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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in French


This page was created at 7:16 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


Students who plan to take courses offered by the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures are strongly encouraged to familiarize themselves with our procedures for the registration process. Details can be found on the RLL website, specifically on the page entitled Overrides. We welcome and encourage student feedback throughout the registration process, which can be directed to rll.permissions@umich.edu.


FRENCH 102. Elementary French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s): Sabine Gabaron (sgabaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 101 with a grade of at least C- (Prerequisites enforced at registration). Transfer students who have received credit for one term of French must take the placement test to determine the appropriate course for their needs. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 103. FRENCH 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The sequence of FRENCH 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture that are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials.

Classes meet four hours per week. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as a final examination and speaking tests. Class participation is graded.

FRENCH 102 is only open to students who have completed FRENCH 101 at U-M with a grade of C- or higher. It is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level or another college or university. All students with prior instruction in French should take the placement test to determine the appropriate course for their needs. Details about the availability of the placement test are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

FRENCH 103. Review of Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s): Sabine Gabaron (sgabaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 102.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

FRENCH 103 is a course for students with some prior language study in French, and covers the same material presented in FRENCH 101 and 102. Entrance into the course is by recommendation of the placement exam or with the permission of the coordinator. (Information on the placement exam is available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.) Because students placed in FRENCH 103 are already familiar with some of the material, the course moves at a rapid pace. Students will need to plan on spending at least 8 to 10 hours each week preparing for daily lessons. Tests and quizzes (with both aural and written components) will be administered to check students' assimilation of the material covered in class. There will be two hourly exams, three 25 minutes quizzes, a final exam, writing assignments, and two speaking tests.

By the end of the course, students will have a good working vocabulary and strong listening comprehension skills; they should be able to express themselves in French (both in writing and orally) using most of the basic structural patterns in the language. Students will also have a general knowledge of some French-speaking cultures. Technology (multi-media, the web) will be used to aid in developing writing, reading, and listening skills as well as cultural competency. Since active participation is essential to the development of strong communicative skills, regular attendance is required and participation will be included in the final grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

FRENCH 112. Second Special Reading Course.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 — Taught in English (Reading Assignments in French).

Instructor(s): Rachael A Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 111. FRENCH 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Completion of FRENCH 111-112 does not satisfy the LS&A language requirement. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 230, 231, or 232.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Although available for undergraduates, this course is mainly geared toward graduate students from any discipline compelled by their individual departments to pass a foreign language requirement.

Offered each winter semester, FRENCH 112 exists as the follow-up class for FRENCH 111 (taught each fall semester). However, FRENCH 111 is not a pre-requisite. A sufficient knowledge of French is necessary if the student has not attended FRENCH 111, and suitability to enter the class will be at the discretion of the instructor.

Each semester begins with regular, mandatory class meetings, as we spend time finishing the text used in FRENCH 111, as well as incorporating the group translation of relevant articles treating a wide range of topics. After several weeks, students will select a substantial French article (approx. 10,000 words) that pertains directly to their specific area of study, and individual translation of this is then undertaken by the students, aided by weekly individual meetings with the instructor.

Depending on the requirements of each department, students may opt to take a language requirement exam (offered by their department) at any time, and may leave the class if they succeed. Or, students may attend for the entire term and earn a grade sufficient for completion of their program's language requirement.

Text: Stack, Reading French in the Arts and Sciences

Attendance to first section is mandatory. Class is conducted in English (texts in French). Auditors are accepted if they participate fully in class discussions and complete all homework assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 231. Second-Year French.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s): Lori McMann (lmcmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 112 or 230.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students whose last French course was NOT at UMAnn Arbor must take the placement test. Details are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/langinstruct/placementtest.html.

FRENCH 231 builds and expands upon the work done in FRENCH 101/102 or FRENCH 103. The primary goals of FRENCH 231 are to:

  • develop and refine your listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills;
  • provide you with strategies that allow you to communicate and read more effectively;
  • help you review previously learned grammatical structures and acquire new structures and uses;
  • develop an awareness of French-speaking cultures the world over, and to discover both similarities and differences between the way French-speaking people live, think, and express themselves as compared to the way you live, think, and express yourselves;
  • utilize technology to help you in your study of French and to have greater access to Francophone cultural documents.
Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of CD-ROM activities, writing exercises, and laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

FRENCH 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s): Kathleen Meyer (kemeyer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 112 or 230.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING FRENCH 232: This course description is for the non-topics sections, specificallly sections 001 through 023. Before registering, students should be aware that section 025 is a special topics section. Please read the appropriate course description below (keep scrolling) before registering.

In FRENCH 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos, and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture, and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, one composition, two tests, and a final examination.

IMPORTANT REMINDER: All students who have not taken any French language courses at U-M should take the placement exam before registering for a course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

FRENCH 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 025 — Beginning Business French.

Instructor(s): Rachael A Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 112 or 230.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This class remains part of the foreign language requirement, fulfilling the same role as a regular FRENCH 232 class. We will meet all the same linguistic goals:

  • Increase accuracy and facility in new and previously-learned vocabulary and grammatical structures;
  • Speak and write at length and with greater detail about past, present, and future events using more complex sentence structures.
  • Learn to express feelings and opinions, and feel comfortable hypothesizing on a variety of cultural issues.
  • Improve listening and reading skills, comprehending longer, more difficult authentic texts as the semester progresses.
This Special Topics course will differ from regular FRENCH 232 with regard to the content-based material. In Beginning Business French, our focus will lie in the presentation, understanding, and appreciation of the French and Francophone business world. This linguistic and cultural study will encourage the continued improvement in all aspects of communication in French, while allowing students to become familiar with details pertaining to the commercial market, management basics, banking and international trade. Specific topics particularly germane to France: unemployment, socialist society, 35-hour work week, and decentralization will also be covered. As well as the required texts noted below, students will be required to watch and comment upon the business/economic section of the French TV news each week; and read current economic/business article from newspapers/on-line journals.

Required Texts:

  • Economie et Finace by Conrad J. Scmitt and Katia Brillié Lutz (McGraw-Hill).
  • Reprise, A Complete Review Workbook for Grammar, Communication and Culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Taught in French.

Instructor(s): Yannick Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 232. Prerequisite to the concentration and academic minor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/french/235/004.nsf

This course, taught in French, deals with some of the most recent political, social, economic and cultural issues facing today's French/Francophone society. Themes are explored through readings, videos and CDs.

Its content includes:

  1. The French Republic.
  2. Europe: The European Union — The European Monetary Union.
  3. Transatlantic Relations: Franco-American Relations / Globalization.
  4. Societal Issues: Unemployment / Social Exclusions / Delinquency / AIDS.
  5. Families: Traditional / PACS / Gay Rights: Adoption.
  6. Women: Political Parity / Abortion Laws / Excision.
  7. France's Multicultural Society: Colonization / Immigration / Islam / Raï / Rap.

Your final grade is based on three oral presentations (30%), three essays (30%), several written exercises (20%) and class participation (20%).

Required texts:

  • A Course pack (Yannick Viers).
  • NTC's French Grammar (Isabelle Fournier, NTC).

Recommended text:

  • Insiders' French (Eleanor Levieux, University of Chicago Press).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

FRENCH 240. French and Francophone Topics in Translation.

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

Section 001 — French Colonialism and Its Aftermaths. Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Jarrod L Hayes (hayesj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E First-Year Seminar Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will offer an introduction to Francophone literature through a variety of works from cultures colonized by France. The regions we will study include North and West Africa, the Caribbean, and Quebec. Since this literature will be studied in translation, this course would be an ideal introduction to French postcolonial studies for those who do not read French. But since the reading list is composed of works not frequently taught, French concentrators may take advantage of the one course in English allowed for the concentration to supplement their knowledge of Francophone cultures.

Each of the regions represented by Francophone literatures experienced radically different forms of colonial rule. French exploration of North America began during the 16th century, but Quebec was lost to the British in 1763, and French settlers there were in turn colonized by the British. French possessions in the Caribbean were consolidated in the early 17th century, yet Martinique and Guadeloupe remain French departments to this very day. In 1830, France invaded Algeria, which would become its most important settler colony, and the Algerians fought a bloody, eight-year revolution for their independence, which was achieved in 1962. Tunisia and Morocco became protectorates in 1881 and 1912 and were granted independence in 1956. Though the French established a foothold on the coast of West Africa in 1659, the scramble for Africa began in earnest only at the end of the 19th century, and all countries of French West Africa had become independent by 1960.

This course will first examine the experience of colonial rule as articulated by those colonized by the French. The mere existence of such narratives is an indication of a French-style education, which elevated a minority to the status of a privileged élite but also gave this minority the tools with which to criticize colonial injustices in the colonizer's own language. We will then examine narratives that articulate the aftermath of colonization which persisted once most colonized countries achieved independence. In many cases these narratives offer a bitter critique of repressive post-independence governments that took over from the French at independence, often with France's consent. Throughout the course, special attention will be devoted to the history of slavery in the Francophone world, and the way racial differences were constructed by French colonizers (as opposed to definitions of race most Americans are familiar with). Consideration will also be devoted to the way colonialism and nationalism intersect with gender and sexuality.

Course Requirements:

There will be short papers, a midterm, a longer research paper on a work not included in the reading list for the course, class presentations, and in-class writings.

Required Texts:

  • Driss Chraïbi, The Simple Past (Morocco)
  • Simone Schwarz-Barth, The Bridge of Beyond (Guadeloupe)
  • Gabrielle Roy, The Tin Flute (Quebec)
  • Assia Djebar, Fantasia: An Algerian Calvacade (Algeria)
  • Mariama Bâ, So Long a Letter (Senegal)
  • Aimé Césaire, Notebook of a Return to the Native Land (Martinique)
  • Ahmadou Kourouma, The Suns of Independence (Ivory Coast)

This course is taught in English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 250. First-Year Seminar in French and Francophone Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 — L'Espagne romantique. Taught in French.

Instructor(s): Michèle A Hannoosh (hannoosh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 232. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/french/250/001.nsf

The French Romantics were fascinated by the image of Spain — as a setting for their works, a destination for their travels, a subject for creative invention. The "founding moment" of the Romantic movement was inextricably linked with a "Spanish" story: the riotous performance of Victor Hugo's Hernani at the Comédie française on 25 February 1830.

In this first-year seminar, we will examine the manifestations and implications of this theme in selected works by Chateaubriand, Nodier, Hugo and Mérimée. We will aim to determine what the idea of Spain may have meant not only for individual writers and for the development of French Romanticism, but also for French society of the nineteenth century more generally: for this theme had a spectacular after-life in one of the most popular and oft-performed French operas ever written, on which the course will finish — Bizet's Carmen.

This course is taught entirely in French.

Readings:

  • Chateaubriand, Les Aventures du dernier Abencerrage
  • Nodier, Inès de las Sierras
  • Hugo, Hernani
  • Mérimée, Carmen

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 — On Ignorance. Taught in French.

Instructor(s): Katherine M Ibbett (ibbett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will read a range of French texts that address questions of ignorance, naivety or stupidity. How do writers represent these seemingly negative qualities? Can there be a positive value to these traits? Is ignorance ever useful? What is the relation between ignorance and virtue? Can (or should) the reader identify with ignorance? We will read a play, a novel, and some short stories, and consider how stupidity is figured in film. Throughout the academic term, we will also work on critical reading and writing skills in French. (This is an introduction to French literature: ignorance is welcomed.)

Texts:

  • Molière, L'école des femmes;
  • Flaubert, Un cur simple;
  • Lafayette, La princesse de Clèves;
  • Modiano, Des inconnues

Film:

  • Chantal Akerman, J'ai faim, j'ai froid, and other short films

This course is taught entirely in French.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002 — Travels in French Literature.

Instructor(s): Delers (odelers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on a number of travel narratives in French literature. We will explore a wide variety of texts, from medieval romances to eighteenth century philosophical tales, "fin-de-siècle" poetry and twentieth century ethnography. More than a chronological journey through the past centuries, we will try to find out how each text articulates its own "voyage."

Among others, we will look for answers to the following questions:

  • How do travel narratives help mediate the confrontation with the Other, or with a new civilization? What types of descriptions do those narratives favor?
  • How do travel narratives and tourist accounts compare and differ?
  • Does ultra-realism do away with the ideological biases of narrative descriptions?
  • How do travels change the individual? Do geographic distances matter more than spiritual discoveries?
  • Can travel narratives be used as metaphors to reflect upon the political organization of our societies?
  • Isn't the ultimate travel the capacity to travel with words?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 274. French and Francophone Societies and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 — Islands and Identities in Francophone Literatures.

Instructor(s): Magali Compan-Barnard (mccompan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The island centrally figures into western fantasies and fears evoking notions of both paradise and isolation. The island is also a space that fosters the identity and writing of its native inhabitants. In this course we will consider the role that the island plays as myth, trope, ideal, problem, literary inspiration, and geographic reality in the formation of francophone literature. We will examine novels, plays, poems, short stories and tales that reflect upon the role of the island in the formation of Caribbean and Indian Ocean identities. Thematic questions we will consider over the course of the academic term include: How do island natives write space and write themselves within that space? How does the island get transfigured from a colonial space to a space of resistance?

A midterm paper (3 to 5 pages), oral presentations, a final paper (5 to 7 pages), and daily class participation will be required. Coursework will encourage all aspects of the writing process: Generating and organizing ideas, drafting, revising and editing the other students' work in peer groups. Texts will include Bernardin de Saint Pierre's Paul et Virginie, Aimé Césaire's Une tempete, Daniel Maximin's Une ile, une nuit, and Rabemananjara's Antsa and other poems from La Reunion, Madagascar and Mauricius.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 331. French Literature in Translation.

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

Section 001 — Letters, Gender, and the French Enlightenment. Taught in English. Meets with HISTORY 391.001, INSTHUM 311.001, & WOMENSTD 345.003.

Instructor(s): Dena Goodman (goodmand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Only one literature in translation course may be considered in the completion for the concentration requirements.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/391/001.nsf

See HISTORY 391.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 331. French Literature in Translation.

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

Section 002 — Mapping PARIS Through America and Africa. Meets with CAAS 358.006.

Instructor(s): Alain Michel Mabanckou (ambanck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Only one literature in translation course may be considered in the completion for the concentration requirements.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 358.006.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 333. French Phonetics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 — Taught in French.

Instructor(s): Helene Neu (hneu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

ADVISORY NOTE TO STUDENTS: To ensure adequate preparation for this course, all students who enroll in FRENCH 333 must have satisfactorily completed two courses taught in French beyond FRENCH 235 or RCCORE 320. Students who have not met these prerequisites may be dropped from the course after the term starts.

This course is designed to provide students with a foundation in articulatory phonetics and French phonology. Students will also learn techniques for improving their own pronunciation or for their use in teaching French to others. We will examine the physiological characteristics of individual sounds (consonants, vowels, and semi-consonants), the relationship between the meaningful sounds of French and their orthographic representations, the rules governing pronunciation of "universal" French, and the most salient features in the pronunciation of selected regional varieties of French from within France and from other parts of the francophone world. Much of the focus of the course will be on rules governing syllabification, intonation, liaison, and deletion or retention of the "mute e". Students will have opportunities to apply theory to practice in class, but most oral production practice will be assigned as independent and regular work to be done with audiotapes outside of class.

Homework for each class consists of reading theory, writing phonetic transcriptions using the International Phonetic Alphabet, analyzing phonological problem sets and oral practice with the tapes. Written homework, quizzes, a midterm, and a final written final exam will evaluate ability to use the phonetic alphabet and knowledge of basic theory.

Participation, 1-2 oral quizzes, recitation of 1-2 poems, and the final oral exam will be used to evaluate proficiency in pronunciation.

This course is taught entirely in French.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 335. Composition and Stylistics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 — Taught in French.

Instructor(s): Yannick A Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course, taught in French, focuses on textual interpretation and written production. Students acquire stylistic, narrative, rhetorical and prosodic tools indispensable in textual analysis and written activities. Course presents essential elements of stylistics, rules of essay composition, analysis of prose, poetic texts and press articles, use of monolingual and bilingual dictionaries, and rules of punctuation.

Literary readings include poems or short stories by Guillaume Apollinaire, Charles Baudelaire, Joachim du Bellay, Guy de Maupassant, Edgar Allan Poe, Arthur Rimbaud and Paul Verlaine. Literary and non-literary readings are complemented by video excerpts on painters Antoine Watteau and Edouard Manet, nineteenth century Paris, the Franco-Prussian war, the Chinese Cultural Revolution, and the pro-choice/pro-life debate. Musical recordings also present melodies by Claude Debussy, Gustave Fauré and Léo Ferré.

Final grade: Several written exercises (20%), two written tests (20%), two 5-page essays and one 5-page paper (45%), class participation (15%).

Required texts:

  • A Course pack (Yannick Viers).
  • NTC's French Grammar (Isabelle Fournier, NTC).
Recommended text:
  • Robert Micro Poche (Le Robert).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 350. Special Topics in French and Francophone Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 — 19th Century Fantastic. Taught in French.

Instructor(s): Alina M Clej (aclej@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will explore the connections between the realities of French colonialism, and its imaginary (fantastic) representations in the literature, and visual culture of the 19th century. We will study in particular the various forms taken by Orientalism, and the obsession with an exotic Other, at once seductive and repelling, in travel narratives and poetry, fashion, and the arts. From the "egyptomania" inaugurated by Napoleon's expedition in Egypt (1798-99) to the infatuation with Japanese prints ("japonisme") at the end of the 19th century, French Orientalism contributes in significant ways to what we call modern "French" culture. Although the emphasis will be on the fantastic as a genre, we shall also discuss the relation of individual writers (eg. Hugo, Nerval, Gautier, Baudelaire, Flaubert, Verlaine) to wider trends in French culture, such as Romanticism, Parnassianism, Symbolism, Impressionism.

No exams. Evaluation will be based on three papers, a brief oral presentation, and participation in class discussion. Course is taught in French.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 350. Special Topics in French and Francophone Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002 — New Voices of African Literature in the French Speaking World. Taught in French.

Instructor(s): Alain Michel Mabanckou (ambanck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides students with an overview of the history and dynamics of African Literature with the French speaking world. Since the 90's, the perception and role of literature has changed dramatically. A new generation of African and Caribbean writers has appeared with new issues. In particular, we will concentrate on these changes and why it is so important to analyze these complex issues related to immigration as part of the need to construct collective and individual identities of the "Black subject."

Required books:

  1. Bolya, La Polyandre, ed. Le Serpent à Plumes
  2. Sami Tchak, Place des fétes, éditions Gallimard
  3. Abdourahmane Waberi, Transit, ed. Gallimard
  4. Alain Mabanckou, African Psycho, ed. Le Serpent à Plumes

Films:

  1. La petite vendeuse de soleil
  2. Musique et jeunesse du Congo
  3. La vie est belle

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 367 / MEMS 377. Literature, History, and Culture of Early Modern France.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 — L'imaginaire Jaloux. The Jealous Imagination: Depicting an Unavowed Emotion. Taught in French.

Instructor(s): George P Hoffmann (georgeh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Suspicious lovers imagine scenarios, scrutinize character, and "create" scenes. Jealousy would seem almost intrinsically literary ... And reading the literature of jealousy can encourage one examine motives and second-guess intent in a way that parallels the hypotheses and deductions the jealous lover feels endlessly compelled to entertain. This painful yet profoundly imaginative experience has acted as a topic, motive, and, ultimately, form for fiction from the earliest romances to France's first "psychological" novels. Béroul, Tristan et Iseult; Lemaire de Belges, Épître de l'amant verd; Rebelais, Tiers livre; Navarre, Heptaméron; Rosset, Histoires tragiques; Shakespeare, Othello; Lafayette, La Princesse de Montpensier; Molière, l'École des femmes; Racine, Andromaque.

This course is taught in French. Four papers, short presentation, two exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 368. Enlightenment, Revolution, and Romanticism.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 — Enlightenment, Revolution, and Romanticism: Voyages in Space, Society, and Time. Taught in French.

Instructor(s): William R Paulson (wpaulson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the literature and culture of the crucial century and a half (roughly 1715 to 1851) in which France occupied the center stage of world history and its modern society and institutions came into being. Inspired by voyages to distant lands and contacts with unfamiliar cultures, writers of the Enlightenment produced a witty and disrespectful literature that criticized the customs and social structures of monarchic France and its powerful Church. Their ideas contributed — though how, and how much, is still a matter of debate — to the French Revolution of 1789, an epochal event in the creation of modern Europe. Its repercussions led succeeding generations in France to be preoccupied with history, time, loss, change, self, and art — leading themes of what came to be known as romantic literature. Readings of short prose works by Voltaire, Madame de Graffigny, Bougainville, Diderot, Rousseau, Michelet, Madame de Duras, Balzac, and Nerval, as well as brief selections from poets of the revolutionary and romantic eras.

This course is taught in French. Three short papers and one oral examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 379. Studies in Gender and Sexuality.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 — Families: Stories of Sex and Violence. Taught in French.

Instructor(s): David Caron (dcaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

If you were to choose between your family and your friends, who would you choose, and why? When is the family an oppressive structure? When is it a recourse against social and political oppression? What are the links between heterosexuality and capitalism? Is homosexuality inherently subversive? How are the private and the public spheres articulated, and for what purpose?

The focus of the course is the twentieth century and the modern family. In addition to short theoretical texts dealing with the construction of the modern bourgeois family, we will read a variety of literary texts that challenge existing models and/or propose alternative ones.

Readings: Karl Marx, Jean Cocteau, Annie Ernaux, Émile Ajar, Emile Copfermann, Hervé Guibert, Denis Lachaud.

Films: Ma vie en rose, by Alain Berliner, and additional film clips.

This course is taught entirely in French.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 391. Junior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/Independent%20Study%20Form.pdf

Independent study. Students must gain consent of the French Honors committee to enroll, a process that can take several days to a few weeks to complete. Course content is designed with a faculty advisor. Work should consist of readings of selected works from French literature, conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Details and the application form are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/concminors/indepstudy.html.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FRENCH 392. Junior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/Independent%20Study%20Form.pdf

Independent study. Requires consent of French honors committee to enroll. Students should find a faculty member to sponsor them. Class work consists of readings of selected works from French literature, conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Details and the application form are available online at www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/concminors/indepstudy.html.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FRENCH 399. Independent Study.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 235, and 2 courses numbered between FRENCH 250 and 299; permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/Independent%20Study%20Form.pdf

Readings and topical studies relating to French-speaking cultures (in Europe, Africa, North America, and Indian Ocean) not addressed in other courses, as well as to aspects of French and Francophone culture that may require special treatment.

Visit www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/concminors/indepstudy.html for detailed instructions and application.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

FRENCH 414. Advanced Business French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 — Meets with BA 415.001 and BA 415.451.

Instructor(s): Rachael A Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FRENCH 380. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in BA 415.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

During this class, we will deepen our linguistic and cultural awareness of the French-speaking business world. We will study and practice both written and spoken commercial French within their true cultural context. Themes covered during the semester will include banking, advertising, product marketing, claims and disputes, company organization and hierarchy. The mechanics of job application in French will be covered in detail, as will possible scenarios encountered once accepted into a company. Required writing assignments will concentrate on commercial correspondence, stressing the traditional nature of written business French. Oral work will include the practice of communication and integration in both formal and social business settings.

A series of business culture videos will be viewed and used as a springboard for discussion regarding the differences (both perceived and real) between business interactions in the francophone world and the U.S.

Required Texts:

  • Parlons Affaires
  • Le Français Commercial

This class is conducted entirely in French. Attendance is mandatory. No auditors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 453 / HISTART 464. Interdisciplinary Topics in French Art, Literature, and Culture.

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

Section 001 — Figuring the Artist in Nineteenth-Century France. Taught in English, but knowledge of French is desirable. Meets with FRENCH 660.001 and HISTART 771.001.

Instructor(s): Michèle A Hannoosh (hannoosh@umich.edu) , Susan L Siegfried (siegfrie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Taught in English. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/french/453/001.nsf

As nineteenth-century artists and critics became ever more self-conscious about artistic subjectivity, the visual artist emerged as an important character in novels by Balzac, Flaubert, the Goncourts, Zola and others, becoming the repository of literary fantasies and anxieties about individual creativity. This interdisciplinary course will study the artist as a social and literary phenomenon in early and mid-nineteenth century France.

The involvement of critics and writers in shaping artistic personae will be another major theme, as critics contributed to the public staging of an artist and in turn influenced artists' conceptions of their own work. We will study paintings and texts that took their audiences "inside" the artist's private world through eyewitness accounts, portraits, and images of the studio and other artistic milieux. These popularized images of artistic personalities and spaces will be compared with their fictionalized representations in novels of the period.

This course will be taught in English, but knowledge of French is desirable.

Graduate students interested in this course who wish to enroll under a graduate-level number may enroll in either FRENCH 660.001 or HISTART 771.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

FRENCH 491. Senior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (FRENCH 492), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/frenchhonors.pdf

Supervised independent study leading to the completion of an honors thesis; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

See the Honors Concentration in French section of the Romance Languages & Literatures department website for detailed information and application form.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

FRENCH 492. Senior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/frenchhonors.pdf

Supervised independent study leading to the completion of an honors thesis; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

See the Honors Concentration in French section of the Romance Languages & Literatures department website for detailed information and application form.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


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