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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Linguistics


This page was created at 7:07 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



LING 151. Elementary American Sign Language II.

Section 002, 003.

Instructor(s): Theresa Ann Kales

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 150. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a continuation of LING 150. Students will continue to learn to use and recognize selected grammatical structures of American Sign Language (ASL) for use in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics. Additional vocabulary is introduced to expand students' communicative skills in ASL conversations. Students also will learn additional ways of forming questions in ASL to enhance skills in using and recognizing a variety of ASL structures. Upon completion of LING 151, students will be able to observe basic courtesies while making introductions, giving directions, and conversing about past, present, and future events in ASL. Regular attendance is essential. Participation in class includes role playing in selected situational activities. Class will meet two days, two hours a day.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 210. Introduction to Linguistic Analysis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John M Lawler (jlawler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~jlawler/210.html

Nothing is more distinctly human than our ability to use language. Because of that, we expect that the study of language can provide insight into "human nature." This course is an analytic introduction to the methods linguists use for describing languages (although general training in analytic thought is our ultimate goal). Drawing on examples from a large number of the world's languages, we will look at the sounds of language, how they are produced and how they pattern into words; we will study the diverse ways in which individual languages approach processes of word and sentence formation, while we ask whether there are processes universal to all languages. By focusing simultaneously on language data and on the techniques used by linguists to make sense of these data, we will see that our understanding of the object of inquiry (language) is influenced by our methods of inquiry. Requirements include problem-solving assignments, midterm and final exams; no prerequisites except an interest in language and thinking.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 211. Introduction to Language.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Acrisio M Pires (pires@umich.edu), Deborah Keller-Cohen (dkc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/ling/211/001.nsf

Human beings have always been curious about the uniquely human possession, human language — about its structure, its diversity, its use and its effects on others. This course explores the human capacity for language. We begin with the discussion of the uniqueness of human language and then review major properties of language structure including sound systems, word and sentence structure, meaning and their use. We explore how these properties relate to language acquisition, processing/computation, conversation and writing. The course also considers the rich variation of language in terms of language change, dialects, and identity. Course requirements include regular homework and in-class assignments, one mid-term exam and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 251. Intermediate American Sign Language II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Theresa Ann Kales (tkales@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 250. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will continue to learn communicative structures of American Sign Language (ASL) and develop further skills in the use of physical space to recognize and express various meanings. Vocabulary and idiomatic expressions will be expanded to cover increasingly varied settings. Students completing LING 251 will be able to communicate in ASL in a range of conversational interactions. Regular attendance is essential. Participation in class includes situational role-playing and class presentations. LING 250 is a pre-requisite for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 272 / ANTHRCUL 272. Language in Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James Patrick Herron (jherron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/272/001.nsf

See ANTHRCUL 272.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

LING 305. Advertising Rhetoric.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey G Heath (jheath@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/ling/305/001.nsf

This course considers how verbal and visual advertising messages are interpreted by consumers in a cultural context. 40% of the course is spent on analysis of familiar products and services such as cars, diamonds, and banks. Consumers typically have contradictory desires regarding such products (e.g., a car should be roomy yet compact, and sporty yet comfortable). This is further complicated by the ambivalent attitude of audiences to advertising communications in general. Another 40% of the course is spent showing how this rhetorical framework accounts for the deployment of formal resources, such as photographic styles and typeface selections, in magazine ads. The remaining 20% is spent in creative competitions where small groups of students design semi-finished magazine ad drafts. No artistic experience is expected, and the course is not open to students from the School of Art.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 313. Sound Patterns.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jose R Benki (benki@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 or 211. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~benki/L313/Ling313syllabusF03.pdf

This course explores two fundamental aspects of the sounds of human languages: speech sounds as physical entities (phonetics) and speech sounds as linguistic units (phonology). In viewing sounds as physical elements, the focus is articulatory descriptions: How are speech sounds made? What types of articulatory movements and configurations are used to differentiate sounds in the world's languages? In this part of the course, the goal is to learn to produce, transcribe, and describe in articulatory terms many of the sounds known to occur in human languages. In the second part of the course, the focus is on sounds as members of a particular linguistic system. Phonological data from a wide range of languages are analyzed — that is, regularities or patterns in sound distribution are extracted from the data set and then stated within a formal phonological framework. We will also construct arguments to support the proposed analyses, and will find that phonetic factors play a crucial role in validating phonological analyses. Throughout the course, a major emphasis is that speech sounds are simultaneously physical and linguistic elements, and that these two aspects of sound structure are interdependent. Class sessions will consist of lectures, phonetic practice, and discussion of phonological data sets. Each student will also write a research paper on the phonetics and phonology of a language. Course grades will be based on weekly assignments, midterm, research paper, and a take-home final exam. LING 210, 211, 411, or permission of instructor is required to take the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 315. Introduction to Syntax.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven P Abney (abney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 or 211. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course investigates the syntax (sentence structure properties) of human language. It addresses the need for a scientific model to explain human knowledge of language that also makes predictions about its representation in the mind. The focus here is on human language as a specific cognitive capacity restricted to humans, rather than on the individual languages (e.g., English, Arabic, Hindi) that are made possible by the existence of this capacity. For this reason, the course explores in detail many structural properties that are common across different languages, even those that clearly do not share a common recent past. A simple example: all languages have specific strategies to ask questions that make them different from affirmative sentences (e.g., English uses special question words — 'who', 'what' and so on — as most languages do). In order to explain this and many other common properties of human language, a scientific hypothesis that has been explored in depth is that a large part of human knowledge of language is biologically determined, and maybe innate. This is further supported by the fact that normal children effortlessly learn their native language at an amazing speed, despite the complexity of the task at hand (compare trying to learn for example Korean or Turkish as an adult, with years of language classes), and despite variation and deficiencies of the language input they are exposed to.

it is also clear, however, that there is a huge diversity among human languages, which can be illustrated only in an unfair way in this short description (e.g., only some languages change the sentence structure in a regular question: you say 'Who do you like?' in English, instead of 'You like who?', a possible word order similar to the one would find for instance in Chinese). Given this kind of diversity, which will be made clear, children need to be exposed to some minimum input of a particular language in order to be able to acquire it proficiently. Therefore, a major question that arises in modern linguistic inquiry and that will be object of this course is how the hypothesis of a biological basis for human language — which provides an explanation for the common aspects among all human languages and for the striking success of the acquisition task — can be reconciled with the obvious diversity of the human language experience. Course requirements include (bi-)weekly assignments, a midterm and a final exam.

Prerequisites: Although there are no official prerequisites, students usually take one introductory course in linguistics (LING 210, 211 or 212) before taking this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 344 / ASIANLAN 344. The Languages of South Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter E Hook (pehook@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/ling/344/001.nsf

Introduces the student to the linguistic structures of South Asian languages and examines the role of languages in the formation of ethnic, communal, and cultural identity in the nations of the subcontinent.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 345. Languages and Peoples of Eastern Europe, Russia and the Caucasus.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vitalij V Shevoroshkin (vvs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a brief acquaintance with 150 languages and peoples of Eastern Europe, Russia, and Caucasus — "a mountain of languages."

Topics will include:

  • Spread of the Russian language in Siberia, Caucasus, and Central Asia, as compared with the expansion of English in America
  • Russification policy in the former Soviet Union
  • Languages of Eastern Europe and Russia under dictatorship
  • Language as a weapon: forbidden books, songs, and anecdotes as a tool which ultimately brought down the Communist system in Eastern Europe and Russia
  • Cultural differences between peoples speaking different languages
  • National character as seen through the language: differences in the meaning of the words FREEDOM, FRIENDSHIP, EMOTION in Russian and in English
  • Russian and East European languages today: a massive borrowing from American English
  • Recent achievements in language study in Russia and Eastern Europe.

Specialists in the area as well as singers of native songs will be invited. Several video films will be shown. Students will be evaluated by their discussion in class, as well as by their written homework.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

LING 352(451) / PSYCH 352. Development of Language and Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan A Gelman (gelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/352/001.nsf

See PSYCH 352.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of Instructor

LING 370 / ANTHRCUL 370. Language and Discrimination: Language as Social Statement.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edward R Barrett (rustyb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 210 recommended. (3). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rustyb/370/

This course examines the role of language attitudes in maintaining (often unrecognized) forms of discrimination based on race, ethnicity, gender, and national or regional origin. We examine the interplay between language and ideological processes which function below the level of consciousness, particularly the ways in which prejudice towards particular varieties of English (as well as towards other languages) plays a role in racial discrimination. We are concerned with the suppression of linguistic variation; that is, with the development of a standard language ideology, which is understood to be a bias toward an abstracted, idealized, (but ultimately unattainable) homogeneous spoken language, modeled on variants favored by the white, middle-class American mainstream and often assumed to be the only "correct" way of speaking American English. Many people depend on standard language ideology without ever examining or even being aware of the assumptions it entails. In this course, we will look into those assumptions, which are both linguistic and social. We will examine the ways in which prejudiced views about language are institutionalized by the media, the entertainment industry, school systems, the business community, and the judicial system. The effect of the standard language ideology and the practices of these institutions is to suppress perfectly functional language variation through the hegemonic assumption that there is a "correct" way to speak English and that all Americans must learn to speak English in a particular way. This course should be of interest to those interested in linguistics, anthropology, ethnic studies, women's studies, law, and education. An introductory linguistics course would be helpful but is not essential.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 385. Experiential Practice.

Section 001 — [3 credits].

Instructor(s): John William Mclaughlin (johnmcl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course students, participate in a service project or projects that draw on their knowledge of linguistics. In addition, we will meet as a seminar that complements the placement. Some weeks the seminar will meet as a whole group to discuss readings relevant to your projects or to discuss general issues that arise in the course of your work.

In the past project sites have included:

  • The Family Literacy Institute,
  • the University Center for the Development of Language and Literacy (formerly the UM's Communicative Disorders Clinic),
  • assistance with an ESL course at the UM English Language Institute and
  • UM Family Housing ESL Program.

Some of these are daytime opportunities and some are after school and evening.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor

LING 395. Individual Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

LING 408 / ENGLISH 408. Varieties of English.

Section 001 — Early Middle English Texts. Meets with ENGLISH 503.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Toon (ttoon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See ENGLISH 408.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 429. Discourse Analysis and Language Teaching.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Malcolm Swales (jmswales@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 313, 316, or 315. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What are the connections between language, linguistics, and language teaching materials? In particular, how can the recent advances in discourse analysis and corpus linguistics be built into tasks and exercises? This practical course is designed to give participants training in the processes of collecting authentic language data, analyzing that data, and converting it into appropriate pedagogical formats.

Although the main focus of illustration will be ESL, every effort will be made to accommodate other interests. There will be one or two guest speakers, and use will be made of the Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English (MICASE).

The course text is Guy Cook "Discourse Analysis", available at Shaman Drum. Other materials will be on reserve at the Linguistics/ELI Library.

Assessed work will consist of a number of shorter exercises and a final major project (group or individual). Graduate students will also produce a short academic paper.

Toward the end of the academic term, we will round off the course with a mini-conference in the English Language Institute, where the final projects will reappear in either presentation or poster format!

Inquiries to jmswales@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 001 — Multilingualism:Societies&Prac. Meets with ANTHRCUL 458.001/675.001 and LING 792.001.

Instructor(s): Judith T Irvine (jti@umich.edu) , Ann Lesley Milroy (amilroy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/458/001.nsf

See ANTHRCUL 458.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 002 — Intro to HPSG (Head-driven Phrase Structure Grammar) Syntax. Meets with Ling 792.002.

Instructor(s): William H Baxter III (wbaxter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 003 — Natural Language Processing System. Meets with Anthro 458.002 and Ling 792.005.

Instructor(s): Steven P Abney (abney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course looks at natural language processing (NLP) systems; the aim is to provide students with an overview of how NLP systems are put together. There will be an emphasis on natural language understanding (NLU), as opposed to generation or machine translation, and we will focus particularly on parsing, which forms the heart of any (reasonably sophisticated) NLU system. The course assumes basic programming abilities, but there are no formal prerequisites.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 492. Topics in Linguistics.

Section 004 — Voice of America's Ethnic Minorities: Language Change, Maintenance and Loss.

Instructor(s): Renee L Blake

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How speakers see themselves and how they are seen by others are often linked to the language that they speak and the linguistic choices they make. In the present course, we will consider the interaction of language and ethnicity. We will look at the role of language in the construction of identity, particularly ethnic and racial identity. Further, we will consider in-group and out-group uses of language alike. In particular, we will look at four sets of ethnic minorities in the U.S.: African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans.

Language, language attitudes, language use-none of these is neutral. We will examine American language ideology, not only those aspects of it that are widely held among Americans generally, but also facets that differ from group to group and may be contested between groups. We will consider the politics of language in America, including the current school-centered controversies over bilingual education and the acknowledgment of "Ebonics". With regard to formal education, we will look at its role in language socialization, particularly in the language socialization of minority children.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 494. Undergraduate Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the concentration advisor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent study course for undergraduates.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

LING 495. Senior Honors Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (LING 496), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent senior Honors reading course for undergraduates.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

LING 496. Senior Honors Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent senior Honors reading course for undergraduates.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

LING 513. Phonology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Edward R Barrett (rustyb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 313. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Phonology studies the sound system of human languages. This course introduces the fundamental concepts in phonology. Topics include distinctive features, phonological rules, prosodic structure (syllable, stress, tone, intonation), multi-tiered phonology, feature geometry, underspecification, and Optimality Theory. Both theory and problem-solving ability will be emphasized. Besides readings for class, weekly exercises constitute an important part of the course. In addition, there is a final project on a selected topic.

Prerequisite: LING 313 or 512, or permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

LING 514. Semantics and Pragmatics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peter Ludlow (ludlow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LING 316. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces four tools for semantic analysis, their relation to current issues in semantic theory, and their relation to an overall picture of what meaning is and how it is encoded in natural language. The four tools are:

  1. (intensional) predicate and propositional logic,
  2. discourse representation theory,
  3. situation theory, and
  4. generalized quantifier theory.

These tools are couched in the truth-functional approach to what meaning is, according to which language is basically classificational — linguistic expressions (words, predicates, sentences) serve to classify reality into what is the case and what isn't the case. With these tools, we will explore current issues in semantics relating to the syntax-semantics interface, quantification, scope and anaphora, information packaging and the various ways in which meaning and context interact.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1


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