See FILMVID 366.008.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 007 — Literature and Culture Schools and schooling: Intersections of the personal, the institutional, and the cultural.

Instructor(s): Anne Gere (argere@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine how individuals, cultures, and institutions shape and are shaped by powerful, durable structures, such as schools, in society. We will consider how we come to understand and interact with schools and schooling by looking at various cultural representations of them, as well as how local, personal, and embodied schools and schooling shape and are shaped by various cultural models, institutional authority, and personal, embodied interactions. In particular, we will focus on how race, class, and other power dynamics intersect to impact how we understand and interact with schools, especially those often termed "high-need" or "urban." We will consider how the reform-minded can access, value, and draw upon community cultural knowledge to bring about change in how to think about and interact with these institutions and their individual stake-holders. We will examine representations of such schools and schooling in media, film, literature, non-fiction, and popular culture, and will consider a local "high need" community and its schools as a case study, reading texts about the community and interacting with its teachers and students in order to ground our inquiry.

Course requirements include one multi-genre introspective project, weekly written responses to readings, films, and class activities, and participation in presenting reviewed material to the class and leading class discussion.

Course enrollment is limited to participants in Teachers for Tomorrow, a certification program for students committed to teaching in urban/high-need schools.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 001 — Theatre & Social Change.

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course teaches students how to use their creative skills and social commitments to facilitate the powerful expressiveness of high school youth and of incarcerated youth and adults. In-class exercises, improvisations, and discussion of theater and pedagogical texts prepare us to assist workshop participants in imagining and shaping their own plays. Students will work an average of two to three hours a week in one of a number of state correctional facilities located in Adrian, Detroit, Jackson, Ypsilanti, and Plymouth, at Henry Ford and Cooley High Schools in Detroit, or at one of four juvenile facilities.

An additional two hours is spent in class meetings, and a further hour is devoted to meetings between each site team and the instructor. No exams.

Admission to the class is by permission of instructor. Check 3275 Angell for specially posted hours for interviews for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 002 — Multicultural British Literature.

Instructor(s): Simon E Gikandi (gikandi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The idea or image of Britain as the center of a homogenous and pure culture, one reflected in a set of "island" stories untouched by the rest of the world, is perhaps one of the most persistent myths in the study of British literature, society, and culture. In this course we will attempt to question this mythology by focusing on the writing of a group of writers who, in the last twenty or thirty years, have transformed the idea of Britain by calling attention to the metropolitan, migrant, and hybrid nature of British society. By reading novels by British writers whose backgrounds or origins are to be found in Asia, Africa, and the Caribbean, we will try to reflect on how the new, multicultural Britain is generating narratives whose goal is nothing less than the transformation of what it means to be British. How and why did this literature become important to the body of British literature and what is its relationship to established English writing? What forms of writing do "ethnic" British writers use to examine the popular culture and lifestyle of a national culture that is being transformed by people it used to define as outsiders? To answer these questions, we will start with British "Big House" novels concerned with the crisis of Englishness at the beginning of the twentieth century (Forster's Howard's End and Waugh's Brideshead Revisted ) and their parody by the Anglo-Japanese writer Kaguro Ishoguro (Remains of the Day ). The rest of the course will focus on the multicultural novels of Diran Adebayo, Hanif Kureishi, Salman Rushdie, Meera Syal, Timothy Mo, and Zadie Smith. We may also view video versions of some of the films involved in this rethinking of Britishness.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 003 — Creative Writing Workshops and Social Change.

Instructor(s): Sarah A Wolfson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

According to Adrienne Rich, "There is no simple formula for the relationship of art to justice." In this course we will deepen our understanding of that relationship by using our skills and social commitments to facilitate creative writing workshops with incarcerated youth and adults and possibly with under-served high school students. In-class exercises, weekly journals, and the discussion of literature and pedagogical texts will prepare us to assist workshop participants in producing and shaping their own stories and poems. Students will work an average of two to three hours a week in one of a number of state correctional facilities located in Adrian, Detroit, Jackson, Ypsilanti, and Plymouth, at one of four juvenile detention centers, or at a Detroit high school. An additional two hours are spent in class meetings, and a further hour is devoted to meetings between each site team and the instructor. This course will occasionally meet together with English 319: Theater & Social Change.

Admission to the class is by permission of the instructor. Check 3146 Angell Hall for specially posted hours for interviews for this course.

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ENGLISH 321. Internship.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concentration in English. (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 001 — Fiction.

Instructor(s): Nancy Reisman (nreisman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we'll focus on forms of short fiction, sources for stories, and ways of developing the initial spark of character, image, memory, or concept into fully rendered original fiction. As we discuss student work and the stories of published contemporary writers, we'll explore narration, point of view, characterization, structure, lyricism, metaphor, uses of time, silence, and other elements: the art and architecture of story making. Workshop writers will produce several short focused pieces in addition to longer stories for workshop discussion. Interested students should have some previous experience with fiction writing.

In order to enroll in this course, students must:

  • Get on the Waitlist.
  • Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall, Undergraduate Student Services Assistant, by noon on Tuesday, January 6th.
  • When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 002, 003 — Fiction.

Instructor(s): Patricia T O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

In order to enroll in this course, students need to:

  • Get on the Waitlist.
  • Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of prose to the Undergraduate Student Services Assistant, in the Main Office of the English Department, room 3187 Angell Hall, by noon on Tuesday, January 6th.
  • When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 004 — Fiction.

Instructor(s): Karel Glastra van Loon

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In order to enroll in this course, students need to:

  • Get on the Waitlist.
  • Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall, Undergraduate Student Services Assistant, by noon on Tuesday, January 6th.
  • When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 005 — Poetry.

Instructor(s): Richard K Hilles (rhilles@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In order to enroll in this course, students need to:

  • Get on the Waitlist.
  • Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall, Undergraduate Student Services Assistant, by noon on Tuesday, January 6th.
  • When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 006 — Poetry.

Instructor(s): Khaled Mattawa

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

As an introductory poetry writing class, this course aims at exposing beginning poets to a wide range of possibilities in poetry. We will study issues of starting a poem, generating material for poetry, the nature of poetic writing, imagery, narrative, figurative language, prosodic forms, rhythm, musicality, and revision. The course will involve a good deal of reading of poetry as well as extensive writing, of course. We will read model poems that best represent the aspect of poetry we're studying at a particular time, and students will be given numerous exercises focusing on that aspect, be it meter, or imagery, or stream consciousness. The class will alternate between short lectures and workshop where a student's work will be critiqued in small groups or by the whole class.

REQUIREMENTS:

Weekly assignments: Students will turn in 2 poems to the instructor on a weekly basis.

Journal: Your journal should include all the assigned exercises, other writing attempts on your part, responses to the assigned readings and to your outside readings.

2 Review Essays: Each student is required to write 2 short, 4-page essays, reviewing a recent book of poetry (no books earlier than 1980), or a book poetry in translation by a 20th century poet.

Final Portfolio: The portfolio is a final selection of your best work, finished and revised to the best of you ability, 20-pages or 25o lines.

In order to enroll in this course, students need to:

  • Get on the Waitlist.
  • Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall, Undergraduate Student Services Assistant, by noon on Tuesday, January 6th.
  • When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 5 Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 007 — Fiction.

Instructor(s): Laura K Kasischke

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In order to enroll in this course, students need to:

  • Get on the Waitlist.
  • Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 Angell Hall, Undergraduate Student Services Assistant, by noon on Tuesday, January 6th.
  • When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form. You will be notified by the Department of acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 001, 002 — The Mask.

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Minister's Black Veil," a parable in which a good parson comes out of his house one morning wearing a veil over his face, the Townspeople respond by whispering to each other: "He has changed himself into something awful, only by hiding his face." The center of our discussions in this writing class will be to address the questions of created personas, of inspired identities. The characters we read about will help us understand lives we haven't lived, whereas our own writing, perhaps, will be inspired by the lives we have lived or want to live, by the "stories" we want to tell. Each individual community we belong to (for example: friend, student, child, sibling, religious preference [or non-preference], sexual partner) encourages us to play a different role. So many communities. So many roles. Our readings will have us, in small ways, experience the lives of different ethnic groups, genders, and sexual orientations. Our writing will need to use this experience of the other as we attempt to create a rhetorical "I" to narrate our own essays. Reading contemporary literature, discussion, writing, and more writing will be the mainstay of the class. Assignments include: approximately three 7-8 page drafts of essays and a weekly peer response from each student. The readings will be selected from a diverse group of authors of different genders, ethnic backgrounds, socio-economic classes, sexualities, and religions.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 003, 005.

Instructor(s): John W Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Much like the ENGLISH 225 courses I have taught over the last dozen years, this course will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy majoring reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo — be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage College Dictionary

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 004 — All Things Considered.

Instructor(s): Rosemary Ann Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We write well when we write about subjects that interest us. We also write well when we write about subjects in which we have a fair amount of expertise. With these ideas in mind, this course, to a large extent, will be determined by the students in it. It will, of course, have page limits, deadlines, grades….but the class readings will be selected by the students and the paper topics will be decided by the writers (with a lot of feedback and advice from me and other members of the class). Come prepared to state your special interest(s), suggest at least one substantial text (essay, book or film) for the class to read on that topic from which all of us can learn and profit, and propose a sequence of essay assignments for yourself and your area(s) of interest. Be prepared to do a lot of writing and revising of your work and to have your work reviewed by others in the class.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): John W Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ENGLISH 325.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5 Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 007 — Life-Stories.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course engages students in the process of collecting and writing life-stories, both one's own and that of another individual (a community elder or family member). Formal writing assignments include a series of autobiographical essays, culminating in a larger piece by the course end. In class, students reflect deeply on their life-writing experiences, as well as read and comment on autobiographical excerpts by such writers as John Edgar Wideman and Annie Dillard. We will focus on how differences in race, ethnicity, gender, and physical ability inform life-stories, and address such questions as: how is life-story linked to body, place, and tradition? How do people sort and make sense of their lives? What do they choose to remember, or to forget? How is the making of life-stories important to us?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Aric Knuth (aknuth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 009, 010.

Instructor(s): Fritz Garner Swanson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 011.

Instructor(s): Alexander Luria Ralph

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Anne G Berggren

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 013.

Instructor(s): Valerie Laken

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 015.

Instructor(s): Josie Kearns

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 326. Community Writing and Public Culture.

Section 001 — Community Writing and Public Culture.

Instructor(s): Joyce A Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 124 or 125. (3). (CE). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course asks that the student work at and to some extent write for an area non-profit organization, while reflecting deeply in writing and in discussion about the meaning of this work. Community assignments may involve contributing to a grant proposal, newsletter, website, or brochure, all of which will be peer-reviewed in draft form by the class itself. We will also discuss issues raised by our sites and by the related, assigned readings — i.e., our motives, insider/outsider roles, and the new skills and identities encountered at our community sites. The course provides a way of thinking about community work and social justice not just as service but as interrogating both our own motives and background, as well as the professions themselves. How can / do we ourselves contribute to the formation of public scholarship and public culture? How is knowledge produced, both in the university setting and in the non-prof? Who is responsible for the ways things are (perceived), as well as how we would like them to be?

In addition to keeping a weekly reflective journal, students will do a brief interview, an organizational analysis, a group oral report, a model "mission statement" and "fact sheet" related to their community site, and some modest research that leads to a larger paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 330(412) / FILMVID 330. Major Directors.

Section 001 — Welles, Lupino, & Cassavetes.

Instructor(s): Catherine L Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 230 or 236. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/filmvid/330/001.nsf

See FILMVID 330.001.

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ENGLISH 330(412) / FILMVID 330. Major Directors.

Section 003 — American Comic Masters Since the 60's: Allen, Brooks, Edwards, and Ashby.

Instructor(s): Peter M Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 230 or 236. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See FILMVID 330.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 [includes cost of film pass] Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 349(449) / THTREMUS 323. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): E.J. Westlake (jewestla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jewestla/

See THTREMUS 323.001.

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ENGLISH 349(449) / THTREMUS 323. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Peter Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 351. Literature in English after 1660.

Section 001 — Literature of the British Empire: 1660 to the Present. Satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): David W Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Surveying modern British literary history since 1660, this course teaches students about standard literary-historical terms (such as restoration, romanticism, modernism) and key developments in genre (romantic lyric, the "rise of the novel"). At the same time, our readings enable a thematic examination of British imperial history from its early colonial contexts to latter-day issues of globalism. The course's objective is to show how our thematic focus on empire in fact bears closely on very general features of British literary history. In particular, ideas of Englishness and Britishness can be seen to pervade British literary history, and those ideas typically have implicit or explicit recourse to conceptions of foreignness and of the non-European. Likely readings are Aphra Behn's Oroonoko; a novel by Daniel Defoe; Samuel Johnson's Rasselas, a gothic novel, romantic poetry, a Victorian novel, and twentieth-century works. Three exams and a paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 367 / MEMS 367. Shakespeare's Principal Plays.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Linda K Gregerson (gregerso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will read a representative group of dramatic works by William Shakespeare, including plays from all four genres to which he contributed: comedy, tragedy, history plays, and romance. These works have become the touchstones of all that we treasure in the western literary canon, and we will pay considerable attention to the features that have made them so, but they did not function primarily as literary artifacts in their own era. We will consider the political and social realms in which the vital and unprecedented popular theater of the Renaissance emerged, as well as the practical components of Renaissance stagecraft. A highlight of the semester will be attendance in March at a performance of Othello by the Guthrie Theater and (this part to be confirmed) a class visit by several of the actors. Plays likely to be on our syllabus are: A Midsummer Night's Dream; Henry IV, Part One; Twelfth Night; Hamlet; Othello; King Lear; The Tempest.

Midterm, final exam, frequent quizzes, five in-class writing assignments.

Costs: The Riverside Shakespeare ($66.80) plus one ticket to Othello at group discount rate (approximately $20).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 001 — Love and Heroism. [Honors]. Satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): John R Knott Jr (jknott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will read some of the best and most representative works of medieval and early modern English literature, beginning with the Anglo-Saxon Beowulf (in Seamus Heaney's translation) and ending with Milton's Paradise Lost. Along the way, we will read some Chaucer, Gawain And The Green Knight, a selection of Elizabethan love poetry, and a couple of Shakespeare plays (probably Othello and Antony and Cleopatra). Our focus will be on transformations of heroic and romantic ideals and some of the ways these become entangled. Related concerns will include changing ways of representing women and their roles and visions of social, political, and religious order.

There will be in-class exercises, two or three papers, a midterm, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 002 — History of Early English Poetry. Satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

After a brief survey of English prose from the 14th to the 18th Century, we shall study the following forms from the same period: alliterative verse, rhymed couplets, various stanza forms, sonnets, and blank verse (narratives and plays). The emphasis will be on shifts of style through time, on trying to define and explain these shifts in terms of cultural forces and authorial talents. Poets will include Langland, Chaucer, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift, and Pope. Everyone will need to learn to read Middle English, to scan verse, and to gain familiarity with various terms for characterizing poetic style. Everyone will be asked to engage in detailed textual analysis as well as to write on broader issues.

A substantial essay reporting original research will be required. Required texts: The Norton Anthology of Literature, Vol. I, and a course pack.

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ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 003 — Medieval English and Welsh Literature.

Instructor(s): Amy Christine Eichhorn-Mulligan (acem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Which beliefs, events, heroes, heroines and villains did medieval people think were so important that they preserved and enshrined them in their literature? Who told these stories, and why? Who read and listened to them? How did the concerns of authors and audiences change over time and place? To respond to these questions, in this course we will look closely at a wide assortment of medieval texts, including poetry, prose and drama, from both England and Wales. We will read literature that depicts a grand, mythic and oftentimes magical world, populated with larger-than-life figures such as King Arthur and his followers. We will also examine texts that reflect the experiences of a much wider and more diverse population. Through our wide-ranging study we will be able to compare and contrast various literary forms and functions, and explore the ways that people of different places and times projected themselves and their cultures through the written word.

Texts will include, but are not limited to, Beowulf, The Mabinogi, Old English and Middle Welsh poems, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, selections from the Canterbury Tales, and a medieval miracle play.

Though the majority of texts will be read in English translation, we will have the opportunity to do some reading in Middle English. No prior knowledge in Middle English, or medieval literature in general, is required for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 001 — The Beginnings of the Novel.

Instructor(s): Ilana M Blumberg (blumberg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will focus on the beginnings of the novel and its development as a form through the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Much of our attention will be devoted to the close reading of novels by authors including Behn, Defoe, Richardson, Fielding, Burney, Scott, and Austen. We will be particularly interested in the emergence of the category of "fiction": many early novels represent themselves as true histories, with novelists posing as mere "chroniclers" or "editors" of original documents. What conditions–philosophical and material–contribute to these claims? How does this relationship between fictional and historical literature develop over time and how does it continue to shape our contemporary, twenty-first century understanding of fact and fiction? Secondary readings on these topics will be assigned.

Requirements will include informed participation, regular response papers, 6-8 pg. papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 002 — Comedy and Sentimentality in Eighteenth-Century Literature.

Instructor(s): Tricia A McElroy (mcelroyt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the complex interactions of two opposing poles of eighteenth-century literature. In sentimentalism––with its emphasis on strong emotions and sympathy for the sufferings of others––we will explore one of the most prominent innovations in eighteenth-century literature. We will read two well-known sentimental novels, Richardson's Pamela and Goldsmith's Vicar of Wakefield, alongside a set of lesser-known texts––short tales about mistreated young women, and weepy "pre-romantic" poems about beggars, madmen, and dead birds.

But we will also explore a set of eighteenth-century comic texts and the everyday humour that they reflect––a coarse, cruel, and often misogynistic humor that is completely alien to modern readers. We will look at jokebooks and comic folktales, at a popular wife-beating farce and even a puppet show (Punch and Judy). These comic texts shows us, in the most unmistakable way, the sort of things to which literary sentimentalism was reacting. Toward the middle of the course, however, we will consider a set of comic texts that parody or scoff at the rising tide of sentimentalism. In Shamela, we will read Henry Fielding's uproarious travesty of Richardsonian sentimentality, and in Joseph Andrews we will discover his alternative innovation of the comic social novel. In Charlotte Lennox's Female Quixote, we will read the hilarious tale of a young woman who tries to lead her life in accordance with the codes of French romance (a genre by which literary sentimentalism was strongly influenced). Finally, in Smollett's Humphry Clinker, we will enjoy a novel that at once mocks the excesses of sentimental fiction (its epistolary form seems to parody Richardson) and at the same time offers its own more restrained scenes of tender feeling.

The course emphasizes narrative fiction over other literary genres. In part, this choice is determined by time constraints. But it also reflects the fact that the novel was the primary vehicle not only of sentiment, but also of a comic-realistic tradition that predated and continued to offer a skeptical commentary on the innovations of sentimentality.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 003 — Literature in English, Defoe to Douglas. [Honors].

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course considers literature written within the context of one of the most turbulent and fertile stretches of Western cultural development, as individuals and communities attempted to define their identity in terms of religious commitment, the human ability to reason, the human ability to feel, or nation.

Authors whom we shall read include Defoe (Roxana), Dryden, Pope, Swift, Voltaire, Blake, Rousseau, Wordsworth, Shelley, Austen, Tennyson, Whitman, and Douglas. An especially exciting feature of this class will be the chance to note the emergence of American voice(s) within the cacophony and euphony of works written in English.

The class will ask attentive and wide reading, lively class discussion, and, in all probability, 2 essays, a midterm and a final examination.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 004 — English Literature of the Seventeenth Century: Religion, Science & Social Upheaval. Satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Sadia Abbas (abbass@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How do English writers of the seventeenth century grapple with religious controversy, the challenges and failures of science, the pressure of an intellectual, theological, and social world in ferment? How do different literary genres give shape to these questions? What is the intersection between literary form and religious, political, and philosophical debate? What is the relation between sex and religion for writers of this period? How does the idea of Englishness work its way into concerns about form? We will ask these, and other questions throughout the semester. Readings from Francis Bacon, John Donne, Fulke-Greville, Ben Jonson, Elizabeth Cary, Andrew Marvell, George Herbert, John Milton, Richard Crashaw, Thomas Carew, Margaret Cavendish, and others.

Two papers (one long, one short) and a final.

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ENGLISH 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 001 — Victorian, Modern, and Postmodern.

Instructor(s): John Richard Kucich (jkucich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on three distinct historical/cultural periods — Victorian, modern, and postmodern. A comprehensive understanding of these three periods will help us clarify a wide range of literary and cultural developments over the past two hundred years. To help characterize the three periods, we will explore each period's dominant ideas about individualism, gender difference, and aesthetic form. Course materials will include novels, films, poetry, plays, and essays. Probable texts will include works by Donald Barthelme, Charlotte Brontë, James Joyce, Toni Morrison, Virginia Woolf, Charles Dickens, Jean Rhys, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Robert Browning, T.S. Eliot, Caryl Churchill, and Michael Cunningham, as well as 2-3 films. Two papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 002 — Locating Modernism.

Instructor(s): Andrea Patricia Zemgulys (zemgulys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/372/002.nsf

Modernist literature often leaves us wondering just where in the world we are as readers; indeed, many modernist authors explicitly wished that we dispense with our desire for narratives grounded in stable and recognizable settings. At the same time, however, these authors in their own lives sought out particular settings to shape themselves as artists and to give rise to their visions. This course will explore the empty, abstract, and/or dislocating spaces of modernist literature, and think about their relation to some of modernism's most favored settings (such as urban streets, battlefields of the Great War, and peripheries of the empire). Do we understand these texts any better for examining their locations? Or do our efforts to locate modernism lead to a misreading of its texts? The reading list for the course will concentrate on British "high" modernist poetry and fiction, and include works by Mary Butts, T.S. Eliot, E.M. Forster, James Joyce, D.H. Lawrence, Wilfred Owen, Jean Rhys, and Virginia Woolf, as well as works by Charles Baudelaire, Georg Simmel, Gertrude Stein, and Jean Vigo.

This is a four credit hour course. It will require weekly writing assignments, two essays (or one long essay), and a research presentation, and will set two exams.

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ENGLISH 383. Topics in Jewish Literature.

Section 001 — The Yiddish Classics. Satisfies the New Traditions Requirement for English concentration. Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Anita Norich (norich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What do we know about modern Yiddish culture? What are its origins and how did it develop? Who were its major writers and what were the themes, social structures, literary forms of primary concern to them? In this course we will answer these and other questions by reading the fiction of three writers: Sh.Y. Abramovitch (also known as Mendele Moykher Sforim), Sholem Aleichem, and Y.L. Peretz. Their short stories and novels are considered the classics of modern Yiddish literature and offer a provocative introduction into the Eastern European Jewish milieu in which they wrote. We will also consider some of the adaptations made of their work in Yiddish and English drama and film, and some of the changes made when their stories and novels were brought to an American audience. All readings will be in English translation. No knowledge of Yiddish is required for this course.
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ENGLISH 388 / AMCULT 325. Pacific Literary and Cultural Studies.

Section 001 — Pacific Island Worlds.

Instructor(s): Damon I Salesa (salesa@umich.edu), Susan Y Najita (najita@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See AMCULT 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

ENGLISH 401 / RELIGION 481. The English Bible: Its Literary Aspects and Influences, I.

Section 001 — This course no longer satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Bible is a book, a text: it is also a collection of texts of the most astonishing variety and range. Our first task will be to try to understand these works in terms both of form and content and then of the circumstances which occasioned and shaped them. We will also study how the Bible came to have its present form(s), and consider its transmission as text and as cultural influence. Students will be encouraged to study especially the literary influences of the Bible in authors of interest to them. The particular readings will be influenced by class needs: we shall surely include Genesis, Exodus, Job, the Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isiah, Hosea, Mark, The Acts of the Apostles, Romans, and the Apocalypse.

Writing Requirements: three essays of moderate length, a midterm, and a final. Class attendance and participation essential.

This course no longer fulfills the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 001 — Children's literature.

Instructor(s): Lisa Makman (lmakman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the major genres of children's literature. Students will read from a wide variety of classical and contemporary works, from The Tale of Peter Rabbit to Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone. The genres we will study include fairytales, historical fiction, fantasy, and science fiction. The course will cultivate an awareness of story patterns, generic conventions, and innovations. Among the topics to be considered are conceptions of child's play, gender and the child's development, imagining the child's imagination, sense and nonsense, and coming of age. The course will also examine broader questions such as the following. What are possible pedagogical functions of literature for children? What meanings are given to childhood in our culture and what is the role played by children's literature in producing these meanings? How have the meanings given to childhood changed historically?

Requirements: response papers, final exam and research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 002 — Filipino American Literature. Meets with AMCULT 311.001.

Instructor(s): Emily P Lawsin (elawsin@umich.edu), Maria S See (ssee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/amcult/311/001.nsf

See AMCULT 311.001.

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ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 005 — West African Novel in English.

Instructor(s): Jennifer A Wenzel (jawenzel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/407/005.nsf

Chinua Achebe has often been called the "father of African literature," both for his 1958 novel Things Fall Apart, and for his infrastructural efforts to create opportunities for other writers. Part of the appeal of Things Fall Apart derived from its appearance shortly before Nigerian independence in 1960, during the optimistic decade of African decolonization. Yet to posit a postcolonial origin for African literature is to ignore not only oral and written traditions in indigenous African languages, but also a centuries-long tradition of African writing in English, including that of early 20th -entury West African nationalists. While our primary focus will be on mid-to-late 20th-century novels in English by authors from Nigeria and Ghana, we will resist reading them merely as Achebe's "progeny." Instead, supplementary readings in other genres (e.g., the autobiography of Olaudah Equiano; popular "market" literatures) and translations from other languages (e.g., the fantastic Yoruba-language fiction of D.O. Fagunwa) will help to suggest a range of possible relationships among these texts. We will consider the implications of reading within the rubrics of national, regional, continental, or global literatures, as well as the resonances and tensions between the concerns of these texts and those of postcolonial theory. Questions of distribution and reception, including the respective constraints of African and international publishing, will also be relevant to our discussion. Course requirements will include short essays and at least one exam.

Major texts likely to be drawn from the following:

  • Achebe, Chinua. Things Fall Apart
  • Aidoo, Ama Ata. Our Sister Killjoy
  • Armah, Ayi Kwei. The Beautyful Ones Are Not Yet Born
  • Awoonor, Kofi. Comes the Voyager at Last: A Tale of Return to Africa
  • Balogun, F. Odun. Adjusted Lives: Stories of Structural Adjustment
  • Emecheta, Buchi. The Joys of Motherhood
  • King-Aribisala, Karen. Kicking Tongues
  • Nwapa, Flora. Women Are Different
  • Okri, Ben. The Famished Road
  • Saro-Wiwa, Ken. Sozaboy
  • Soyinka, Wole. The Interpreters
  • Tutuola, Amos. The Palm-wine Drinkard
  • Photocopied packet of literary, historical, theoretical supplementary readings

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 407. Topics in Language and Literature.

Section 006 — War and the American Writer.

Instructor(s): John H McGuigan (jhmcguig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

American culture was profoundly shaped during the 1900s by a series of new wars creating new conditions both for soldiers on the fronts and civilians at home. Starting from that rather obvious premise, this course explores the "how" and "why." The shocking scale and mechanization of World War I, costly non-intervention in the Spanish Civil War and the resulting necessity of World War II, the forgotten Korean War, the domestically divisive Vietnam conflict, the restorative Desert Storm — each conflict abroad necessitated a renegotiated sense of self at home. Many of the art works we will study define themselves in opposition to the respective official government line, but through the use of primary sources we will examine both sides of the domestic battle for the cultural and rhetorical upper-hand, as people fight to determine how a conflict will be understood and how it will be remembered. Soldiers' letters, for example, can illuminate the role art played in the lives of soldiers, helping them negotiate the danger of their immediate environment and inform their sense of the larger historical and political forces at work.

This course requires two shorter papers, a reading journal, and a 10pp research project using University research collections. Readings could include works by Crane, Cather, Faulkner, Hemingway, H.D., Dos Passos, Vonnegut, Mailer, O'Brien, Komunyakaa, and Bowden, in addition to films and journalism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 408 / LING 408. Varieties of English.

Section 001 — Early Middle English Texts. Satisfies the Pre-1600 Literature requirement for English concentrators. Meets with ENGLISH 503.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This term we will examine (often with the aid of parallel translations) works in early Middle English, as well as the better known and more frequently studied major authors — Chaucer, Gower, Piers, the Pearl poet. Readings will include selections from prose and poetic histories, mystical writers; contemporary social and political documents (laws, recipes, medical texts, chronicles, charters). We will examine a wide range of early Middle English texts as we develop an appreciation for the roles written English played in medieval England and the cultural and political consequences of the ability to read and write. [Although this course follows up on material covered in ENGLISH 407 (reading Old English), ENGLISH 407 is not a prerequisite.]

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 414. Multimedia Explorations in the Humanities.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of Instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mmx/w04/414w04syl.htm.

This course offers students the opportunity to work in groups creating and/or augmenting web-based resources for the study of a humanities topic of their choice. Students may register in groups with the mentorship of any collaborating faculty member or register singly and form partnering and, if needed, mentoring relationships. All students will study in the field of their chosen group, learn modern information technology, and use that technology to produce materials that become part of on-going resources for use by themselves and others. Reading, writing, and production requirements will be adjusted to the backgrounds of each student and the needs of each group. A typical minimum requirement is the equivalent of reading five books in the field of choice (e.g., 18th century satire or The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood), mastering at least three substantial programs (e.g., Flash or Photoshop), and producing the multimedia equivalent of 30 pages of revised, researched prose.

Note: Students must add themselves to the waitlist, and then contact the professor for permission into this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor : Students must add themselves to the waitlist, and then contact Prof. Rabkin for permission into this course.

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 002 — Nature Writing as Autobiography.

Instructor(s): John R Knott Jr (jknott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will read some of the best contemporary nature writing, with an emphasis on how such writing can function as a form of autobiography, a way of fashioning the self in the process of discovering and interacting with the natural world. We will begin with a selection of essays that will give you a sense of the range and creative energy of writing in this flexible genre, followed by a mix of classic and more experimental works: Edward Abbey's Desert Solitaire, Peter Matthiessen's The Snow Leopard, Sue Hubbell's A Country Year, Annie Dillard's A Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, Gary Snyder's The Practice of the Wild, Terry Tempest Williams' Refuge, Barry Lopez' About This Life, and Janisse Ray's Ecology of a Cracker Childhood.

The work of the course will include some in-class writing, weekly journal entries, and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 003 — Fictions of Empire.

Instructor(s): John Richard Kucich (jkucich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the central role played by the British Empire within British fiction from 1848 to the present day, with emphasis on the period of massive imperial expansion from 1875-1914. During the last century and a half, most major works of British fiction have been preoccupied, directly or indirectly, with questions about empire — questions about its viability; its moral justifications; its impact on hierarchies of race, gender, and class; and its role in shaping the identities and values of ordinary British citizens. These works can tell us a great deal about how the empire has been entwined with every aspect of British self-consciousness — even among those who never left their homes in England. These works can also tell us a great deal about our own contemporary experience, as citizens of the dominant imperial power in the world today. We will most probably read works by Charlotte Brontë, H. Rider Haggard, Olive Schreiner, Robert Louis Stevenson, Mary Kingsley, Rudyard Kipling, Joseph Conrad, Bram Stoker, and E.M. Forster, as well as a few works by non-British authors "writing back" to the empire: Chinua Achebe, Nadine Gordimer, and J.M. Coetzee. In addition, we will read a number of essays and other ancillary materials — both contemporary and historical — that will help us contextualize the fiction.

There will also be 1-2 films. Two papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 004 — Black Women of the U.S. Caribbean, and Latin America: Life, Literature and Music. Meets with CAAS 458.003.

Instructor(s): Ifeoma C Nwankwo (icn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/417/004.nsf

Black women's voices have been muffled by the powerfully repressive forces of slavery, sexism, colonialism, among other forms of oppression. Despite these attempts to silence them, Black women workers, writers, and musicians have found ways to make their voices heard and their experiences acknowledged in the public sphere. In this course, we will identify, compare, and contrast the methods and genres used by Black women in the U.S., Latin America, and the Caribbean. In our analyses of women's life stories, literary texts, and songs we will consider questions such as:

  1. Is the highlighting of sexuality, including as employed by contemporary musicians such as Li'l Kim and Trina, an effective way to combat silencing?
  2. To what extent does the creation of life by way of becoming a mother provide a path to voice or contribute to voicelessness?
  3. What is the role of Black men in the search for public voice?
  4. Do literacy and formal education smooth or complicate the path to voice?
    What is the role of socioeconomic class in Black women's relationship to voice/voicelessness?
  5. How does migration provide new opportunities and/or close off possible paths to voice? and
  6. Have the strategies used by Black women changed over time, or are certain methods tried, true, and therefore constant?

Reading/Listening list includes works by: Gwendolyn Brooks, Missy Elliott, Audre Lorde, Calypso Rose, Nancy Morejon, and Celia Cruz.

Course requirements: Presentation, papers (one midterm and one final), class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 006 — The Sincerest Form.

Instructor(s): Delbanco

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A course in the nature and technique of contemporary short fiction, from the reader-writer's point-of-view. Close analysis of twelve examples of recent American prose, with an eye on authorial technique. Written work will consist of exercises in imitation, an effort to enter the style and specific rhetoric of the examples at hand. We will read short stories from Andrea Barrett, John Barth, Charles Baxter, Raymond Carver, Ernest Hemingway, Richard Ford, Jamaica Kincaid, Bernard Malamud, Lorrie Moore, Bharati Mukherjee, Tim O'Brien, and Flannery O'Connor. The article of faith on which this course is based is that imitation is not merely the sincerest form of flattery, but also a good way to grow.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 008 — Representation and Indigenous Peoples.

Instructor(s): Jennifer A Wenzel (jawenzel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/417/008.nsf

This seminar will focus on issues of cultural and political representation as they relate to indigenous peoples. Questions of both indigeneity and personhood emerged out of encounters in the "contact zones" created by European imperial expansion, generating images of indigenous peoples (as noble and other savages, for example) that would take on a life of their own. We will examine the proliferation of such images in narratives of these encounters, as well as their incorporation into other genres and disciplines, from poetry and prose fiction to essays and ethnographies. Also of concern will be indigenous peoples' images of Europeans, and how their own cultural practices respond to, challenge, accept, or transform representations of them, and to what uses traditions that predate colonial encounters are put after those encounters. We will examine contemporary issues — from Fourth World movements in an era of post-nationalism and globalization, to the commodification of "ethnic chic" and New Age appropriations of "native wisdom" — that suggest significant challenges to, and revivals of, myths of the noble savage. The course is international in scope, with particular focus on India, South Africa, and the Americas, although students will be encouraged to pursue and share interests in other regions. Literary and cultural texts will be supplemented by readings from philosophy, political science, economics, and international law. Reading list may include, but is not limited to, texts by Sherman Alexie, John Barrow, Aphra Behn, J.M. Coetzee, Christopher Columbus, Mahasweta Devi, Handsome Lake, Zakes Mda, Rigoberta Menchú, Michel de Montaigne, Carter Revard, Dr. Seuss, Leslie Marmon Silko, and Colin Turnbull.

Course requirements include essays, presentations, and thoughtful participation in the seminar.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 010 — Race, Citizenship, and Justice in American Literature and Law.

Instructor(s): Gregg Crane

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Reading political speeches, legal cases, and statutes, as well as novels, memoirs, essays, and poetry from the 1850s through the turn of the century, we will uncover and analyze the interchange between legal and literary formulations of citizenship and justice. We will consider in some detail the joint efforts of such political, legal, and literary figures as Charles Sumner, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Frederick Douglass, Moorfield Storey, Charles Chesnutt, and W.E.B. DuBois to correct American law by manipulating the cultural consensus on individual rights, political power, and the racial composition of the American community.

Writing assignments will include several short papers (3-5 pp.) and a longer paper (12 pp.) due on the last day of class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 001 — Fiction.

Instructor(s): Patricia T O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and, to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required. Students who want to enroll in the workshop should get on the waitlist and bring a manuscript to class the first evening. A list of those admitted will be posted shortly thereafter.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Instructor. STUDENTS WISHING TO ELECT THIS COURSE MUST WAITLIST AND BRING A 10-15 PAGE PORTFOLIO TO THE FIRST CLASS MEETING.

ENGLISH 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Eileen K Pollack (epollack@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on student work. Each student will write three new stories during the term and rewrite at least two of these stories. Students must also be committed to helping their classmates improve their work through honest yet compassionate responses to their manuscripts. To inspire ourselves to write and help us study various aspects of form and technique, we will also be reading the works of published authors. A major emphasis of this section will be on structure and theme — not in the sense of obeying conventional narrative modes or inserting messages, morals, sermons and symbols into a text, but in the sense of figuring out a way to unify a story around a central conflict and question, of discovering why a given story is worth telling. Interested students should get on the waitlist and bring a manuscript to the first class period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 003 — Fiction.

Instructor(s): Nancy B Reisman (nreisman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a studio course designed to help advanced undergraduate writers further develop their art, build on their knowledge of craft, and refine both writers' own aesthetics and their understanding of literary fiction's possibilities. How do you as a writer and as a reader define "story"? What shapes of fiction do you draw on, invent or reinvent to convey your particular vision, and what new territory might benefit your work? We'll focus primarily on short forms of literary fiction, exploring their potential and their limits, the uses of traditional and inventive structures, ways of presenting character, choices in narration and point of view, the music of the language, etc. We will read published fiction by several contemporary writers, and throughout the academic term workshop writers will produce and present new fiction, write brief experimental exercises, and read and respond to fiction by other workshop members.

Permission of Instructor required. Students who wish to enroll in the course should get on the Waitlist and bring a manuscript for review to the first class session. A list of admittees will be posted soon thereafter.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John W Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a continuation of ENGLISH 325 and will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist concentrating in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy concentrator reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo — be prepared to work hard for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course. Text: The American Heritage College Dictionary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 5 Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 002 — Nation of Immigrants. Satisfies the American Literature and New Traditions requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Central to the myth of the American Dream is the construct of the immigrant, those "tired" and "poor," welcomed to our shores, expecting to find "streets paved with gold," and "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" limited only by their own energy and desire. Not surprisingly, some of America's most compelling literature is about and by immigrants who write of the promise and disappointment of that dream and of the inevitable conflicts between old world ethics and new. This composition class will make their writings and the essays you compose in response to their ideas its focus. We will read texts by Jhumpa Lahiri, Gish.Jen, Andre Dubus III, Anne Fadiman, Bernard Malamud, Oscar Hujelos, — and other professional writers — and by the writers in this class.

Requirements include three 6-8 page essays, 2 page responses to each others essays, active participation in class discussion, and regular attendance. The syllabus and other instructions relating to the course will appear on my web-site as they are completed. http://www.personal.umich.edu/~merla/

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 426. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENGLISH 428. Senior Writing Tutorial.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): G Keith Taylor (keitay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223, 323, and 423/429. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a thesis tutorial for undergraduate students who are in their last year of the Creative Writing Subconcentration and have taken the 200-, 300- and 400-level writing workshops. Working closely with the writing faculty, students will complete a major manuscript. The course will culminate in a reading series in which students present their best work to the public.

Biweekly tutorials will be scheduled according to the convenience of the instructor and students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001 — The Writing of Kinetic Poetry.

Instructor(s): Thylias Moss (thyliasm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In writing poems this academic term, there will be an emphasis on gestures to compensate for what so far is necessarily lost in the translation of experience into poetry, beginning with a consideration of the loss of the three-dimensionality of experience as it is made to conform to the two-dimensionality of the page. For poetic structures, we will therefore attempt to utilize the structures of polyhedra, foam, fractals, and whatever other structures can assist us in giving shape to experience, to help us create more locations for poems to progress in both space and time. We will further draw upon various forms of kinetic typography that can help us liberate not only the writing of our poems, but also the display of our poems from strictly linear and 2D representation. Through the use of such software as Illustrator, Powerpoint, and Flash, we will become more able to access the three dimensionality of experience in our poems, We will be concerned with what lies on the planes opposite, under, beside, above, below, etc. the emotional, physical, logistical, tonal, momentary, etc. locations of the subjects and ideas in our poems. And we will also consider how what we place on these planes can vary as scale and time are varied. The understanding in this course will be that interactions define kinetic systems, and that existence, the overall source of our poetry, is itself a kinetic system. The academic term will culminate with a display of our kinetic poetry. Please join me in this experiment. Texts will probably include but are not limited to: Platonic and Archimedean Solids by Daud Sutton, Garbage by A. R. Ammons, Fractals: The Patterns of Chaos by John Briggs, Asylum by Quan Barry.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor/department

ENGLISH 432. The American Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregg Crane

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will focus on the 'reversal of fortunes' story as a way of exposing the main features and development of the American novel. Our reading will be drawn from a long list of reversal tales, such as Benjamin Franklin's Autobiography, Washington Irving's "Rip Van Winkle," Frederick Douglass' Narrative, Herman Melville's "Benito Cereno," Lydia Maria Child's Hobomok and Romance of the Republic, Horatio Alger's Ragged Dick, William Dean Howells' Rise of Silas Lapham, Frances Harper's Iola Leroy, Gertrude Dorsey Brown's "A Case of Measure for Measure," James Weldon Johnson's Autobiography of an Ex-Coloured Man, Abraham Cahan's The Rise of David Levinsky, and George Schuyler's Black No More. In some of these stories, reversals of fortune prove to be superficial, leaving aesthetic and ethical values untouched, but, in others, such changes result in a transformation of important principles and ideals. Perhaps most interesting are the narratives which simultaneously assert and deny the connection between change and value. As we look at narrative representations of the value of change and change of value, we will study shifts in novelistic form, closely comparing the figurations of change in sentimental, realist, naturalist, and modernist fiction. Writing assignments will include a midterm and final, reading quizzes, and one or two short (4-5 pp.) papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 433. The Modern Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John A Whittier-Ferguson (johnaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine developments in English fiction from the turn of the twentieth century to mid-1941. We will explore the ways in which the twentieth-century novel, rather than being driven primarily by plot, attempts to trace, in Joyce's words, "the curve of an emotion" or to incorporate, as Lawrence desires, philosophy and fiction in the novel. Virginia Woolf tells us that "human nature changed" in the first decade of the 1900s. Certainly the way novelists constructed human nature altered dramatically. We will also discuss issues that might be broadly grouped under the heading "gender": how do men and women in the twentieth century respond to or initiate the radical redefinitions of sex roles that occur during our century? Or are those "radical redefinitions" more rhetorical than substantive? How do anxieties and confusions manifest themselves in the texts we're discussing? We will also pay close attention to the variety of ways each author positions her / himself in relation to a past: how does the modern stand in relation to history? Readings will include a substantial course pack and the following texts: Bennett, The Old Wive's Tale; Stein,Three Lives; Joyce, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man; Lawrence, Women in Love; Woolf, To the Lighthouse and Between the Acts.

Course requirements are three essays (two five-page papers and a final, more substantial essay that's seven to nine pages long). There will be a final exam. This course has discussion sections

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 434. The Contemporary Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ira Konigsberg (ikonigsb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course covers a broad spectrum of contemporary writers and types of fiction, As well as establishing the specific themes and narrative methods of these literary figures and groups of novels, the course also seeks to discover similar concerns, ideas, and techniques in relation to recent social and cultural developments. The course especially focuses on the possibilities and impossibilities of fiction to deal with social and individual trauma in the real worlds of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The class will read Bernard Malamud's The Assistant, Thomas Pynchon's The Crying of Lot 49, Margaret Atwood's Surfacing, Tony Morrison's Sula, V.S. Naipaul's A Bend in the River, D.M. Thomas' The White Hotel, Don Delillo's White Noise, Julian Barnes' A History of the World in 10 1/2 Chapters, and Michael Ondaatje's The English Patient.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 441. Contemporary Poetry.

Section 001 — Contemporary Poetry. Satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine some of the most significant poems and poetry movements in the period 1945-2003. We shall begin by looking at poems about World War II, and then move on to poems of the so-called Confessional school. Sylvia Plath's book Ariel and Ted Hughes' Birthday Letters will be a special focus, as well as work by the Beat Generation poets. We shall study an assortment of "canonical" as well as multicultural poems from the last two decades. The latter part of the course will feature a volume by Frank Bidart, a visiting writer for a weeklong period in winter. One short and one long paper are part of the coursework, as well as a reading journal, a midterm, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 444 / THTREMUS 322. History of Theatre II.

Meets with THTREMUS 522.

Instructor(s): Leigh A Woods (lawoods@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See THTREMUS 322.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 447. Modern Drama.

Section 001 — Churchill and Stoppard.

Instructor(s): Barbara C Hodgdon (hodgdonb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Though they were born just a year apart, Stoppard in 1937 and Churchill in 1938, these two major British playwrights at first seem utterly different. Stoppard seems the witty, allusive, even derivative playwright, entranced alike by literature and philosophy, creating characters who, like those of Oscar Wilde, exist in a world of intelligent conversation rather than a politically committed society. Churchill's writing, by contrast, was at first explicitly political, feminist, and collaborative, growing from her involvement with groups of actors who improvised and workshopped material that she shaped into plays. We will start, therefore, by reading early plays that help to "define" each playwright's practice: Stoppard's Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead, Churchill's Light Shining in Buckinghamshire and Vinegar Tom. But then we will try to read these playwrights in tandem, working chronologically through their careers. We will want to consider how both playwrights use historical, literary and dramatic sources; we will look at contexts of the theatre scene for which they wrote, the actors and directors with whom they worked; we also will note how their writing changes focus as well as form and explore their critical reception.

Plays to be read will depend on availability of texts, but will probably include the following: Stoppard's Jumpers, Travesties, Professional Foul, The Real Thing, Arcadia, The Invention of Love, and Churchill's Cloud Nine, Top Girls, Mad Forest, Far Away. Additional required plays: Bertolt Brecht's The Good Woman of Setzuan; Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot.

Class requirements: written questions on plays, active discussion, 3 short papers, and a final project (which may include performed scenes).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 463. Modern British Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrea Patricia Zemgulys (zemgulys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/463/001.nsf

This course will survey poetry, fiction, cinema, and drama composed in Britain from 1900 to 1965. Our reading list will include W.H. Auden, Elizabeth Bowen, Daphne DuMaurier, Graham Greene, D.H. Lawrence, George Orwell, Jean Rhys, and Muriel Spark, among others. We will also think about these texts in relation to their historical and social contexts (such as the two World Wars, the rise of the welfare state, and changing class structures and gender roles over this period).

Weekly writing assignments, two essays (5 pages and 10 pages), and two exams will be set for the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 465 / MEMS 465. Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales.

Section 001 — Satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Karla T Taylor (kttaylor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales is an anthology of stories varying in style and genre, told by similarly diverse fictional narrators. Including both the stateliness of the Knight's Tale and the ribaldry of the Miller's Tale, it creates a new audience in English for a literature simultaneously playful and serious. We will read most of the Tales, paying attention to the work's qualities as an innovative story collection. Central questions will include: How does the Canterbury Tales address its audience? What is the purpose of its interpretative openness? What relations develop between literary style and social position? We will focus especially on narrative voices and the effects they create in their readers; audio tapes will help us hear these voices in Middle English.

One or two short papers, one longer paper, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 469. Milton.

Section 001 — Satisfies the pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Michael C Schoenfeldt (mcschoen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course, will be devoted to reading closely the poetry and prose of John Milton, England's greatest epic poet, amid the various intellectual and social currents of the seventeenth century. Milton is a writer with whom almost every subsequent generation of English writers has had to deal, for better and worse, and his reputation has fallen and risen as political, social, and aesthetic ideals have changed. Milton's impassioned efforts to address the ills of his day entailed contradictions that are still very much with us: he was a political activist who was willing to endorse authoritarian methods to accomplish liberal goals; he was a devout believer in meritocracy who rarely felt this belief threaten an inherited if incorrigible misogyny; he was the epic narrator of the War in Heaven who felt that military valor had nothing to do with true virtue. Milton also wrote some of the most sublime poetry available in English about the joys of the natural world, about work, about the deeply embodied pleasures of eating and sex, and about human relationships. We will be particularly interested in how Milton's political career reverberates throughout the poetry — the ways, for example, that his experience as a defender of regicide may have influenced his portrait of Satan's rebellion against a resolutely monarchical God. We will also look at how political defeat produced a radically inward reorientation of Milton's ardent political and spiritual aspirations. We will spend the lion's share of our time in an intensive reading of Paradise Lost, but will also read some of the early poetry and prose as well as Samson Agonistes and Paradise Regained.

Requirements include attendance and participation, 2 five-page essays, a midterm, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 470. Early American Literature: Key Texts.

Section 001 — Satisfies the American Literature and Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Susan Scott Parrish (sparrish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will offer you a broad introduction to the literature and intellectual history of North America from the first Spanish contacts through the period of the Early Republic. We will read, for example, the descriptions of New World nature and peoples by marvelling Spanish and English explorers and conquerors, the impassioned theological expressions of New England, narratives of captivity, conversion, and enslavement that emerged from the often violent crossing of cultures and races throughout the American colonies and around the Atlantic rim, a seduction novel, and the foundational documents surrounding the Revolution. My interest lies not in defining an American character, form or story, but in asking why certain forms emerged or were invoked and altered in response to unique historical situations.

There will be three short papers and an oral presentation.

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ENGLISH 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 001 — American Adolescence.

Instructor(s): Lisa Makman (lmakman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, students will explore the emergence of contemporary notions of adolescence in nineteenth and twentieth-century American literature and culture. Reading texts from a variety of disciplines, we will discuss ways in which conceptions of youth have changed since adolescence was first defined as a developmental stage, and we will consider factors that have conditioned these shifts. Topics to be discussed include sex and gender, working class culture, "identity crisis," rites-of-passage, and young adult literature. We will study works by writers such as Mark Twain, J.D. Salinger, Susan E. Hinton, Maya Angelou, and Sandra Cisneros alongside the work of theorists such as G. Stanley Hall, Margaret Mead, Erik Erikson, and Carol Gilligan. Films to be viewed include Rebel without a Cause and American Graffiti.

Requirements: two papers, a midterm, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 478 / CAAS 476. Contemporary Afro-American Literature.

Section 001 — The African American Novel. Satisfies the New Traditions and the American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Arlene Rosemary Keizer (arkeizer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The African American novelist Ralph Ellison wrote "I believe that true novels, even when most pessimistic and bitter, arise out of an impulse to celebrate human life and therefore are ritualistic and ceremonial at their core. Thus they would preserve as they destroy, affirm as they reject." This course explores the African American novel from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, investigating the ways in which these works "preserve as they destroy, affirm as they reject" aspects of the genre and its sub-categories (e.g., the Bildungsroman). As we examine the formal and thematic elements of the novels, we will pay particular attention to the ways in which Black folk culture, music, religious practices, and popular culture make their way into literary works. Some familiarity with African American literature and history will be beneficial to students enrolling in this course.

Course requirements include two papers and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 001 — William Carlos Williams.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will study the life, ideas, and literary works of William Carlos Williams, one of the most original and influential of the great American modernist writers. Williams is primarily known for his free verse lyric poetry, so we will spend most of our time on this work (The Collected Poems of William Carlos Williams, Volumes I and II); but we will also study Williams' work in other genres — his epic poem (Paterson ), his imaginative historiography (In the American Grain), his prose improvisations (Kora in Hell), his short stories (The Collected Stories of William Carlos Williams), his plays (Many Loves & Other Plays), and one of his novels (e.g., A Voyage to Pagany ). For help with his ideas, we will read his essays (The Selected Essays of William Carlos Williams ). For his life we will read Paul Mariani's biography (William Carlos Williams: A New World Naked ) and Williams' own account in his autobiography (The Autobiography of William Carlos Williams).

Requirements for the course will be a midterm exam on Williams' life, ideas, and artistic techniques; a short paper (5 pages) on an individual work; and a longer research paper (15-20 pages) on a more general issue in Williams' literary production as a whole.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 002 — Buddhism & Romanticism. Meets with COMPLIT 490.001.

Instructor(s): Santiago Colas (scolas@umich.edu), Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See COMPLIT 490.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 003 — Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years. Meets with RUSSIAN 479.001.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 005 — James Joyce.

Instructor(s): John A Whittier-Ferguson (johnaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a course for students who desire to be part of an intensely focused group of readers that will work its way through what has repeatedly been called the greatest novel of the twentieth century: James Joyce's Ulysses. As I trust we will all discover, Ulysses is a book that is best read in such a group. And though Ulysses will constitute the central object of our study, this course will challenge and reward you with an exploration of a great deal of Joyce's prose, including Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist, and selected poetry and essays as well. At the end of the term, we will make several brief excursions into Finnegans Wake. We will supplement our investigation of Joyce's novels with readings from a course pack containing essays (by Joyce and his critics) and excerpts from books on Joyce. The course pack should assist you in understanding the novels; it will also comprise a sampling of the enormous diversity of interpretive approaches that Joyce's work has inspired. We will spend some time studying the interpretive history that frames Joyce's prose.

Course requirements will include three essays (two five-page papers and a final, more substantial essay that's about ten pages long). Students will be responsible for generating discussion questions for the class on a course email group. The course will conclude with an unforgettable final exam. Class participation is crucial: this is not a lecture course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 006 — Morrison and Baldwin. Satisfies the New Traditions and the American Literature requirements for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Michele L Simms-Burton (mlsimms@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the novels of Toni Morrison and James Baldwin, and how their similarities and differences merge to create a rich tapestry of literature in the American and African American literary tradition. The course will question the extent to which Baldwin's narratives influence Morrison's writings. The following novels will be read: Song of Solomon, Beloved, Jazz, and Paradise, Go Tell It on the Mountain, Giovanni's Room, If Beale Street Could Talk, and Sonny's Blues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 483. Great Works of Literature.

Section 001 — Primo Levi and the Memory of Auschwitz. (Drop/Add deadline=January 26).

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Primo Levi was a Jew from Torino who survived for nearly a year in Auschwitz. His books, which deal recurrently with this experience, arguably constitute one of the major moral and stylistic projects of the twentieth century. In this course we will discuss five of them: Survival at Auschwitz, The Reawakening, The Monkey's Wrench, The Periodic Table, and The Drowned and The Saved. We will also read selections from his poems. We will examine in particular his understanding of the role of memory and remembering in constituting social experience, and observe the ways in which he confronts the problem of writing about the unspeakable.

Coursework includes several brief reading reporst (2 pages each)and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 001 — Theories of Tragedy & The Tragedies of Theory.

Instructor(s): Vivasvan Soni (vivasvan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/english/484/001.nsf

Tragedy is one of the oldest literary genres, with its roots in the democratic experiments of ancient Greece. Yet it also remains one of the most important literary genres today. Not only does it inform aesthetic production of all kinds, from movies to theater to novels, but it also shapes the way we perceive our world. We speak of a tragic life or a tragic event just as we speak of a tragic film, and the way in which we interpret "tragic" in each case transforms our perception of lived reality. At its most basic, tragedy wrestles with some of the fundamental problems of human existence: the meaning of suffering, our ethical response to suffering, our possibilities for happiness. In addition, tragedy is one of the most explicitly politicized literary genres, both formally and in terms of its thematic content. Thematically, tragedies themselves are often concerned with the relation between the individual and the community and the reciprocal responsibilities of that relationship. Formally, since tragedy is a communal ritual, the very experience of watching tragedy is a political one. Yet theories of tragedy have conceived the political possibilities of tragedy very differently, from those who find in it a nascent democratic sensibility, to those who see it as the expression of an aristocratic high culture.

In this class, we will read both classical and contemporary theories of tragedy, paying close attention to the changing ways in which theorists have understood the ethical and political value of tragedy. Not only will we develop a more sophisticated understanding of an important literary genre, but we will also acquire a familiarity with a variety of critical approaches to literature and learn how each one addresses literary problems differently. We will read some of the most important texts in the history of literary criticism (Plato's Republic, Aristotle's Poetics, Nietzsche's Birth of Tragedy ), and explore a variety of contemporary theories, such as Marxism, feminism, psychoanalysis, structuralism, postcolonial theory.

Here are some of the questions we will seek to answer by examining theories of tragedy: How does ancient tragedy differ from modern tragedy, and how is individual subjectivity conceived differently as a result? Why does tragedy come to serve as a model for modern psychological subjectivity? What is the political function of Greek tragedy, and how does this change in the modern state? Why does the tragic hero function as a model of political resistance to established norms? What are the different ways in which tragedies place ethical demands on us? Why is tragedy so much better suited to understanding complex ethical situations than moral philosophy is?

It is my hope that through this class we will become attuned to the political and social relevance of literary texts, and we will learn to be attentive to the subtle ways in which literary paradigms determine our own ethical and political responses to our world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 486. History of Criticism.

Section 001 — Post-Colonial Theory: An Introduction.

Instructor(s): David W Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Post-colonial theory brings dramatically various resources to bear on investigating the effects of European colonialism across the globe. How was colonial power exerted? How may we discern indigenous voices within colonial contexts? And how may we best conceive the manifold dilemmas of identity that continue to trouble once-colonized peoples, dilemmas that impinge on ideas of individuality, nation, religion, gender and more? Presuming no prior study in theory, this course surveys several forms of general theory — notably feminism, Marxism, psychoanalysis and deconstruction — to put us all into a position of strength when reckoning with the diversity of postcolonial approaches themselves. Our theory readings range back at least to Edward Said's 1978 work Orientalism and extend up to the present. Very active in-class engagement is expected; assignment structure is likely to be exam-heavy, with a paper option.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 496. Honors Colloquium: Completing the Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sara B Blair (sbblair@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 492, admission to the English Honors Program, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course meets once a week for an hour. It is designed to help the cohort of thesis writers with the kind of problems that are likely to arise in the late phases of thesis composition. While ENGLISH 496 is a comparatively informal continuation of ENGLISH 492, students are required to attend these sessions. The course is taught by a number of the faculty working in the Honors program, who take turns guiding each week's meeting.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENGLISH 497. Honors Seminar.

Section 001 — The Charge of U.S. Modernity. [Honors]

Instructor(s): Joshua L Miller (joshualm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior or senior standing, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we'll discuss a broad range of novels and short fiction written between 1898 and 1945 and the historical, political, and cultural trends that they were responding to and participating in. The historical framework of this course — beginning with the Spanish-American War and ending with World War II — will provide context for the novels we read. How do these authors define the "modern"? What, for that matter, is a "novel" in twentieth-century U.S. literature? How did these authors participate (and resist) the process of defining who was an "American"? How did crucial trends in technology (mass production, cinema, transportation), science (relativity), and politics influence the novelists who sought to participate in U.S. modernity? How did U.S. authors reconcile the modernist imperative to "make it new" with the history of the Americas? What are the languages of modernity?

Assigned readings may include novels by John Dos Passos, Gertrude Stein, Jean Toomer, Djuna Barnes, Ernest Hemingway, Nella Larsen, Henry Roth, and William Faulkner, in addition to shorter readings by Henry Ford, Theodore Roosevelt, Randolph Bourne, W.E.B. DuBois, Américo Paredes, Carlos Bulosan, H.L. Mencken, and other contemporaries. In the research component of the course, we'll pursue original primary source materials and discuss how to make use of them in academic argumentation.

Course requirements will include intensive reading, in-class presentations, and an extensive research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENGLISH 498. Directed Teaching.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENGLISH 499. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department


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