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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History


This page was created at 7:55 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



HISTORY 111. Modern Europe.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jonathan L Marwil (jmarwil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HISTORY 110 is recommended as prerequisite. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Had Europeans in 1700 had access to a time-machine they might have felt more comfortable visiting their Roman ancestors than coming to see their descendants today. This course will try to demonstrate why. We will survey the transformations in European society and culture in the last 300 years, examining not only familiar agents of change (war, revolution, technology) but some that are less often discussed (novels, photography, film). We will examine as well how Europeans tried to shape the lives of peoples in other parts of the world and how in turn those peoples returned the favor. Finally, we will consider the very notion of "Europe" and "Europeans," and how they evolved over an era of shifting alligiances and identities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 160. United States to 1865.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregory E Dowd (dowdg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/160/001.nsf

This course surveys the truly colonial origins and early development of the United States. The troublesome concept of nationalism, rising once again as a major force throughout the world today, lends the course an organizing principle. Beginning with the convergence of various cultures--Native American, European, and African--along the Atlantic seaboard in the sixteenth, seventeenth, and eighteenth centuries, the first half of the course explores the emergence of a culturally diverse nation with a contested political constitution. The second half of the course explores the problem of American nationhood through examinations of slavery, social conflict, immigration, sectional division, and near self-destruction in the Civil War. Throughout, it will examine ordinary and extraordinary lives and events.
Format: The course consists of three separate but interweaving strands: lectures, readings, and discussion. Read the textbook to gain background knowledge for the lectures, the more specialized readings, and the discussions. Much of what you read and hear will be interpretive and subject to challenge. In the discussion sections you should grapple openly with the issues raised in the lectures and the readings.
Grading: You will write a mid-term examination (25%) and a final examination (35%). These will draw on the lectures and the readings. You will also write a paper based on an assigned topic (25%). Your general participation in the discussion sections will account for some 15%.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 161. United States, 1865 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David John Fitzpatrick (fitzd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is the second half of the basic, introductory survey of American history. It addresses the development of the American nation from the end of the Civil War to the present day. The focal point of the course is the changing nature of the concept of freedom during this period. In this context the course will examine the evolution of the United States from an agrarian nation with little concern for foreign affairs to the world's preeminent power with self-defined global interests. This examination necessarily will focus on the lives of individual citizens; the transformation of the labor force and the workplace; and the role played by race, ethnicity, class, and gender in determining one's place within the greater society. In so doing the course will investigate the era's major reform movements as well as the reasons for and reaction to the nation's increased involvement in international affairs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 001 — The History of Witchcraft in the Early Modern Period.

Instructor(s): Valerie Ann Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Attitudes toward witchcraft prove to be extremely revealing as a way to understand early modern society, community structure, gender relations, intellectual and religious attitudes, and legal culture. The phenomenon of witchcraft has produced an enormous array of modern reactions, ranging from historical and anthropological analyses, to satanic and feminist revivals of witchcraft practice, to popular, sensationalized novels and movies.

This course is designed to expose students to the wide variety of mystical, political, literary, historical, and anthropological approaches taken toward the subject of witchcraft. Students will read and interpret trial records, diaries, sermons, and modern popular and scholarly works, from the fifteenth-century Hammer of Witches to The Wizard of Oz . Geographically, material ranges from Salem, Massachusetts, to Russia. Requirements: participation in weekly lecture and discussion sections, oral presentations, several short papers, and a longer research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 002 — Epidemics: Deadly Disease in American History.

Instructor(s): Martin S Pernick

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

From smallpox to AIDS, dramatic disease outbreaks both shaped and were shaped by American culture. This course explores how medicine and culture intersected to influence the causes, experiences of, and responses to epidemics in America; and it uses epidemics to illuminate the history of American society from colonization to the present. Lectures introduce new topics and summarize discussions. Discussions will explore past perceptions and compare past and present; we will not discuss the present apart from the past. Readings (4 to 5 hours weekly) include modern histories, plus old newspapers, films, and medical journals. Written assignments are two five-page book review papers, a short weekly journal, and an individual research project with parts due throughout the term. They will introduce you to the medical, graduate, and undergraduate libraries. Readings available only for purchase cost about $30; other required readings available on reserve or for purchase cost about $130 more.

Course pack available from Dollar Bill at Michigan Book and Supply.

Readings:

  • Crosby, Columbian Exchange (Greenwood)
  • Rosenberg, Cholera Years (Chicago)
  • De Kruif, Microbe Hunters
  • Brandt, No Magic Bullet (Oxford)
  • Gould, A Summer Plague (Yale)
  • Garrett, The Coming Plague (Penguin)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 003 — Criminal Responsibility in Anglo-American History.

Instructor(s): Thomas A Green (tagreen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar deals with several fundamental issues in Western civilization as they have manifested themselves in the Anglo-American past: the requisites for criminal guilt; the means of determining whether one possesses those requisites (typically, the criminal trial); and the most common justifications for imposition of punishment (retribution, deterrence, and reform). We shall study these matters in relation to two central ideas of freedom: political liberty and human free will. Special attention will be given to: the history of the jury as a "buffer" between the state and the individual or the community; the manner in which challenges to the presumption that humans possess the ability freely to control their behavior have shaped the institutions and ideas of Anglo-American criminal justice. Students will analyze and discuss primary sources and recent historical writings and will write several short papers.
The following required books are available at Shaman Drum.
-The Salem Witch Trials by Peter Hoffer
-Fictions in the Archives by Natalie Davis
-On Crimes and Punishment by Cesare Beccaria
-The Trial of the Assassin Guiteau by Charles Rosenberg

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTORY 197. First-Year Seminar.

Section 001 — Vienna, Berlin, Paris 1890-1930.

Instructor(s): Rudi P Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

When, where, and how does our age begin? Before Vienna the unconscious was an object of wonder; before Berlin the cinema was a charming toy; before Paris music and art made sense. Within the orbits of these great cities, before, during, and after World War I, our world was created at the hands of extraordinary men and women.

This seminar explores the literature, art, music, cinema, — the culture of an age in a flurry of creation and destruction, using the similarities and differences of the cities as center. Students will work on projects of their own choosing: some examples from the past have included the self-portraits of Picasso, the war in the air, Hollywood as an outpost of Europe, women's work in wartime, sports photography as a social indicator, — there are many possibilities.

Required Readings:

  • Bertold Brecht, Three Penny Opera
  • Albert Einstein, Autiobiography
  • Siegmund Freud, Dora
  • Otto Griedrich, Before the Deluge
  • Frank Whitford, Klimt.

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HISTORY 197. First-Year Seminar.

Section 002 — The Christian Experience-Early, Medieval, Modern: A Comparative Introduction to Ethics, Worship, and Community.

Instructor(s): Matt Herbst (matth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The two millennia of Christian experience reveal a great diversity of approaches to ethics, worship, and community. Can we connect these disparate images into a common thread of Christian experience? This class will provide a comparative introduction to this problem by listening to such voices as: 2nd Century Christians executed by the Romans, late antique bishops who exercise great wealth and power, medieval reformers struggling against "tradition," 17th Century Puritans building the "new Jerusalem" while murdering dissenters, and a 20th Century preacher in a Birmingham jail. We will listen to their voice through sermons, letters, and other writings and we will also enter into their visual world by examining the art and architecture that shaped their experience. We will consider their views on: What Christians should do in the face of injustice and social-ills? How are Christians to relate to believers and non-believers? Should Christians oppose the state or stay out of "the world"? How should Christians worship? How did a "Church" look in the different periods? What does "Church" even mean? What, if anything, connects the early, medieval, and modern Christian Experience? Are they even the same religion?

Readings:
-Meeks, Wayne A. (1986). The Moral World of the First Christians. Philadelphia: The Westminster Press. Introduction, Pages 11-17; Chapter 2, "Great Traditions," pp. 40-64
-Constantelos, Demetrios J. (1968). Byzantine Philanthropy and Social Welfare. Chapters 1-3, Pages 3-41.
-Gager, John G. (1975). Kingdom and Community. The Social World of Early Christianity. Chapter 5, "The Success of Christianity," pp. 114-148
-1st Century: Didache
-2nd Century: Ignatios of Antioch Justin Martyr Irenaeus.
-5th Century: John Chrysostom
-7th Century: Life of John the Almsgiver Life of John the Almsgiver, http://www.fordham.edu/halsall/basis/john-almsgiver.html
-14th Century: Athanasios, Patriarch of Constantinople Life in Christ
-16th Century: George Fox????
-19th Century: Charles Grandison Finney
-20th Century: Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Life Together

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTORY 201. Rome.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Raymond H Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A survey of Roman history from the consolidation of the Roman empire in the second century B.C. to the rise of its political heirs in the Mediterranean world in the eighth century A.D. Topics to be discussed include Rome's overseas expansion; the administration of a large empire; the impact of Christianity; the conversion of Constantine; heresy and the imposition of orthodoxy; barbarian kingdoms; Justinian's reconquest; the rise of Islam; and the coronation of Charlemagne as a revived Roman emperor.

Readings will include many ancient texts in translation and some modern scholarship. Final grade is based on two tests, frequent written exercises, and participation in discussions. No prerequisites; everyone welcome.

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HISTORY 205(122) / ASIAN 205. Modern East Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James Lee (jql@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/205/001.nsf

The course offers an introduction to modern East Asia through a survey of Chinese history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Using lectures, readings, visual materials, writing, and discussions, our goal is to understand the dramatic changes that have radically reshaped Chinese society, economy, politics, and culture during this time. This year, we will pay special attention to China's many nineteenth century crises, to the shifting course of revolution and revolutionary politics in the early and mid twentieth century, and to the equally revolutionary transformation of China during the last quarter-century. No prior familiarity with China and the Chinese language is assumed.
Textbooks include:
1.Jonathan D. Spence, The Search for Modern China. (New York: Norton, 1999)
2.Mao, Zedong, Selected works
3.James Lee and Wang Feng, One Quarter of Humanity: Malthusian Mythology and Chinese Realities, 1700-2000. (Cambridge, Ma.: Harvard University Press, 1999)

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HISTORY 211 / MEMS 211. Later Middle Ages, 1100-1500.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Patrick James Nold

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/211/001.nsf

This course will investigate the institutional, economic, and intellectual development of Europe from the opening of the second millennium through the fourteenth century. Some important themes will be the nature of kingship and representative institutions; patterns of urban, economic, and demographic growth; and movements in religious and intellectual life. Extensive readings from contemporary documents (chronicles, romances, poetry, sermons, etc.), a midterm, a final examination, and two short papers are required.

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HISTORY 218. The Vietnam War, 1945-1975.

Other History Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David R Smith

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore the origins of colonialism and the rise of the Cold War to understand the political, economic, and military conflicts that contributed to the outbreak of war in Vietnam after 1945. This course will not focus exclusively on American involvement in the war, but rather will attempt to portray a broader international perspecitve of this conflict. With several decades of massiveeconomic, political, and military turmoil, it must be recognized that the Vietnam War brought an overwhelming amount of human tragedy and displacement. Accordingly, this course will attempt to both understand the policy decisions that led to war in Vietnam and, importantly, put a human face on the war — both for those from Vietnam (and surrounding nations) and those from the United States.

Along with informed participation in discussion section, all graded work required in this course will consist of written compositions, including two exams and a short paper.

Required readings for the course may be purchased at Shaman Drum Bookshop, 313 S. State:

  • Stanley Karnow, Vietnam: A History
  • George C. Herring, ed. The Pentagon Papers
  • Bao Ninh, The Sorrow of War: A Novel of North Vietnam
  • Graham Greene, The Quiet American
  • Eric M. Bergerud, Red Thunder, Tropic LIghtning: The world of a Combat Divison in Vietnam
  • Le Ly Hayslip, When Heaven and Earth Changed Places

      Course Pack (available at Dollar Bill, 611 Church St.)

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 229 / ANTHRCUL 226. Introduction to Historical Anthropology.

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): David E Pedersen (pedersen@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      See ANTHRCUL 226.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

      HISTORY 247(448) / CAAS 247. Modern Africa.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Jean-Herve Gilbert Jezequel

      Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 200 recommended. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

      R&E

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/247/001.nsf

      No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 255. Gandhi's India.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Nita Kumar (nitak@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: HISTORY 206 recommended. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This is a course that explores Modern India and M.K. Gandhi through the lens of several different analytical perspectives. Whether we use modernist, Marxist, psychoanalytic, feminist, or cultural discursive methodology decides what questions we will ask and what answers we might hope to find or be satisfied with. It will also decide our terminology and our sources, that is, our basic assumptions and the limits we are setting to our knowledge. In this course, therefore, we will study Gandhi: his biography,ideas, practices, successes and failures. We will also use Gandhi as a tool for the doing of History. We will read a dozen books and major articles each with a different interpretive approach, and the reviews of these. Then we will work with some fiction on Gandhi, his own writings, and contemporaries' writings, towards a critical paper on "the methodologies of writing on Gandhi." This critical work will, hopefully, include the further question: Is "Gandhi" or "Modern India" a particularly elusive topic? Does the topic require an approach that might perhaps have to be forged, beyond the existing approaches as we can identify them?

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      HISTORY 260 / AMCULT 260. Religion in America.

      U.S. History

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Susan M Juster (sjuster@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: HISTORY 160 and 161 are recommended but not required. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This is a one-term introduction to the study of American religion from colonial times to the present. The emphasis will be on religion as a cultural system rather than as a set of formal beliefs or institutions. We will explore

      • the European roots of American religious forms;
      • the rise of revivalism as a major cultural force in colonial and nineteenth-century America;
      • the commercialization and fragmentation of religious life after the American Revolution;
      • the place of women in the major religious traditions;
      • the synthesis of African, Native, and Christian belief systems and the rise of the Black church as a political force;
      • the emergence of fundamentalism on the political stage in the twentieth-century; and
      • the wide diversity of sectarian beliefs in all eras of American history.

      Students will read a variety of texts, and write several short papers as well as a longer, research-based paper. A midterm and final exam are required.

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      HISTORY 274 / CAAS 230. Survey of Afro-American History I.

      U.S. History

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Julius S Scott III (jsscott@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      See CAAS 230.001.

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      HISTORY 287 / ARMENIAN 287. Armenian History from Prehistoric Times to the Present.

      Section 001 — Taught in English.

      Instructor(s): Gerard J Libaridian (glibarid@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      "Armenian History from Prehistoric Times to the Present" explores the role of dynastic families and the nobility as well as intellectual élites and the Church in the rise and fall of different forms of Armenian statehood, from ancient and medieval kingdoms to the republics in the twentieth century. The course will cover successive political and economic systems throughout Armenian history as well as recent debates on domestic and foreign policy choices and their relationship to political parties and the Armenian Diaspora.

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      HISTORY 302. Topics in History.

      Section 002 — History of Jewish Women.

      Instructor(s): Phyllis Mack

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      In this course we examine the images, roles, and creativity of Jewish women from the medieval period until today, with special attention to issues of spirituality, the body and sexuality, and women's activities in work and politics. What do Jewish traditions tell us about the relation of women to God, to prayer and liturgy, and to the quest for social justice? What was the historical relationship between formal religion and daily life? What changes occur in the modern period, and how are Jewish women continuing to shape their own traditions?

      The course will meet weekly and part of each discussion will be the paragraphs evaluating the readings that students post on the course 'bulletin board.' Students will also be required to present material from the readings in class. In addition, there will be two term papers, a shorter one (5-7 pages) due mid-semester, and a longer 7-10 paper due at the end of the course.

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      HISTORY 319. Europe Since 1945.

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Dario Gaggio (dariog@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/319/001.nsf

      This course examines the social, economic, political, and cultural history of the European continent (East and West, South and North) from the end of WWII to the present. The lectures will be organized both chronologically and thematically. A course like this cannot aim at exhaustiveness, and some important topics in national histories will not be covered. We will focus instead on transnational events and movements that affected the lives of Europeans across the boundaries of the single nation states. As a rule, particular national cases will be discussed mostly as examples of general patterns and processes. We will deal with a wide range of sources (from monographs and scholarly articles to movies, memoirs, and works of fiction) in our attempt to move beyond the level of state policies and capture the meanings of events for the historical actors who lived through them. Topics will include the politics of the Cold War, the Stalinization of Eastern Europe, the process of European integration, the advent of mass consumption, protest movements in capitalist and socialist countries, and the fall of communism after 1989 and its consequences.

      Readings:

      • Wegs and Ladrech, Europe Since 1945. A Concise History;
      • Peter Schneider, The Wall Jumper;
      • Franz Fanon, A Dying Colonialism;
      • Angelo Quattrocchi and Tom Nairn, The Beginning of the End: France, May 1968;
      • Peter Maas, Love Thy Neighbor;
      • Katherine Hayter, Open Borders;
      • Slavenka Drakulic, Café Europa;
      • Course packet

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      HISTORY 322 / GERMAN 322. The Origins of Nazism.

      Section 001 — Taught in English.

      Instructor(s): Scott D Spector (spec@umich.edu), Kathleen M Canning

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. (4). (HU). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

      R&E

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/322/001.nsf

      This course explores the origins and the outcomes of the Nazi seizure of power in Germany in 1933. Because no single factor can explain why Germans consented to Nazi rule or why so few resisted Nazi persecution and genocide, we will take a multi-layered approach to this question, examining the relationships among and between political, cultural, social, and economic change. The first half of this course explores the vibrant culture and fractured politics of the Weimar Republic (1918-1933), which was deeply marked by the first World War. Our study of Weimar captures the hope and optimism that underpinned its culture and politics, but also explores how and why the Nazis emerged from this very culture to assault and dismantle it. In the second half of the course we examine the ideologies and practices of the Nazi "racial state" and the forces that drove it into war and genocide. Students will examine the blurry lines between consent and dissent, complicity and resistance in the everyday lives of both perpetrators and victims of the regime. Finally, we will investigate the connections between racial persecution and the war of conquest launched by the Nazis in 1939.

      Team-taught by two professors from History and German, course materials will include not only texts, but also film, art, literature, and personal memoirs from the Weimar and Nazi periods.

      Format: two lectures, one discussion per week. Requirements include midterm, final, and occasional short response papers.

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      HISTORY 326. Modern Italy: 1815 to Present.

      Section 001 — Taught in English. Meets with ITALIAN 359.001.

      Instructor(s): Dario Gaggio (dariog@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/326/001.nsf

      This course examines the history of Italy from 1815 to the present. Modern Italy has been a laboratory for the social and political change of western Europe. Nationalism, fascism, and social democracy have found in Italy an ideal terrain for their conceptual and historical development. We will focus on the process of national unification, on the strategies implemented by the post-unification governments to forge a national identity, on the politics of fascism, and on the contradictory nature of the Italian democracy in the post-W.W.II decades. A variety of media (historical texts, works of fiction, and films) will provide an introduction to the complex and often dramatic history of the Italian people. Moreover, an interdisciplinary perspective will allow us to go beyond the level of state policies to explore the profound transformation of Italian society and culture over the last two centuries.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 331(439). Eastern Europe Since 1900.

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Brian A Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course will explore the dramatic history of northeastern Europe (understood to include the territory now delineated by Poland, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, and Hungary) from 1918 to the present day. The people of this region experienced glorious moments such as the birth of independent nation-states after WWI and the overthrow of communism in 1989, but they have also suffered through decades of oppression by regimes of both the right and the left. Most horrifically, they stood at the very center of the mid 20th century's violence, enduring the full terror of WWII, the Shoah, and Stalinism. Multimedia presentations will help students visualize the lifestyles of the region's ethnically and religiously diverse population, the unspeakable nightmare of war and mass murder, and the gray (but not necessarily black-and-white) realities of communism.
      Course requirements include two take-home essay projects and an in-class midterm and final.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 2

      HISTORY 333 / REES 396 / SLAVIC 396 / POLSCI 396 / SOC 393. Survey of East Central Europe.

      Section 001 — The Political Economy of Transformation in Eastern Europe.

      Instructor(s): Katherine M Verdery

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397. Laboratory fee ($10) required.

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/317/001.nsf

      See REES 393.001.

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      HISTORY 336 / CAAS 336 / WOMENSTD 336. Black Women in America.

      U.S. History

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Michele Mitchell (mmitch@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      See CAAS 336.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 344 / RCSSCI 344. The History of Detroit in the 20th Century.

      U.S. History

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Stephen M Ward (smward@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

      Theme Semester

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      See RCSSCI 344.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

      HISTORY 348(477). Latin America: The National Period.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 001 — Meets with HISTORY 478.001.

      Instructor(s): Fernando Coronil (coronil@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

      R&E

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/348/001.nsf

      This course examines the history of Latin America from the early nineteenth century until the present. The approach is chronological and thematic. A temporal narrative will be organized around these themes: (1) state formation, including forms of political rule and the construction of collective identities at local, national, and continental levels; (2) élite and popular relations, including cases of rebellion, revolution, and state repression; and (3) forms of capitalist development and transformations in class relations, ideologies of economic development, and center-periphery linkages. The discussion of individual countries and of specific topics will be intertwined throughout the course. Classes will combine lecture and discussions. Students are required to read the assigned materials BEFORE each class and are encouraged to participate in class discussions. Written work will involve a short essay, a longer paper, a midterm, and a final. Readings will include relevant sections from a textbook, and articles, monographs, novels, short stories, newspapers and films, some of which will be selected in response to class discussion and students' interests.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 352(550). Imperial China: Ideas, Men, and Society.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Chun-Shu Chang

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This is a systematic analysis of state, society, people, and ideas in Imperial China from 221 B.C. to the end of the 18th century. Each dynasty or period is examined by its characteristic development and unique features. The following topics are to be covered:

      1. the concept and structure of empire;
      2. emperors and political culture;
      3. great thinkers, influential political leaders, and powerful rebels;
      4. wars and foreigners;
      5. Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism;
      6. class, gender, and race;
      7. writers, literature, and the structure of feeling;
      8. science and technology; and
      9. eating culture, art of entertainment, and daily life.

      Special features of the course include reading of Classical Chinese poetry, singing of Peking opera, and discussion of the Scientific Revolution and the birth of "Modern China" in the 17th century. The course is open to all undergraduates.

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      HISTORY 357(392). Topics in African History.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 001 — Conflict and Violence in Africa. Meets with History 595.001 and CAAS 358.002.

      Instructor(s): Jean-Herve Gilbert Jezequel

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 359. Visions of the Past.

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Jonathan L Marwil (jmarwil@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course rests on the proposition that most of what most people have ever known about the past has come from deliberated aesthetic forms such as monuments, paintings, novels, and films. Many more Americans have read or seen Gone With the Wind than have ever read a history of the Civil War; films like Schindler's List have been the primary means by which Americans and Europeans have conceptualized the destruction of European Jewry. This course, therefore, will examine how and why history is represented in the various aesthetic forms, and how those representations have created our sense of what is important in history. We shall read a half dozen novels and plays, see several films, look at a variety of art and architecture, and listen to several musical forms. Classes will be lecture and discussion, and there will be one or two papers besides a midterm and final.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 371 / WOMENSTD 371. Women in American History Since 1870.

      U.S. History

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/371/001.nsf

      This course will examine how social constructions of gender, race, class, and sexuality have shaped women's lives in the U.S. from the Civil War to the present, and how some women have pushed at the boundaries of those constructions through, for example, changing patterns of work, leisure, education, and intimacy; through political activism; through labor organizing; through involvement in a variety of social movements; and through popular culture. We will emphasize the diversity of women's historical experiences by region as well as by social category, and will situate those experiences in the larger contexts of social, economic, and political change on local, national, and even global levels. Requirements include a midterm, a final, and a paper, as well as active participation in discussion sections. Films will be shown.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 374 / AMCULT 374. The Politics and Culture of the "Sixties."

      U.S. History

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

      Theme Semester R&E

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/374/001.nsf

      See AMCULT 374.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 375 / WOMENSTD 375. A History of Witchcraft: The 1692 Salem Trials in Historical and Cross-Cultural Perspective.

      U.S. History

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Carol F Karlsen (ckarlsen@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      An exploration in both history and women's studies, this course focuses on early modern European and Euro-American witchcraft beliefs, representations, accusations, and trials. It addresses three central, interrelated questions: (1) what caused the Salem witchcraft outbreak of 1692? (2) why were most witches in Christian witchcraft traditions presumed to be female? and (3) how can we account for the transformations in witch imagery from the seventeenth century to the present. There are no definitive answers to any of these questions, only a variety of attempts by scholars and other writers to answer them. We will read and analyze some of the most influential of these attempts, evaluating their merits in light of both other interpretations and the original witchcraft documents. Students will develop and write about their own conclusions in several short papers and one long one, basing their arguments on evidence provided in the readings and course lectures. Please be advised that while the history of witchcraft is a fascinating subject, it is also a complex and therefore intellectually demanding one; though no prerequisites are required, regular attendance and intellectual engagement with the readings and discussions are necessary to do well in the course.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 378 / AMCULT 314. History of Asian Americans in the U.S.

      U.S. History

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Scott T Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/amcult/314/001.nsf

      See AMCULT 314.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 382 / MEMS 382. History of the Jews from the Spanish Expulsion to the Eve of Enlightenment.

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Stefanie B Siegmund (siegmund@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/382/001.nsf

      This course will survey major trends in Jewish history in European and Mediterranean lands from c. 1450 to c. 1700. The themes of this course include: developments in Jewish communal structure, familial structure; the question of "marrano" or converso identity; the relationship of Jews and Judaism to the Catholic Church and to the events and ideas of the Reformation; the economic, political, and theoretical relationship between the Jews and developing European states and the Ottoman empire. Specific topics to be addressed include: the impact of the expulsion of the Jews from Spain and Portugal; the emergence and spread of Lurianic Kabbalah; the development of the ghetto in the Italian states; the emergence of Jewish mercantile communities in Northern Europe and in the "New World"; the "court Jews"; male and female expressions of Jewish piety and folk-religion; the Sabbatian movement; and rabbinic authority. Readings will include two seventeenth century Jewish autobiographies (of Leone Modena, a Venetian Rabbi) and of Gluckl of Hameln, a Jewish merchant woman of Hamburg); an early modern printed work describing the customs of the Jews of Italy, and other primary sources and selections from recent scholarship. Prerequisites: none, but Judaic Studies 205, History 110 or History 381 are advised.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 391. Topics in European History.

      Section 001 — Letters, Gender, and the French Enlightenment. Taught in English. Meets with FRENCH 331.001, INSTHUM 311.001, & WOMENSTD 345.003.

      Instructor(s): Dena Goodman (goodmand@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/391/001.nsf

      The eighteenth century has variously been described as the epistolary century, the Age of Enlightenment, and the century of women. In this course we will explore the French eighteenth century as these three dimensions intersect in the writings of the period. Readings will include such major Enlightenment works as: Montesquieu, The Persian Letters, Voltaire, Letters on England, Graffigny, Letters of a Peruvian Woman, Diderot, Letter on the Blind, Rousseau, La Nouvelle Heloise, and Laclos, Dangerous Liaisons, as well as letters by Voltaire and Julie de Lespinasse. All readings will be in English translation, although students with a reading knowledge of French are welcome to do any or all of the readings in French.
      Questions to be explored include: How do writers use the epistolary form to express or shape Enlightenment values and ideas? What relationship is there between letters as a form of writing and Enlightenment as a way of thinking and acting in the world? How is gender as a theme expressed in Enlightenment epistolary writing? What do the different roles of women and men in these texts suggest about Enlightenment views of gender? What can we learn about different understandings of the Enlightenment's promise for women from comparing epistolary texts written by women and men?
      Expectations for student work:
      1) To keep up with and be prepared to discuss weekly readings in seminar. Preparation will include weekly postings to coursetools discussion page.
      2) To lead class discussion once over the course of the semester and write a brief report on that discussion.
      3) To write 2 papers 5-page paper at mid-term based on course readings 12-15 page term paper that draws on readings outside the course. Students with a reading knowledge of French will have an opportunity to use their skills to draw upon a wider range of epistolary materials for this assignment.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 391. Topics in European History.

      Section 002 — Ethnic Minorities Central Europe. Meets with HISTORY 591.002.

      Instructor(s): Rita C-K Chin

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course examines the shifting meanings and histories of ethnic minorities in Central Europe over the past 250 years. Its prime focus is the interactions between German-speaking peoples and the numerous ethnic groups within the Habsburg Empire (Hungarians, Czechs, Serbs, Croats, etc.), as well as Jews, Poles, Turks, and Afro-Germans.

      The course uses two key analytical frameworks for thinking about ethnic minorities in this part of the European continent. The first, Central Europe or Mitteleuropa, complicates our conventional image of Germany as an ethnically homogeneous society. By broadening the geographic scope, the course draws attention to the specificity of the place itself, an area where competing empires (Napoleonic, Habsburg, Ottoman) overlapped and cross-pollinated. We will consider how different empires dealt with ethnic minorities and how minority status often shifted depending on one's territorial location.

      The second framework for the course is nationalism. We will examine how the construction of nation-states, as well as the drawing and re-drawing of borders, played an important role in determining minority status. The course focuses on specific moments — the 1848 revolutions, the unification of Germany, World War I, the Third Reich, and Reunification — which radically altered the definition of who would be included and excluded as part of the "nation."

      The format of the course will be a mixture of lecture and discussion. Course requirements include a map quiz, two exams, and a short paper.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 392(392). Topics in Asian History.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 001 — Women's Lives in Twentieth Century China: From the Personal to the Political. Meets with History 392.001.

      Instructor(s): Zheng Wang (wangzhen@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      See WOMENSTD 344.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 393(393). Topics in U.S. History.

      U.S. History

      Section 001 — U.S. Intellectual History Since 1940.

      Instructor(s): Genter

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. Laboratory fee required.

      Credits: (3).

      Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course is an interdisciplinary exploration of the major intellectual and cultural developments in American life since 1940. We will explore how political shifts, industrial growth, and social change have affected the ways in which American intellectuals and artists have thought about such traditional topics as identity, subjectivity, political and social equality, race, gender, and democratic participation. In particular, we will examine the ambiguous development of the "self" in the late twentieth century — how political and cultural changes have altered our understandings of individual identity and expression. Topics include: existentialism, modernism, critical theory, abstract expressionism, the Beat movement, the New Left, feminism, postmodernism, and queer theory. Readings include works by Jack Kerouac, Richard Wright, Herbert Marcuse, Adrienne Rich, Ayn Rand, and Fredric Jameson. The format will be lecture/discussion. Requirements include attendance, midterm and final exam, and a short written assignment.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5

      HISTORY 393(393). Topics in U.S. History.

      U.S. History

      Section 002 — Contemporary Issues in Native America. Meets with AMCULT 496.002.

      Instructor(s): Judith Daubenmier (jdaubenm@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. Laboratory fee required.

      Credits: (3).

      Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/amcult/496/002.nsf

      White Americans once thought Native Americans were a vanishing people, but Native Americans remain a vibrant part of the country's life. This course looks at a range of issues that confront many Indians and Indian communities today. Who is an Indian? How should Indians be portrayed in film and other media? How much freedom should Native American communities have to run their own affairs without outside interference? How should Native American communities provide for the economic development of their reservations? The course will consider these questions and others in a seminar setting emphasizing discussion of readings and writing. Prerequisites: None.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 395. Reading Course.

      Instructor(s):

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. A maximum of eight credits can be elected through HISTORY 394 and 395.

      Credits: (1-4; 1-3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This is an independent 1-4 credit course open only to history concentrators by written permission of the instructor.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

      HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

      Instructor(s):

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

      HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

      Section 001 — Cinema & Society Before Casablanca.

      Instructor(s): Rudi P Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

      Upper-Level Writing

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      The growth and role of cinema in society makes one of the fascinating stories of the last century. The movies have influenced society, and society has channeled the development of cinema as well. We will look at this relationship from the earliest narrative films up to 1943. Our discussions will range across technique, business history, the demography of Hollywood, "documentaries," the claims of artistry, and also across the Atlantic, so we can compare the use and misuse of film. All the movies we view will be in black and white, and many will be silent. They require close attention and patience. Written work will include analyses of film and historical inquiries about the interplay between the public and its "reflection" on the screen.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

      HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

      Section 002 — Confucianism & Chinese History.

      Instructor(s): Chun-Shu Chang

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

      Upper-Level Writing

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course explores the Confucian principles of historiography and their dominant influences on the interpretation and writing of history in China from ancient to modern times. Specifically, the first part of the course examines the Confucian interpretive perspectives on the nature, meaning, function, and style of history. The second part studies the application of the Confucian theory of history in writing history and in promoting political reforms in China since the time of Confucius, and the third part analyzes the myth, reality, and misunderstanding of the Confucian tradition of history in political movements in early modern and modern China.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

      HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

      Section 003 — World of the Ship.

      Instructor(s): David J Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

      Upper-Level Writing

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      An exploration of the social, cultural, economic and legal dimensions of seventeenth and eighteenth century Anglo-American maritime life that scrutinizes the work of common laborers and situates their work in the expanding Atlantic economy. Topics include: captains, sailors, female and Black mariners, pirates, Captain Kidd, privateers, shipbuilding, medicine, scurvy, map-making, longitude, Captain Cook, commodity trading, naval warfare, mutiny, Captain Bligh, shipwrecks, and developments in admiralty law.

      There will be six short papers and one medium-length paper required, along with weekly readings.

      Books will be available for purchase at Shamam Drum Bookstore. All books and articles are also on reserve at the Shapiro Undergraduate Library.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

      HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

      Section 004 — Witchcraft in Early Modern Europe and America.

      Instructor(s): Phyllis Mack

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

      Upper-Level Writing

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This seminar surveys some of the major outbreaks of witchcraft panic and persecution in Europe and America that resulted in thousands of executions, mainly, but not exclusively, of women. These outbreaks and the writings (and artistic works) that justified them are windows into more general beliefs and values of elite and popular groups: beliefs about crime, the nature of womanhood, the meaning of Christian doctrine, and the body and sexuality. The introductory sessions deal with Christian doctrines relating to gender, magic, sexuality, folk beliefs, and the nature of Church authority. The body of the course deals with the historiography of the witch craze and discussion of individual episodes using primary sources. In the concluding sessions we discuss images of the witch in the 20th century, the McCarthy "witch hunts" of the 1950s, and the feminist and environmentalist wicca movement. The course will meet weekly and is designed to satisfy E.C.B. writing requirements. Students will complete four short reviews of reading assignments, plus a longer (10 page) source-based paper due at the end of the semester. Students will submit these longer papers in draft form, present them to the class, and rewrite them incorporating editorial suggestions.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

      HISTORY 396. History Colloquium.

      Section 005 — SSEAS Changing Islamic Rel Pract.

      Instructor(s): Barbara Daly Metcalf

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

      Upper-Level Writing

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course looks at this history of Islamic practices and movements in South and Southeast Asia, focusing in particular on the period of colonial rule and independent states. Although often neglected in general studies of Islam, this area is home to most of the world's Muslims. The course includes readings on the early expansion of Islam in these areas but then turns to a range of topics related to nationalism, sectarianism, reform, and revival movements, as well as documents related to the practices of everyday life. In addition to secondary sources, readings will include many primary sources, including biography, guidance literature, novels, judicial opinions, and official documents. The goal of the course is to gain experience in analyzing a wide range of texts in relation to specific historical contexts and in comparison with other geographic areas.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

      HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

      Instructor(s):

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

      HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

      Section 001 — The Medieval Papacy.

      Instructor(s): Patrick James Nold (pnold@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/397/001.nsf

      ‘There is not, and there never was on this earth, a work of human policy so well deserving of examination as the Roman Catholic Church … The proudest of royal houses are but of yesterday, when compared with the line of Supreme Pontiffs.' The English historian Macaulay first voiced in the nineteenth century a view now common: that the antiquity and longevity of the papacy as an institution makes it an attractive subject for historical study. This course will examine the history of the Christian Bishops of Rome from their earliest mention in the historical record until the Reformation. That story has often been told in terms of a 'rise and fall' — animated by papal ideology and marked by a series of increasingly acrimonious conflicts between 'church' and 'state'. But such a historical narrative, and the interpretation of documents on which it is based, is open to question. Students in this seminar will be asked to consider the primary documents and to think about alternative approaches for writing the history of the medieval popes (e.g. prosopography, local history, etc). Indeed, the frequent writing of papers in this course will provide students with the opportunity to decide some of the contentious historiographical debates for themselves. We will use one general textbook and a substantial course reader of sources, along with various specific studies.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

      HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

      Section 002 — Topics in Canadian History.

      Instructor(s): Kenneth Michael Sylvester

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course is designed to provide an overview of Canadian historiography, and to encourage students to think comparatively about the United States' northern neighbor. The class members will participate in weekly discussions of assigned readings and prepare interpretive papers, or research a topic, emerging from several broad themes: geography and prehistory; ecology and society in pre-European Canada; France's colonial imprint (the St. Lawrence, Great Lakes, and continental interior); creoles and colons; the impact of seigneurial tenure; the collision with the British Empire; the impact of the American Revolution; metamorphosis of the St. Lawrence; rebellions and reform; removing aboriginals and planting provinces; the art of nation building; bringing in the edge of empire; resettling the west; the politics of population and the origins of multiculturalism; industrialization and urbanization; the sectarian nature of French-English relations; working class and gender revolts, agrarian democracy; social reform and incrementalism; Cold War and continental embrace; a destiny of Quebec's own choosing; a new Constitution and Canada's path dependency.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

      HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

      Section 003 — Atlantic Dissenters Age of Empire.

      Instructor(s): Julius S Scott III (jsscott@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course explores the changing, turbulent world of the 17th and 18th century. It examines some of the social and economic consequences of the expansion of Europe through the eyes of marginal individuals and social groups — religious dissenters and urban workers in Europe, sailors and pirates on the high seas and ashore, witches in New England, Native Americans in North America, rebellious Africans elsewhere in the "New World" — who attempted from their different corners of the Atlantic Basin to resist dominant modes of authority and to shape alternative visions of society in the period from the English Civil War through the French Revolution. Under difficult circumstances and with varying degrees of "success," these people of divergent backgrounds, cultures, and aspirations grappled with many of the important issues which continue to occupy us today — the responsibility of the individual to the group and the citizen to the state, and the relationship between workers and employers, between women and men, and among peoples of disparate cultures. Our central challenge will be twofold: both to understand our exchanges within the context of social changes affecting the entire Atlantic world, and to understand them as well on their own terms — a difficult mission. Students will be encouraged and expected to think creatively, to make connections and find threads of continuity among linking events and people separated by time and space. Finally, the group will examine and assess critically how successful recent social historians and others have been in accomplishing these same goals.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

      HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

      Section 004 — Stories of Change: American Left & the American Right. Meets with AMCULT 496.003.

      Instructor(s): Martha Eugenia Deerman

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      In this course, we will compare the stories circulating in the American Right and the American Left during the mid-twentieth century. A central goal of this course is to teach students how to do archival research and how to integrate primary sources (such as newsletters and speeches) with secondary sources (the scholarly literature on political movements). Course work includes in-class interactive discussions, meetings with archivists and training sessions with librarians. The substantive focus of the course — the stories told at opposite ends of the political spectrum — will be explored through the stories told by the activists themselves and stories told in movement documents. Consequently, some class sessions will be devoted to exploring these materials in the holdings of the Bentley Historical Library and the Labadie Collection of the Hatcher Library.

      The course will not provide a comprehensive survey of the many movements making up the Right and the Left. Rather, we will focus on the stories of some groups within the Radical Right (e.g., organizations against civil rights and communism) and those that laid a foundation for 1960s progressive movements (e.g., anarchists, pacifists and feminists)

      Course work includes intensive class discussion, weekly reading, field trips to the archives, and a final research paper. Because students in this course are asked to master both a methodological approach (archival research methods) and a substantive area (American political movements) much of our class meeting time will involve hands-on sessions working in the archives and developing the research paper. Students are not expected to already be knowledgeable about either archives or right and left wing movements.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

      HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

      Section 005 — Stories of Change: American Women's Movements. Meets with AMCULT 496.004.

      Instructor(s): Martha Eugenia Deerman

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Enrollment limited to junior and senior History concentrators by permission only. History concentrators are required to elect HISTORY 396 or 397. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      In this course, we will explore the stories told within women's movements of 1960s and 1970s. We will look at how slogans, political platforms, and speeches are articulations of compelling stories justifying activism and constructing new identities. A central goal of this course is to teach students how to do archival research and how to integrate primary sources (such as diaries Course work includes in-class interactive discussions, meetings with archivists and training sessions with librarians. The substantive focus of the course — women's movements — will be explored through the stories told by the activists themselves and stories told about the activists by observers. Consequently, some class sessions will be devoted to exploring the holdings of the Bentley Historical Library and the Special Collections of the Hatcher Library. We will focus on personal papers and other first-hand accounts of activists and social commentators.

      Course work includes intensive class discussion, weekly reading, field trips to the archives, and a final research paper. Because students in this course are asked to master both a methodological approach (archival research methods) and a substantive area (American women's movements) much of our class meeting time will involve hands-on sessions working in the archives and developing the research paper. Students are not expected to already be knowledgeable about either archives or women's movements.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

      HISTORY 398. Honors Colloquium, Junior.

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Beate D Dignas

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students; junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Upper-Level Writing

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This seminar is designed to prepare students to write an Honors thesis. As the first course in a three-term sequence for History Honors concentrators, it will focus on the craft of historical research and writing, and will combine analysis of theoretical works on, and possible models for, the doing of history with practical nuts-and-bolts investigations of the tools necessary to define and produce a thesis. We will be especially attentive to thinking about how historians work: the ways in which topics are defined, primary sources identified and analyzed, and arguments fashioned. Because writing is critical to the process of making knowledge in history, the seminar will be writing-intensive (approximately 40 pages), and will include a variety of kinds of historical essays. By the conclusion of the course the participants will have chosen their research topics and thesis advisors and will have written a prospectus outlining their plan of research.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

      HISTORY 398. Honors Colloquium, Junior.

      Section 002.

      Instructor(s): Neil F Safier

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students; junior standing. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Upper-Level Writing

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This seminar is designed to prepare students to write an Honors thesis. As the first course in a three-term sequence for History Honors concentrators, it will focus on the craft of historical research and writing, and will combine analysis of theoretical works on, and possible models for, the doing of history with practical nuts-and-bolts investigations of the tools necessary to define and produce a thesis. We will be especially attentive to thinking about how historians work: the ways in which topics are defined, primary sources identified and analyzed, and arguments fashioned. Because writing is critical to the process of making knowledge in history, the seminar will be writing-intensive (approximately 40 pages), and will include a variety of kinds of historical essays. By the conclusion of the course the participants will have chosen their research topics and thesis advisors and will have written a prospectus outlining their plan of research.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

      HISTORY 399. Honors Colloquium, Senior.

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Leslie B Pincus (lpincus@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students, HISTORY 398, and senior standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-6). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of HISTORY 399, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

      Upper-Level Writing

      Credits: (1-6).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/399/001.nsf

      This course is a workshop for thesis writers. It concentrates on practical and theoretical problems of research and writing with special reference to methodological questions.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

      HISTORY 409. Byzantine Empire, 867-1453.

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): John V Fine Jr

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      A survey taking the Byzantine Empire from the accession of the Macedonians till the Empire's fall to the Ottomans. The course focuses on both internal political history and foreign affairs (relations with the West; the great Church split between Rome and Constantinople; relations with Crusaders and with Slavic neighbors — Russians, Bulgarians, and Serbs, relations with the Seljuk and Ottoman Turks). The main texts are: Ostrogorsky's History of the Byzantine State, and Jenkins' Byzantium: The Imperial Centuries; and for the final two centuries, Nichol's The Last Centuries of Byzantium. Flexible requirements: Besides the final examination, various options exist: (1) a short paper and hour exam; (2) a longer paper and no hour exam.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 432. Medieval and Early Modern Russia.

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Valerie Ann Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      Since medieval times, Europeans have brought back tales of exoticism and barbarism from Russia to their homelands, but few have taken the time to understand the nature of Russian society and culture. This course attempts to examine early Russian society in its own terms, while also studying the historiographic tradition and the issues at stake for the various historians of the field. The course spans the history of Russia from the ninth century, when written records begin, to Peter the Great at the beginning of the eighteenth century. Topics include the formation of the Russian state, the conversion to Orthodox Christianity, the invasion of the Mongol horde, the reign of Ivan the Terrible, and the transformation of Muscovy in the seventeenth century.

      Early Russian history poses particular intellectual challenges. The history of this period is not only completely unfamiliar to most people today, but is also complicated by the unreliability of the source record. Imagine trying to make sense of American history if the authenticity of the Constitution were uncertain and scholars were divided about whether or not the Civil War actually took place. This is the degree of uncertainty that plagues the history of early Russia and makes its study exceptionally exciting and interesting. Each student has the opportunity to contribute original insights and to participate in clarifying the opaque record by filling in some of the blanks. This course allows students to experience the joys of original interpretation and research in a field where the answers are still unknown.

      REQUIREMENTS:

      1)Very short weekly papers (approx. 2 paragraphs) responding to questions from the readings.
      2)Midterm: in class.
      3)7-8 page paper on a primary source
      4)Take-Home Final Exam, distributed on Friday April 13, at my office; due Thursday April 19 at my office, by 3:30 p.m. The exam will require approximately 8 pages of writing, typed, double-spaced.
      5)Short, in-class or at-home writing assignments may be added as the term progresses.

      There are no prerequisites.

      TENTATIVE READINGS:
      (Books will be available for purchase at Shaman Drum Bookstore on State Street)
      1)Bushkovitch, Paul, Peter the Great
      2)Halperin, Charles J., Russia and the Golden Horde: The Mongol Impact on Medieval Russian History (Bloomington: University of Indiana Press, 1985).
      3) Skrynnikov, Ruslan G., Ivan the Terrible (Gulf Breeze, FL: Academic International Press).
      4)Platonov, S. F., The Time of Troubles: A Historical Study of the Internal Crisis and Social Struggle in Sixteenth- and Seventeenth-Century Muscovy, trans. by John T. Alexander (Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 1970).
      5)Pouncy, Carolyn, The Domostroi: Rules for Russian Households in the Time of Ivan the Terrible (Ithaca: Cornell University Press).
      6)Riasanovsky, Nicholas, A History of Russia, (any edition)., Oxford. (expensive text book, but should be available in used copies for more reasonable prices).
      7)Zenkovsky, Serge A., Medieval Russia's Epics, Chronicles and Tales, revised and enlarged ed. (NY: Dutton, 1974).

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 434. Russia in the 20th Century: War, Revolution, and Reform.

      Section 001 — Undergraduates only. Meets with History 434.005.

      Instructor(s): William G Rosenberg (wgr@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      HISTORY 434 explores the history of revolutionary Russia and the Soviet Union. At the present moment of historical reimagining, when the Soviet past is rapidly being reconstructed to suit various contemporary needs, studying in a careful way the history of what until recently was the world's second great "super power" should provide new perspectives for students interested in the complexities of the present day world. Using novels, memoirs, documents, and other texts, HISTORY 434 will explore the utopian visions as well as the harsh social realities of the developing Soviet system, its culture, politics, economics, and imperial structures as well as the broad historical patterns underlying its collapse. While focusing on the Soviet Union, it will also attempt to link these patterns with the human predicament more generally.

      The course is designed for juniors, seniors, and first year graduate students, but should be accessible to sophomores as well. It presumes no prior knowledge or Russian or European history. Undergraduates are required to attend all lectures and discussion sections, complete in a timely way all required reading, prepare two short written projects, and take a midterm and final exam.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 449. Topics in Middle Eastern History.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 001 — Ancient Sites, Scripts, and Archives as Backgrounds to the Bible. [3 credits]. Meets with ACABS 491.001 and HISTORY 449.001.

      Instructor(s): Robert Christopher Hawley (rchawley@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      See ACABS 491.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2

      HISTORY 450. Japan to 1700.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Tonomura

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/450/001.nsf

      This course will explore the evolution of Japanese society from its prehistoric days to the last phase of the age of the samurai by focusing on such key topics as emperors and outcastes, sacrality and pollution, aristocrats and warriors, bureaucracy and feudalism, sexuality and religion, peasant and lord, and diplomacy and violence. Both chronologically and topically organized, the course will emphasize the interconnected patterns of social transformation over the millennium of history. Students will read translation of primary sources (literature and documents) in addition to textbooks and scholarly articles. Films and slide presentations will supplement lectures and class discussion. Students will be evaluated on the basis of class participation, in-class quizzes and three short take-home essays. The course welcomes participation by graduate students who will write an extra paper for earning graduate credits. No prerequisite for taking the course.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 453. Modern Southeast Asian History.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 001 — 1942-1999.

      Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrázek (rdlf@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      The major themes of this course will be late-colonialism, nationalism, and modernization of Southeast Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, Siam/Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, and Burma) — a historical conflict between the societies of the region and the global community of "developed" nations. Political, social, and intellectual history will be studied but, first of all, the course wants to be an introduction to a sensitive and well-informed reading of a broadest variety of historical sources. Individual students' interest in particular region will be fully supported.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 455. Classical India and the Coming of Islam 320-1526 A.D.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Thomas R Trautmann (ttraut@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      The greater part of this course concerns itself with the history of ancient India in its classical age beginning with the empire of the Guptas, and attempts to analyse the components of Indian civilization in its classical form (kinship, caste, political organization, religious institutions). It then examines the Turkish invasions and the challenges posed by Islamic rule. This is a lecture course, and it presumes no prior study of India on the part of any of its participants (except the professor). Both undergrads and grad students are welcome.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 456. Mughal India.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 001 — Meets with ASIAN 455.001.

      Instructor(s): Farina Mir

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/history/456/001.nsf

      This course will examine the political, social, cultural, and religious history of India during the period of the Mughal Empire (1526-1858). The Mughal Empire was one of the great empires of the early modern world, encompassing the vast majority of the Indian subcontinent at its height and with more wealth and subjects than either of its two great contemporaries, the Ottomans and the Safavids. This course will explore the larger historical and geographical contexts that enabled this political dynasty, originally based in Central Asia and Afghanistan, to emerge as the preeminent power in the Indian subcontinent. It will analyze the nature of Mughal rule, looking specifically at the evolving nature of Mughal state structure, how a majority non-Muslim population was accommodated, the interactions between religious communities, and Mughal contributions to Indian aesthetics in the arenas of architecture, art, and music. The course will trace both Mughal ascendancy and the decentralization of political power in the last century and a half of the Mughal era (1707-1858). We will examine how Mughal power was challenged, the rise of "successor" states across the subcontinent -- analyzing the political, social, and cultural implications of the devolution of power in the eighteenth century, and the eventual assumption of political control by the British crown in 1858. The British assertion of political sovereignty in India was the result of a sustained engagement with Indian society through much of the Mughal period. We will trace the relationship between British trading interests and Indian society in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, a period which saw the transformation of the English East India Company from a trading concern to a political sovereign in India. Lastly, we will explore perceptions of India's Mughal past in contemporary South Asia. These range from discourse on Mughal architecture and history in India's lucrative tourism industry, to representations of Mughal history in popular Indian cinema, to the portrayal of Aurangzeb, the last "great" Mughal emperor (1658-1707), as an icon of religious bigotry.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 457. History of India, 1750-1900.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Barbara Daly Metcalf

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course covers the history of the Indian sub-continent from a period of decentralized regional states in the eighteenth century, of which the British East India Company based in Bengal was one, to the establishment by the mid-nineteenth century of British control over the entire sub-continent. One central theme of the course will be to show that the commonsense notions of continuity, fostered both by colonialism and nationalism, must be replaced with understanding the newness of modern identities and the new meanings infused into old terms ("caste," "Hindu" or "Muslim," even "India" itself). To understand how our cultures are constructed is to give us a critical distance on what otherwise seems part of nature. Topics covered include the nature of pre-British political and social life; the strategies of British conquest; the emergence of a new public life including movements for social and religious reform. Course requirements include attendance at all classes and completion of the assigned reading before class; two short essays (10-12 pp.); a mid-term and a final.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 459. Gender, Medicine, and Culture in U.S. History.

      U.S. History

      Section 001 — Meets with WOMENSTD 342.002.

      Instructor(s): Martin S Pernick (mpernick@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course compares men and women as healers and as patients, and the connections between medical and cultural gender roles in U.S. history, from the colonial era to the present, focusing on the past two centuries. We will examine how changes in gender both affected and reflected changes in medicine and culture, emphasizing connections between changing concepts of health and of gender. The course will be taught primarily in lecture format, though periodic in-class discussion groups will also be held. Reading assignments will range from modern histories to old medical journals, newspaper articles, poetry and films. Although no background in history, gender studies, or medicine is required, prior coursework in at least one such area would be helpful. There will be essay-style midterm and final exams, a seven page book review paper, and bi-weekly short quizzes.

      The course is not open to first-year undergraduates. Those who miss the first meeting without advance permission will be dropped from the course; if you are considering whether to register you must be at the first meeting to preserve the option of enrolling.

      Course pack from Dollar Bill at Michigan Book and Supply.

      Readings:

      • Laurel Ulrich, A Midwife's Tale, (Vintage)
      • Regina Morantz-Sanchez, Sympathy and Science, UNC
      • Judith W. Leavitt, Brought to Bed, Oxford
      • Andrea Tone, Devices and Desires, Hill & Wang (NOTE: SAME TITLE, DIFFERENT BOOK, AS THE NEXT ONE)
      • Margarete Sandelowski, Devices and Desires, UNC
      • Judith W. Leavitt, Typhoid Mary, Beacon Press
      • Nancy Tomes, Gospel of Germs, Harvard
      • Martin Pernick, The Black Stork, Oxford
      • Edward Larson, Sex, Race and Science, Johns Hopkins
      • Allan Brandt, No Magic Bullet, Oxford
      • Elizabeth Lunbeck, Psychiatric Persuasion, Princeton
      • Barron Lerner, Breast Cancer Wars, Oxford

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 461. The American Revolution.

      U.S. History

      Section 001 — Undergraduates only. Meets with HISTORY 461.005.

      Instructor(s): David J Hancock (hancockd@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      An intensive course on the background to the Revolution, its progress, and the changes it wrought in American life. Emphasis on America's mid-18th-century socioeconomic transformation, Britain's reorganization of her empire in the 1760s and 1770s, colonial opposition, and the emergence of a uniquely American ideology. Subsequent topics include the progress and disclocations of the military conflict, the attempt at confederation, and the culmination of the Revolutionary movement in the iteration and early development of the Constitution and Bill of Rights.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 463. The Origins of the American Civil War, 1830-1860.

      U.S. History

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course attempts to understand the causes of the American Civil War. It begins with a description of the society of the ante-bellum South; turns next to a portrait of Jacksonian politics and political ideology; then takes up that transmutation of Jacksonian ideals in the 1840's and 1850's through which hostile sectional stereotypes were defined. It culminates with an exploration of the sense in which the intellectual, social, religious, and economic conflicts in America came to be summarized by the slavery question during the period, because of the demands of political competition. There will be a midterm exam, a research paper of ten pages, and a two-hour final examination. Reading will average about 250 pages a week. Enrollment will be limited to forty students, in order to facilitate class discussion.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 467. The United States Since 1945.

      U.S. History

      Section 001 — Undergraduates only. Meets with HISTORY 467.011.

      Instructor(s): Matthew D Lassiter (mlassite@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Theme Semester

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      HISTORY 467 provides a topical and thematic approach to post-1945 United States history, including Cold War politics and culture, the fate of liberalism and the rise of conservatism, the power shift to the suburbs and the Sunbelt, social movements of the Left and the Right, the relationship between countercultures and the mass consumer culture, and the era of globalization and its discontents. The main emphasis of the course is the intersection of politics, culture, and society in recent U.S. history. We will engage questions such as: How has the "frontier mythology" shaped postwar America? How did the Cold War reshape political culture and popular culture in the United States? What happened to the power base of organized labor? How have civil rights, feminism, environmentalism, the Christian Right, and other grassroots movements changed American society? Why did the United States lose in Vietnam? Why is the "war" metaphor so popular in American domestic policy? Were the Seventies more important than the Sixties? Are the "culture wars" finally over? How are Latinos and other new immigrant groups changing contemporary politics? Did the ideology of American Exceptionalism advanced by Ronald Reagan and on display in two wars in the Middle East overcome the "Vietnam Syndrome"? Is it accurate to speak of a new "American Empire" in the global arrangements that have replaced the Cold War framework? Did the 1990s really mark the triumph of the "new economy"? Where did your shoes actually come from?
      The workload for History 467 resembles the requirements in 300-level history courses, and no prerequisites are necessary to enroll in this course. History 467 is divided into a lecture/discussion format that will include books, films, documentaries, fiction, and short discussion projects. The graded assignments include a take-home midterm assignment, an independent research paper, and an in-class final exam.

      The list below contains the books that are likely to be required for purchase, although these are subject to change.
      **Tom Engelhardt, The End of Victory Culture: Cold War America and the Disillusioning of a Generation
      **Thomas Sugrue, The Origins of the Urban Crisis: Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit
      **William Chafe, Civilities and Civil Rights: Greensboro, North Carolina, and the Black Struggle for Freedom
      **Tim O'Brien, The Things They Carried
      **Bruce Schulman, The Seventies: The Great Shift in American Culture, Society, and Politics
      **Ruth Rosen, The World Split Open: How the Modern Women's Movement Changed America
      **Mike Davis, Magical Urbanism: Latinos Reinvent the U.S. City
      **Thomas Frank, One Market Under God: Extreme Capitalism, Market Populism, and the End of Economic Democracy

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 468. Topics in U.S. History.

      U.S. History

      Section 001 — Asians and Blacks in Detroit. Meets with CAAS 358.001 and AMCULT 305.001.

      Instructor(s): Scott T Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

      Theme Semester

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/amcult/305/001.nsf

      In this seminar course, we will analyze urban community history and politics from the perspective of Asian Americans and African Americans in Detroit. Course materials will provide students with knowledge of topics such as racial segregation, urban redevelopment, the 1967 rebellion, the Black Power movement, and the Justice for Vincent Chin movement. We will connect our discussion of history to an analysis of current efforts to revitalize Detroit, comparing and contrasting strategies developed by politicians, corporations and grassroots community activists. This is a community service-learning course. We will apply the knowledge we acquire to the creation of cooperative projects related to the revitalization of Detroit. In turn, much of our learning will come from practical experience working with community-based organizations in Detroit. Students will also have an opportunity to develop community organizing and outreach skills. Important: Following week 2, the majority of class meetings will be held at off-campus locations in Detroit. Transportation assistance will be provided as needed.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

      HISTORY 472. Topics in Asian History.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 001 — Modern Empires in Pacific Asia. Meets with HONORS 493.002.

      Instructor(s): Leslie Pincus, Mark Nornes (amnornes@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

      HISTORY 475(580). The History of American Constitutional Law.

      U.S. History

      Section 001 — Undergraduates only. Meets with HISTORY 475.005.

      Instructor(s): J Mills Thornton III (jmthrntn@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (4).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course is a survey of the evolution of American constitutional law from 1789 to the present. It will rely primarily upon reading the selections from the opinions of the U.S. Supreme Court to be found in A.T. Mason and D.G. Stephenson, Jr., eds., American Constitutional Law, and Stanley Kutler, ed., The Supreme Court And The Constitution. The goal will be to discover how the different material circumstances and social and political assumptions of each age in American history have been reflected in the Supreme Court's shifting conceptions of the meaning of the Constitution. In this way, we will seek to define how beliefs about the essential character of American republicanism have been altered through time, and in addition, to appreciate the Supreme Court's changing understanding of its own role in the constitutional order. There are no prerequisites for the course, but HISTORY 160-161 or an equivalent understanding of the general structure of American history is assumed. There will be a midterm examination of ninety minutes, a ten-page term paper, and a two-hour final examination.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 476(569) / LHC 412. American Business History.

      U.S. History

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): David L Lewis

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior, senior, or graduate standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/lhc/412/001.nsf

      This course familiarizes students with the broad sweep of American business history, and touches on global business history as well. Much course content is personalized, that is, focuses on people, rather than institutions or events.

      Course pack. No text.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

      HISTORY 477. Law, History, and the Dynamics of Social Change.

      Section 001 — The Law in Slavery and Freedom: The U.S. and Latin America in Comparative Perspective. [2 credits for Law Students; 3 for others]. Meets with Law 877.001 and INSTHUM 511.002.

      Instructor(s): Rebecca J Scott (rjscott@umich.edu) , Martha S. Jones (msjonz@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      In this class we will analyze the ways in which slavery — generally defined in the Americas as the ownership of property in human beings — was codified and regulated in law. By examining judicial records, we will explore the ways in which law upheld and reinforced the power of slave owners. We will then look at the mechanisms through which slaves themselves at times were able to make use of the legal system to advance their own interests and, in some instances, achieve their freedom. Course readings will include evidence from ordinary trials and from famous U.S. appellate cases like Dred Scott v. Sandford, as well as material from French Louisiana and Spanish Cuba. We will conclude by exploring the role of law and judicial processes in upholding and challenging the structures of caste and white supremacy that emerged following upon slave emancipation.

      2 credits for Law Students; 3 credits for undergraduate and graduate students

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of Instructor

      HISTORY 478. Topics in Latin American History.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 002 — Literature and Social History (Brazil). Meets with LACS 455.002 and CAAS 458.002 and PORTUG 474.004.

      Instructor(s): Sidney Chalhoub

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      See LACS 455.002.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

      HISTORY 481. Topics in European History.

      Section 001 — The Caucasus Since the Fall of the Soviet Union.

      Instructor(s): Gerard J Libaridian (glibarid@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course will examine militarized conflicts (Nagorno Karabagh, South Ossetia, and Abkhazia) and latent ones (such as Ajaria, and Javakheti) in the South Caucasus as well as diplomatic efforts at conflict resolution in the last decade. The rise of conflicts and nationalism will be studied in view of factors such as ethnicity, religion, class, historical processes, and of state-building in independent Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia in the context of post-Soviet international relations.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 491 / ECON 491. The History of the American Economy.

      U.S. History

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Peter Rousseau

      Prerequisites & Distribution: ECON 101 or 102. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      See ECON 491.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 492 / AAPTIS 492 / GEOG 492. Shaping the Globe: Geography and Cartography in the Premodern Middle East & Europe.

      Section 001.

      Instructor(s): Gottfried Hagen (ghagen@umich.edu), Michael David Bonner

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      See AAPTIS 492.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

      Other History Courses

      Section 001 — Steam Engines and Computers, From Industrial Proletarians to Information. Meets with RCSSCI 461.001 and SOC 495.004.

      Instructor(s): Thomas Wilfre O'Donnell

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~twod/steam/

      See RCSSCI 461.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 498. Topics in History.

      Other History Courses

      Section 002 — Migration and the 'New Europe'.

      Instructor(s): Rita C-K Chin

      Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected up to three times for credit.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      This course focuses on the post-1945 period and explores migration as a key motor in producing what has become known as the "New Europe." Europe, in this conception, is characterized by a traffic in bodies, capital, and culture, a form of circulation which has produced an increasingly diverse and multicultural society. The course emphasizes a comparative approach to migration in the "New Europe." We will examine the three main groups of migrants in postwar Europe (postcolonials, guest workers, and asylum seekers) and the legal parameters which have shaped their lives. We will also explore the similarities and differences in migration across three countries — Britain, France, and Germany. In addition to the socio-economic, legal, political, and gendered aspects of migration, the course considers the ways in which this new diversity has radically transformed the cultural landscape of Europe, focusing especially on film and literature. This course will be conducted as a seminar. Course requirements include weekly response papers to the readings, active participation in class discussions, and a final paper.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 546 / AAPTIS 495 / RELIGION 496 / WOMENSTD 471. Gender and Politics in Early Modern Islam.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 001 — Taught in English.

      Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

      Prerequisites & Distribution: Students should preferably have had one course in Islamic Studies. Taught in English. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

      Foreign Lit

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      See AAPTIS 495.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 578 / LACS 400 / CAAS 478. Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 001 — Race and Popular Culture in 20th-Century Brazil. Taught in Portuguese. Meets with PORTUG 474.001.

      Instructor(s): Paul Johnson

      Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 202 recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      See LACS 400.001.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

      HISTORY 578 / LACS 400 / CAAS 478. Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America.

      Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East

      Section 002 — Slavery, Disease and Race: A View from Brazil. Meets with PORTUG 474.002.

      Instructor(s): Sidney Chalhoub

      Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 202 recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

      Credits: (3).

      Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

      See LACS 400.002.

      Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4


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