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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in College Honors


This page was created at 7:40 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 001 — A World of Math (meets Jan. 13 - March 2). Restricted to First-Year Honors Students. (Drop/Add deadline=January 26).

Instructor(s): Jeff Allotta (jallotta@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

mini/short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Have you ever wondered whether math died after the discovery of calculus? In fact, it is very much alive and more recent discoveries are quite essential in things we all now take for granted.

In this seminar, we will discuss several interesting applications of mathematics and some ideas behind mathematical research. There is no required background other than knowledge of arithmetic and elementary school algebra (it is not necessary to be able to do any of this in your head). The main focus will be on algebra and number theory. The goal of the seminar is to show you that math can be fun. Textbook: FERMAT'S ENIGMA by Simon Singh.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 002 — Artificial Languages (meets Jan. 16 - March 5). Restricted to First-Year Honors Students. (Drop/Add deadline=January 26).

Instructor(s): Max Montesino (mmontesi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

mini/short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will focus on artificial languages (languages expressly created, not those arising naturally) to examine prominent questions in linguistics, as well as to examine beliefs about what a language should be able to do and how languages look. Students will adopt-a-language, research its structure and uses (from the Internet), and report relevant data in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 003 — War, History, and Selective Memory: (Mis)Representations of the Sino-Japanese Conflict (meets Jan. 26 - March 15). Restricted to First-Year Honors Students. (Drop/Add deadline=February 11).

Instructor(s): William Gao (wgao@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

mini/short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar examines the broad relations between truth and representation. Through selected small readings, we will try to determine whether or not it is possible to depict history accurately, and what the act of representation contributes or detracts from the narrative of historical truth. The seminar will use the Japanese occupation of Manchuria as an example where representation of the event has been continuously contested, and through this example we will try to discern what forces exist to skew representations in a particular direction. This course draws from sociology, history, and political science.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 004 — Physical Sciences & the Public (meets Jan. 26 - March 15). Restricted to First-Year Honors Students. (Drop/Add deadline=February 11).

Instructor(s): Matthew Ross (mrross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

mini/short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Technology and science play a vital role in the world of today. This course will examine the interaction of the public and the physical sciences. Topics include public opinion and government policy related to physical science, physical science in relation to homeland security, and some of the advances physical science may offer in the future and how they could relate to society. For example, the possibility of quantum remote sensing and its impact on privacy, our over-dependance on new technologies, etc.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 005 — Great Films: Film, Literature, and Culture (meets Jan. 26 - March 15). Restricted to First-Year Honors Students. (Drop/Add deadline=February 11).

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Lamping (elamping@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

mini/short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In what ways does a film leave a greater impression than a book? This course is meant to be an introduction to understanding and analyzing films in literary and aesthetic terms. We will take a look at the structure, style, narration, themes, and psychology of films, and discuss how these are related to a literary genre. We will also discuss visual strategies and the ways in which they can successfully create a lasting impact on society. Special attention will be given to current films, television, music, video games, and other media in order to discuss the nature of entertainment, violence, cultural myths or stereotypes, and the role of comedy versus tragedy in society. Assignments may include bringing in audio or visual clips, watching films, or taking trips to see films, art exhibits, poetry readings, or other relevant media. My goal is to expose students to new ways of analyzing media and the world around them, and talk about media not often discussed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 006 — Student Activism and Social Change at the University of Michigan (meets Jan. 12 - March 8). Restricted to First-Year Honors Students. (Drop/Add deadline=January 26).

Instructor(s): Rob Goodspeed (rgoodspe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

mini/short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rgoodspe/honors135.006.html

In addition to a long history as one of the nation's premier research universities, the University of Michigan has a long history of student activism. In the 1930 and 40s, U-M students were actively involved in a national pacifist movement that first tested the possibilities and limitations of student activism, creating an important tradition for the future. In the 1960s and 1970s, students at the U of M and dozens of other campuses in the United States sought to redefine the relationship between students and university administrators, protest the Vietnam War, participate in the civil rights movement, and starte co-ops for housing, food, and medicine. In the 1980s, student activists nationwide pressured institutions to divest from corporations that did business with South Africa's Apartheid regime, and the 1990s have seen student activism related to campus police, secret societies, sweatshop labor, and civil rights.

This course will examine three specific periods of student activism at the University: Students for a Democratic Society's (SDS) antiwar and civil rights protests of the late 1960s and early 1970s, The Black Action Movement (BAM) strike in the early 1970s pressuring the University to admit underrepresented minorities, and the Michigamua Tower sit-in in 2000 when the Students of Color Coalition (SCC) sought to bring to light the activities of a secret campus honor society.

We will explore the events in depth through newspaper articles, memoirs of participants, primary sources, and perhaps one or more class visitors. We will explore how different students and administrators viewed the events, who participated in the protests, and how the relationship between administration and students changed over time. How have students' activities related to larger political debates? What are the possibilities and limitations of student protest to effect change? Sources will include selections from the following:

  • The Michigan Daily, and other newspapers;
  • Ayers, William — Fugitive Days: A memoir (Boston: Beacon Press, 2001);
  • Davis, Henry Vance — The University since BAM: Twenty Years of Progress? (Ann Arbor, Mich., Office of Minority Affairs, UM, c1990);
  • Fleming, Robben — Tempests into Rainbows: Managing Turbulence (Ann Arbor, UM Press,1996).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 007 — What Is Scientific Research and What Does it Entail? (meets Jan. 26 - March 15). Restricted to First-Year Honors Students. (Drop/Add deadline=February 11).

Instructor(s): Seetharam Chadalavada (schad@umich.edu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

mini/short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Are you interested in the sciences? Are you thinking about being a doctor or research scientist? There are many interested in pursuing this goal. In this section we will explore and create plans for individuals to get on the proper track. One of the most important backgrounds to have is research. Scientific research encourages reasoning ability, creativity, and mastery of a particular topic. Many discover through experience that the simplest questions remain unanswered and are the most difficult to conquer. As a section we will develop contacts with University faculty for each student to get a foundation for what student research entails. We will cultivate and implement strategies to negotiate with your mentor about your assigned responsibilities and possible authorships. We will devise plans for students to earn summer fellowships/grants and pursue work that results in a thesis or a publication. In addition, we will have workshops to learn how to write proposals that stand out and maximize your chances for funding. As a supplement to the classroom, we will visit selected laboratories that work in areas ranging from stem cell to biomedical research. In the concluding weeks, we will learn about getting published in technical and non-technical journals and the different writing styles that each requires. In this section, we will explore these and many more student guided topics. Students should have interest in science and be willing to share their knowledge and experiences. Hopefully after our time exploring the various avenues of scientific research, we will leave with a broadened perspective of what academic research entails.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 008 — Relativity and Quantum Physics (meets Feb. 10 - April 6). Restricted to First-Year Honors Students. (Drop/Add deadline=March 1).

Instructor(s): Walter Dulany (wdulany@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

mini/short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

General relativity and quantum mechanics are the two of the most important and famous discoveries of the past century, but despite their fame they are not widely understood. This course will give an easy introduction to the fundamental ideas behind these two subjects, their implications, the points at which they conflict, and possible resolutions of these conflicts.The only prerequisites for this course are a desire to understand new things and an ability and willingness to think. There will be no real mathematics (nothing even approaching calculus), but there may be a small amount of reading.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 009 — The politics of gender: campus and beyond (meets Feb. 12 - April 7). Restricted to First-Year Honors Students. (Drop/Add deadline=March 3).

Instructor(s): Noel Egnatios (negnatio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

mini/short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will discuss gender in a way that begins focused and abstract and ends as a universal discussion of the concrete issues of today. Gender and politics within the Greek System at UofM will be the key focus of part two of the course. Discussion topics will include:

  1. Introduction to gender
    1. term identification (i.e., "gender", "sex", etc.)
    2. feminist theory as it relates to the study of gender
    3. important research in gender studies
    4. ideological debates in the field
  2. Gender and campus politics
    1. groups and power
    2. the Greek system (*this is where my research would fit in)
    3. "gendered crimes" on campus (i.e., rape, hazing)
  3. Beyond campus: "Gender, gender everywhere"
    1. discussion of the politics of gender in American government
    2. gender in the media
      1. advertising
      2. popular music
      3. media coverage of rape and sexual harassment
    3. the changing face of gender in America
      1. the "metrosexual" male
      2. increasing sexualization of men
      3. body dismorphia and eating disorders

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 135. Ideas in Honors.

Section 010 — Poetry of Structures, Materials, and Machines. Meets March 3-April 21. (Drop/Add deadline=March 16).

Instructor(s): Zachary Caple (zcaple@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First-year standing in the Honors Program. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

mini/short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this class we will engineer light to make obvious the contours, binding sites, and micro-components of poetic materials and devices. We will take our lead from the engineer - and borrow heavily - in order to modify meaning and images to our specifications.

Individuals are responsible for assessing their own performance. Consequently, the workload will range in density depending on how the student wishes the universe (or the universe wishes her) to mean. Required writing will take place in a workbook; additional poems and projects are encouraged. Readings will come from: Made to Measure: New Materials for the 21st Century by Philip Ball, Set in Motion: Essays, Interviews, and Dialogues and Brink Road by A.R. Ammons.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 001 — Organizational Behavior, Structure, & Dynamics: Behavior Of & In Organizations. [Honors].

Instructor(s): John E Tropman (tropman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/honors/250/001.nsf

This course examines the behavior in organizations as well as the behavior of organizations. We all work in "organizations." How does the organizational environment affect what we do and how we act? What are the main kinds of organizational cultures and how do we fit into them? Four cultures will be specifically explored: the clan culture, the hierarchy culture, the market culture, and the adhocracy culture. Implications for us personally will be considered. But organizations are also actors; organizations make, or do not make, decisions. They need to contend with rapidly changing environments, and those which fail to contend appropriately will become "boiled frogs." We will examine what characterizes organizations which learn and adapt, and what distinguishes them from those which are rigid, and die. Clearly issues of leading and managing play a crucial role in success or failure. We will look at what leadership is in an organizational context, and how it is distinguished from managing. Students will have the opportunity to undertake a term-long project, and report on it in the sessions after Spring Break.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 002 — Social Science Methods for Policy Analysis. [Honors].

Instructor(s): William Birdsall (birdz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The intention of this course is to introduce students to a spectrum of social science research methods useful for policy analysis through an extended example of reducing sexual abuse of children. The methods will include multivariate statistical analysis of the determinants of confessing to child molestation, a qualitative case study of a successful county, and legal research methods. These methods will be taught in conjunction with how to prepare and present policy analyses. Students will apply one or more of these methods to a policy problem of their own choosing. They will present a written and oral report for an actual decision making body that has responsibility.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 003 — Alternative Realities: Science and the Study of Human Perception. [Honors].

Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will investigate a number of broad, highly subjective, inherently interesting questions about the nature of human perception. The broadest of these will be the question of cultural relativism: Do people from widely different cultures experience immediate reality in fundamentally different ways? The alternative realities to be explored will be those attributable to cultures, subcultures, cults, historical eras, substances (i.e., drugs), and mental illness. Most importantly, the scientific enterprise, as one mode among others, of establishing an order of reality will also be presented in this context. Grades will be determined by weekly commentaries and one paper written by each student.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 250. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 004 — Law and Psychology. [Honors].

Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will study the relationship between law and psychology within a general framework. We examine a number of real cases that have been covered by the popular press (e.g., the trial of Lorena Bobbitt) as well as some fictional accounts (e.g., Grisham's "A Time to Kill") with regard to how the law defines the limits of personal responsibility. We will also discuss the psychological import of the legal issues in these cases such as the insanity defense and battered wife syndrome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 251. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 001 — Religion in Modern India. [Honors]. Meets with ASIAN 253.001.

Instructor(s): Pashaura Singh (psingh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ASIAN 253.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HONORS 252. Sophomore Seminar.

Section 001 — Numbers and Reasons. [Honors].

Instructor(s): Fred L Bookstein (flb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students with sophomore standing. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an underclass course in how numbers are used in argument about patterns in the world. Initially it appears that these uses are diverse. Measurement in the natural sciences typically deals with true values (constants); measurement in the behavioral and social sciences, with problems of managing social systems. Measurements in sciences on the boundary, like neuropsychology or medicine, attempt with variable success to capture stable latent aspects of individual hidden states or histories. In this course we try to sort out much of this variation by careful attention to the logical role of quantification in the versions of reality constructed by the various disciplines we consider, from astrophysics through historical sociology. The approach is by various methods, including cognition, arithmetic, history of science, and the careful analysis of instrument readings, answers to questions, and various visual representations of same. Four specifically statistical themes — least squares, the normal distribution, inverse probability, and regression — are covered in brief lectures, but there is no associated "homework."

Reading load: heavy, about 1500 pages over the academic term, plus an optional reading list of some 75 additional volumes. Writing: Four short papers and a term paper Maximum class size — 12 Enrollment is by permission of the Honors Office.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/department

HONORS 290. Honors Introduction to Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The opportunity is created to enable highly qualified underclassmen to elect a course for independent, guided study under the direction of a professor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HONORS 291. Honors Introduction to Scientific Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A research tutorial course in which the participating student serves as a research assistant for a staff scientist. Valuable research experience and a more personal association with the University research program are provided. Each student is expected to work about four hours a week for each credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HONORS 292. Honors Introduction to Scientific Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A research tutorial course in which the participating student serves as a research assistant for a staff scientist. Valuable research experience and a more personal association with the University research program are provided. Each student is expected to work about four hours a week for each credit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HONORS 390. Junior Honors Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent research under supervision of faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HONORS 490. Senior Honors Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to upperclass Honors concentrators. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of HONORS 490, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent research under supervision of faculty. Includes preparation of undergraduate thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

HONORS 493. College Honors Seminar.

Section 001 — Pop(ular) Buddhism. [Honors]. [3 credits]. Meets with INSTHUM 311.002 and Asian Studies 380.002

Instructor(s): Donald S Lopez Jr (dlopez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See INSTHUM 311.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

HONORS 493. College Honors Seminar.

Section 002 — Modern Empires in Pacific Asia. [Honors]. [3 credits]. Meets with HISTORY 472.001

Instructor(s): Leslie Pincus (lpincus@umich.edu), Mark Nornes (amnornes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/honors/493/002.nsf

This course will explore the histories and practices of the nineteenth and twentieth-century empires, both Western and Asian in provenance, that have shaped and linked the modern histories of Pacific Asia (East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Pacific Islands) and Euro-America: The Netherlands in what is now Indonesia, Great Britain in parts of China, Hong Kong, Burma, Malaysia and Singapore; France in Vietnam, Laos, and Cambodia; Japan in Taiwan, Korea, China, Southeast Asia and the Pacific Islands. We will pay special attention to America's "informal" empire in Pacific Asia that took renewed shape in a powerful military presence following WWII in places like Japan, Korea, Guam, and the Philippines, where U.S. occupations and bases have been most conspicuous. We will address questions about the origins and structures of these imperial regimes in the modern era as well as the lasting imprint they have left on the collective memories and societies of the Pacific Asian region. Students will have an opportunity to view the history of empire and its aftermaths through a prism of multiple approaches-including both large historical narratives and "vignettes" from different disciplines and genres including history, literature, cartography, memoir, the mass media, and material culture. Course materials to be purchased by students will include a substantial course pack and several texts, both fiction and nonfiction. The course will be conducted as a collaborative endeavor in seminar format. Students will be asked to write up a number of short "response papers" as well as one larger project based on primary sources or archival research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

HONORS 493. College Honors Seminar.

Section 003 — Pacific Places and Routes: Culture & History in Oceania. [Honors]. [3 credits]. Meets with ANTHRCUL 357.001.

Instructor(s): Stuart A Kirsch, Diaz

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ANTHRCUL 357.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

HONORS 493. College Honors Seminar.

Section 004 — Altered Encounters: Global Change & Asian Cities. [Honors]. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Gavin Shatkin (shatkin@umich.edu), Aseem Inam (aseem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/up/697/032.nsf

This course will examine social and cultural change in Asian societies through the lens of the region's cities, and the changes they are undergoing in this era of globalization. Asia is rapidly urbanizing, and half of Asians will live in cities by 2025. What has this transition meant for the lived experience of Asian people? For the development of political institutions? For culture? How have women been affected by this transition, and what has it meant for household relations? What has it meant for the poor, and for the wealthy? The course will specifically look at the ways that such change has been reflected in the social and cultural life, the literature, film, language, and religious practices in cities. It will combine readings and discussion, guest lectures from University of Michigan faculty, and films on urban topics. Finally, students will work during the semester on group projects looking in depth at change in a specific city of their choosing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HONORS 493. College Honors Seminar.

Section 005 — Exploring the Psychological Underground of Power. [Honors]. [3 credits]. Meets with PSYCH 401.001.

Instructor(s): David G Winter (dgwinter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/honors/493/005.nsf

This course examines power from several related psychological perspectives. We begin with a survey of the phenomenology of power--that is, what it "feels like" to exercise power over another person or group. We discuss interpretations of this phenomenology by Freud, Canetti, and other theorists. We then explore several topics relating to power: (1) some possible biological and physiological bases of these feelings (2) psychological theories about the nature and meaning of the power experience, (3) the effects of power on others-both good effects (e.g., inspirational leadership) and bad (oppression), (4) the effects on the powerholder, (5) links between power, aggression, and sexuality, (6) power and the creation of "difference" among people, (7) the psychological and cultural origins of power drives, and (8) whether (and how) power can be tamed or even given up completely. The readings will be drawn not only from psychology but also from other social sciences, and from literature."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

HONORS 493. College Honors Seminar.

Section 006 — Race & Identity in Western Art Music. [Honors]. [3 credits]. Meets with WOMENSTD 483.004, WOMENSTD 698.001, MUSICOL 405.001 and MUSICOL 505.001.

Instructor(s): Naomi André (nandre@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor or of the Honors Director. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Repetition requires permission of the Honors Program.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See WOMENSTD 483.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


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This page was created at 7:40 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.


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