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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History of Art


This page was created at 7:40 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


History of Art 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from History of Art 101 to History of Art 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


HISTART 102. Western Art from the End of the Middle Ages to the Present.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier (rzurier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed HISTART 104 and 105, or 150. Two credits granted to those who have completed one of HISTART 104 or 105.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a survey of topics in European and American Art from the late 14th century to the present, as well as an introduction to the techniques of art history. It will examine institutions such as patronage and the art market, the changing roles of artists in society, and the changing functions of art. Weekly discussion sections will be devoted to building skills in visual analysis and critical reading of art-historical literature.

Requirements: informed participation in section meetings, regular reading assignments, two short papers, midterm, and a final examination. There are no prerequisites for this course. Students will take a field trip to the Detroit Institute of Arts.

The required textbook will be Art Past/Art Present by David Wilkins, Juergen Schulz, and Kathryn Linduff.

Optional text will be A Short Guide to Writing About Art by Sylvan Barnet.

Textbooks will be available through Shaman Drum as well as the usual sources.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 112. History of Photography.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Graham Bader

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course surveys the history of photography from the medium's contested beginnings in the 1830s to its current metamorphoses in the digital age. We will examine the place of photography across a range of institutions and practices — including art, science, journalism, war, family, exploration, commemoration, and surveillance. In addition to tracing the medium's technical developments and most noted practitioners over the past two centuries, the course will explore different understandings of photographic meaning itself: how photographs have been seen both to lie and tell the truth, to be both subjective statements and objective documents. Readings will include a survey textbook, historical accounts, and contemporary critical perspectives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 001 — Yoruba Visual Culture. First-year students only.

Instructor(s): David T Doris

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce students to the history of African and African Diaspora art and visual culture through a close study of the Yoruba people of southwestern Nigeria. Yoruba culture has been a compelling force not only in West Africa, but also throughout the Western Atlantic: in Cuba, Brazil, Trinidad, Haiti, the U.S., and many other locales. Looking at and engaging with objects, listening to music, watching films, interacting with knowledgeable Yoruba people, and reading a diversity of literature, we will try to understand the breadth, the power, and the excellence of this remarkable African culture. Such a focus will also allow us to trace the broader historical path of African cultural studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 002 — Constructions of Identity in the Ancient World. Meets with CLCIV 120.002.

Instructor(s): Emma Cameron Blake

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CLCIV 120.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 203 / ASIAN 203. Chinese Art and Religion.

Section 001 — HA grid distribution: III.1,2,3,4.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (ningq@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a survey of the arts and religions of China, as well as an introduction to the technique of visual analysis in historical studies. It examines the three major religions in China — Buddhism, Daoism, and Confucianism — from the perspective of visual representations and religious practice. Religious traditions of minorities such as Lamaism in Tibet, Shamanism in the northeast, Muslim in the northwest, ghost beliefs in the southwest, and the Mazu (sea goddess) cult in the coastal regions (including Taiwan and Hong Kong) will also be introduced.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 210. Norm and Storm: Rebellion in Art.

Section 001 — HA grid distribution: I.4.

Instructor(s): Sussan Babaie (sbabaie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course takes modern and contemporary visual culture of Iran and its diasporas as a point of departure to examine the meaning of rebellion in and through art. It seeks to explore the ways in which the makers and consumers of art have questioned, contested, subverted and negotiated visual and cultural "norms." What are those norms and how are they defined, naturalized, enforced? What artistic strategies are deployed to decentralize dominant paradigms, be they the force of tradition or of the 'foreign' (farangi)? What are the mechanisms for the visual production of a rebellious relationship with the established norms of sexuality, gender, race, or religious and political ideologies? We also investigate the posture of rebellion in relation to the emergence of modernisms outside Europe and the U.S. Comparative studies of the visual enterprise of modernity in places such as Iraq, Egypt and Pakistan will help us navigate the cultural tensions and artistic negotiations between tradition and invention, between rebellion and conformity, between the institutional and the individual. We will examine genres of visual representation ranging from painting and sculpture to such small media as posters, stamps and banknotes, from public monuments and architecture to film and photography. Requirements include several short papers, a final exam, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 212 / ARCH 212. Understanding Architecture.

Section 001 — HA grid distribution: IV.4.

Instructor(s): A Melissa Harris

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Not open to students enrolled in Architecture.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/arch/212/001.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 214 / CAAS 214. Introduction to African-American Art.

Section 001 — HA grid distribution: IV.4.

Instructor(s): Jacqueline R Francis (jrfranci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course surveys the twentieth century's history of African-American painting, sculpture, photography, and mixed media practices. Moving through the material chronologically, we will discuss a variety of stylistic strategies and the artists' staked-out positions regarding race, gender, sexual class, and nation. We will also consider audience reception, namely, audiences responses to the art and to the artists themselves. The textbook to be used is S. Patton, African-American Art. Articles: To be placed on Fine Arts Library Online Reserves.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 222 / CLARCH 222. Introduction to Roman Archaeology.

Section 001 — HA grid distribution: IV.1.

Instructor(s): Emma Cameron Blake (ecblake@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/clarch/222/001.nsf

See CLARCH 222.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 251 / MEMS 251. Italian Renaissance Art, II.

Section 001 — HA grid distribution: IV.3.

Instructor(s): Megan L Holmes (holmesml@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will study Italian art from circa 1480 to 1570. This period is traditionally known as the "High Renaissance," and usually begins with the maturity of Leonardo da Vinci and ends with the death of Michelangelo. We will follow the careers of major masters like Botticelli, Leonardo, Raphael, Titian, and Michelangelo. We also will explore the urban centers — Venice, Florence, Rome — where these masters, and many others not as well known, produced their works in response to the demands of patrons and institutions. We will study key works of art, sites of production, techniques, patrons, practitioners, and publics. We will be interested in gender and social rank, and will visit the exhibition at the University of Michigan Museum of Art "Gender, Power and Representation." Transformations in artistic practices and representational forms will be related to specific social, political, economic, and cultural conditions. We will also consider primary sources, and pay close attention to how art historians selectively consider the fragmentary material and textual remains from the period and incorporate them into a "story of art." There will be weekly section meetings, a midterm and final exam, and a short paper. The following text will be required: John T. Paoletti and Gary M. Radke, ed., Art in Renaissance Italy, 2nd ed (Upper Saddle River, N.J.: Prentice Hall/Abrams, 2000) and a course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 260. European Painting and Sculpture of the Seventeenth Century.

Section 001 — HA grid distribution: IV.3.

Instructor(s): Thomas Chauncy Willette (willette@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the visual culture of seventeenth-century Europe with particular emphasis on the pictorial and plastic arts. Lectures will examine the extraordinary achievements of such well-known figures as Caravaggio, Annibale Carracci, Artemisia Gentileschi, Guido Reni, Bernini, Velázquez, Poussin, Rubens, Van Dyck, Rembrandt and Vermeer, as well as visually interesting and historically important works by artists who are less well known. We will look not only at paintings and sculptures but also at drawings, prints, maps and book illustrations, in order to sample the diverse ways in which the visual arts were used and valued in the seventeenth century. Lectures will consider the role of art in scientific discourse, religious practices, political communication, and social and economic life. The principal goals of this course are: (1) to give students broad familiarity with key artistic productions of the period and the historical circumstances of which they are a part, and (2) to help students develop skills in visual and historical analysis. Each week students will be asked to study a short reading or complete a looking-and-thinking assignment in preparation for section meetings. These discussion groups are an integral and required part of the course, designed to give you opportunities to talk about particular works of art and issues treated in the lectures while developing your skills in the analysis of visual art and art historical writings. There will be a one-hour midterm quiz (with slides), a short paper, and a final examination (with slides). At least one of your section meetings will be a field trip to the University of Michigan Museum of Art. Three to four texbooks, plus course pack, will be used.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 272. 20th-Century Art: Modernism, The Avant Garde, The Aftermath.

Section 001 — HA grid distribution: IV.4.

Instructor(s): Simon James Elmer

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of the course is to study the relationship between modernism and the avant-garde in twentieth-century European, Russian, and North American art. The course is divided into four chronologically overlapping parts.

Part one: 'The Critique of Representation' (1906-1914), will look at the interrogation of the conventions of the visual image in art practice in Paris before the Great War.

Part two: 'Utopian Visions' (1906-1939), will look at the formation of the European and Russian avant-gardes in what has come to be seen as the period of high modernism leading up to the Second World War.

Part three: 'The Challenge to Painting' (1914-1939), will look at the alternative history of modern art in the interwar period represented by the Dada and Surrealist movements.

And part four: 'The End of Modernism' 1939-1990), will look at the dissolution of the modernist project in post-war North American art, and the rethinking of its history in relation to the paradox of a 'post-modern' present.

Movements whose output will be studied in the course include Fauvism, Cubism, Futurism, Expressionism, Suprematism, Constructivism, Purism, De Stijl, Neo-Plasticism, Dada, Surrealism, Abstract Expressionism, the Neo-Avant-Garde, Pop Art, and Appropriation Art.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 384(431) / CLARCH 384. Principal Greek Archaeological Sites.

Section 001 — HA grid distribution: IV.1.

Instructor(s): Lisa C Nevett (lcnevett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and a course in archaeology. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CLARCH 384.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 387(487) / ASIAN 360 / PHIL 360 / RCHUMS 375. The Arts and Letters of China.

Section 001 — HA grid distribution: III.1,2,3.

Instructor(s): Shuen-Fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/asian/360/001.nsf

See ASIAN 360.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 393. Junior Proseminar.

Section 001 — Baudelaire's Paris. [Honors]. Students must have Junior standing and 3.5 HA GPA. Fulfills HA seminar requirement. HA grid distribution: IV.4.

Instructor(s): Howard G Lay (hglay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concentration in history of art and upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is concerned with visual and literary culture in Paris during the Second Republic, the Second Empire, and the early years of the Third Republic. It takes as its focal point the essays, criticism, and poetry of Charles Baudelaire — perhaps the most probing, and easily the most idiosyncratic and contentious observer of the cultural events of his time. Baudelaire's responses to the annual controversies of the Paris Salon, the caricatures of the daily press, the wholesale rebuilding of the capital under Louis Napoleon, and in a larger sense, to the concept of Romanticism, the experience of modern life, and the objectives of criticism itself, are crucial to our understanding of modernism in the visual arts. The course is accordingly designed to review recent theorizations of modernism (almost all of which locate the origins of their subject in the work of Courbet and Manet) in the context of a strongly historical reading of Baudelaire's various musings on painting, sculpture, caricature, and the city. It also aims to re-assess the advent of modernist painting in terms of its relation (antagonistic or complicitous) to a wide range of Parisian cultural phenomena — from the somewhat narrow interests of professional artists and critics, to the broader consequences of urban modernization.

Requirements: Two fifty-minute tests, a short in-class presentation (@ fifteen minutes), and a long research paper (@15-20 pages).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 001 — Representations of Lesbianism in Early Modern Western Europe. HA grid distribution: IV.3. Meets with WOMENSTD 347.001.

Instructor(s): Patricia Simons (patsimon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will examine the varieties of representations of women who desired other women in Western Europe from the 15th-17th centuries. Focusing on England and Italy, with forays into France, Germany, Spain and Holland, we will read early modern texts (poems, drama, opera, mythology, prints, paintings, domestic artifacts, pornography, and medical writing), as well as contemporary theorizing about lesbianism. Charting continuities and discontinuities between early modern conceptions and twenty-first century ones, we will investigate the extent to which a coherent history of lesbianism exists.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 002 — Art & Crusade. HA grid distribution: IV.2. Meets with HISTART 646.001.

Instructor(s): Cecily J Hilsdale (cjhilsda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides a survey of the major artistic monuments associated with the European crusading movement. Crusades were not merely directed towards Jerusalem and the Holy Land but also towards pagan and heretical movements along the northern and eastern edges of Europe, in the south against the Moors in Spain, and even internally against heretics in southern Spain and Italy. Such expansionism has recently been characterized as a form of "medieval colonialism" prefiguring later colonial endeavors in the Americas. In response to the question of medieval colonialism, we will examine the underlying ideology of the crusading movement — its origins through conclusion and afterlife — as well as Byzantine and Islamic responses to such European expansion.

While focusing primarily on the visual arts associated with the eastern crusades, this course will begin with the first papal call to arms in 1095 and continue through the thirteenth century and beyond. We will explore not only Crusader art narrowly defined as artistic production during the Crusader occupation of the Levant, but also take into consideration responses to the Crusades as well as broader notions of cultural identity and marginality.

Students will be evaluated on the basis of two small papers as well as two tests.

In addition to weekly readings from primary and secondary sources, the following books will be required: Edward Peters, ed., The First Crusade: The Chronicle of Fulcher of Chartres and Other Source Materials (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995 [1971]); Jonathan Riley-Smith, ed., The Oxford Illustrated History of the Crusades (Oxford University Press, 1997 [1995]).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 003 — The Art and Poetry of Michelangelo. Fulfills HA seminar requirement. HA grid distribution: IV.3.

Instructor(s): Thomas Chauncy Willette (willette@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The life and art of Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) offers an exciting context for intensive study of verbal and visual creativity in early modern Europe. For his contemporaries, and for many later generations, Michelangelo exemplified the ideal modern artist postulated in the art literature of humanistic philosophy and cultural theory. The seminar will examine Renaissance theories of style and invention as a means of grasping the substratum of rhetorical "figures" or "tropes" that inform both his rough-hewn sonnets and his highly polished marbles. Hence we will attend closely to certain drawings that show the artist thinking on paper, in both line sketches and fragments of verse. Other central topics include Michelangelo's verbal and visual self-fashioning as a grouchy genius, his Neoplatonic theories of artistic inspiration, his preoccupation with the body as the source of visual and verbal metaphors, and the religious anxiety that accompanied his intense devotion to craft and physical beauty. We will analyze both the language and the genres of his poetry — notably the sonnet, the madrigal, and the epitaph, as well as the critical vocabulary employed by contemporary critics of his art, such as Giorgio Vasari, Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo, Pietro Aretino, and Ludovico Dolce. Close inspection will be made of Michelangelo's drawing techniques, as well as his use of color and his treatment of stone surfaces, in order to observe the figurative effects of his working of materials. We will study a considerable portion of his works in sculpture, painting and architecture, while examining his prodigious reputation and influence, particularly in the court settings of Medici Florence and Papal Rome. Students are expected to participate in discussion at every meeting. Several short papers will be required, and there will be a midterm slide exam with essay questions. A substantial research paper will be due by the end of the term. There will be field trips to the University of Michigan Museum of Art and possibly one visit to another area collection. All students should purchase a copy of James Saslow, ed., The Poetry of Michelangelo, (Yale University Press 1991). One other book and a course pack will also be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 004 — Early Arts of Iran: A Museum Exhibition Seminar. Fulfills HA seminar requirement. HA grid distribution: I.1. Meets with HISTART 613.001.

Instructor(s): Margaret C Root (mcroot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar is arranged around a special exhibition of international significance planned to open at the Kelsey Museum in February 2005. It offers undergraduates a unique opportunity to work collaboratively with graduate students, the curator-in-charge, and other museum staff in a hands-on learning environment. The exhibition (Signs & Symbols: The Arts of Early Iran and its Neighbors) will present special themes in the study of the early representational arts of ancient Iran (around 4000-3500 BCE). In this age of long-distance trade, emerging state organizations, increasingly assertive religious institutions, and developments in the emergence of writing, signs and symbols were richly message-laden tools of communication. As such, they served not only the realms of increasingly complex administrative activity; they also served to mediate between human agency and the forces of nature, the spirit, and the powers of medicinal magic. An initial set of seminar-style sessions will focus on background readings in English on the subject of the exhibition. Students will develop topics for individual research that will be part of a larger group dialogue on concepts for the exhibition. The research will (1) channel into proposed layouts and information panels for specific display cases and (2) produce essays that may (with student consent) contribute either to the exhibition publication or the children's workbook, as relevant. This course meets the History of Art Undergraduate Seminar requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of Instructor

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 005 — Impressionism & Modernity. HA grid distribution: IV.4. Meets with RCCORE 334.001.

Instructor(s): Simon James Elmer

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will examine the relation between modernism and modernity in Impressionist and post-Impressionist painting in France between 1860 and 1900. Artists whose work we willlook at include: Édouard Manet, Edgar Degas, Camille Pissarro, Claude Monet, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Gustave Caillebotte, Mary Cassatt, Berthe Morisot, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Georges Seurat, Emile Bernard, Paul Gauguin, Vincent van Gogh, and Paul Cézanne. Rather than a survey, the course will be taught around a series of case studies. Each class will focus on a particular theme informing the practice of these and other artists, and discuss the problems it raises for art historical knowledge. The questions the course seeks to address, therefore, are both historically specific and methodological. Topics to be covered include: the historical conditions for the emergence of Impressionism; the identification of the modern with ambiguity and the marginal; the relation between social and pictorial space in Impressionist and post-Impressionist painting; the transformation of urban experience in Paris under Napoleon III; class and gender as determining structures of the historical viewer; the relation between the ubiquity of the prostitute in late-nineteenth-century art and literature and the rise of the commodity form; constructions of sexual difference and the gendering of space; landscape painting and the rise of the leisure industry; the formation of the avant-garde as a field of practice; authorship and the construction of the modern artist; the notion of the primitive as a symptom of modernity; artistic autonomy and historical determination; and the place of Impressionism in the history of modernism.

Students who are interested in this course should contact the instructor, Dr. Simon Elmer, at simonelmer@hotmail.com.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 006 — The Sixties and Beyond: Art in Europe and the United States. HA grid distribution: IV.4.

Instructor(s): Graham Bader

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will examine the multifarious art production of the 1960s in both Europe and the United States. Beginning with a consideration of late-fifties perspectives on gestural abstract painting, we will proceed by exploring such diverse practices as happenings; pop; minimalism; op and kinetic art; "post-painterly abstraction"; and early video and conceptual projects. Issues of particular concern throughout the academic term will include: relations between art, politics, and mass culture; art and the body; medium specificity and its discontents; technology and new media; and the developing internationalization of the artworld in the decade under consideration. Course readings will focus in particular on primary documents from the period, including art periodicals, artists' statements, and original critical essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 398. Honors Thesis.

Section 001 — Satisfies HISTART seminar requirement.

Instructor(s): R Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HISTART 397. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits:

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will function identically to HistArt 397, except that issues having to do with the writing, organization, and rhetorical strategies of the senior thesis will receive more emphasis than problems related to research. Each senior thesis writer will meet weekly with faculty advisors and the Director of Undergraduate Studies (who oversees the seminar). Class time is divided between group meetings (of all parties) and individual tutorials (between students and their advisors). The seminar thus provides a weekly 3-hour forum in which students and faculty discuss a wide range of issues having to do with research techniques, methodological problems, and writing skills. It also encourages exchange and cooperation among thesis-writers concerning the challenges of an extended research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3, 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Undergraduate students may work independently with a faculty member from the department of the History of Art.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HISTART 403 / ENVIRON 403 / NRE 403. History of Human Interaction with the Land.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth A Brabec (ebrabec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ENVIRON 403.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 415 / WOMENSTD 415. Studies in Gender and the Arts.

Section 001 — Women in Early Modern Europe: Artists, Networks, Viewers. HA grid distribution: IV.3.

Instructor(s): Patricia Simons (patsimon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and one course in women's studies or history of art. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course looks at the conditions of production that enabled the emergence of European women as independent artists in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Our primary focus will be on the Netherlands and Italy, but comparative material will be drawn from England, Spain and elsewhere. We will be looking at spaces and modes of production, such as courts, convents, and cities, and the social networks of patronage, marketing, and gift exchange within which women made and viewed art. Our investigations will concentrate on areas in which women artists made notable achievements, such as still life, portraiture, and self-portraiture. The religious sphere was also a major venue for women's cultural production in such areas as theatre, music, visual imagery, and patronage. Other topics to be considered include the engagement of women in other areas of visual culture, e.g., needlework, calligraphy, anatomical wax models.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 464 / FRENCH 453. Interdisciplinary Topics in French Art, Literature, and Culture.

Section 001 — Figuring the Artist in Nineteenth-Century France. Taught in English, but knowledge of French is desirable. HA grid distribution: IV.4. Meets with FRENCH 660.001 and HISTART 771.001.

Instructor(s): Michèle A Hannoosh (hannoosh@umich.edu) , Susan L Siegfried (siegfrie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Taught in English. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/french/453/001.nsf

See FRENCH 453.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 001 — Issues in Modern Sculpture Theory. Fulfills HA seminar requirement. HA grid distribution: IV.4. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Alexander D Potts

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course to examine the debates that have taken place about the nature and function of sculpture over the past century, as well many of the key works that have provoked these debates. It will consider the different forms taken by modern sculpture, from the figures and objects of Giacometti and constructions of David Smith, to the process work of Eva Hesse, the performance and installation orientated art of Beuys and Morris, and the psychologically charged images and assemblages of Nauman and Bourgeois. The course will discuss artists' efforts to fashion things that relate to everyday life and yet are not simply consumer objects. It also will explores the interventions made in spaces outside a gallery setting, including the land art of Robert Smithson, Oldenburg's giant everyday objects, Serra's blackened steel walls and Henry Moore's biomorphic blobs. Modern culture celebrates endless change, and yet it hankers after permanence and monumentality. Sculpture is right there at the centre of this split — and at times uncomfortable, at times reassuring presence, both throw-away gesture and stable thing. Teaching is by way of seminar discussion. Assessment is based on two slide tests and an end-of-term essay. There is a required course reader that will be made available at the beginning of the term. For preliminary reading, you are recommended to consult Rosalind Krauss, Passages in Modern Sculpture (1981), available in paperback.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 002 — Black Atlantic Visual Cultures: Time & Vision. HA grid distribution: II.3,4; V.4. [3 credits]. Meets with CAAS 458.010.

Instructor(s): David T Doris (dtdoris@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will examine a variety of Black Atlantic visual cultures, both in Africa and in the Diaspora, with a focus on how historical memory and the experience of the passage of time are articulated in objects and performances. What, for example, are the poetics of trying to reclaim historical "African" origins when such a reconstruction is by definition impossible? The idea of allegory will run strongly through the course: the mourning of lost "ancient" wholeness marked also by the enduring hope that fragments of the past can be reassembled to redeem the present. This is not to say, of course, that the people whose lives and works we will discuss here are abjectly "living in the past" — though this very misconception has been rehearsed often in museum exhibitions devoted to the objectifying study of "Other" cultures. Here, we will address the ways in which the realities of a shifting present are addressed, in struggle, in celebration, and always in movement, throughout the African Diaspora. Classes will consist of both lectures and intensive discussion, so it will be useful — though not required — for the student to have at least some familiarity with African Cultural Studies. Evaluations will be based on in-class participation and presentations, as well as on a term project (which may or may not be a written project, depending on circumstances), and weekly written responses to the readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 489. Special Topics in Art and Culture.

Section 003 — At Home with the Greeks and Romans. Undergraduates only. HA grid distribution: IV.1. [3 credits]. Meets with CLARCH 396.001.

Instructor(s): Lisa C Nevett (lcnevett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All of us have a home, whether it consists of a whole house or a single room, and most of us have strong views about how our home should be furnished and decorated. We all know that entering into someone else's house can reveal much about his or her character. In the same way, studying the physical remains of domestic buildings — including their decoration and furnishings — reveals much about the behaviour and character of the ancient Greeks and Romans.

The course will tackle a series of topics, starting with the emergence of private housing in the Greek Dark Ages (tenth and ninth centuries B.C.) and moving forward in time through the Classical and Hellenistic periods, looking at housing from sites such as Athens, Olynthos, Pella, and Delos. Questions raised will include how and why the organisation and decoration of houses changed so dramatically over a relatively short time, and what the remains of houses tell us about broader issues such as the character of the Greek economy and the nature of social relationships. We will then move on to compare the Greek 'core' with the 'diaspora' areas, using the evidence from sites such as Himera in Sicily, Euesperides (Bengazi) in Libya. The second half of the course will cover households in various areas of the Roman world, starting with Italy itself (Rome, Pompeii and Herculaneum, Ostia), and move outwards to look at contrasting groups of evidence from some of the provinces, including North Africa (Dougga, Bulla Regia, Volubilis, Timgad and especially, the Michigan excavations at Karanis in Egypt) and the Greek East (Ephesos, Doura Europos, Antioch). Questions raised will include the extent to which it is possible to talk about a standardised 'Roman house' and the degree to which housing in different areas provides evidence for the continuity of indigenous cultural traditions.

Discussion/seminar class. Assessment will be via class participation, presentations and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 514. Spanish Art: El Greco to Goya.

Section 001 — HA grid distribution: IV.3.

Instructor(s): R Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 102. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Beginning with lectures that formulate a notion of the spiritual bond between apparently dissimilar works of Spanish art, the course passes to in-depth analyses of selected major Spanish painters from the late 16th to the early 19th C. Religious imagery, genre, still life, portraits, mythology, and landscapes by such masters as El Greco, Ribalta, Ribera, Velázquez, Zurbaran, Murillo, and Goya will be featured. Along the way we will confront and attempt to explain extraordinary expressive extremes, from the explosively passionate to the dream-like, from the brutal to the graceful, from the chaste to the decorative, from realism to idealism. The cultural/historical situations, the creative uniqueness, and yet the essential "Spanishness" of each of these artists will be explored. The text (J. Brown, The Golden Age of Painting in Spain, 1998) will be supplemented by readings in a required course pack and in books placed on reserve in the Fine Arts Library. Students will be evaluated on the bases of midterm and final exams of essay type.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 565. Early Modern Architecture in Italy, Austria, and Germany.

Section 001 — HA grid distribution: IV.3. Meets with ARCH 528.001.

Instructor(s): Lydia Soo (lmsoo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/arch/528/001.nsf

The course examines the architecture of the Baroque period, the buildings and cities of the late sixteenth to the mid-eighteenth centuries in Italy, France, England, and Central Europe. They will be discussed in relationship to contemporary theoretical writings, addressing issues of function, structure, and beauty, as well as in relationship to the cultural context of the Baroque period, including philosophical, religious, political, economic, and environmental factors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

HISTART 581 / AAPTIS 580. Islamic Architecture: Continuity and Innovation.

Section 001 — Safavid Iran (1501 to 1722). HA grid distribution: I.3.

Instructor(s): Sussan Babaie (sbabaie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 285. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar explores the visual production of an extraordinary period in Iranian history. The Safavid spiritual and political revolution marshaled the reunification of the disparate ethnic and geographic zones of "Iran" for the first time since the advent of Islam and it launched the gradual but decisive Shi'ification of the region. We examine the visual and spatial record of this period in light of the primary sources (both Persian and European) and in conjunction with the rapidly expanding corpus of Safavid scholarship. Problems and issues to consider may include, among others: the city as history, notions of viewing and social communication, the formation of a theory of art, the interface between literary and visual styles and modes of representation, the pictorial representations and ceremonial enactments of a utopian kingdom on earth, the cultural space of race, gender and sexuality, charismatic absolutism and Shi'i notions of kingship as activated through pilgrimage (to palaces as much as to holy shrines), the artistic and urban dimensions of the early modern global competition in trade and diplomacy, etc. Genres as diverse as divination bowls and public squares, manuscript paintings and choreographed banquets will be considered through close examination of objects and texts and through field trips both near and far.

Enrollment is by permission of the instructor and is limited to 12 students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor


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