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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Environment


This page was created at 7:08 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



ENVIRON 111(UC 111) / GEOSCI 172 / SOC 111 / GEOG 111 / NRE 111 / AOSS 172 / ENSCEN 172. Introduction to Global Change: Human Impacts.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ben van der Pluijm (vdpluijm@umich.edu), David Ellsworth (ellswort@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit for seniors. Satisfies the geography requirement for State of Michigan certification for social studies teachers.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/globalchange2/

Instructors:
Richard Ford — Anthropology;
David Ellsworth — SNRE;
Ben van der Pluijm — Environment;
Tom Gladwin — SNRE/Business;
Vincent Abreu — AOSS.

Course e-mail: globalchange@umich.edu.

Global environmental change encompasses the rapid, interconnected changes now occurring in the Earth system — its climate, human population, resources, and ecosystems. Global Change II — Human Impacts guides students in learning about our natural world and the role of human activities in shaping and changing the environment.

Global Change II is an interdisciplinary, team-taught and web-supported introduction to the human dimensions of global change. You will study the recent, explosive growth of the human population, our impacts on land, air, and water resources, modern energy and climate policy and pressures on biological diversity, produced by recent human advances in technology and institutions. The course concludes by considering the political and policy considerations relevant to the transition to a more sustainable future.

Global Change II is suitable for all students and assumes no prior background. It can be taken without prior enrollment in Global Change I, its companion course on the physical processes. Homework and laboratories make extensive use of computers to perform spatial analysis, develop quantitative reasoning skills, help students learn to write critically, and promote personal interaction with the faculty. This course is one of three core courses required for the Global Change Minor.

Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab/discussion per week. Grades will be based on weekly lab exercises, course participation, a web poster project, midterms, and a final exam.

In Global Change II you will learn, among other topics, about:

  1. Human Population Growth
  2. Its History and Social Influences
  3. Detection of Global Environmental Change
  4. Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems
  5. Human Impacts on Resources
  6. Human Appropriation of the Earth's Energy, Water and Food Resources
  7. Energy and Climate Issues
  8. Urban and Industrial Environments
  9. Deforestation and Desertification
  10. Biodiversity
  11. Achieving Sustainable Development
  12. Economics of Development
  13. International Treaties and Government
  14. Our Common Future
  15. Models of the Future

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENVIRON 139. First-Year Seminar in the Environment.

Section 019 — Environment, Sustainability & Social Change. Meets with UC 154.001.

Instructor(s): James E Crowfoot (crowfoot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (ID). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this seminar is to begin to understand at both the global and local levels, the emerging responses to major problems resulting from unprecedented environmental changes. Initiatives to achieve future sustainability will be the focus of the seminar.

We will begin with a multidisciplinary examination of global environmental and related social changes. Focus will be on the needs of humans and other life forms, including the biophysical conditions on which life depends. Interconnections between the natural environment and social and cultural systems will be emphasized. To help develop a "global" perspective, we will identify implications of these changes for local communities, particularly in the U.S.A.

By critically examining the multiple meanings of "sustainable development" and "sustainability" and related practices, the seminar will address the emerging choices and actions for change. Emphasis will be on changes being pursued by communities, organizations, and individuals in response to growing perceptions of the unsustainability of established values and behaviors. Also, we will examine our own lifestyles in relation to achieving greater sustainability.

To understand initiatives to achieve greater sustainability in local geographical communities, we will study the topics of sustainable consumption, land use, food security and agriculture, materials use, and business and economy. Discussions of these topics will draw upon print and electronic resources, presentations by guest practitioners, and community based experiences of the seminar's members. Readings will come from a wide range of publications including core books of readings by different authors (e.g., People, Land and Community, Vital Signs 1999, and Eco-Pioneers) and articles from a variety of journals (e.g., The Futurist, Science, Resurgence, Harvard Business Review, and Co-op Quarterly).

Seminar members over the course of the academic term will select and complete a project of their choice. Each seminar member will be expected to involve herself/himself in relevant learning activities of their choice beyond the seminar and within the University as well as the surrounding community. If they choose to, students will have the opportunity to pursue and integrate into their seminar work service learning experiences related to the pursuit of sustainability. Information and other learning from these involvements will be incorporated in the seminar.

Writing assignments will include options for individual choice and utilize the forms of a journal and integrative essays expressed as op-ed articles, short research papers directed to different audiences, news articles, and book reviews. Essential parts of the seminar learning process will include thorough preparation for discussions and active participation in presenting and discussing ideas as well as in actively listening and responding to other seminar members. Assignments will be mostly individual but some will involve groups.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 239 / NRE 239. Introduction to Environmental Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William S Currie (wcurrie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: MATH 115 and ENVIRON 100. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/nre/239/001.nsf

Introduces basic methods of quantitative analysis and communication for environmental science, natural resources science, and ecology. Provides a foundation in analytical concepts, quantitative tools, and the scientific method. Laboratories will emphasize hands-on data manipulation in Excel, introductory statistics in SPSS, and basic spatial analyses in ArcGIS.

This course satisfies one of the Analytics core requirements for the Program in the Environment concentration, and serves as a prerequisite for ENVIRON 438 and ENVIRON 420.

Prerequisite: One introductory course in ecology or environmental science.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 256 / ANTHRCUL 256 / NRE 256. Culture, Adaptation, and Environment.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca D Hardin (rdhardin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores anthropological approaches to human relationships with their environments and resources. We will examine diverse conceptions of culture and nature, and time and space, and the impacts that contemporary global forces are having on indigenous societies and their ecosystems. We will be particularly interested in the relative strengths and weaknesses of materialistic and cultural analyses of human-environment relationships, and models that attempt to combine them.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 300 / NRE 300. Special Problems and Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent study covering different resource issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENVIRON 302. Topics in Environmental Social Science.

Section 001 — International Environmental Security: War and Environment. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): J David Singer (jdsinger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See POLSCI 498.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. WRITING SAMPLE & TRANSCRIPT SUBMITTED TO INSTRUCTOR FOR PERMISSION TO ENROLL..

ENVIRON 302. Topics in Environmental Social Science.

Section 002 — Environmental Public Opinion Analysis. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Paul Mohai (pmohai@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended to provide both a substantive examination of public opinion on the environment and its importance in the political process as well as an opportunity for undergraduate students to gain hands on experience with applying statistical methods for analyzing such data.

There are no prerequisities for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 302. Topics in Environmental Social Science.

Section 003 — Global Water. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Thomas E Princen (tprincen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The first half of the course deals with the substance (water, trade) and the process (negotiation). Water includes the biophysical conditions and the social determinants of increasing scarcity. The World Trade Organization (WTO) includes basic issues of trade and environment and the role multilateral institutions can/do/should play. Negotiations includes theory (from game theory to legal to interpersonal and diplomatic) and practice (one-on-one negotiating, mediating, multilateral). The second half is a multiparty negotiation, entirely in role. It concludes with a debriefing on process (negotiating dynamics, successful and failed) and substance (where does the international community go from here regarding freshwater). The course thus combines features of a seminar (readings and discussion) and a lab (simulation).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 302. Topics in Environmental Social Science.

Section 004 — Environmental Policy: A Great Lakes Case Study. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Michael Donahue, Jennifer Read

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/environ/302/004.nsf

This course introduces students to various Great Lakes issues. Students will gain an understanding the scientific and policy implications of multi-disciplinary issues, such as: invasive nuisance species; water diversion and consumptive uses; fisheries management; water quality; coastal planning; and climate change.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 304. Topics in Culture and Environment.

Section 001 — Environmental Ethics. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Rolf Bouma (rbouma@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The fact that humanity's relationship to nature has gone awry is rarely disputed, but the proposed cures are manifold. How should humans value the non-human world? Do humans have ethical duties to entities other than fellow humans?

This course investigates a variety of proposed answers that claim to better situate humans with respect to nature. Such systems include variations on anthropocentrism, including a number of e-centric cousins (ecocentrism, biocentrism, zoocentrism, etc.) as well as movements such as deep ecology and ecofeminism. Current questions and controversies will be used to highlight the alternative visions that these various philosophies offer. Also considered will be the components of personal and communal ethics that lead to changes in praxis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 310 / NRE 310. Toxicology: The Study of Environmental Chemicals and Disease.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rita Loch Caruso

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory Biology and Chemistry. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/nre/310/001.nsf

This course explores relationships between environmental chemicals and adverse human health outcomes, providing an introduction to the study of toxicology. More specifically, the course examines chemical and biological factors that determine and influence toxicity, and the role of chemical exposure in the development of specific diseases such as cancer, birth defects, and reproductive disorders.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 311 / NRE 311. Introduction to Aquatic Ecosystems.

Section 001 — Meets with NRE 511.001.

Instructor(s): Michael J Wiley (mjwiley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in biology and chemistry. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mjwiley/www311/index.html

Introduces fundamental physical/chemical/biological concepts and basic techniques necessary for the study of aquatic ecosystems. Covers physical-chemical processes, overview of aquatic fauna and flora, and surveys major types of aquatic ecosystems including rivers and streams, lakes, wetlands, oceans. Interactions between the hydrological cycle and the landscape provide the basic theme around which ecosystem presentations are organized. Laboratory sections present basic taxonomic materials during the first half of the course; during later half lab sessions will focus on field trips to representative environments and on the collection of biological specimens for required individual collections. Prerequisite: Introductory Biology/Ecology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 315 / EEB 315. The Ecology and Evolution of Infectious Diseases.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mercedes Pascual (pascual@umich.edu), Johannes Foufopoulos (jfoufop@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 100 or 162. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/environ/315/001.nsf

See EEB 315.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 333 / NRE 333. Writing About Natural Resources and Environment.

FOR SNRE STUDENTS ONLY; SHOULD BE TAKEN IN CONJUCTION WITH A REGULAR SNRE COURSE.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: junior standing and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A course taken in conjunction with regular SNRE courses by which the upper-level writing requirement is met.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

ENVIRON 361 / PSYCH 385 / NRE 361. The Psychology of Environmental Stewardship.

Section 001 — Meets with NRE 561.001.

Instructor(s): Raymond K De Young (rdeyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.snre.umich.edu/nre361/

An enduring challenges of crafting a sustainable society is to create one in which people will want to live. A restrained and austere existence may soon prove to be an ecologically necessity. It is unlikely, however, that people will eagerly pursue such a life if it is presented merely as the unfortunate necessity of survival. The issue here is how to reframe and then promote such a future so that people not only willingly accept it but actually seek it out. This is primarily a behavioral, not a political or technological, challenge. To meet this challenge, behavior change tools and strategies are developed. Emphasis is on informational and motivational means of changing behavior in a durable manner. The possibility of maintaining, or even increasing, our quality-of-life while reducing our material consumption will be addressed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 365 / NRE 365. International Environmental Policy.

Section 001 — Meets with POLSCI 379.001.

Instructor(s): Edward A Parson (parson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/nre/365/001.nsf

This course will examine the history and present status of policy-making on several prominent international environmental issues. Issues examined will include climate change, depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer, protection of endangered species and biological diversity, and long-range air pollution. The course will also examine the driving forces that contribute to global environmental burdens, the range of policy and institutional responses potentially available to manage them, the use of scientific information in informing policy responses, and the factors that distinguish international from domestic policy-making.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 370 / NRE 370 / ARCH 423 / UP 423. Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Philip D'Anieri

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/up/423/001.nsf

A comprehensive introductory course. Methods and processes in governmental planning and development of human activity systems requiring space, capital, and management components in the metropolitan environment. Major topics include: space and location planning, zoning and subdivision regulations, urban form and design, new town planning, housing urban renewal, transportation, metropolitan intergovernmental relations, comprehensive urban developmental planning, population and economic planning studies, planning techniques and methods. Emphasis is placed on recent developments and emerging problems.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 375 / ECON 370 / NRE 375. Natural Resource Economics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gloria E Helfand (ghelfand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECON 101 and 102. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ECON 471 or 472.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/nre/375/001.nsf

A one-term introduction to Environmental and Natural Resource Economics. Initial emphasis is on economic principles and analytical techniques of significance to natural resources problems. The latter part of the course emphasizes application of economic analysis to actual problems of managing natural resources both public and private. Topics include externalities, unpriced goods, cost-benefit analysis, resource scarcity, exhaustible resource depletion, renewable resource harvesting and common property problems.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 398 / NRE 398. Natural Resources Internship Program.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of faculty sponsor. (1-3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Undergraduate students, under the guidance of a faculty advisor, participate in an internship relevant to their field of study. Undergraduate students can receive 1-3 credits for internships. See the Program in the Environment in 1520 Dana Building for Internship Guidelines. Permission of Faculty Sponsor and Program in the Environment Field Placement Coordinator.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENVIRON 399 / NRE 399. Junior Honors Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Donald R Zak (drzak@umich.edu), Rosina M Bierbaum

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course starts Program in the Environment and SNRE Honors students on their research projects. During the term, students develop a topic of interest into a research proposal. This requires identifying the topic, accessing pertinent literature, finding a faculty sponsor, developing a research design, and writing a research proposal. Course readings and discussions will focus on research methodology and dissemination of research findings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ENVIRON 403 / HISTART 403 / NRE 403. History of Human Interaction with the Land.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth A Brabec (ebrabec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will survey the design and management of human settlements and their surrounding landscapes throughout history. The range of examples and sites will be viewed within the context of the cultural, political, social, and environmental forces that shaped them, and also their lingering effect on 20th-century perceptions of the landscape.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 408 / NRE 408. Wetlands Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Douglas A Wilcox

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in ecology. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course emphasizes the role of wetlands as a component of ecosystems, landscapes, and global biogeochemical cycles. The science and management of wetland ecosystems provides a framework to discuss the importance of wetlands as a sustainable resource for water quantity and quality, wildlife habitat, and preservation of natural areas.

Terminology, classification, functions, values, hydrology, biogeochemistry; biological adaptations; development, succession, vegetation fauna; habitat relationship, peatlands, Great Lakes coastal wetlands, managment and restoration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 409 / EEB 487 / NRE 409. Ecology of Fishes.

Section 001 — [4 credits].

Instructor(s): Edward S Rutherford (edwardr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in ecology. (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and lab: 4 credits). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and lab: 4 credits).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/nre/409/001.nsf

Covers physiological, behavioral, and numerical responses of fishes to biotic and abiotic factors; the relationship between environmental factors and fish energetics, growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction; adaptations of fish for survival under different environmental constraints in major habitat types.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 409 / EEB 487 / NRE 409. Ecology of Fishes.

Section 003 — [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Edward S Rutherford (edwardr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in ecology. (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and lab: 4 credits). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and lab: 4 credits).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/nre/409/001.nsf

Covers physiological, behavioral, and numerical responses of fishes to biotic and abiotic factors; the relationship between environmental factors and fish energetics, growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction; adaptations of fish for survival under different environmental constraints in major habitat types.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 414(ENVRNSTD 415) / RCNSCI 415. Science and Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan Presswood Wright (spwright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One college-level science course. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RCNSCI 415.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 418 / NRE 418. Biology and Management of Insects.

Section 001 — [4 CREDITs].

Instructor(s): John A Witter

Prerequisites & Distribution: Module 1: 2 credits; modules 1 and 2: 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3: 4 credits. (Module 1: 2 credits; modules 1 and 2: 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3: 4 credits). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. ENVIRON 418 must be elected for a minimum of 4 credits to meet the requirement for an applied ecology course, and a minimum of 3 credits to satisfy the Resource Management Requirement or be included in the REM Concentration.

Credits: (Module 1: 2 credits; modules 1 and 2: 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3: 4 credits).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Introduction to systems, problems, and current topics of the insect world. Examines relationships of insects to woody plants, other animals, their environment, and each other. Systematically and integratively examines pests of functional plant parts. Selected topics: insect structure and function, adapted features, IPM, control techniques, and insects and their impacts in a variety of ecosystems.

Course is divided into 3 modules:

  1. concepts of insect biology and management [2 credits; required of all students],
  2. interactions in three landscape ecosystems: aquatic, forest, and agricultural [1 credit; optional], and
  3. lab, emphasizing identification of insects and field trips [1 credit; optional].

Students select module 1 only for 2 credits, modules 1 and 2 only for 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3 for 4 credits.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 418 / NRE 418. Biology and Management of Insects.

Section 005 — [2-3 CREDITs].

Instructor(s): John A Witter

Prerequisites & Distribution: Module 1: 2 credits; modules 1 and 2: 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3: 4 credits. (Module 1: 2 credits; modules 1 and 2: 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3: 4 credits). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. ENVIRON 418 must be elected for a minimum of 4 credits to meet the requirement for an applied ecology course, and a minimum of 3 credits to satisfy the Resource Management Requirement or be included in the REM Concentration.

Credits: (Module 1: 2 credits; modules 1 and 2: 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3: 4 credits).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Introduction to systems, problems, and current topics of the insect world. Examines relationships of insects to woody plants, other animals, their environment, and each other. Systematically and integratively examines pests of functional plant parts. Selected topics: insect structure and function, adapted features, IPM, control techniques, and insects and their impacts in a variety of ecosystems.

Course is divided into 3 modules:

  1. concepts of insect biology and management [2 credits; required of all students],
  2. interactions in three landscape ecosystems: aquatic, forest, and agricultural [1 credit; optional], and
  3. lab, emphasizing identification of insects and field trips [1 credit; optional].

Students select module 1 only for 2 credits, modules 1 and 2 only for 3 credits, or modules 1, 2, and 3 for 4 credits.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 419 / NRE 419. Agricultural/Forest Pest Management.

Section 001 — [credits?].

Instructor(s): John Witter

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 418 or EEB 442. (1-4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Ecological basis of pest management with emphasis on components and processes of ecosystems, plant and insect herbivore relations, predator and prey interactions, parasites and host interactions, and population dynamics of insects. Fundamental principles and techniques of pest management with emphasis on predators, parasites, diseases, insecticidal and behavioral chemicals, cultural control and host resistance. Effect of insecticides of biological control systems. Current examples in pest management. Special problem assignments to meet the needs of graduate students with diverse backgrounds.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 420 / NRE 420. Principles of Geographic Information Systems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel G Brown

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 239 or graduate standing. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~danbrown/nre420/

The goals of this course are to provide a firm understanding of the issues that affect the use of GIS for application, research, and planning in natural resources. You will learn to conceptualize and implement geographic data management and analysis for research and application.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENVIRON 425 / EEB 496 / NRE 425. Population Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James Edward Breck (breck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: General ecology and calculus; and ENVIRON 438; experience with computer spreadsheets desired. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.snre.umich.edu/NRE425/index.html

A quantitative second course in ecology in which principles of population ecology (single and multiple species) are examined from both theoretical and applied viewpoints. Principles will be examined using a wide range of organisms. Many applications of population ecology will be considered, including: conservation of long-lived species, harvest optimization, biological control, biology of introduced and invading species, biodiversity, island biogeography, metapopulations, and ecological risk assessment. Computer applications will use spreadsheets and mathematical software.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 441 / NRE 441. Remote Sensing of the Environment.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan French

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 239 or upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an introductory interdisciplinary remote sensing course. Students will learn the theory, sensors, analysis methods, and applications of environmental remote sensing. Specifically students will learn fundamentals of electromagnetic radiation and its interaction with earth terrain. Students will learn:

  • sensor systems, including both optical and microwave
  • remote sensing image characteristics, measurement, and analysis methods
  • applications problem analysis to determine which remote sensing systems can supply needed data, and cost-effective approaches to environmental problem solution.

Course instructors and student groups present case studies from fields such as forestry/forest ecology, agriculture, archaeology, conservation biology, geology, mapping, ocean science, pollution detection, urban, vegetation damage, wildlife habitat assessments, and watershed ecology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 451 / EEB 451 / NRE 451. Biology of Mammals.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Philip Myers (pmyers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($75) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($75) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See EEB 451.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 457 / NRE 457. Plant Physiological Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David S Ellsworth

Prerequisites & Distribution: College-level calculus and a course in ecology (BIOLOGY 281, EEB 381, ENVIRON 330). (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/nre/457/001.nsf

Examines the physiology of plant environmental responses to understand whole-plant and ecosystem ecology. The focus is on biophysical and biochemical principles relating to plant performance in field environments. Ideas and findings from physiological ecology are applied to topical environmental problems. The laboratory emphasizes tools for investigating ecophysiology in the laboratory and in the field.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 465 / NRE 465. Environmental Decision Making in Business.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michaela T Zint (zintmich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/nre/465/001.nsf

ENVIRON 465 is an interdisciplinary course designed for LS&A, SNRE, and School of Business Administration seniors. The course focuses on the real-world intersections of business, environmental science, and human behavior and is taught through a variety of methods including: case studies, guest speakers, trips to local businesses and group projects where student teams consult to local businesses regarding the implementation of specific environmental process enhancements. In addition to assessing content knowledge, the various assignments promote specific communication skills to develop students' ability to deliver credible advice to the business community.

In addition to the group assignment, students write a case memorandum, an assessment of an environmental advertisement, and a news story regarding an environmental-business issue. The group assignment requires students to identify ways that local businesses can reduce their environmental impact while increasing their profits. In the past, several businesses have changed their practices based on students' recommendations. Some students have decided to pursue additional degrees in business or environmental/natural resource science after completing this course and have obtained internships and employment with contacts made during the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 476 / EEB 476 / NRE 476. Ecosystem Ecology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): George W Kling, Don Zak

Prerequisites & Distribution: General ecology and a 400-level course in Aquatic or Terrestrial Ecology. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/eeb/476/001.nsf

Current theories about the control and function of ecosystems, the approaches and techniques being used to test these theories, and the application of theory to the management and restoration of ecosystems.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENVIRON 499 / NRE 499. Senior Honors Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENVIRON 399. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The primary goal of the course is to carry out the Honors thesis research, with guidence and support of a faculty sponsor. Class sessions in the Winter term provide the opportunity to discuss thesis progress and problems, issues related to writing the thesis, and preparation for the final presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


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