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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Film and Video Studies


This page was created at 7:37 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



FILMVID 200. Introduction to Film, Video and Television Production.

Instructor(s): Robert Rayher (rray@umich.edu), Stashu Kybartas (skybar@umich.edu), Jennifer Hardacker (hardacke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will provide students with a basic introduction to hands-on production in film, video, and television. Pre-Production, Production, and Post-Production (from basic script form to directing to editing) are all covered, and the differences as well as the similarities of these three related media are explored.

Please note that the first class is located at the Argus Building which is located at 400 South 4th Street (Not 4th Avenue.)

Odd Section Numbers are restricted to Film/Video concentrators

Sections 001 & 002, 011 & 012 — Rayher
Sections 003 & 004, 009 & 010 — Kybartas (http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/filmvid/200/003.nsf)
Sections 005 & 006, 007 & 008 — Hardacker

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

FILMVID 230. Introduction to the Moving Image.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brian Edwards Price (pricebe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Introduction to the Moving Image" involves a first examination of the language, structures, and narratological and theoretical assumptions that reveal channels of expression in the motion picture, in public television, and in video art. It is assumed that film, television, and videography possess aesthetic languages as do other outlets of artistic expression, i.e., the display arts, music, theater, etc. The course will engage students in the discovery of those peculiar aesthetics unique to celluloid and electronic moving imagery, doing so through a process of intensive reading, visual analysis, critical writing, lecture and sectional discussions. In addition to an understanding of the value and complexity of expressive elements in these mediums, the course will examine moving image media within certain social/historical contexts, e.g., film art as political exercise (Einstein, Riefenstahl, Oliver Stone), the ascendancy of documentary from Flaherty and Lorentz to American television, narrative conditioning of American cinema through statutory and self-regulatory procedures. Students may elect "Introduction to the Moving Image" as the prerequisite course for concentration declaration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 300. Filmmaking I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stashu Kybartas (skybar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 200. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/filmvid/300/001.nsf

This is the introductory 16mm motion picture production course. This laboratory-workshop course is designed to give students a solid understanding of how film technique can be used to communicate ideas in narrative, documentary, and experimental expression. Working in small groups, students script, shoot, and edit exercises build around these three types of film. In creating their short motion pictures, students master master-shot/coverage procedures, screen direction and continuity, and artificial and available light shooting techniques. Lectures and exercise critiques engage students in theoretical/aesthetic discussions of the relationship between film idea and film form.

Evaluation: production assignments, midterm test, final project.

Text: Pincus and Ascher, Filmmaker's Handbook.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 301. Video Art I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terri L Sarris (tsarris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 200. Permission of instructor required; preference given to film and video concentrators. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to introduce students to the terminology, aesthetics, and methods of single-camera video production. Using Super-VHS video equipment, students will learn the techniques of single-camera production, including scripting, directing, shooting, and editing. Students work in small groups to design and produce video projects in a variety of styles such as short narrative and experimental documentary. Evaluation will be based on production projects and scripts, production journals, and participation in class discussion and critique. This course is designed to teach students to analyze the relationship between technique and content in video production and to allow students to explore the creative potential of the video medium. Limited to 20 students, with preference given to film and video concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

FILMVID 306(405). Computer Animation I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christopher E McNamara (mcnamart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 200, and permission of instructor. Students should have a basic working knowledge of the Macintosh platform, Photoshop, and digital video. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This digital media production course is a hands-on investigation of the Macintosh computing environment and more specifically the moving image software used to create short, animated works; multimedia projects; video and motion graphics.

Students registering for this course must come by the Film/Video main office to fill out an in-house waitlist form.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

FILMVID 310. Screenwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terry J Lawson

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 200, and completion of the introductory composition requirement. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course teaches students to write a feature-length screenplay in acceptable format. Students will learn to develop an idea first into a written "concept," then into a "treatment," "step outline," and finally into a full script. The course will focus on such subjects as screenplay structure, plot and subplots, characterizations, shots, scene, sequence, dialogue, thinking visually, and soundtrack. Students will also learn the importance of rewriting their work. As part of the process, the class will study select screenplays, then view the films which were made from these scripts. Students will also read and discuss each other's work. Given this "workshop" approach, attendance is critical. Students can expect to write between five and ten pages a week.

Students registering for this course must come by the Film/Video main office to fill out an in-house waitlist form.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 310. Screenwriting.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Jaron Odish

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 200, and completion of the introductory composition requirement. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course teaches students to write a feature-length screenplay in acceptable format. Students will learn to develop an idea first into a written "concept," then into a "treatment," "step outline," and finally into a full script. The course will focus on such subjects as screenplay structure, plot and subplots, characterizations, shots, scene, sequence, dialogue, thinking visually, and soundtrack. Students will also learn the importance of rewriting their work. As part of the process, the class will study select screenplays, then view the films which were made from these scripts. Students will also read and discuss each other's work. Given this "workshop" approach, attendance is critical. Students can expect to write between five and ten pages a week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 311. Screenwriting for Television.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elaine M Loeser

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 200 and completion of the composition requirement. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The students will write an episode of an existing one-hour television show selected by the instructor. The course covers the entire process of writing for television, from learning the structure and voice of the show, pitching stories for it, writing an extensive outline (or beat sheet) for the episode, and finally writing an authentic script in the proper format. The students are the "writer's room" for all scripts in process.

Requirements: At least two teleplays, and work at rewriting at least one of these. The class will read the teleplays and view multiple episodes of the shows being written by members of the class. Students will read and discuss each other's work. Students can expect to write the equivalent of ten pages a week.

Students registering for this course must come by the Film/Video main office to fill out an in-house waitlist form.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 320(420). Documentary Film.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark H Nornes (amnornes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/filmvid/320/001.nsf

The films to be studied in this course are selected from the spectrum of documentary film practice from the 1920s to the present. We will concentrate on specific topics as well as an historical overview. Considering the developing and shifting conception of documentary film practice, social issues, political and propagandistic values, and documenting the "Other," as well as claims to veracity and objectivity, will be treated within an analytical framework. Different approaches to production — particularly within the burgeoning ethnographic and women's film practices — will also be examined. Written assignments and term papers will be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 330(412) / ENGLISH 330. Major Directors.

Section 001 — Orson Welles, Ida Lupino, & John Cassavetes.

Instructor(s): Catherine L Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 230 or 236. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/filmvid/330/001.nsf

This course examines the careers and films of three directors who worked as "mavericks" or "independents" in relationship to the Hollywood film industry during different epochs of its development. Of special interest will be their shared background and performance in their own films as actors, as well as their concern with realism and stylistic innovation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 330(412) / ENGLISH 330. Major Directors.

Section 003 — American Comic Masters Since the 60's: Allen, Brooks, Edwards, and Ashby.

Instructor(s): Peter M Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 230 or 236. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Representative films, about half by Allen, spanning the careers of these contrasting yet complementary American masters. Emphasis on their cinematic "languages" and dramatic themes — the relationship between what they say and how they say it — and the nature of their comedy. One film per week; three lecture hours; mandatory small discussion groups. Course may be repeated if content differs from previous election.

No prerequisites, but the course is not "An Introduction to the movies." The course's reading, Giannetti's Understanding Movies, will give beginners a solid foundation. Alternate text for seasoned veterans. Purchase of a pass admits you to all screenings, all at the Michigan Theater. Rigorous writing with high standards for analytical/critical prose. Two 2-page papers; one 5-page paper; final exam. Those who insist that "media" takes a singular verb flunk.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 [includes cost of film pass] Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 360. The History of World Film.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Giorgio Bertellini (giorgiob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is required for concentrators in the Program in Film and Video Studies, but is open to all students. The course examines the rich contribution of nations other than the United States to world cinema, understanding these films both as responses to the dominant American film industry and as unique expressions of their own national cultures. The course also will discuss the influences of these national cinemas on one another as well as on American film. By focusing on a series of classic films, the class will examine German Expressionism, Soviet Cinema, French Poetic Realism, Italian Neorealism, the French New Wave, post-war Japanese cinema, as well as the cinemas of Spain, India, and Eastern Europe. Students will write midterm and endterm papers of about eight pages each and take a midterm and final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 365. Race and Ethnicity in Contemporary American Television.

Section 001 — Meets with COMM 478.001.

Instructor(s): Megan Sutherland (meghans@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 230 or 236. (3). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What forms do racial and ethnic representations take in contemporary American television? How do these forms function politically and culturally? This course addresses these questions and reviews some of the ways in which race as a category has been understood and theorized in both popular and academic discourse. We will examine these theories and explore how "whiteness," and issues surrounding notions of racial and ethnic identity have been addressed by contemporary American television in sometimes obvious and at other times subtle ways that influence the attitudes of its audiences. We will look at some early representations of race and ethnicity in television programming to create the framework for our primary investigation. The course seeks to place the forms and functions of racial representations in a variety of television contexts, including sit-coms, musical variety, drama, music videos, and news coverage.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 366. Topics in Film, Television and Popular Culture.

Section 001 — Sexuality, Society, & Censorship in Classical Hollywood Cinema.

Instructor(s): Gaylyn Studlar (gstudlar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on the tensions and opportunities created by Hollywood's systemization of moral self-regulation in the years 1930-1968. Soon after the establishment of "talking pictures" in Hollywood, the American film industry responded to public concerns about screen depictions of sex and violence by publishing a code of principles and rules to guide Hollywood filmmakers in controlling the moral content of their films. In 1934, the Production Code Administration was created to apply stricter enforcement standards of the Code when another tide of public criticism against the low standards of screen morality again raised the spectre of government-imposed censorship. In spite of protestations, censorship, and reform, box-office figures suggest that American audiences still enjoyed seeing "immorality" in its screen entertainment, and Hollywood found ways to satisfy the public's desire through "coded" depictions of sex and violence. The issue of politics was even more problematic, with populist trends in one era (such as the 1930s), coming under suspicion in years following (such as World War II). This system of self-regulation would hold sway over the Hollywood studio system until it began to break down in the 1950s under pressure of changing moral standards and the efforts of filmmakers such as Otto Preminger, Billy Wilder, and Elia Kazan.

We will cover three aspects of Hollywood representation: sexual content, political content, and violence. We will see film clips to establish the context for censorship and then explore how films presented controversial material in the 1930-1934 — so-called "pre-Code" — period, under the PCA, and as Code enforcement collapsed. Special attention will be paid to the stifling of left-wing and radical political sentiment in post-World War II Hollywood film in response to the House Un-American Activities Committee. The impact of the studio era's representational conventions on subsequent Hollywood film, including contemporary cinema, will be considered.

Films screened will likely include many of the following: The Public Enemy, Baby Face, Blonde Venus, High Noon, Angel, Bombshell, Pride of the Marines, Double Indemnity, The Maltese Falcon (1st version), The Glass Key (2nd version), The Big Heat, Baby Doll, Stormy Weather, The Miracle of Morgan's Creek, Kiss Me, Stupid, Love with the Proper Stranger.

Textbooks:
Leonard Leff, The Dame in the Kimono,
Buhle and Wagner, Radical Hollywood, and
Stephen Prince, Violence in Classical Hollywood Film.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 366. Topics in Film, Television and Popular Culture.

Section 006 — Virtuality and Digital Identity.

Instructor(s): Sheila C Murphy (scmurphy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines how identity (who we are) and identification (how we connect to representations) functions in relationship to media that is characterized as virtual. In doing so, we will consider how identity is mapped onto virtual spaces and enacted within digital media culture. We will pay particular attention to how gender, race, and class are configured in relation to virtuality. In this course, students will study "traditional" media like film and video and also analyze digital media work like websites, animations, and video games.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 366. Topics in Film, Television and Popular Culture.

Section 008 — Shakespeare on Screen. Meets with ENGLISH 317.005.

Instructor(s): Barbara C Hodgdon (hodgdonb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the phenomenon of 'Shakespeare and film', concentrating on the ranges of meaning provoked by the conjunction. We shall be looking at examples of films of Shakespeare plays both early and recent, both in English and in other languages, and both ones that stick close to conventionalized and historicized conceptualizations of 'Shakespeare' and adaptations at varying degrees of distance towards the erasure of Shakespeare from the text. The transposition of different forms of Shakespearean 'textualities' (printed, theatrical, filmic) and the confrontation with the specificities of film produce a cultural phenomenon whose cultural meanings — meaning as Shakespeare and meaning as film — will be the subject of our investigations. There will be regular weekly screenings of the films to be studied. (You must enroll in the lab section as well as the course.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 366. Topics in Film, Television and Popular Culture.

Section 010 — The Television Sitcom. Students must concurrently enroll in FILMVID 402.001 this term.

Instructor(s): Bambi L Haggins (bhaggins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course is designed to enable you to historically and culturally contextualize particular televisual texts both critically and creatively. The course will be divided into four units: each of which will focus upon the evolution and intransigence of a particular subgenre of the situation comedy. The studies component of each unit will involve the examination of the domestic, the social, the ensemble and the act-based sitcoms, respectively, in terms of how they reflect and refract contemporary American popular culture, their representations of race, gender, ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation as well as their popular and critical reception.

The writing component of the unit will build upon the critical examination by incorporating the analysis of the dramatic structure of the texts as well as efforts to replicate and/or revise the approaches used by writing staffs for the selected series.

Finally, the production component will allow you to actually direct and produce a scene from a sitcom; utilizing your knowledge of the critical and creative processes as well as continuing instruction an television production.

*Please note, students in FILMVID 366.010 must also enroll in FILMVID 402.001 this term. A waitlist form must be filled out in the main office, 2512 Frieze Bldg.

The course will meet in the LS&A Television Studio, located at 400 Fourth Street. Students should plan their schedules to allow for travel time.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 366. Topics in Film, Television and Popular Culture.

Section 011 — Cinema, Popular Culture & The Korean War. Meets with ASIAN 380.011.

Instructor(s): Hye Seung Chung (henryum@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ASIAN 380.011.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 370. Television History.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bambi L Haggins (bhaggins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course traces the development of television from the medium's historical, industrial, and technological roots in radio to the advent of new audiences, technologies, and forms in the 1990s. Addressing television as a global phenomenon, we will investigate television's institutions, structures, and programming from various perspectives in order to understand television's role in mass culture of the late twentieth century.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

FILMVID 400. Filmmaking II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Hardacker (hardacke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 300 or equivalent experience in filmmaking and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an advanced 16mm motion picture production course. The primary goal of this course is to familiarize students with dramatic film production from interpreting the screenplay through shooting, editing, and post-production. The relationship of these activities to aesthetic development being the fundament of the course, and the basis of its connection to film studies. You will have access to a state-of-the-art Panaflex 16mm camera in addition to standard production equipment. Students work in small groups to produce a substantial sync-sound final project, as well as participating in a large in-class dramatic production (collaboration with Theater and Drama students). Evaluation: participation in in-class projects, production assignments, final project.

Text: Pincus and Ascher, Filmmaker's Handbook.

Students registering for this course must come by the Film/Video main office to fill out an in-house waitlist form.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

FILMVID 402. Television Studio II.

Section 001 — The Television Sitcom, Students must also concurrently enroll in FILMVID 366.010 this term.

Instructor(s): Terri L Sarris (tsarris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 302 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course is designed to enable you to historically and culturally contextualize particular televisual texts both critically and creatively. The course will be divided into four units: each of which will focus upon the evolution and intransigence of a particular subgenre of the situation comedy. The studies component of each unit will involve the examination of the domestic, the social, the ensemble and the act-based sitcoms, respectively, in terms of how they reflect and refract contemporary American popular culture, their representations of race, gender, ethnicity, class, and sexual orientation as well as their popular and critical reception.

The writing component of the unit will build upon the critical examination by incorporating the analysis of the dramatic structure of the texts as well as efforts to replicate and/or revise the approaches used by writing staffs for the selected series.

Finally, the production component will allow you to actually direct and produce a scene from a sitcom; utilizing your knowledge of the critical and creative processes as well as continuing instruction an television production.

*Please note, students in FILMVID 402.001 must also enroll in FILMVID 366.010 this term. A waitlist form must be filled out in the main office, 2512 Frieze Bldg.

The course will meet in the LS&A Television Studio, located at 400 Fourth Street. Students should plan their schedules to allow for travel time.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

FILMVID 404. Interdisciplinary Collaborations in Visual Media.

Section 001 — Collaboration in the New Media. [3 credits]. Meets with PAT 442.001, INSTHUM 411.001, ARTDES 454.001.

Instructor(s): Christopher E McNamara (mcnamart@umich.edu), Andrew Jay Kirschner

Prerequisites & Distribution: A 300- (or 400-) level production course in the relevant emphasized area: FILMVID 300, 301, 302, or 306; and permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (1-3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/pat/442/001.nsf

See INSTHUM 411.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor/department

FILMVID 410. Screenwriting II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James S Burnstein

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 310. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will learn to cast a critical eye on their own first drafts by analyzing other class members' screenplays. Working in teams, students will break down screenplays in terms of structure, story logic, character development, character relationships, dialogue, visuals, and theme. Using feedback from their fellow students and instructor, students will strive to fix the problems in their own individual screenplays. A major rewrite and polish will be required.

Please note: A maximum of twenty students will be admitted to this course. Students will be selected based on the quality of their original screenplays and/or their Screenwriting I instructor's recommendation. Other factors being equal, preference will be given to senior concentrators in Film and Video Studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 414. Film Theory and Criticism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Johannes Eugen von Moltke (moltke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is primarily a reading course designed to provide the student with an overview of how people through the twentieth century have thought about film. Theories of cinema offer a philosophical approach to understanding film as an art form. Starting with Hugo Munsterberg and Vachel Lindsay in the 1910s, students will read a wide range of theoretical approaches as they proceed through this 100 year history.

We will compare and contrast the viewpoints of influential thinkers on film such as Eisenstein and Bazin, as well as analyze recent commentary that takes up questions regarding film as a representation of culture, as a medium for narrating stories, as a source of psychological fascination, and as a technologically unique process. This course is required for concentrators in the program, but is open to all students with some background in film. Requirements include several papers and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 414. Film Theory and Criticism.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Lucia A Saks (lsaks@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/filmvid/414/003.nsf

Students are acquainted with the canonical texts of film theory, dating from the silent period up to the latest developments in multicultural and postmodern theory. The goal is both a familiarity with key concepts and terminology, and the improvement of student's analytic abilities as they approach film from the point of view of philosophy and social theory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 423. Practicum for the Screenwriter.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert W Rayher (rray@umich.edu), Jim Burnstein, Janet Maylie

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 200, 310, and 410. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

FILMVID 423 is a collaborative course bringing together filmmakers, writers, and actors into one class to take a feature screenplay to the screen. Advanced screenwriters will provide the scripts. The filmmakers and actors will work with the writer to perfect the script for filming and then direct, act, shoot, and edit selected scenes. The entire academic term is devoted to this collaboration. The instructors will decide on the screenwriters selected for this course based on the quality of the screenplays they have written in FILMVID 427 and the production needs of this class. Permission of the instructor (Jim Burnstein, Robert Rayher). This course meets together with Janet Maylie's Acting course (THTREMUS 399.003 — Film Acting Practidum)..

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FILMVID 427. Screenwriting III.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James S Burnstein

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 310, 410, and permission of the instructor. Limited to students whose work is judged as showing outstanding potential in writing for the screen. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An Advanced screenwriting course that provides individual and small group instruction to select students who have completed basic (FILMVID 310) and intermediate (FILMVID 410) screenwriting. Students will write a final draft of a revised original screenplay and a first draft of a new screenplay.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 441. National Cinemas.

Section 001 — French Cinema.

Instructor(s): Richard Abel (richabel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 360. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers a survey of French Cinema from the Lumières in the 1890s and the Pathe-Freres' brief world dominance in the 1900s through a variety of commercial and artistic renewals (in the 1920s, 1930s, and 1960s) to the embattled period of the 1980s and 1990s. Several weeks at the beginning of the course will be synchronized with a special series of 1920s French films restored by the Cinémathèque Française and shown at the Michigan Theater.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 441. National Cinemas.

Section 003 — Nordic Cinema.

Instructor(s): Hubert I Cohen (hicohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 360. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Nordic National Cinemas will study the history of film production in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and especially Sweden, examining the social and political context and domestic audience in each country. We will trace the development of these cinemas from their origins to the golden years of film-making in the 1920s and 1930s, to film production and censorship during WWII, to the new-realism of the 1950s and 1960s, and up through the internationally successful films of recent years, noting along the way the influence of American cinema. We will focus on the most famous films of such internationally-recognized film-makers as Mauritz Stiller, Victor Sjöstrom, Carl Dreyer, Ingmar Bergman, Billie August, and Lars von Trier, as well as some nationally important film-makers such as Gustaf Molander, Gabriel Axel, Aki Kaurismaki. We will stress the idea that Nordic cinema is the cinema of five different national traditions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 460. Technology and the Moving Image.

Section 001 — Color in Film: History, Theory & Criticism.

Instructor(s): Brian Edwards Price (pricebe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 230 or 236. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the various ways in which technology has shaped the art forms of the moving image. The course traces the impact of such innovations as sound, color, and wide screen on the history of the motion picture, virtual reality, and multi-media performances. As well as studying the aesthetics of technology, this course examines the ways in which technology through art influences individual psychology and society at large.

To consider these elements motivating our future media environments, students will read a diverse range of scholars' and artists' writings and examine numerous examples of digital media as well as watch weekly film screenings. Readings and screenings will highlight historical precedents of recent developments, and examine key debates in the direction of immersive environments. By the end of the academic term, students should be able to analyze moving image production from a number of complementary points of view, all aimed at locating innovation, critical rigor, and artistic excellence in the art-technological work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 480. Internship.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concentration in Film and Video Studies. Permission of instructor required. (2). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. May not be included in a concentration in Film/Video. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is restricted to Film/Video concentrators who work, under careful supervision, in some part of the film or video industry. Students will work in some aspect of preproduction, production, or postproduction, in the creative or business areas of film and video, documenting their experiences and learning in a journal that must be submitted for final credit.

Please note; does not count towards the Film/Video Concentration

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

FILMVID 485. The Global Screen.

Section 001 — Circumnavigating the Atlantic: Cinema, Exile & Diaspora. Meets with AMCULT 498.002.

Instructor(s): Lucia A Saks (lsaks@umich.edu), Catherine Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 230 or 236 and one of: FILMVID 360, 441, 440, 442, CAAS 400, 442. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/filmvid/485/001.nsf

This course will explore transnational trends in cinematic representation by focusing on films made in different locations in, and between the territories lining the Atlantic Ocean. Co-productions between European, American, and African nations will be considered, as will films addressing the subject of exile, migration, and (post)colonial relations. The impact of movement and exchange on the construction of gendered, racial, and ethnic identities, as well as on filmmaking strategies, aesthetics, and audience reception will receive particular attention. Special screenings of new work by African and Black diasporic filmmakers will be accompanied by guest lectures.

Prior enrollment in AMCULT 351: Race and American Cinema or FIMVID 360 World Cinema recommended, but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FILMVID 489. Senior Screenwriting Tutorial.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 410 and permission of the instructor. Open to Dramatic Writing concentrators only. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is restricted to students in the Dramatic Writing concentration. Coursework consists of independent study in writing and refining a screenplay under the supervision of a faculty member.

In emphasizing a complete approach to the study, analysis, and creation of written dramatic texts, the Dramatic Writing concentration requires students to be engaged in the creation of dramatic texts intended for production and performance. This tutorial is provided as one of the options for a capstone experience for those students who choose the sequence in screenwriting within the Dramatic Writing concentration. It permits students to have the opportunity to work closely with an instructor in the process of creating a full-length screenplay.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

FILMVID 490. Senior Honors Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Acceptance as an Honors Candidate in Film and Video Studies. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of FILMVID 490, the final grade is posted for both term's elections. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is restricted to students taking Honors in the Program in Film and Video Studies. Students work independently with a faculty member in the Program on a thesis or on a film or video project during their senior year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

FILMVID 499(399). Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. Does not count toward film-video concentration requirements. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent study on a subject to be determined by student in conjunction with a faculty member. Must be approved by Program in term prior to enrollment. In exceptional cases, students can petition for enrollment during current term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

FILMVID 500. Directed Study in Film and Video.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Advanced course permitting intensive study of film and/or video subject under supervision of a Film/Video faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department


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