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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

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Courses in Political Science


This page was created at 7:00 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



POLSCI 101. Introduction to Political Theory.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mika Tapani Lavaque-Manty (mmanty@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/101/001.nsf

This course offers an introduction to some of the major — and even some minor — figures in Western political thought, from ancient Greece to our day. Our goal is to understand how the contributions of various thinkers at different times have helped people answer enduring questions about political life: What is justice? Must we obey political authorities? What is human good? What may do in our pursuit of our goals? The course will combine historical with contemporary readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

POLSCI 111. Introduction to American Politics.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth W Kollman, Vincent L Hutchings , Arthur Lupia

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A critical introduction to American politics with an emphasis on elections and public opinion; the functioning of political parties and interest groups; decision-making in the national congress, the presidency, and the federal courts; and the connections (or lack thereof) between democratic processes and public policies.

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POLSCI 140. Introduction to Comparative Politics.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald F Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/140/001.nsf

This course examines how democracy evolves and functions in different settings around the world. We start with the emergence of democracy in Western Europe, examining the factors that give rise to it and help it survive. We then examine the origins of fascism in Germany and Japan; and the rise of communism in Russia and China, attempting to understand why these alternatives to democracy flourished in those settings — and why they later collapsed. This leads to an analysis of the current struggle between reformers and hardliners over the move to market economies and liberal democracy in Russia, China, and Eastern Europe, and an assessment of the prospects for democracy in Mexico, Iran and India. Finally, we examine the probable evolution of democracy in advanced industrial societies. In addition to two lectures, there are two meetings a week in relatively small discussion sections, designed to encourage active discussion of these topics.

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POLSCI 160. Introduction to World Politics.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James D Morrow (jdmorrow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/160/001.nsf

This course analyzes world politics from a broad and general perspective, explaining and exploring the principles involved in the functioning of the global political system and illustrating these principles with contemporary material. The course begins by presenting basic concepts like national power and reviewing well-known theories such as realism and liberalism. A strategic approach based on the combination of power, preferences, and perceptions will be explained. That approach is used to understand a variety of issues in world politics, including war, alliances, domestic politics and foreign policy, and international political economy. These issues will be presented both in general terms and applied to understand specific key events. The course requires two short papers, a midterm, and a final.

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POLSCI 300. Contemporary Political Issues.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregory B Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~gmarkus/ps300w04.html

POLSCI 300 takes up issues that are the focus of contemporary political debate in the U.S., such as taxes and spending, poverty, healthcare, and relationships between the U.S. and the rest of the world. Curiosity, initiative, and a willingness to examine ideas and "facts" critically are the essential prerequisites. We will read, discuss, write, and do a lot. You will write seven 750-word papers over the course of the academic term, worth 70 points altogether. The other 30 points is based on your contribution to class discussions and your documented participation in relevant out-of-class activities. We do not grade on a curve.

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POLSCI 302(401). Development of Political Thought: Modern and Recent.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andreas Kalyvas (akal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 101. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the history and development of modern Western political thought. We will focus on the gradual separation between politics and religion, the central role of social contact theories, the justification of private property, the ascendancy of the modern state, the re-articulation of the republican project, the displacement of sovereignty from the King to the People, and the shifting meaning of political and individual freedom. Issues related to the rise of liberalism, the transformation of constitutionalism, and the promises of socialism will be of central importance. Readings will include works by Luther and Calvin, Machiavelli, Bodin, Hobbes, Harrington, Locke, Hume, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, John Stuart Mill, and Marx. All readings will be from the original works. There are no secondary textbooks for this course. There will be a midterm and a final examination.

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POLSCI 306(406). American Political Thought.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer F Kirkpatrick

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 101 or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/306/001.nsf

This course is an introduction to the canonical texts in American political thought by linking them to significant political and social movements that attempted to "re-found" aspects of American political life. Possible movements and groups we will consider include the abolitionists, the pioneers on the Western frontier, the early labor movement, the temperance movement, the suffragettes, and the civil rights movement. The course will focus on two questions:

  1. To what extent do these movements share the theoretical concepts, ideals, and values articulated in the canonical texts of American political thought?
  2. How are fundamental theoretical concepts such as democracy, liberty, community, equality, freedom, and so on altered both by these groups themselves and in response to them?

Class meetings will consist of lecture and discussion.

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POLSCI 311(411). American Political Processes.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Debra Ann Horner

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course students have an opportunity to acquire a range of skills that are imperative to the making and evaluation of political decisions and public policy. Students will learn how to:
Identify and construct persuasive political and policy arguments,
Better understand basic microeconomics, with special emphasis on how taxes, subsidies and other government actions affect the relationship between supply and demand,
Better understand how individual preferences interact with electoral and legislative institutions to affect political decision making,
Understand when policies are implemented and enforced as their sponsors intend, and,
Serve on a debate team that is responsible for constructing and defending an argument on a current political or policy topic.

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POLSCI 314(483). American Political Parties and Electoral Problems.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we seek a broad understanding of what the American political parties are, how they operate and how they evolved, and how they compare to parties in other countries. We will study them mainly in the context of presidential and congressional elections, although we will also consider local parties, party organization, and parties in legislatures. Students will be expected to read assigned books and articles and be prepared to discuss the material. Lecture and discussion will be the format.

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POLSCI 317(412). Courts, Politics and Society.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anna R Kirkland

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/317/001.nsf

This course introduces students to the U.S. court system as an important and unique location of political decision-making. We examine courts and legal actors at all levels to understand how law shapes politics and how politics shapes law. Topics may include the role of the Supreme Court in a democracy; "adversarial legalism" in the U.S.; capacities of courts to bring about social change; roles of lawyers and social movements in litigation; debate over tort reform; and the role of U.S. courts in international human rights cases.

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POLSCI 318(413). American Constitutional Politics.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven Benjamin Dow

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a course in political science and political theory concerned with law. The course focuses on one of the most vital aspects of politics: interpreting and applying the nation's fundamental principles. It addresses: the role of language in grounding the legitimacy of the political order; the ways (if any) in which that language is translated into reality; and how those translations are justified. In connection with those general themes, we shall focus on three additional questions: WHAT is the (or a) Constitution; WHO are to be its authoritative interpreters; and HOW are those interpreters to go about the business of interpreting? We shall take up topics such as judicial review, interdepartmental relations, federalism, the power to wage war, and constitutional crisis. Some background in American history, American institutional politics, or political theory is desirable.

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POLSCI 319(414). The Politics of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven Benjamin Dow

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Theme Semester

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Examines a number of Supreme Court decisions in the field of civil liberties and civil rights. In addition to delineating the political significance of the decisions, some emphasis is also placed on the dynamics of compliance with the Court's stated policy.

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POLSCI 324(419) / CAAS 418. Black Americans and the Political System.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science; CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors and creators and initiators in the political process. The course will focus upon the inputs, the responses of the decision makers, and the outputs in terms the political process. Finally, the various controversies will be explored and analyzed in regard to African American politics.

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POLSCI 325(420) / COMM 484. Mass Media and Political Behavior.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William P Jennings (wpjennin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/comm/484/001.nsf

See COMM 484.001.

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POLSCI 326(421). American State Government.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer L Bednar (jbednar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 111 or upperclass standing (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

State governments are alternatively ignored as irrelevant, squeezed fiscally by the federal government, or championed as policy laboratories and the providers of government tailored to fit local needs. The American union began as a compact of independent states under the Articles of Confederation, but has evolved to the point where the states often seem to be no more than administrative levels of government. No education in the American government is complete without a serious examination of its vertical construction. What is the relevance of state government to the American political system? How does federalism affect our economy, our domestic policy, our foreign affairs? And how do we voters control a government divided vertically? In the second half of the course, we will examine a dozen policy areas including welfare, education, crime & policing, and the environment.

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POLSCI 340(442). Governments and Politics in Western Europe.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin W Thunert

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course introduces both the main characteristics of representative government in modern Europe as well as the political systems of major western European countries like France, Germany, Great Britain, and Italy as well as those of selected smaller countries. The course has a twofold purpose. First, it provides students with a basic knowledge of the aforementioned political systems. Second, it is designed to develop a deeper understanding of the varieties of democracy currently practised in Europe as well as of different social and economic structures. By the end of the term, students should have a basic knowledge about the aforementioned political systems and they should be able to critically discuss the different ways in which European democracies can be organized and how they actually function. The classes will mainly be based on lecturing with questions and discussion segments. The course will alternate between comparative approaches and country-specific analyses of European politics. It is not primarily a course on European Union politics, although the structure of the emerging EU political system will be discussed.

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POLSCI 343. Political Economy of Developed Democracies.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert J Franzese Jr (franzese@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~franzese/SyllabiEtc.html

This course examines the effects of democratic politics on economic policymaking, policies, and outcomes and, conversely, the effects of the economy on the conduct of democratic politics. We study how and why certain political configurations systematically produce certain kinds of economic policies and outcomes and why certain economic structures and/or conditions systematically produce certain kinds of political outcomes and electorally and partisan motivated policies. For example: What are the effects of elections — electoral rules, competition, and timing — or of government partisanship on monetary and fiscal policy? What are the effects of economic-sectoral structure on the nature of democratic competition? We aim to develop an understanding of the relationships that systematically obtain between certain economic and political variables rather than to recount historically the economic policies in any particular era or country. All students will write two short papers (around 10 pages), each revised. Course grades derive from these papers, a midterm and a final exam, and class participation. Course homepage: www-personal.umich.edu/~franzese/SyllabiEtc.html.

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POLSCI 356(456). Government and Politics of Japan.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John C Campbell

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 140 or upperclass standing. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/356/001.nsf

Japan is an ever-more interesting country to study, due both to its obvious importance, and to the fact that it is the only post-industrial non-western country. This course offers an overview of contemporary Japanese politics, designed for students with a general interest in Japan as well as political science concentrators. Special attention is given to how politics has affected and been affected by cultural patterns, social organization, economic growth, and Japan's position in the world. Grading will be by examination and short papers.

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POLSCI 358(458). Politics of the European Union.

Comparative

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth W Kollman (kkollman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we seek to understand the historical development, political institutions, and philosophical underpinnings of the European Union. Topics will include federalism, different notions of sovereignty, studies of contemporary decision-making in the Union, and assessments of democratic institutions in Europe. Prominent points of debate, such as monetary union, trade policies, environmental policies, enlargement policies, and defense policies, will be discussed. Particular attention will be paid to the contemporary debates on changes to the decision-making institutions in the Union.

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POLSCI 360(460). Problems in World Politics.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Zeev Maoz (moaz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 160 or upperclass standing (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (3). (SS). May be elected twice for credit. Repetition requires permission of the instructor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/360/001.nsf

Strategy has often been defined as the art of using and threatening force for the purpose of serving and advancing political goals. The study of strategy has predated the academic study of world politics, but was integrated to the mainstream analysis of international political problems. This course will review some of the key aspects of the field of strategic studies. It will focus on traditional issues, as well as on problems of modern warfare and strategy. The topics included in the course are:

  • What is strategic studies? Basic approaches.
  • Methodology and logic in strategic studies
  • Basic dilemmas in traditional strategy: offense vs. defense
  • Basic dilemmas in traditional strategy: surprise vs. escalation
  • Deterrence and compellence
  • Direct vs. indirect approaches as fundamental problems in strategic logic
  • Wars of the third kind: guerrilla warfare and terrorism
  • Air and Naval strategy
  • Information warfare
  • Civil-military relations and the linkage between military strategy and political processes
  • The revolution in military affairs: its nature, implications, and problems.

Course requirements include a midterm, a term paper, and a final exam.

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POLSCI 361(461). Regional Conflict and Cooperation.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Douglas W Lemke (dlemke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will consider whether international behavior differs in regional settings around the globe. Traditional world politics approaches assume away most or all regional variation, in clear contradiction of a great deal of research embodied with comparative politics traditions. We will focus specifically on patterns of conflict across regions, but pay attention to cooperative, especially economic, interactions too.

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POLSCI 365. Political Responses to Economic Globalization.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jude C Hays (jchays@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Previous coursework in political science or economics. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Explores the political responses within the advanced industrial democracies to the globalization of markets and the likely policy consequences of these responses.

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POLSCI 368(468). Cooperation and Conflict in the International System.

World

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Douglas W Lemke (dlemke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 160. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We begin by discussing some traditional social science arguments that suggest cooperation should be very rare in the international system. We then turn to consideration of patterns of cooperation and of conflict within the system. We will seek to understand why it is that some members of the system can cooperate in rather remarkable ways, while at other times overt conflict erupts. When discussing cooperation, we will pay close attention to whether these instances satisfy the traditional arguments' expectations about possible ways to overcome collective action problems, relative gains concerns, etc.

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POLSCI 379(479). Advanced Topics in Foreign Policy.

World

Section 001 — International Environmental Policy. Meets with ENVIRON 365.001.

Instructor(s): Edward A Parson (parson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/nre/365/001.nsf

See ENVIRON 365.001.

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POLSCI 379(479). Advanced Topics in Foreign Policy.

World

Section 002 — International Politics of the Middle East.

Instructor(s): Moaz

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/379/002.nsf

The international politics of the Middle East are a microcosm of world politics in general. This course will focus on the key aspects of politics among nations in the region, and on the structure of and the processes undergoing in the Middle East regional system as a whole. Topics covered in this course include the following:

  • The formation of the Middle East regional system
  • State formation processes
  • War and peace in the Middle East
  • The relationships between domestic political processes and international processes
  • Alliances and regional organizations
  • The superpowers and the regional system
  • The political economy of the Middle East
  • Past, present, and future trends in the politics and economics of the Middle East
  • A regional regime in the Middle East: Problems, prospects, or a pipe dream?

Course requirements include a midterm, a term paper, and a final exam.

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POLSCI 389(489). Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 001 — Democratization. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Jennifer Anne Widner (jwidner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/389/001.nsf

This is the first iteration of a new course on democratization and democratic consolidation. Explores competing explanations for the rise of new democracies, then asks what makes some new democracies endure while others fail. The course introduces features of constitutional design that promote higher levels of performance and dampen violence. Addresses the relationships between political culture, social structure, and stable democracy. Concludes with a review of recent international experiments in "building democracy" in war-torn communities. Sub-topics include alternative conceptions of democracy, design of electoral systems, institutional innovations that enhance accountability, relationship between rights and democracy, problems of counter-majoritarianism. Reading includes several important classics as well as material drawn from political biography, law, and politics.

Winston Churchill once wrote, "Democracy is the worst form of government, except for all those other forms that have been tried from time to time." This course uses Churchill's observation as a point of departure. We briefly discuss the pros and cons of democratic systems writ large and then move on to the main concern: how democracy takes root — and why it does so in some times and places and not others. The course asks what we have learned about democratization in the aftermath of three waves of democratic change. What advice, if any, might we offer to pro-democracy activists in Burma or Russia, political entrepreneurs in newly democratic South Africa, or occupation authorities in Iraq about building democratic systems?

The syllabus for this course will be available in early December. Each class revolves around a question or debate important in connection with the broad subject matter. Currently the reading assignments come from the list that follows (including a number of articles not noted). The workload is comparable to the workload in POLSCI 359. In short, this course is not easy, but the books we read are interesting.
Noah Feldman After Jihad: America and the Struggle for Islamic Democracy (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2003)
Fareed Zakaria. The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad W.W. Norton, 2003.
Robert Dahl. Polyarchy
Stephen Holmes and Cass Sunstein. The Cost of Rights
Samuel Huntington. The Third Wave.
Giuseppi di Palma. To Craft Democracy
John Dower Embracing Defeat
The Federalist Papers
Alexis de Tocqueville Democracy in America
Timothy Garten Ash. The Magic Lantern
Martha Minow. Between Vengeance and Forgiveness.

Course pack with articles and book chapters on issues ranging from creating pacts during democracies to patterns of democratization in different parts of the world and the U.S. experience in Japan and Germany.

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POLSCI 389(489). Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 002 — Terrorism, War and Due Process. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Lawrence R Greene

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Throughout the history of the United States, in time of national crisis, the federal government has made decisions relating to the protection of the nation from both internal and external forces.

One common denominator applicable to all periods of crisis has been the suppression of the guarantees of "due process" mentioned in the Constitution.

In this course, we will discuss terrorism, war, and due process. At the conclusion of the term we should be able to decide if Americans have more to fear in time of national crisis from its elected government or from an enemy force.

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POLSCI 390. Practicum for the "Michigan Journal of Political Science."

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the Chair. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course allows students to gain experience working on the journal under the direction of the chair or other appropriate faculty member. This experience involves editing the Michigan Journal of Political Science. In addition to taking part in working on the year's issue, students wishing credit for working on the journal would do readings and write book reviews and research notes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 391(185). Introduction to Modeling Political Processes.

Methods

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott E Page (spage@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (SS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit.

Full QR

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to the use of models as a way of developing theories about social science phenomena such as competition for votes, conflict over territory, outbreaks of protest, alliances in business and politics, or even patterns of marriage. The models covered in the course involve many different processes such as rational choice, learning, and social diffusion. Some are mathematical and others computer-based. After a general introduction to the reasons for using models in developing theories, the course concentrates on developing modeling skills: constructing, manipulating, evaluating, and revising models.

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POLSCI 396 / REES 396 / SLAVIC 396 / HISTORY 333 / SOC 393. Survey of East Central Europe.

Comparative

Section 001 — The Political Economy of Transformation in Eastern Europe.

Instructor(s): Katherine M Verdery

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397. Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/317/001.nsf

See REES 397.001.

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POLSCI 400(402). Selected Topics in Political Theory.

Theory

Section 001 — Special Topics in American Political Thought: Work, Virtue, and Democratic Citizenship.

Instructor(s): Anne Manuel (amanuel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 101 or 301 or 302. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course looks at the intersection of thinking on work, virtue and democratic citizenship in the American political imagination. Beginning with the Puritans and ending with contemporary debates, the course highlights and interrogates the connection between modal work practice and political inclusion. To what extent does conformity to work norms produce a sense of sameness or solidarity among an otherwise heterogeneous democratic citizenry? What happens when work norms are questioned or ignored? We will explore how a sense of sameness around work is brought into being and how it is invoked or circulated in political thought and practice.

This is a political theory course and as such will emphasize close reading skills. Be prepared to read and reread the texts. This course is a writing intensive course. Students will produce several short and one longer piece of analytic writing focusing on accurate paraphrasing, use of textual evidence, argument and counter-argument. Writing as a process of drafting and revision will be emphasized. The course will also include an oral participation component; students will be expected to offer substantive and thoughtful commentary on the readings and on the essays of other students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 403 / CLCIV 403. Greek Political Thought.

Theory

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Arlene W Saxonhouse (awsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 101 or 302. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will consider the development of Greek political thought from Homer through Aristotle, with focusing especially on the challenge posed by the Sophistic separation of nature and convention and on the contributions of Greek thought to our understanding of the possibilities and limits of democracy. In addition to readings from Homer, we also will study some of the poems of Solon, selected tragedies and comedies, and some of the fourth-century oratorical works. Primary focus will be on Thucydides, Plato, and Aristotle. A background in political theory, especially POLSCI 101 and/or 301 and/or classics would be helpful, but is not required. There will be two short (4 pp.) papers, one midterm and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 451 / JUDAIC 480. Jewish Identity, Politics, and Culture in the Age of Secularism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Zvi Y Gitelman (zvigitel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: POLSCI 350, JUDAIC 205, or any course in modern Jewish history. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See JUDAIC 480.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 481. Junior Honors Proseminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John C Campbell

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to Honors concentrators with junior standing. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/481/001.nsf

This is a seminar that is designed to introduce students to the Honors program in political science and the process of research design leading to the defense of a thesis prospectus. Students must be admitted to the program before enrolling in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 486. Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups.

American

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vincent L Hutchings (vincenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 492. Directed Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. POLSCI 491 and 492 may be elected for a combined maximum of eight credits. No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed individual study of any subject agreed upon by the student and the advising instructor, which does not duplicate a formal course offering.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

POLSCI 494. Senior Honors Proseminar.

Instructor(s): Robert W Mickey (rmickey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to senior Honors concentrators. (4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit. No more than four Honors credits may be elected as part of a concentration plan in Political Science.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Each student prepares a substantial paper under the direction of a member of the Department of Political Science faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

POLSCI 495. Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory.

Theory

Section 001 — Comedy, Tragedy, and Political Theory.

Instructor(s): Arlene Saxonhouse (awsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and concentration in political science (Prerequisites enforced at registration). Primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Political theory takes many literary forms — from the Platonic dialogue to the scholastic treatises of St. Thomas Aquinas to the aphorisms of Nietzsche. This seminar study how dramatic works of comedy and tragedy from antiquity, Machiavelli, and Shakespeare convey to their audiences understandings of the possibilities and limits of political life. By presenting individuals caught in moments of political decision making, these plays illuminate the challenges of political choice and the concrete implications of those choices. Supplementary readings will relate these challenges to specific texts from the writings of political theorists such as Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, and Hannah Arendt.

There will be two brief papers and a final paper. Much of the class grade will depend on class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 001 — Television and American Politics.

Instructor(s): Donald R Kinder (drkinder@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of the seminar is to cast a cool eye on claims made about television's impact on American political life. We will consider ways, some good, some not so good, that television influences politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 002 — Urban Politics.

Instructor(s): Gregory B Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar introduces you to the craft of conducting action-oriented research in urban settings. Working in teams, students will design and implement original research projects on topics they select in consultation with the professor. Each team will produce a research report and will also present the report to the class. Most reports will be written products, although other formats, such as a documentary video, are possible. Teams will identify and collaborate with urban organizations, agencies, or groups that have an interest in the subject of the research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 003 — Are Americans Good Citizens?

Instructor(s): Ted Brader (tbrader@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/polsci/496/003.nsf

How well do Americans live up to expectations for citizens in a democracy? We begin by considering a range of perspectives on what democracy demands of citizens. We then review evidence on the actual political behavior of Americans to see how they compare to expectations. Over the course of the academic term, we consider what Americans know about politics, their beliefs and values, their level of civic and political participation, the quality of political discussion, and the manner in which they evaluate policies and political leaders.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

American

Section 004 — Elections and Voting Behavior.

Instructor(s): Wong

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Comparative

Section 001 — Canadian Politics.

Instructor(s): Stephen R Brooks

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Americans do not know, but Canadians cannot forget, that two nations, not one, came out of the American Revolution. The United States is the country of the revolution, Canada of the counterrevolution.

— Seymour Martin Lipset

There are three important reasons for Americans to study Canadian politics. Seymour Martin Lipset, much of whose career has been devoted to understanding the variations between Canada and the United States, argues that the study of Canada — the other country produced by the American Revolution — provides crucial insights into the nature of American politics. North America is, he has long argued, the ideal laboratory for students of comparative politics, allowing one to compare two societies that resemble each other enormously in terms of language, economics, culture, and shared history, but whose politics are different in significant ways. The study of Canadian politics helps Americans to better understand their own political system, providing a perspective that is not available to those whose knowledge and understanding of America have never been challenged by comparison to the society most like their own, but which has remained stubbornly different for well over two centuries since their common history as British colonies.

The second reason is the huge importance of Canada to the United States. Canada — not Mexico, China, or Japan — is America's largest trading partner. Total U.S. trade with Canada is almost as great as that between the U.S. and Mexico and Japan combined. Trade with Canada is about four times as great as U.S. trade with China. Beyond the economic intimacy between Canada and the U.S., whose economies have been formally integrated in many ways since the Free Trade Agreement of 1989, there is also a personal intimacy. How many people know that Canada is the sixth largest country of origin for immigrants to the U.S. since the early 1800s; the third-ranking country for foreign-born Americans; the second most important source of temporary workers in the U.S.; and the fourth-largest source of illegal aliens?

The third reason is the well known glamour and pizzaz of Canada. Stereotypes aside, can a country that has given America and the world Mike Myers, Jim Carey, Pamela Anderson, Neil Young, and Peter Jennings really be such a dull place?

This course will examine the politics and government of America's largest trading partner. It will cover all of the essential elements of the Canadian political system, including political culture, the constitution, parties and elections, interest groups, and the media, from a perspective that constantly asks how and why these features of the Canadian political scene are similar to or different from what one finds in the United States.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Comparative

Section 002 — Future of Advanced Industrial Societies.

Instructor(s): Robert Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This undergraduate seminar will examine the impact of a wide variety of factors on the evolution of life, and the evolution of societies. The underlying goal is to understand how the societies we live in are changing and are likely to change in the long term. We start with the distinctive and unusual factors that made this planet suitable for complex life. We then examine the impact of factors ranging from technological change to epidemics, genetic evolution, and variations in agriculture and climate. Finally we will analyze ongoing cultural changes that are transforming what people want out of life and how they pursue their goals. Each participant will write three short papers, each of which counts for 25 percent of the final grade. Your oral contributions in the seminar will count for 25 percent of the final grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

World

Section 001 — International Environmental Security: War and Environment.

Instructor(s): J David Singer (jdsinger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor. Writing Sample and transcript must be submitted to instructor.

POLSCI 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

World

Section 002 — European Foreign Policy.

Instructor(s): Martin Thunert (thunert@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing; primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

These are times of profound changes in Europe. The end of the Cold War, the enlargement of the European Union to 25 member states in May 2004, and continued progress towards integration within the EU (monetary union, draft constitution, charter of rights, etc.) all have uncertain but undeniable implications for the future of international politics both within and beyond Europe. These and other developments provide a fascinating context for the comparative study of the foreign policy the European Union and its member states.

This course has several aims: by analysing and reviewing the foreign policies of the EU and its member states, the course tries to understand how different states as well as the EU as an international actor define and articulate their interests, as well as the means they use to pursue these interests. We will also work to develop a greater theoretical understanding of the factors shaping foreign policy. Particular attention will be paid to Germany, Britain, and France, but the smaller states will not be overlooked. Topics to be covered either in the course or in research papers include the role of geography, culture, and domestic politics, political cooperation within Europe, attempts to develop a common foreign and security policy for the EU, foreign economic policy, and policies regarding human rights and the environment, as well as policies towards world regions outside Europe.

This is a seminar course designed for students with some background knowledge on the political systems of major European countries, who wish to specialize in selected issues of the foreign policy of the EU and/or its member states. Students will be expected to present some of the course readings and/or of your written work to the seminar during some of the sessions. Prereq: Permission of instructor

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

POLSCI 592. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor. Student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course.


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