Information for Prospective Students Information for First-Year Students Information for Transfer Students Information for International Students Learning Communities, Study Abroad, Theme Semester Calendars Quick Reference Forms Listings Table of Contents SAA Search Feature Academic Advising, Concentration Advising, How-tos, and Degree Requirements Academic Standards Board, Academic Discipline, Petitions, and Appeals SAA Advisors and Support Staff

Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Latin American and Caribbean Studies


This page was created at 7:39 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


Quechua, the language of the Inkas, is spoken today by millions of people in Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, and Colombia. It has a written literature that goes back to the sixteenth century. The U-M Quechua Language course meets the LS&A undergraduate language requirement. Quechua is offered as a regular course during the academic year at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and as an intensive summer course in Cuzco, Peru.


LACS 399. Thesis-Writers' Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David L Frye (dfrye@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of LACS 399, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Senior Thesis required for the interdepartmental concentration program in Latin American and Caribbean Studies is intended to deepen your understanding of a specific issue or problem in the field, while drawing together your work in separate disciplines. It represents a significant amount of work, and provides you with an opportunity to work closely with an individual faculty member while exploring in greater depth issues that may have arisen in your earlier course work and research. (If you are interested in Latin America and the Caribbean but cannot devote a considerable amount of energy in your senior year to such a project, you might consider the LACS Undergraduate Minor, which has no thesis requirement.) For more information about LACS 399, please contact the LACS Student Advisor at 763-0553.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LACS 400 / HISTORY 578 / CAAS 478. Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America.

Section 001 — Race and Popular Culture in 20th-Century Brazil. Taught in Portuguese. Meets with PORTUG 474.001.

Instructor(s): Paul Johnson

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 202 recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will read, view and interpret Afro-Brazilian cultural forms (like samba, Carnaval, the orixás, and feijoada), European forms "africanized" in Brazil (like futebol, the musical form of choro, and spiritualism), and contemporary forms imported and indigenized (like rap). We will examine such sub-cultures as they have shifted in status from the margins to the center over the course of the last century. We will ask why and how this shift occurred. We will raise the question of whether such forms have been "whitened" and "folkloricized" to become national forms rather than specifically Afro-Brazilian ones, and how this might change their meanings. Throughout this journey, we will hold in focus the leitmotiv of "race" as it was configured, and is configured today, in the nation-building process of Brazil.

Reading and discussion in Portuguese only, with occasional and limited English. At least semi-conversational Portuguese required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LACS 400 / HISTORY 578 / CAAS 478. Ethnicity and Culture in Latin America.

Section 002 — Slavery, Disease and Race: A View from Brazil. Meets with PORTUG 474.002.

Instructor(s): Sidney Chalhoub

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 202 recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Slavery and emancipation were the major issues in nineteenth-century Brazilian history. The question of slavery and the African slave trade deeply divided the dominant classes in the years of Independence and formation of the nation-state (1820s and early 1830s). In the context of increasing social unrest, slave rebellion and the growth of coffee cultivation, the propertied classes had rallied their energies for the continuation of slavery by mid-century. In the 1850's, devastating epidemics of yellow fever and cholera made social perceptions of disease an integral part of the history of slavery and emancipation in Brazil. In the 1870's and 1880's, with the drama of emancipation unfolding, yellow fever meant death to European immigrants and a major obstacle to achieving a social configuration that valued the whitening ideal and excluded people of African descent from social and economic opportunities. Thus the interplay of slavery, disease and racial ideologies is a major theme in nineteenth-century Brazilian history, and one that suggests the need to seek broad comparative perspectives in such matters. Although the primary focus of this course is Brazil, students may opt to write a final paper that compares an aspect of the social history of disease and/or slavery in Brazil and another nation or region.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LACS 455. Topics in Latin American Studies.

Section 001 — Religions of the African Diaspora. Meets with CAAS 458.007 and PORTUG 474.003.

Instructor(s): Paul Johnson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This survey course offers an overview of the religions of the African Diaspora. Beginning with a theorization and genealogy of the concept of diaspora itself, the course provides overviews of Brazilian Candomblé and Umbanda; Cuban Santería; Haitian Vodou; Jamaican (and globalized) Rastafarianism; the ancestor religion of the Garifuna of Honduras, Guatemala and Belize; Obeah/ orisha practices of Trinidad; and the Afro-Baptist tradition and Pentecostal roots of the Black Church in the U.S. Key issues will include the way "Africa" is recreated in ritual practice, the experience of exile and transculturation, and common ritual tropes such as spirit possession.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LACS 455. Topics in Latin American Studies.

Section 002 — Literature and Social History (Brazil). Meets with CAAS 458.008 and HISTORY 478.002 and PORTUG 474.004.

Instructor(s): Sidney Chalhoub

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In writing their stories, 19th and early 20th-century Brazilian novelists sought to describe and interpret the history of the nation since independence. As is the case elsewhere, such novelists thought that writing fiction was to analyze social transformations, to debate the meaning of history and to project the future of the nation. The course will focus primarily on the evidence regarding changes in the politics of social dominance prevailing in the period -from slavery and paternalism to the worlds and meanings of "free" labor. Thus, questions of race, class and gender in the more general context of defining and setting the new limits of citizenship rights will be emphasized. Novels (a tentative list): Alencar, José de, Senhora. Profile of a Woman, Austin, University of Texas Press, 1994 (1st. edition: 1875). Almeida, Manoel Antônio de, Memoirs of a Militia Sergeant, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1999 (1st. edition: Memórias de um Sargento de Milícias, 1855). Azevedo, Aluísio, The Slum, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 2000 (1st. edition: O Cortiço, 1890). Azevedo, Aluísio, Mulatto, Austin, University of Texas Press, 1990 (1st. edition: O Mulato, 1881). Machado de Assis, Helena, Berkeley, University of California Press, 1984 (1st. edition: 1876). Machado de Assis, The Posthumous Memoirs of Brás Cubas, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1997 (1st. edition: 1880). Machado de Assis, Dom Casmurro, Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1997 (1st. edition: 1899).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LACS 471. Elementary Quechua, I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Callalli

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Introduces students with little or no Quechua proficiency to conversational and cultural skills needed to use the language in real life situations. Covers both written and spoken Quechua; introduces basic structures of Quechua while focusing on the development of speaking and reading skills; emphasis is on developing conversational ability. Those who successfully finish this course will gain sustained control of basic conversation. Evaluations based on homework, weekly quizzes, reading aloud, interviews.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LACS 472. Elementary Quechua, II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ines Callalli

Prerequisites & Distribution: Quechua 471. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Introduces students with little or no Quechua proficiency to conversational and cultural skills needed to use the language in real life situations. Covers both written and spoken Quechua; introduces basic structures of Quechua while focusing on the development of speaking and reading skills; emphasis is on developing conversational ability. Those who successfully finish this course will gain sustained control of basic conversation. Evaluations based on homework, weekly quizzes, reading aloud, interviews.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LACS 474. Intermediate Quechua, II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ines Callalli

Prerequisites & Distribution: Quechua 473. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Emphasis is on conversational skills and grammatical structure. Students learn complex structural patterns, build up vocabulary, get acquainted with Andean culture and society, and develop conversation skills. Evaluation based on homework, quizzes, readings, and interviews.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LACS 476. Advanced Quechua, II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ines Callalli

Prerequisites & Distribution: Quechua 475. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Improves conversation skills, builds up vocabulary, and heightens reading ability in Quechua. Strengthened aural/oral training is given. Students work with original, unedited texts as well as with edited, re-transcribed materials in Quechua literature. Reading materials inform students of Andean culture, history, and literature. Students learn more accurate syntax, pragmatic ways of expression, and ways of thinking in Quechua. Evaluation based on attendance, homework, exams, class activities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LACS 499. Reading and Research in Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of Instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent reading and research in Latin American and Caribbean Studies under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in Latin American and Caribbean Studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor


Page


This page was created at 7:39 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.


lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Advising Technology (webmaster_saa@umich.edu), G255-E Angell Hall

Copyright © 2004 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.