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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in German


This page was created at 7:09 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



GERMAN 101. Elementary Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/101/Kursinformation/W04.html

GERMAN 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Few things are more fun and exciting than learning a new language for the first time, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit. The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies.

The course will include in particular a series of videotaped lectures by distinguished University of Michigan German studies faculty on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, linguistics, and literature, televised over UMTV, which will give students a taste of how they can eventually take advantage of the wide range of language opportunities at the University of Michigan, such as the specialty GERMAN 232 courses (see below) and the subsequent sequences of courses in areas of study ranging from Business and Science to Literature and Philosophy.

By the end of the term, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, Houghton Mifflin
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)

Recommended:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac)Houghton Mifflin
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 102. Elementary Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 101. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/102/Kursinformation/W04.html

GERMAN 102 is the continuation of GERMAN 101; please see above for a description of the general philosophy underlying this course. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth term. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Textbook
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez Vorsprung Workbook
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)

Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Edition
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)
  • Lovik/Guy/Chavez Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (available for IBM or Mac)

Recommended Texts for "Free Reading" [see description of "Language Learning Journal" online or in the first few pages of the course pack!]

  • Crossgrove & Crossgrove: Graded German Reader
  • Bürger: Münchhausens Abenteuer
  • Martin: Kein Schnaps für Tamara
  • Sempé/Goscinny: Asterix, Volume 1.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 103. Review of Elementary German.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test or permission of department. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100, 101, or 102.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/103/Kursinformation/W04.html

GERMAN 103 provides a review of the fundamental components of the German language for students who have had prior German language instruction before entering the University of Michigan. The course focuses systematically on all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to take advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies.

The course will include in particular a series of videotaped lectures by distinguished University of Michigan German studies faculty on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, linguistics and literature, televised over UMTV, which will give students a taste of how they can eventually take advantage of the wide range of language opportunities at the University of Michigan, such as the specialty GERMAN 232 courses (see above) and the subsequent sequences of courses in areas of study ranging from Business and Science to Literature and Philosophy. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth terms. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Required Texts:

  • Widmaier/Widmaier, Treffpunkt Deutsch 3rd Ed., Textbook, Houghton Mifflin
  • Widmaier/Widmaier, Treffpunkt Deutsch 3rd Ed., Workbook, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack. Available at Excel, 1117 South University, phone 996-1500

Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach, Melin, English Grammar for Students of German, 4th Ed. Olivia & Hill
  • Brown A Practical Guide to Language Learning, McGraw-Hill
  • Widmaier/Widmaier Treffpunkt Deutsch 3rd Ed., CD-ROM, Prentice-Hall
  • Widmaier/Widmaier Treffpunkt Deutsch 3rd Ed., Tutorial Software — Mac or IBM, Prentice Hall.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 206. Conversation Practice.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 102 or 103. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Students previously enrolled in a 300- or 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 205 or 206. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/index.html

The unwritten German class! In this course, you will dramatize everyday situations that ask for spontaneously expressing an opinion or formulating an argument. The topics that nourish our discussions are both inclusive and inconclusive: current cultural events, German etiquette, popular magazines. By cross-analyzing various resources, you will hone your conversation skills while you learn simultaneously about German cultural institutions. Although far from being exclusive, this course may address in particular those of you who are currently enrolled in GERMAN 221, 231, or 232 and those who intend to participate in the junior-year-abroad program. Graduates of previous GERMAN 305 classes are regretfully barred from this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 231. Second-Year Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 102 or 103, or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230 or 221.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/231/Kursinformation/W04.html

In this course, the four basic language skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) developed in the first year will be reviewed and extended. The course includes a selection of recent feature films such as Lola rennt, as well as a variety of shorter video clips and movie excerpts. Readings will be taken from print and online sources and will cover a variety of fields and themes ranging from popular culture, contemporary social issues and history to classical music, art, poetry, and a short text by Nietzsche. By the end of the course, students will be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, and be able to survive and hold conversations in a German-speaking country. They will be comfortable surfing the web in German, and able to read and write independently about short texts covering a wide range of topics, so that they will be able to pursue their own specific interests in GERMAN 232 and beyond. Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), regular attendance, video assignments, tests, and quizzes. Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. A $250 prize is awarded each academic term for the best final video in GERMAN 221/231.

Required Text:

  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

Recommended Grammar Text [All the grammar you are required to know is in the course pack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference that would also be helpful to you in the future, and would provide information on many topics for which we do not have enough time in the course.]:

  • Wells, Larry D. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 2nd Edition

Recommended Texts for "Language Learning Journals" [see description of "Language Learning Journal" online or in the first few pages of the course pack; more info on these books is on the main GERMAN 221/231 course page]:

  • Widmer, Uris, Liebesbrief fuer Mary, Diogenes, Zuerich
  • Brothers Grimm, Grimms Maerchen
  • Frisch, Max, Andorra, Suhrkamp
  • Rowling, J.K., Harry Potter und der Stein der Weisen
  • Brussig, Thomas, Am kuerzeren Ende der Sonnenalle
  • Carroll, Lewis, Alice in Wonderland/Alice im Wunderland, dtv bilingual edition (dtv 9244)

Other Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German 4th Edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Wells, Larry D. Arbeitsbuch (workbook with additional exercises to accompany Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, students complete the fourth-term introductory language sequence by selecting one of several "special topics" courses intended as an introduction to the study of an academic discipline, such as Music, Philosophy, History, or Science, in German. Students should emerge from the course prepared and motivated to do work (or read for pleasure) in German in this field throughout their academic career and beyond. Students are strongly encouraged to arrange their schedules so they can enroll in the section whose topic interests them the most, in order to get the maximum benefit from this course. Interest in the course content is the most effective motivation for language study, and students can emerge from GERMAN 232 with genuine pride in what they are able to do with their German. More generally, by the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard. The special topics and course requirements for this term's sections are given below.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 001 — Contemporary German Society and Business Culture.

Instructor(s): Janet K VanValkenburg (jvv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/index.html

While building a basic vocabulary and reviewing essential grammar appropriate to this level, students will be reading a variety of authentic texts dealing with such current issues as German's geographic location; Germany's recent history and the need to come to terms with its past; the reunification of "the two" Germanys and repercussions thereof in contemporary German society and business world; foreigners in German society and workplace; and the evolution of the European Union.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 002 — Contemporary German Society and the European Union.

Instructor(s): Peggy M Wunderwald-Jensen (pwjensen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

While building a topic-oriented vocabulary and reviewing essential grammar appropriate to this level, students will be reading and discussing a variety of authentic texts dealing with Germany's geography, economic situation, the situation of foreigners, the reunification of "the two" Germanys and repercussions thereof in contemporary German society. Furthermore, students will get an insight into the evolution, the decision-making process, and current issues of the European Union.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 003 — Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm: Their Lives, Scholarship and Collection of Fairy Tales.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the lives of the nineteenth-century scholars Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm and their ever-popular collection of fairy tales. The primary goal of the course will be to situate the most famous work of the Brothers Grimm into their wide-ranging scholarly interests. The course will include an introduction to their lives and scholarship. Both the intellectual motivations behind the fairy tale project and the manner in which the tales were collected will be explored in depth. The course will devote significant time to the tales themselves, including many that are not well-known in the U.S.

A wide range of materials and assignments will be employed in the course. Required texts include an edition of the tales and a course pack containing excerpts from biographies of the Brothers Grimm, passages from the Grimms' scholarly publications and personal correspondence, and exercises to improve students' reading and writing skills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 004, 005 — Mathematical Scientific German.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/german/232/004.nsf

This course serves as an introduction to the tools that are vital for pursuing further science-based work in German — practical or academic. Recently, one of the reasons why students have taken this course has been to prepare themselves for summer internships available with German companies or for study abroad in technical and scientific fields.

In addition to reading various scientific articles, we will go on excursions to the Hands on Museum, and the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, students will have the opportunity to present some fun experiments in groups; there will be an elementary math lesson (or more if the class is interested) as well as presentations by other guest speakers, etc.

In addition, we will pause along the way to consider the nature of science and the cultural values that can underlie it, as well as the ethical implications that a rapidly increasing amount of technology and knowledge has on our society today. The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. No background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations/projects, and exams.

By the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard.

Required Text:

  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition;
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 006 — Classics of German Literature.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This section offers an introduction to German literature through the reading of some of the most important texts in German (as well as world) literature. Our readings will proceed backwards, from Heiner Mueller (20th century) to Lessing (18th century), including other eminent authors like Kafka, Heine, Goethe, and Schiller.

Through these texts, we will not only deal with literary history, but also touch upon political and social developments, and central issues of German culture. In pursuit of this goal, we will read the texts at a moderate pace to allow ample opportunity for understanding their meaning and learn how to discuss them under a large variety of aspects and perspectives. This means that class participation is mandatory, and, in order to improve both speaking and writing skills in German, a fair amount of writing will be integral to the course.

Text used: Frisch, Max. Andorra.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 007 — Introduction to German Film.

Instructor(s): Dorothea M Von Herder (dvherder@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This fourth-term course provides a creative and entertaining approach to the field of Film Studies in German. Students will read articles on film criticism (English and German) as well as view and discuss German film classics of various periods and genres. In the hands-on part of the course students will shoot a short movie (10-15 min) based on a self-produced script. Workshops in shooting and editing video will be provided. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations, essays, and the script/video-project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

Section 008 — Legal German: Trials and Constitution.

Instructor(s): Carsten Hoppe (hoppec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will provide students with an introduction to German legal vocabulary and the German constitution, the Grundgesetz. The introduction to the German legal system will include comparisons to the U.S. legal system, mock trials and debates on legal issues, and discussions of trials that captured the public imagination. The course will begin with a unit on the Nuremberg trials and their impact on the framing of the German constitution. There will also be a unit on changes in the legal system in response to terrorism in the 60s, 70s and early 80s as well as after September 11.

Course materials will include background readings in English and original German documents, as well as a number of feature films and court transcripts and footage available on the world wide web.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 243. Faust.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 — Taught in English. Meets with GERMAN 499.001.

Instructor(s): Frederick R Amrine (amrine@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will begin by tracing the earliest versions of the Faust legend from the late Classical "myth of the Magus" to the sixteenth-century chapbooks. The main focus of the course shall be, however, the four central texts of the tradition: Marlowe's Tragicall History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus; Goethe's Faust, A Tragedy (both Parts; tr. Arndt); Thomas Mann's Doctor Faustus: The Life of the German Composer Adrian Leverkuhn as Told by a Friend (tr. Lowe-Porter); and Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita (tr. Glenny) and the fundamental theological, philosophical, aesthetic, and social issues as they raise. No knowledge of German required (but German concentrators will be required to read Goethe and Mann in the original).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 290. The Internet in German (LAC).

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beau D Case (bdcase@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/german/290/001.nsf

This new course is designed to offer German students an academic examination and application of the Internet. In this course, we will:

  • review German computing and related vocabulary;
  • become familiar with various useful German studies websites;
  • learn how to evaluate websites and other information resources;
  • critique websites related to German studies;
  • learn to use the website creation software, Dreamweaver;
  • study the principles of good website design and aesthetics;
  • and, for our final course project we will, in small groups, create our own meta-sites on various topics of our interest.

We will speak and write in English, but we will use German in reading of website material. Outside of class work, approximately 1 hour per week, includes: reading of handouts and brief articles; working on the final group course project; and surfing the web! Grades will be determined by: participation and attendance, a quiz or two, occasional assignments or class presentations, and the final course project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 300. German Grammar and Composition.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maike Ahrends (ahrm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course seeks to increase the accuracy of students' grammar and vocabulary through conversation, writing, and reading. The content of the course is focused on everyday life, cultural trends, and current events in Germany. Texts to be read include journalistic prose, material from the Internet, movies, and popular music. The course will also provide a systematic review of German grammar. The course is intended for students still wishing or needing a systematic review of German grammar and practice in composition after having satisfied the language requirement.

Textbook:
Martin Durrell. Hammer's German Grammar and Usage. Lincolnwood: NTC, 1997.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 300. German Grammar and Composition.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Karl-Georg Federhofer (kallimz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course seeks to increase the accuracy of students' grammar and vocabulary through conversation, writing, and reading. The content of the course is focused on everyday life, cultural trends, and current events in Germany. Texts to be read include journalistic prose, material from the Internet, movies, and popular music. The course is intended for students still wishing or needing a systematic review of German grammar and practice in composition after having satisfied the language requirement.

Recommended Text: Martin Durrell. Hammer's German Grammar and Usage. Fourth Edition. Chicago: McGraw-Hill, 2002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 306. Conversation Practice.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232; concurrent enrollment in a 300-level course is encouraged but not necessary. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Students who have previously participated in a 400-level GERMAN conversation course may not register for GERMAN 305 or 306. This course does not satisfy the language requirement. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students entering this stage of the German conversation cycle do not need to have taken GERMAN 305. This course harbors all of you who are presently or have previously been enrolled in a GERMAN 325 (or higher) course. The goal of this course is to increase your confidence in speaking on any topic. Henceforth, we will speak on any topic that relates to current cultural events. This course focuses on finding synonyms and varying the spoken styles which are necessary to fully appreciate life in German-speaking communities.

In addition, creative and compositional exercises (concocting and completing prose and poetry; writing extemporaneous letters) will alternate with impromptu conversational situations. You are expected to learn, apply, and expand vocabulary. In addition to energetic class participation and perennial e-mail contact (in German) with the instructor or/and with fellow students, short oral presentations complete the requirements.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 308. Preparation for Study Abroad.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu), Karl-Georg Federhofer (kallimz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

"Study Abroad" is especially designed for, but not limited to, students who intend to participate in the University of Michigan's Academic Year in Freiburg (AYF) program. The course will meet one hour per week. Class hours will be devoted to presentations by faculty members and former AYF students on all aspects of German university life, travel in Germany, German politics, geography, history, food, holidays, social customs, medical care, the new monetary system, linguistic and cultural diversity, and LSA requirements relating to study abroad. These presentations will be given in English.

Required are: regular attendance, active participation, and an oral presentation in German on some aspects of Freiburg. Grades will be based on preparation and participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 311. Performance Workshop in Nürnberger Fastnachtspiele.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 102 or 103. (1). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A performance workshop in 16th century German play-texts, leading to a program of Nürnberger Fastnachtspiele to be presented in mid-March (the "Carnival-in-Lent Show") The program will include two quack doctor plays by Hans Sachs (Das Narrenschneiden, 1536 and Der Schwanger Bawer mit dem fuel, 1559) together with Hans Folz' short dialogue Der Bauernhandel (c. 1495). Attention will be paid to the historical context of Carnival in Nürnberg, grotesque comedy in the Nürnberger graphic arts of the time, and the qualities of 16th century Franconian German.

GERMAN 311 is intended to expand options available for Kade residents as a way of building further community and further enhancing language skills. All students involved will be acting (in German) in one or more public performances, as well as assisting in the design and execution of the production as a whole.

Course requirements: Full participation in all workshop sessions and any extra rehearsals called. Assume a role in the production as actor or member of production team (assist. director/ props & costumes, etc.).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 322 / HISTORY 322. The Origins of Nazism.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 — Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Scott D Spector (spec@umich.edu), Kathleen M Canning (kcanning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. (4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/322/001.nsf

See HISTORY 322.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

Section 002 — German Youth Cultures.

Instructor(s): Karl-Georg Federhofer (kallimz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Love Parade, Fanta4, Crazy: Youth cultures, their terminologies and styles, develop and disappear quickly. They stress difference, creativity, and — above all — individuality. Through their multifariousness, German youth cultures and the concomitant aesthetics are loosely defined, and this facet sustains the flexible component in our class.

This course delves then into the popular forms, creative activities, and political orientations of youths within the last ten years. Encountering these specific cultural manifestations (music, film, literature), we will try to find a methodology pertinent to approach this "deutsche Besonderheit — der Mythos Jugend" (Griese). The formal requirements include readings, essays, short quizzes, engaged class participation, motivated physical and oral presence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

Section 003 — German for Engineering II.

Instructor(s): Hartmut Maria Rastalsky (hmr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce students to German engineering discourse. It is designed to prepare students for internships and jobs requiring some knowledge of technical German, and for study abroad in a technical field in a German-speaking country. Readings will be taken primarily from Wie funktioniert das? Technik heute (5th ed.). This book provides a wide range of technical information in a standardized format consisting of one page of text with a facing page of illustrations for each topic. We will watch videos produced by BMW and Opel, videos about recycling processes, etc., and we will make some use of the web. The course also will include one or two field trips and/or guest lectures by faculty from technical fields. In addition, we will spend one day taking some things apart and putting them back together again. Vocabulary building will be emphasized strongly; grammar will be reviewed as needed. There will be a lot of partner and small group work during class time, in order to maximize students' opportunities to practice speaking and to help each other master the material.

Student tasks and the instructor's expectations will be based on the assumption that the majority of students will previously have had the equivalent of four academic terms (or more) of college German. It is strongly recommended, but not required, that students have some background in Engineering. Students enrolling in the course without such a background should be open to and interested in the study of scientific and technical concepts. In particular, it is not necessary to have previously taken German for Engineering I in order to enroll in this course: German for Engineering I and German for Engineering II cover different materials and can be taken in any order.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

Section 004 — The World According to Alma.

Instructor(s): Robert L Kyes (rlkyes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

At the dawn of the 20th century, Alma Schindler was regarded as the most beautiful, talented and intelligent woman in all Vienna. As we read her autobiography, we look into the lives and works of artists, writers, composers and political figures whom she influenced, including her several spouses (Gustav Mahler, Walther Gropius, Franz Werfel) and intimate friends and lovers. We follow them through the deprivations of the Great War, the civil strife that engulfed Austria and Germany in the 30s, and try to understand how art could flourish so brilliantly in the shadow of chaos, as Vienna, the city of dreams, came to embrace German fascism. Readings from Alma's autobiography are supplemented by videos, paintings by Oskar Kokoschka, Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, musical compositions by herself, Gustav Mahler, Alexander von Zemlinski, Richard Strauss, Alban Berg, Arnold Schönberg and others, and passages from works by writers such as Georg Büchner, Franz Werfel, Heinrich Mann, Thomas Mann, Bertha Zuckerkandel and Franz Kafka. Class time is devoted to students' presentations; viewing videos and paintings; listening to songs, symphonies, and operas; discussing works by contemporary authors; and surveying the turbulent social, economic, and political events of the time. Students give at least three oral presentations in class, write a two-page essay every other week, and submit a major project at the end of the term. Grades are based on participation in class discussions, oral presentations, essays, and the final project. No quizzes, no final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

Section 005 — Modern Classics of German Literature and Film.

Instructor(s): Astrid Billes Beck (astridb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This third-year course is designed to provide students with some excellent readings in modern German literature, juxtaposed with outstanding films, and a view to modern German culture. The goal is to engage ourselves with the ideas that arise from the texts and films, to improve vocabulary, use of grammar, and to build confidence in speaking German. Authors: Rlke, Hesse, Brecht, Boerchert, and others, films such as Sonnenallee, Der Winterschläfer, Fassbinder classics and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 326. Intermediate German.

Section 006 — Friedrich Nietzsche - A Free Spirit Between Enlightenment and Vision.

Instructor(s): Joachim Jung (jojung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Although Nietzsche is one of the most quoted thinkers in western culture, his genuine philosophical concepts are often reduced to an accumulation of prejudices and catchword-reductions. This course offers an introduction into the life and the intellectual world of an amazingly versatile thinker, who was not only a philosopher, philologist and cultural critic, but also a musician, composer and poet. Indeed, the influence of his ideas during the 20th century extends to modern art, music, and literature, as well as to psychology, linguistics, and philosophical ethics. In recent times Nietzsche has even been claimed as one of the mentors of postmodernism. Closer investigations of some of his key thoughts and concepts can therefore also be helpful as tools for analyzing basic questions and developments of modern western culture. We will read selections from The Birth of Tragedy.., Untimely Meditations, Human All-Too-Human, Dawn, The Gay Science, Thus spoke Zarathustra, Beyond Good and Evil, Ecce homo.

"Der Stil soll Tanz werden" (The style should become a dance) — was one of his demands on writings (not excluding his own), and indeed, up to now Nietzsche is considered one of the most brilliant writers in the German language. Reading and discussing Nietzsche will be a challenging way for students to improve their own understanding of both the thinker and the language itself. The Course will be conducted exclusively in German and will utilize texts, audio (Nietzsche and music), video documentaries, Powerpoint presentations. In addition to regular attendance, the course requires readings, active participation in discussions, and short oral and written presentations in German.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 329. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of chairman. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent study for students who need work in a certain area to complete their degrees and are unable to acquire it from a regularly scheduled course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

GERMAN 349. Working in Germany.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peggy M Wunderwald-Jensen (pwjensen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 231. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for students planning to go on a summer internship in Germany. Students will become familiar with cultural differences between Germany and the U.S., both in everyday life and in a work environment. We will hear from other students about their experiences. We also will talk about practical issues, such as finding housing, buying a train ticket, and opening a bank account.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 350. Business German.

Section 001 — Taught in German.

Instructor(s): Janet K VanValkenburg (jvv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the language of business German and gives them insight into Germany's place in the global economy. The course is organized around major business and economic topics, such as:

  • the geography of business in German;
  • the European Union and Germany's roll therein;
  • trade;
  • traffic and transportation;
  • marketing;
  • industry;
  • money and banking; and
  • ecology.

In addition to the basic text, students will read actual business, merchandising, and advertising material; newspapers and magazines. There will also be short videos on business and related topics. There will be three major exams; a number of short reports, papers, and projects; and a final exam. The language of instruction is German.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 351. Practice in Business German.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet K VanValkenburg (jvv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Internship in a German-speaking country. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will give credit to a student for the completion of an internship in a German-speaking country.

Requirements for receiving credit are as follows:

  1. The student will complete an eight-week (minimum) internship in a German-speaking country before registering for these three credits.
  2. The student will then complete a report/paper of at least 20 typed pages in German on this experience.
    1. Part 1 of the paper will describe the location of the internship. It will include information on the geography, history, population, major industries, social structure, politics, and culture of the area.
    2. Part 2 of the paper will be a 2 3 page description of the company or organization where the internship was completed. This part will include the elements of a "company presentation": location, history, major changes and developments, industrial branch, products, present legal form, number of employees, yearly turn-over, recent developments.
    3. Part 3 of the paper will be the student's personal account of the internship experience. This part should start with a description of a typical day for the intern: work hours, the facilities, the department, typical duties and activities, superiors, support staff, and co-workers, technologies, special events. If applicable, the student will compare and contrast the working situation and work-relationships in the United States and the location of the internship, noting similarities and differences between the two. The student may also include a description of the housing, as well as pictures and descriptions of travels or other non-work related activities and other mementos of the internship.
    4. Finally, the student will include a copy of any written summary or recommendation provided by the company upon the completion of the internship, as well as copies of thank-you letters written by the student to the company/department and to the landlord.
  3. During the registered term, the student will also make a ten-minute presentation in German about the internship experience to Business German students and potential interns.

No regular class meetings are scheduled.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 382. Nineteenth to Twentieth-Century Drama.

Section 001 — Taught in German with occasional English excursions.

Instructor(s): Silke-Maria Weineck (smwei@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to German drama of the 19th and 20th centuries, reflecting aesthetic, cultural, and political shifts during the period. We will pay special attention to the role of history, science, and sex. Readings include plays by Büchner Woyzeck, Wedekind Frühlings Erwachen, Brecht Mutter Courage, and Frisch Andorra. The course is taught in German with occasional English excursions.

Requirements: two papers (~8pp), attendance, participation.

In conjunction with GERMAN 381, 383, 384, or 385, this course can be taken in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a German concentration or for a German teaching major or teaching minor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 385. Short Fiction: Naturalism to the Present.

Section 001 — Tabus: Gesellschaftskritik in der deutschsprachigen Literatur des 19. und. Taught in German.

Instructor(s): Kader Konuk (konuk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What are society's dos and don'ts? What constitutes socially and politically acceptable behavior? What can taboos tell us about the transformation of German society?

This course examines the way in which nineteenth- and twentieth-century German literature deals with taboos that disrupt or reinforce the social, political, and moral order. We look at literary manifestations of, for example, the anarchist, 'Emanze', homosexual, collaborator, whore, cannibal, 'bastard', divorcee, at the suicidal, the incestuous and polygamous. The course includes short texts and excerpts from works such as Kleist's Die Marquise von O, Grimm fairy tales, Hoffmann's Sandmann, Wedekind's Frühlings Erwachen, Freud's Totem und Tabu, Kafka's Die Verwandlung, Anna Segher's Der Ausflug der toten Mädchen, Kaschnitz' Steht noch dahin, Verena Stefan's Häutungen and Bernhard Schlink's Der Vorleser.

Taught in German, the course is designed to improve intermediate-level written and spoken German.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 406. Conversation Practice.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 305 or 306. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan or minor in German. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No katzenjammer! The final etappe in the tour de conversation will equally stress the practical and informative needs of students who may work, study, or simply live (factually or imaginatively) abroad. You will learn how to compose a résumé and how to address specific professional or academic situations. The latter fields will provide much fodder for our conversations which will also include a wide array of cultural topics in German-speaking communities.

The course aims to provide an ample range of stylistic registers and make you feel comfortable in using them. This course is restricted to students who have already completed a 300-level German conversation course and who have also reached the GERMAN 325-level course plateau. Various presentations and vigorous discussions will establish the formal requirements of this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 426. Advanced German.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Astrid Billes Beck (astridb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 325/326. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

GERMAN 426 is devoted to enhance the writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills of advanced students of German. We will use various approaches to improve your proficiency. You are expected to read newspaper articles, stories, and see films, which will serve as a foundation for compositions and discussions. Written assignments include a weekly composition of at least two pages, and a subsequent grammatic correction of the composition.

All class members are expected to give a class presentation, and lead a discussion. The final grade is based on the compositions, class presentation, and class participation. German will be used exclusively in this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 426. Advanced German.

Section 002 — Contemporary Literature, Film, and Politics and Journalism. Taught in German.

Instructor(s): Maike Ahrends (ahrm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 325/326. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will be exposed to a variety of styles of written and spoken German in order to improve their reading and listening abilities. Students' abilities to present an argument in writing persuasively and engagingly in German will be substantially improved. To this end, students will be required to do extensive writing, rewriting, and peer editing. One oral presentation is required of each student. The course will focus on Contemporary Literature, Film, and Politics and Journalism. German is used exclusively in this course. The final grade is based on the compositions as well as participation in the discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

GERMAN 430 / BA 499. Doing Business in German.

Section 001 — Taught in German. Meets with GERMAN 430.451.

Instructor(s): Janet K VanValkenburg (jvv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 350, or one 300-level courses beyond GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goals of GERMAN 430 are to increase the level of proficiency in all four areas of German (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) while expanding and expounding on particular topics and areas of interest in the German business world. In addition to becoming more competent in appropriate interactive forms and practices of the German business world, such as forms of communication, organization, and negotiation, students will also delve into such other aspects of German business as business technology, product fairs, partnership in the EU, trade, raw materials and protection of the environment, agriculture, marketing and advertisement, competition, and some very German concepts such as "Mitbestimmung" and "Berufslehre."

This course further develops the student's competence to function both knowledgably and culturally correct in a German business setting. The materials used in the course consist of a course pack, German business texts from major German professional journals and newspapers, German business reports, and videotapes. Short papers and one term research paper will be required, as well as oral reports on findings of the papers and on other topics of interest. The course is conversation-oriented, and will be conducted in German.

This term, GERMAN 430 will also include a two-week unit on producing Power Point business presentations. This unit will be offered through the computer lab in the LRC.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 432 / SOC 425. The German Model: Business, Labor, and the State in the 20th Century.

German Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 — Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Jeremy Brooke Straughn (straughn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Taught in English. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/german/432/001.nsf

In 1945, the German Reich lay in ruin, divided and occupied by its enemies and the moral pariah of Europe. By the 1960s, West Germany had developed a stable democracy, a seamless social welfare system, and the strongest economy in Europe. Meanwhile, East Germany was outperforming nearly every other Communist-led country in its hemisphere. By the 1990s, however, the heyday of the "German Model" seemed to be passing. In this course, we will address such questions as: How can we account for the rise of Modell Deutschland in the 20th century? What are the causes of the strains experienced over the last two decades? What role has reunification played? What conclusions can we draw about treating national cases as "models" to be imitated (or avoided)? This seminar is discussion-format and is designed for juniors and seniors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 455. Nineteenth-Century German Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Silke Weineck (smwei@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will read a number of seminal pieces of short prose from the long 19th century (~1780-1910), including selections from Goethe, Kleist, Eichendorff, Droste-Huelshoff, Storm, Kafka, and Thomas Mann. Of special interest will be the development of the novella, a short genre said to be organized around an unerhoerte Begebenheit a rare event of intense symbolic or historical significance. This will allow us to trace changing conceptions of history, transitions, and crises. Readings in German, discussion in German and English. Grades will be based on attendance and participation, written homework assignments, and four short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 457. Twentieth Century German Fiction.

Section 001 — New Women - New Novels. Taught in German.

Instructor(s): Kerstin Barndt (barndt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the role of literature in the history of the German women's movement. Focusing mainly on novels and short stories published in Germany since the end of the 19th century, we will look at the way literary discourses participated in the transformation of gender roles from the 1880s until 1933. By exploring heroines who could bridge the gap between the traditional woman as "angel in the house" and the as yet unrealized New Woman with full citizenship, educational, political, and sexual freedom, women writers came up with representations of femininity that could be both encouraging and disillusioning, and many of which still resonate today. To analyze the role of women's literature in articulating the New Women we will closely look at the texts themselves, as well as at their reception by contemporary feminists, other literary critics, and the growing (female) reading public. Readings, discussions, and writings will be in German; thus, the class will work on improving your spoken and written foreign language skills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 492. German Honors Proseminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frederick R Amrine (amrine@umich.edu), Kerstin Barndt (barndt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior Honors standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

GERMAN 492 can be elected only by students who have completed the Senior Honors Proseminar, GERMAN 491. In GERMAN 492, students write their Honors thesis on a topic of their own selection. Each student works under the supervision of a faculty member who has a research interest in the general area of the thesis topic. The grade is based on the quality of the thesis, which will be read by at least one faculty member in addition to the thesis director, and on the student's performance in an oral defense of the thesis before a faculty committee. An Honors citation is also awarded if the student's overall performance in GERMAN 491 and 492 is judged to be of Honors caliber.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 499. Seminar in German Studies.

Section 001 — Faust. Meets with GERMAN 243.001.

Instructor(s): Frederick R Amrine (amrine@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One year beyond GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will begin by tracing the earliest versions of the Faust legend from the late Classical "myth of the Magus" to the sixteenth-century chapbooks. The main focus of the course shall be, however, the four central texts of the tradition: Marlowe's Tragicall History of the Life and Death of Doctor Faustus; Goethe's Faust, A Tragedy (both Parts); Thomas Mann's Doctor Faustus: The Life of the German Composer Adrian Leverkuhn as Told by a Friend and Mikhail Bulgakov's The Master and Margarita (tr. Glenny) and the fundamental theological, philosophical, aesthetic, and social issues as they raise. This course is for German concentrators only, who will be required to read Goethe and Mann in the original.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Instructor


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