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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies


This page was created at 7:37 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



HJCS 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew, II.

Modern Hebrew: Language Courses

Section 001, 002.

Instructor(s): Paula Weizman (pauliw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 101. (5). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continuation of the development of basic communication skills of reading, writing, and speaking modern standard Hebrew. Class drills, class discussions in Hebrew, language laboratory drills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew, II.

Modern Hebrew: Language Courses

Section 003, 004.

Instructor(s): Milka Eliav (milka@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 101. (5). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continuation of the development of basic communication skills of reading, writing, and speaking modern standard Hebrew.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 202. Intermediate Modern Hebrew, II.

Modern Hebrew: Language Courses

Section 001, 002.

Instructor(s): Doron Lamm (dlamm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 201. (5). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The focus of instruction will be on the four language skills with a continued emphasis on oral work and writing. In addition to continued study of morphology and syntax, some readings selections in fiction and non-fiction prose will be introduced.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 202. Intermediate Modern Hebrew, II.

Modern Hebrew: Language Courses

Section 003, 004.

Instructor(s): Ilan Rosenberg

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 201. (5). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The focus of instruction will be on the four language skills with a continued emphasis on oral work and writing. In addition to continued study of morphology and syntax, some readings selections in fiction and non-fiction prose will be introduced.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 270 / JUDAIC 270. Introduction to Rabbinic Literature.

Judaic Cultural Studies in English

Section 001 — Taught in English. Meets with ACABS 470.001 and HJCS 470.001.

Instructor(s): Yaron Z Eliav (yzeliav@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 470/JUDAIC 470 or HJCS 570/ACABS 570/JUDAIC 570.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The writings that comprise rabbinic literature are considered by many to be masterpieces of the ancient world (on a par with the Bible, New Testament, and the Classical Literature). This course will explore the history and substance of these writings on three levels. First, we will situate the rabbinic enterprise within a broader cultural, historical, and religious context. Second, we will examine the various genres that constitute rabbinic literature and get acquainted with the sages, an élite group of Jewish intellectuals, who created this corpus during the Roman and Byzantine periods. Finally, we will trace the gradual process in subsequent generations that shaped these texts to their current format and endowed them with their unique status. Readings for the course (which all include English translations) will introduce us to the complex world of the sages and help us understand the dynamics that shaped their literary venture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 296 / JUDAIC 296 / RELIGION 296. Perspectives on the Holocaust.

Judaic Cultural Studies in English

Section 001 — Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Elliot K Ginsburg (elgins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/hjcs/296/001.nsf

A study of the Holocaust as a historical event and its impact on Jewish thought and culture. We first survey the historical context: the European Jewish community on the eve of the destruction, and the events leading up to and culminating in that destruction. We then will focus on inner Jewish (and gentile) reactions to the Holocaust, and broader philosophical and ethical implications. We ask: What are the problems (moral, emotional, conceptual) in reading and writing about the Holocaust? What are its implications for those of us who come "after"? The course is also a meditation on visions of the Other, on ethnic-religious hatred, tolerance, and healing. Course materials include memoirs, poetry, fiction, psychological literature, as well as conversations with survivors. Take-home midterm; final exam; 5-8 page paper; journal.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HJCS 302. Advanced Hebrew, II.

Modern Hebrew: Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shachar M Pinsker (spinsker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 301. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a continuation of the Hebrew sequence comprising the second term of the third-year Hebrew class. (Participation in HJCS 301 offered in the previous term is not required if the student is at the advanced level.) The focus will be on developing proficiency in all five languages skills, as well as a deeper and more intimate knowledge of Hebrew and Israeli culture and literature. Student participation is an essential part of the course. Readings will include poems and short works of fiction, as well as journalistic and academic texts. This will be supplemented by other media including music, video, recordings, readings, etc. Students' grades will be determined on the basis of assignments, participation, and a final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 373 / JUDAIC 373. Israeli Culture and Society.

General HJCS

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Tsoffar (rtsoffar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The objective of this course is to introduce students to both the Israeli culture and the complexity of studying it. It explores the formation of modern Israeli culture since the beginning of Zionist immigration to Palestine, although its emphasis is the contemporary Israeli situation by examining historical, literary, folkloric, and other artistic expressions. Modern Israeli culture was created through the revival of Hebrew as a national language, the reinterpretation of traditional Jewish symbols and rituals, the development of a strong collectivist ethos, the creation of a national heroic lore. Subsequently, we will focus on the invention of youth culture and its importance to the creation of collective ideology, the role of archaeology and pilgrimages in biblical geography, the creation of an Israeli national Jewish calendar, or the invention of Israeli folk dance, singing, and food cultures.

The material selected for this course includes a wide range of works reflective of different directions in the history of Israeli culture. Such works include those by and about the Zionist pioneers, the second generation of immigrants to Israel, Holocaust survivors, women, Sephardic/Mizrahi Jews, and Palestinians. Films, music, and slides as well as guest lectures will supplement the readings for the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HJCS 395. Directed Undergraduate Readings.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HJCS 470 / ACABS 470. Reading the Rabbis.

Jewish Literature and Culture in Hebrew

Section 001 — Meets with JUDAIC 270.001 and HJCS 270.001.

Instructor(s): Yaron Eliav (yzeliav@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 202. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 270 or JUDAIC 270, or HJCS 570/ACABS 570/JUDAIC 570.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed as a graduate level introduction to rabbinic literature, a multifaceted corpus produced by Jewish scholars (known in English as Rabbis) from 1st to the 7th century CE. It provides the necessary information for contextualizing the rabbinic project historical, social, cultural, and religious backgrounds as well as mapping of the various genres represented in this literature. In addition, it offers a first hand encounter with the texts in their original language as well as introduction to the most important scholarly trends in the field. As such, the course is geared toward advanced students of Judaism who wish to gain basic knowledge of the rabbis and their literary endeavor as well as those interested in any aspect of Graeco-Roman or Byzantine civilization and wish to work with rabbinic material. Students will attend all meetings of "Introduction to Rabbinic Literature" (HJCS 270; JUDAIC 270). In addition, the seminar will meet every two weeks, during which we will engage in an in-depth study of rabbinic sugyot in the original language and discuss modern scholarship and theory on rabbinic literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 491. Topics in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies.

Jewish Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 — Politics and Culture in Hebrew Literature: Ethnicity and Gender. Taught in English. Meets with JUDAIC 317.003 and WOMENSTD 483.005.

Instructor(s): Ruth Tsoffar (rtsoffar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This upper-level/graduate seminar approaches gender, sexuality, ethnicity, and class as categories of difference that participate in the wider production of Israeli culture. We will look at fictional works and films, conceptualizing ways in which gender and ethnicity compete, conflicted, and negotiate with the historical and modern Israeli national narrative and the way these recent works shift historical Zionism to a post national, global discussion.

We will closely look at the ways Israeli writers and film-makers address general questions about hegemonic language, discursive space, author legitimacy, ethnic mapping and self-representation, as they challenge and approximate the canon and the general Sabra notion of the homeland.

The reading, in translation, includes works by writers such as Ronit Matalon, Shimon Ballas; the poetry of Miri Ben Simhon, Yona Wallch or Sami Schetrit; music by Zehava Ben, or films by David Ofek and Buzaglo. As an interdisciplinary course on culture, this course's research, methods, and debates draw on economic, historical, and sociopolitical context of Israeli culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 491. Topics in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies.

Jewish Literature and Culture in English

Section 002 — From Bible and Midrash to Modern Hebrew Literature. Taught in English. Meets with Judaic 317.001.

Instructor(s): Shachar M Pinsker (spinsker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See JUDAIC 317.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of HJCS 498, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HJCS 543 / ACABS 543. The Bible in Jewish Tradition.

Judaic Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Philo of Alexandria. An advanced knowledge of Greek is required.

Instructor(s): Gabriele Boccaccini (gbocca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ACABS 543.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

HJCS 577 / JUDAIC 467 / RELIGION 471. Seminar: Topics in the Study of Judaism.

General HJCS

Section 001 — Zohar: The Book of Enlightenment.

Instructor(s): Elliot K Ginsburg (elgins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/hjcs/577/001.nsf

The focus of this course will be the Zohar (the so-called Book of Enlightenment or Splendor) surely the central (and mostly rich evocative) work of Spanish Kabbalah. This voluminous work, written in sonorous neo-Aramaic, betrays an artist's sense of language. Avoiding rigid categorization, the Zohar likes to speak of divinity and other "secrets" in fluid terms of light and water: flashing sparks, deep wells, springs, and flowing rivers. At once a "narrative" recounting the spiritual adventures of wandering heroes and a mystical "midrash' on Torah, the Zohar attained a sort of canonical status from the 15th century onward.

Our study of the Zohar will focus on its historical placement, including its relation to currents in Christian and Islamic mysticism, and in philosophy; and with regard to social concerns of the day. We will also explore the riddle of its authorship (not only who composed it, but how was it "written": amid the so-called "circle of the Zohar"). The core of the seminar will focus on ways of reading/decoding the Zohar. Themes to explore include kabbalistic images of the divine and of the natural world; the recasting of devotional practices and ritual innovation (including Shabbat practices; sacred eating; and Zohar's impact on popular piety); its critique of certain regnant Jewish practices: its view of language and Torah; the rich (and sometimes bizarre) symbolization of masculine and feminine; the struggle with Evil and the Other; and its relationship of Messianism. Our textual study will be informed by contemporary scholarship, including three works on the Zohar (by Daniel Matt and Arthur Green) that will be appearing only this fall! While students may rely on English translation, I will make ongoing references to the neo-Aramaic/Hebrew original, as well.

Pre-requisites: it is strongly recommended that students either have prior background/coursework in Jewish Mysticism or other Jewish textual traditions, or have undertaken significant (university) study in other religious, contemplative or philosophical traditions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


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This page was created at 7:37 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.


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