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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Great Books


This page was created at 7:18 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



GTBOOKS 192. Great Books.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): H Don Cameron (hdcamero@umich.edu) , Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors first-year students only. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continuation of GTBOOKS 191, from Plato to the Renaissance. We will read Plato, Symposium and Republic; Vergil, The Aeneid; selections from the Old Testament and New Testament; St. Augustine, Confessions; Dante, The Divine Comedy, Inferno, and selections from Purgatorio and Paradiso); and selections from Boccaccio. GTBOOKS 192 is open only to first-year students in the Honors Program; other students wishing to take a similar course are encouraged to elect GTBOOKS 202.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GTBOOKS 202. Great Books of the Medieval and Modern World.

Section 001 — Science and Religion in Great Books of the Western World from Ancient Rome to Modern America.

Instructor(s): Robert D Wallin (rdwallin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will read, discuss, and write about ten or so of the classics of Western literature. Written for the most part for audiences with backgrounds and expectations widely different from our own, these books have preserved their value and importance with ease. Because they force us to consider important questions and values, because they make us think about the kinds of persons we are or want to be, these books are as much our heritage as are the rules of arithmetic. I want you to become comfortable reading these books and eager to use them in forming your own education.

The theme of "Science and Religion" in the course subtitle refers to separate and distinctive ways of looking at and understanding the world. The way of philosophy and science is often said to be the Athenian or Greco-Roman perspective; the way of religion is said to be the Jerusalem or Judaeo-Christian perspective. The reality, however, as we will see, is not quite so simple. These conflicting and complementary perspectives, however, seem fundamental to the structure of the Western mind and its civilization.

We will begin with some background reading. The Roman epics of Lucretius (The Nature of the Universe ) and Vergil (The Aeneid, ), as well as the New Testament Gospel of Mark and Paul's Letter to the Galatians will serve to ground us. We then will move on to Augustine's Confessions and Dante's Inferno, and three works of the Renaissance, More's Utopia, Machiavelli's The Prince, and Shakespeare's Hamlet. From the 18th century we will read Voltaire's Candide, from the 19th Goethe's Faust, Part One, and probably Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground, and from the 20th Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby.

Our conversation about and with these greats will include about ten pages of writing in a few shortish papers, a few brief quizzes and a midterm (or perhaps two), and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GTBOOKS 204 / PHYSICS 204. Great Books in Physics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Myron Campbell (myron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See PHYSICS 204.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GTBOOKS 221 / ASIAN 221. Great Books of China.

Section 001 — Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Shuen-Fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Chinese is not required. Taught in English. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/gtbooks/221/001.nsf

An introduction to some of the books that have exerted a commanding influence on the lives, thought, culture, and literary experience of the Chinese people through the ages, and that have the power to delight or enlighten Western readers today. We will begin with a short selection from the ancient Book of Changes which represents the earliest crystallization of the Chinese mind and then extend to examine several texts in the ethical, social, and political philosophy of Confucianism; two texts in the mystical philosophy of Taoism; and Sun Tzu's The Art of War, the world's oldest, and perhaps also greatest, military text. Other readings include one wild Buddhist text about the experience of enlightenment; Monkey, a novel of myth, fantasy, comedy, and allegory; The Tower of Myriad Mirrors, a sequel to Monkey exploring the world of desire, dreams, and the unconscious; and finally The Story of the Stone, a monument in fiction, set in the last high point in premodern Chinese civilization and depicting in vivid detail its splendor and decadence. The format of the course consists of two lectures and two recitation sessions per week. Regular one-page written assignments, three brief papers (four or five pages each), and a final examination are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


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