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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Psychology


This page was created at 7:14 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



PSYCH 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brian Edward Malley (bmalley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111 serves, as do PSYCH 112, 114, or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 112, 114, or 115. PSYCH 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in PSYCH 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~bmalley/Psychology_111.htm

Psychology is the science of human and animal behavior and mental processes. As a survey course, "Introduction to Psychology" provides an overview of the methods, terms, theories, and findings in the field. By understanding principles of psychology, you will learn more about yourself, others, non-human animals, and relationships.

The goals of this course are:

  • to integrate principles and applications of psychology,

  • to enhance critical thinking skills,

  • to put facts in the service of concepts,

  • to exemplify the scientific process of inquiry.

Class consists of two lectures each week. Grades are based on exams and written assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: Do not email instructors. Attend the first day of class to find out how permission to register will be handled.

PSYCH 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 030.

Instructor(s): Shelly Gail-Zeff Schreier (schreier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111 serves, as do PSYCH 112, 114, or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 112, 114, or 115. PSYCH 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in PSYCH 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/111/030.nsf

An introduction to psychology as a broad survey course which explores the various theoretical bases for the understanding of human behavior.

Students will learn about the biological processes of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory as well examine the theories of personality, psychopathology, cognitive and social development. Practical applications and contemporary topics will also be explored.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: Do not email instructors. Attend the first day of class to find out how permission to register will be handled.

PSYCH 112. Introduction to Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jun Zhang (junz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 111, 114, 115, or 116. PSYCH 112 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in PSYCH 112 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/112/001.nsf

The course provides an overview of the field of psychology from a natural science perspective, with emphasis on the connection between brain mechanism and behavior. The topics covered by the course are: Brain and Nervous System, Neuron and Neurotransmission, Perception, Attention, Working Memory, Cognitive Development, Aphasia and Amnesia, Sleep and Hypnosis, EEG, Emotion, Conditioning, Reinforcement, and Motivation, Attachment, Personality, and Defense Mechanisms, Mental Disorder: Diagnosis and Treatment. It is hoped that the student will become more understanding of the neural basis of belief, desire, and action of individuals in the society. Students are evaluated based on grades on exams, reaction papers, possibly short quizzes, and activities in the discussion session. As the course draws heavily on materials from neuroscience and neuropsychology, student are expected to have some background in (or at least willing to learn) biology and chemistry. Discussion sessions will meet AFTER the first lecture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 114. Honors Introduction to Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marita Rosch Inglehart (mri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students; others by permission of instructor. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 111, 112, or 115. May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in PSYCH 114 are required to spend three hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to introduce Honors students to contemporary psychology. At the end of this term, the student should realize that psychological research addresses a wide range of issues, and that the approaches to studying these issues are equally numerous. In order to achieve these goals, this course will cover a broad area of topics:

Part 1 is a general introduction to psychology (definitions, history, methods).

In Part 2, we will look at psychology on four different levels of analysis, namely (a) on a biological level (the brain, evolution, and behavioral genetics), (b) a "basic processes" level (exploring research on perception, learning, information processing, motivation, and emotion), (c) on a level of understanding the person (development, personality theories, psychopathology, treatment of mental disorders), and finally (d) on a "social / cultural" level, which focuses on understanding the individual in a social / cultural context (social cognition, social influence, social interaction: intragroup and intergroup processes.).

In Part 3, we will study one specific problem, namely stress in college, and how psychologists address this problem on a biological level (stress and health, sleep, eating behavior), on a basic process level, on a person-centered level (are there personal styles that might make coping with stress easier?), and on a social level (how does social support influence our adjustment to stress?).

Required text: Gleitman H., Fridlund AJ, & Reisberg D., Psychology. W.W. Norton Company. 2004, 6th edition. A course pack will be available from Ulrich's.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 114. Honors Introduction to Psychology.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Wilbert J McKeachie (billmck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students; others by permission of instructor. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in PSYCH 111, 112, or 115. May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in PSYCH 114 are required to spend three hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

PSYCH 114 surveys the field of psychology including such topics as biopsychology, cognition, motivation, personality, social psychology, developmental psychology, psychopathology, and research methods used by psychologists to gain a better understanding of human behavior and experience. The course requirements include (in addition to understanding a textbook) participation in class discussion, keeping a weekly journal of reading and observations, and carrying out a research project with other students. There will be occasional quizzes, a midterm, and final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 001 — I, Too, Sing America: A Psychology of Race and Racism.

Instructor(s): Charles F Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

Theme Semester R&E First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Taking its title from the Langston Hughes poem, this seminar will explore psychological aspects of race, ethnicity, and other cultural differences in the United States. What are some of the opportunities and obstacles to our joining with Hughes in affirming, "They'll see how beautiful I am . . I, too, sing America?"

Topics will include stereotyping, communication, cooperation, conflict, justice, and discrimination. For example: What are psychological theories about how individuals and groups might most benefit from life in pluralistic societies? What are some psychological dynamics of stereotyping? What are possible connections between various forms of discrimination (for example, racism, sexism, homophobia, and anti-Semitism)?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 121. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001 — Mind, Brain, and Violence.

Instructor(s): William J Gehring (wgehring@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/121/001.nsf

Why do people hurt each other? In this course, we will examine how the cognitive and emotional processes of the brain contribute to violent behavior. We will consider how biological and psychological factors interact with an individual's social context and environment to produce violence. Our discussions will include psychological, psychiatric, neurological, and evolutionary perspectives on a wide range of violent behavior, ranging from individual acts of aggression and criminal behavior to war and genocide.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 121. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 002 — Computer, Mind, and Brain.

Instructor(s): Richard L Lewis (rickl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/121/002.nsf

Is the human mind just a kind of computer that happens to be constructed from neurons? In this seminar, we'll debate this question by considering relevant work in artificial intelligence, cognitive psychology, and cognitive neuroscience. We'll also critique how this work is presented in the popular media.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 122 / SOC 122. Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001 — Dialogues on Race, Gender, Sexual Orientation, Religion, or Ethnicity.

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits. May not be used as a prerequisite for a concentration in psychology. May not be included in a concentration in psychology or sociology.

Theme Semester

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/dialogues.html

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts.

Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society. The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different term-long sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, recent dialogues have considered white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women; etc.). Once registered, please go to http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/ to fill out a dialogue placement form. Two course packs are also required.

Questions regarding this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 211. Project Outreach.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Credit is granted for a combined total of fifteen credits elected though PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Project Outreach enables students to do field work in local community settings. The purpose is to gain an understanding of yourself, the agency in which you will work, the people whom you will serve, the psychological concepts observed in action, and to provide a genuine community service. Project Outreach includes approximately 20 agencies in which you can provide direct service to children and youth in community settings, adults and children in health care settings, and persons legally confined to institutions. The "Careers" section of Project Outreach allows active exploration of yourself and career decision making. All sections are two credits, requiring six hours of work per week including four hours of fieldwork; journal writing, or other short assignments; one hour lecture and one hour discussion.

Students need to check the Time Schedule for lecture/discussion times and meeting places per section. Students are invited to stop by the Psychology Undergraduate office in 1343 East Hall to pick up an Outreach Booklet and receive information regarding registration, field work, and general course information for the Winter 2004 Term. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences concentration.

Section 001 — Working with Preschool Children: Students will work at a placement with infants, toddlers, and/or preschool children. The children with whom you work will come from a variety of backgrounds including some children "at risk" due to such factors as living in single-parent or low-income households, or experiencing special educational or emotional needs. This course will address the diversity of experiences that impact young children and their development in our culture.

Section 002 — Big Sibs: Students will become involved in a one-on-one friendship with a child in the community age four through fifteen years. You will develop a meaningful individual relationship with a child in need of a role model, mentor, and companion. The program enables you to become involved in the larger Ann Arbor community as you and your little sib participate in free or low cost, educational and fun activities. The corresponding lecture series addresses various issues that impact childhood.

Section 003 — Juvenile Delinquency and Criminal Justice: Designed to provide students with experience in and knowledge of the criminal justice system. The field placements match students with juveniles or adults in a number of placement settings in the criminal justice system. The lecture series is intended to expose students to a wide variety of issues relevant to juvenile delinquency and criminality. It is our hope that you will not only learn about the system but also have the opportunity to reach out to juveniles and adult criminals and have a positive impact on their lives.
Course Tools site: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/211/003.nsf

Section 004 — Health, Illness, and Society: Help patients and families in medical facilities, community health clinics, elderly residential settings, and community crisis centers. Opportunities include offering empathy, emotional and practical support, in the context of supervised care, and education. Work with a wide range of populations including children, adults, and the elderly. Learn about a variety of contemporary topics related to the field of health care and health promotion.

Section 005 — Exploring Careers: Students explore how their understandings of themselves, their interests, their values, and their skills relate to ideas about a college major and career possibilities. The aims of this section are twofold: (1) to provide students with a psychological perspective on the development of career identity and decision making processes; and (2) to encourage the development of the skills needed to identify career options, become familiar with occupational resources, and to practice job or internship search strategies.

There are no additional cost for this course

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 230(330). Introduction to Biopsychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Seema Bhatnagar (bhatnags@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. A basic familiarity with biology and chemistry will be quite helpful. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. This course is a prerequisite for many upper-level courses in Biopsychology.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/230/001.nsf

This course surveys the field of Biopsychology. It introduces the kinds of questions traditionally addressed by physiological and comparative psychologists. Biopsychology is the study of how psychological processes relate to the brain. A major focus is on how brain processes cause psychological events and behavior, and how psychological events are encoded in the brain (physiological psychology or behavioral neuroscience). Topics will include: principles of behavioral evolution; the anatomy and operation of brain systems relevant to mind and behavior, and their relation to psychoactive drugs; neural mechanisms of normal action, perception, motivation, learning, and cognition in humans and other species. Students must register for the lecture and for one discussion/practicum section.

NOTE: This course is intended primarily for sophomores and second-term first-year students who have ALREADY taken a course in introductory psychology. This course is a prerequisite for many upper-level courses in Biopsychology.

The text book for the course is "Biological Psychology"; by Rosenzweig et al.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 232 / UC 262 / BIOLOGY 262. Evolutionary Biology and Human Disease.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Randolph M Nesse (nesse@umich.edu), Vaughn S Cooper (vcooper@umich.edu), Alan B Weder (aweder@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

Life Sciences

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/psych/courses/darmed/links.htm

See UC 262.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 240(340). Introduction to Cognitive Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Meredith Eden Minear (minear@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/240/001.nsf

The topics to be covered include various aspects of the psychology of human perception, attention, memory, thinking (including problem solving and reasoning), and consciousness. The material will include data and theory about the relationship between cognition and brain function. The course will emphasize not only the content material represented by these topics, but also the process by which researchers develop theories and collect evidence about relevant issues. Students are required to have taken an introductory psychology course that included material on psychological experimentation. Performance will be evaluated via objective examinations that will stress knowledge of the material and understanding of the relationship between theory and data. Readings will be drawn from a text and several primary sources. The course will include lecture, discussion, demonstrations, in-class experiments, and practice on problem-solving exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 250(350). Introduction to Developmental Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lucretia M Ward (ward@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed PSYCH 255.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/250/001.nsf

This course provides an overview of the milestones of human development from conception to death. We examine the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional growth of children, adolescents, and adults, and the various factors (e.g., genetics, parenting, peer groups, schooling, and the media) that influence development. Our goal is to give you an initial introduction to the main issues, central theories, and dominant research methods in developmental psychology. We hope that students can integrate their knowledge of psychology and their observations of human development with the content of this course. We also will discuss the implications of course content for child-rearing, education, and social policy so that you can apply your knowledge to meaningful problems. Requirements include four multiple-choice exams, two papers, and section attendance and participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 260(360). Introduction to Organizational Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Phillip D Akutsu (akutsu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/260/001.nsf

This course will examine the significant influence of individual, interpersonal/group, and sociocultural/contextual processes on organizations. Specifically, organizations are complex networks of social relationships between individuals and within/between groups. This course will review and analyze:

  1. the psychological processes of individuals in organizations;
  2. the interpersonal and group relationships in organizations; and
  3. the sociocultural/contextual processes that may influence individual and group functioning in organizations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 270(370). Introduction to Psychopathology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kimberlyn Leary (kimleary@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/270/001.nsf

Where do we draw a line between the stress and tension of everyday life and the distress and dysfunction clinicians refer to as "mental illness?" What might the study of those whose functioning is deemed "abnormal" help us to understand about the roots of psychological health and the maintenance of well-being? This course will provide an overview of the field of psychopathology. We will cover a range of clinical diagnoses including, but not limited to, depression, anxiety, personality disorders, and the psychoses. Our emphasis will be on theoretical and empirical models of psychopathological conditions as they relate to the definition, etiology, and treatment of mental disorders. The course will focus on diagnostic classification as well as the behavioral and biological aspects of the major forms of psychopathology recognized in the Diagnostic and Statistical manual of the American Psychiatric Association (DSM). Additionally, we also will direct our attention to issues of public mental health (e.g., war and terrorism on stress and coping). We also will consider contemporary treatments for several of the psychopathologies. Students will be evaluated on the basis of in-class examinations, section assignments (including several short papers), and class participation. Students will attend weekly lectures and section meetings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 280(380). Introduction to Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carla Elena Grayson (carlag@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/280/001.nsf

This course introduces students to the field of social psychology by covering such topics as: social inference, schemas, attribution, conformity and obedience, altruism, emotions, stereotypes and prejudice, interpersonal attraction, close relationships, and attitudes and persuasion. Students are evaluated by means of exams and classroom contributions, and through short papers. Instructional methods include assigned readings, lectures, films, demonstrations, and weekly discussion sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 290(390). Introduction to the Psychology of Personality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Oliver C Schultheiss (oschult@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/290/001.nsf

This course is intended to be a general overview of the contemporary study of personality and its theoretical background. Great emphasis will be placed on familiarizing the student with current research and theory on specific personality topics. Examples of some of the topics covered in this course are: personality research methods and assessment; cybernetic and neurobiological approaches to personality; motivation and emotion; learning theory; units of personality (traits, motives, and cognitions); personality development; personality and health; and sociocultural context and personality. Grades will be determined on the basis of three in-class exams, a log book (2 entries per week are expected, one of them discussing an additional reading of your choice), an in-section poster presentation about the findings of a published empirical personality psychology study of your choice, and section attendance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 303. Special Problems in Psychology: Advanced Laboratory.

Instructor(s): Emily Chan (echan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. (2-4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/303/001.nsf

This writing-intensive course provides an overview of the how's and why's of research in psychology as a social science, and it covers such topics as ethics, library research, case studies, observations, surveys and questionnaires, laboratory experiments, APA-style writing, and statistics. It consists of a weekly 75-minute lecture on Monday, in which general ideas about research will be presented, and a weekly 75-minute lab on Tuesday or Wednesday in which research projects will be planned and presented.

Prerequisites: A "gateway" course in psychology as a social science. A basic statistics course (e.g., STATS 350) is highly recommended although not required. You should not take this course if you have already taken one of the psychology as a social science lab courses (e.g., organizational, personality, psychopathology, social).

Grades: Final grades are based on two "objective" exams over terms and concepts covered in class and readings (15% each) and written assignments for the lab (70% total). Each written assignment will be weighted more-or-less by its page length. We encourage you to write drafts of any and all assignments prior to the due dates. If you wish to avail yourself of this option, you will need to work out a mutually-agreed timetable with your lab instructor well in advance of the due date. Attendance per se at lab is not graded but is required: A student cannot pass this course without participating in lab activities and exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 304. Practicum in Teaching and Leading Groups.

Section 052.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. Permission of instructor required. (2-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 304. Practicum in Teaching and Leading Groups.

Section 233.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. Permission of instructor required. (2-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 001 — Practicum in Child Development and Child Care at Pound House. Prerequisite: PSYCH 250. [2-4 credits].

Instructor(s): Brenda L Volling (volling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. A total of six credits of PSYCH letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. PSYCH 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course allows students to acquire experience working in a child care setting with preschool age children. Students will be assigned to specific classrooms and work under the direct supervision of the head teacher and director of the Pound House Children's Center. Students are required to keep a weekly journal summarizing their experiences in the child care setting as well as write papers integrating these experiences with literature on children's development. Students will be required to read the Staff Handbook for information on Center policies as well as independent readings on child development. All students must show evidence of a negative TB tine test and have a physical exam from a doctor stating that there is no reason why they cannot work with young children. For more information, contact Carolyn Tyson at Pound House, 998-8399, cwtyson@umich.edu.

Prerequisite: PSYCH 250.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Contact Carolyn Tyson at 998-8399, cwtyson@umich.edu, for application info.

PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 002 — Michigan Mentorship Program. [3-4 Credits].

Instructor(s): Ellen J Quart (equart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. A total of six credits of PSYCH letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. PSYCH 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycdept/mmentor/

This experiential learning course is designed to provide mentoring experiences for students in the Ann Arbor Public Schools who are regarded at risk for low achievement. We will pair college students with elementary and high school students in order to help students with homework, to encourage effective learning strategies, to set goals, and to help them develop appropriate coping strategies. College students who can relate to younger students' concerns are a tremendous resource for their learning and motivation. Conversely, college students can learn a great deal from children and adolescents as they work through issues.

The course will provide a personal relationship and useful academic information in order to help grade school students become more successful and more motivated in school. University students will be expected to participate in mentoring a minimum of six hours per week, read related background information, keep a weekly journal, and write a 5-10 page paper.

Admission is by application only. Email Dr. Quart (equart@umich.edu) for dates and times of the general informational meetings. Applications are distributed at those meetings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Admission is by application and interview. Contact equart@umich.edu for registration information.

PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 010 — Alcoholism and Other Behavior Disorders in Community Settings, II. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Robert A Zucker (zuckerra@umich.edu) , Frederic C Blow (fredblow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. A total of six credits of PSYCH letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. PSYCH 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/371/010.nsf

The Division of Substance Abuse (www.med.umich.edu/psych/sub/index.htm) and its research arm, the University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC) provide a continuing opportunity for students to gain research experience in community settings as part of the Center's ongoing program of field research studies. Current projects include: a program for screening substance use problems and depression among pregnant women who come for general health care, which may involved the opportunity to conduct follow-up interviews with these women; a project focused on the relationship between alcohol and injury in the Emergency Department which will involve conducting in-person and telephone interviews with patients; a descriptive study of the development of risk for substance abuse and other trouble in Latino and African American families; other developing field research studies being carried out by Center scientists. Projects provide students with the opportunity to obtain research experience in the social, behavioral, and health sciences.

A focused, collateral series of weekly seminars allows students to interact with Center scientists carrying out a variety of studies pertaining to the etiology, course, and treatment of substance abuse. Students administer brief questionnaires to persons in primary care offices, in home to families, and also conduct telephone follow-up interviews with participants in the Health and Pregnancy Study as well as the Emergency Department Study.

Requirements include: interest in social sciences or health sciences; attendance at the weekly seminar; ability to travel to project sites (car preferred); excellent interpersonal skills; and experience interacting with the public. Students will gain valuable experience in multidisciplinary research, in the areas of alcohol problems, depression, other drug problems, and behavioral health screening. This course is the second term of a two-term practicum sequence. The sequence satisfies both lab requirements for students pursuing the Psychology concentration. Those who register for the course will be required to attend a research meeting, a one hour weekly seminar/lecture, and 7.5 hours of field work each week during the academic term. Students also are required to write a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Call 615-6060 for registration information.

PSYCH 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 537.

Instructor(s): Maxwell

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. A total of six credits of PSYCH letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. PSYCH 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 306. Project Outreach Group Leading.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jerome Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology, PSYCH 211, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

This course provides students with knowledge and practice in areas related to enhancing the educational experience of undergraduate students involved in community service learning placements in a community setting. Students will learn to supervise and evaluate the placement activities of others, and gain essential skills in facilitating small group discussions which integrate field experiences with theoretical concepts. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a number of written assignments, placement/activity coordination, and the quality of the small group discussions which they facilitate.

A course pack will be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 307. Directed Experiences with Children.

Working with Children at U-M Children's Center in exemplary preschool programs. For registration information call 647-6886 or email jamilaj@umich.edu.

Instructor(s): Karey Leach Fugenschuh (karey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. (3-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 7 credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: HTTP://www.childrenscenters.umich.edu

Work directly with young children and early childhood educators as a team in the preschool classrooms in the UM Children's Centers on campus. Classroom placements require eight to twelve hours per week (scheduled in four-hour blocks of time; MWF or TTH combinations for 4 or 3 credit-hours). This practicum meets laboratory requirements. A lecture relating theoretical issues to applied practice is held bi-weekly. A course pack (under $30) accompanies the lectures, along with several brief written assignments. There is a meeting between the Head Teacher and student at midterm and final designed to guide and reflect the classroom experience and the students' growth and development in their interactions with children.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. For registration information call 647-6886 or email jamilaj@umich.edu.

PSYCH 308. Peer Advising Practicum in Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria L Slowiaczek (mls@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. (2-3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A total of 12 credits may be elected through PSYCH 304, 305, 306, 307, and 308. A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/psych/ugo/page.asp?id=126

This course is a supervised practicum for Psychology concentrators who wish to learn to help other Psychology students through academic advising. Students are selected through an application and interview process. Applications are available in the Peer Advising Office, 1343 East Hall.

Students are required to work 3-4 hours as peer advisors in the Undergraduate Office, as well as to attend a weekly, two hour class on Wednesdays from 4:00-6:00. A required training in peer facilitation and the psychology concentration is scheduled on the first two sundays after classes begin.

Other requirements include weekly readings, reaction papers, accountability logs of peer advising work and a final project. In addition to experience with individual academic advising, students in this course help facilitate "focus groups" on subjects of interest to Psychology concentrators. The course is limited to about 20 students in order to promote discussion, training, and supervision of the practicum.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Applications can be obtained in the Peer Advising Office, 1343 EH weekdays 11AM-4 PM, or call 647-3711. Applications are due by Monday, Nov 17.

PSYCH 310 / SOC 320. Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation.

Instructor(s): Charles F Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor (admission by application). Intended for juniors and seniors. PSYCH 122 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration. A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration.

Theme Semester R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/facilitate.html

This course is designed to give students a foundation in the skills and knowledge needed to facilitate multicultural group interactions, including structured intergroup dialogues. Topics include: basic group facilitation skills and their applications to multicultural settings; social identity group development; prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; the nature of social oppression; facilitation of intergroup communication; conflict intervention skills; techniques of community building; and surveys of some contemporary intergroup topic areas (e.g., affirmative action, sexual assault, separation/self-segregation). Students who successfully complete this training may apply to act as peer facilitators for the course PSYCH 122/SOC 122, "Intergroup Dialogues." Recent trainees have facilitated dialogues with groups such as Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color;Blacks/Latinos/as; men/women.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. For registration info go to www.umich.edu/~igrc or call 936-1875.

PSYCH 311 / SOC 321. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 310 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/facilitate.html

This practicum follows PSYCH 310/SOC 320 and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students participate in weekly seminars for their own continued development in social identity and multicultural issues. Students are required to attend supervised consultations with instructors and/or peers in addition to weekly planning sessions with their co-facilitator. Discussion of effective facilitation skills for the on-going dialogue groups incorporates theoretical learning and practice of group dynamics observation, conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication, and community building. As part of this work, students will do additional readings on issues of identity and community through assigned readings and course text.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 317 / AMCULT 306. Community Based Research.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lorraine M Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology, and concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 318. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. PSYCH 317 and 318 may be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration. Laboratory fee ($45) required.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($45) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/di/courses.html

This course will cover research methodologies useful in understanding communities. These include community needs and asset assessment, analysis of census and other statistical information on communities, evaluation of programs offered by community organizations, and surveys of community residents. Through readings, lectures, and discussion, the class will consider what is involved in each of these methods and when each is appropriate. Students will use one of these methodologies to carry out a research project in collaboration with a community organization in Detroit. Results from this project will be communicated through a paper and poster session. Concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 318.001 is required. Requirements include readings, lectures, a community profile, and a write-up of the research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 317 / AMCULT 306. Community Based Research.

Section 002 — Collaborative Program Evaluation in a Community-Based Organization.

Instructor(s): Phillip M Creekmore (creekmor@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology, and concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 318. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. PSYCH 317 and 318 may be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration. Laboratory fee ($45) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($45) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/317/002.nsf

This course offers students interested in community-based organizations and research with an opportunity to explore the functions, designs and planning of program evaluation. This course will integrate class-based learning and site-based activities. We will study such things as the principles of participatory action research, community-based organizations (CBOs), program development and modeling, the relationships between program evaluation and research, various forms of program evaluation, and the functions of evaluation for CBOs. This course will design evaluations for several programs within one community-based organization, the Detroit Hispanic Development Corporation (DHDC).

Four trips to DHDC will occur during two periods: during the last two weeks of January and the first three weeks of March. For these trips to DHDC, students should expect to leave for Detroit one hour earlier(at 8AM) and to return at the same time that class normally ends (12PM).

Students will divide into four to five member teams, and each team will interview staff and observe a different program at DHDC. Each team will develop a proposal for program evaluation that identifies the problems to be studied, some relevant literature, program hypotheses, a logic model for the program and activity plan for the evaluation.

12 hours / week for 15 weeks

Below are estimates of the types of activities and amount of time that may engage you during this class.

Session type 1 for 8 weeks: reading and reflection in the classroom.

  • 2 hour class
  • 4 hours reading
  • 6 hours class prep including responses, papers, presentations, test prep

Session type 2 for 4 weeks: interviews and observation at DHDC

  • 2 hours driving
  • 4 hours interviews & observations
  • 6 hours processing, recording, discussing among team members

Session type 3 for 3 weeks: report observations, conclusions and class presentations

  • 1 hour consultations with Creekmore
  • 8 hours writing
  • 3 hours preparation of presentation

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 318 / AMCULT 307. Laboratory in Community Research.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lorraine M Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 317. (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. PSYCH 317 and 318 may be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration.

Theme Semester

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/di/courses.html

This experiential lab involves one visit per week to an African-American, Arab-American, or Latino community organization in Detroit. Students will be assigned to work with community-based organizations on projects to improve the well-being of children and families. Projects involve activities such as tutoring, art workshops, outreach activities, assisting in child care settings, and working in community education projects. Students will conduct a community based research project at their internship organization.

Internships will be supervised by the instructor and program staff. Students must be enrolled concurrently in PSYCH 317: Community Based Research. This type of direct experience provides for a better understanding of course concepts, more in-depth learning, and a location to participate in a community research project.

This lab requires attendance at training sessions or community participation four hours each week. Students will turn in weekly attendance sheets that document their work. Transportation will be provided. An experiential journal, readings, and group project reflecting this experience will be completed for PSYCH 317.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 318 / AMCULT 307. Laboratory in Community Research.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Phillip M Creekmore

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 317. (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. PSYCH 317 and 318 may be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This lab, designed for students enrolled in PSYCH 317, builds on the methods of community research and program evaluation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 322(408). Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (BS). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected twice for a maximum of 4 credits. This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or four credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322 and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322 and 323. Credits do not count toward the Psychology concentration. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in natural science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal, and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 323(409). Field Practicum in Research Techniques for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected for a maximum of two terms and/or four credits with the same instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 404, 405, 322 and 323, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 404, 405, 322, and 323. Credits may not be used toward the psychology concentration. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This field practicum course offers an opportunity to apply academic knowledge in social science within the context of a research setting. The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal, and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 328. Research Lab for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and concurrent enrollment in a Psychology Independent Study (PSYCH 322 or 422). (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected up to four times for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 329. Research Lab for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and concurrent enrollment in a Psychology Independent Study (PSYCH 323 or 423). Permission of instructor required. (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected up to four times for credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 331. Laboratories in Biopsychology.

Section 001 ONLY satisfies the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s): Theresa M Lee (terrilee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 230. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/331/001.nsf

This course is designed to provide an opportunity to gain direct, hands-on experience working in a biopsychology or cognitive science laboratory. There are two components to the course: the general, seminar/discussion section for all students; and the individual, lab-specific component with a faculty supervisor.

The majority of your effort in PSYCH 331 will result from work you do in an individual faculty member's lab. You will determine this with your faculty supervisor within the first week of the course, usually involving 10-12 hours per week in laboratory. PSYCH 331 requires a considerable amount of effort and time commitment. This course is designed to allow students to receive a research experience, including non-laboratory aspects of research, comparable to that of a beginning graduate student.

Work in the seminar/discussion section of PSYCH 331 will include four tasks:

  1. Write a short description of the laboratory you are working in, the primary research questions and methods used to approach those questions.
  2. Write a research proposal that describes the specific project you are working on and the methods used to address the questions.
  3. Deliver an oral presentation in the seminar session, describing your research to your peers.
  4. Prepare a final written report of your research in a journal format.

Admission to PSYCH 331 is by application, which will be available in the Psychology undergraduate office, 1343 East Hall.

Instructions for Enrollment

All students must register in two sections — a lecture section (001) and a lab section. All students in the course will meet together for a common 'lecture' section (001), for 2 hour/week, but will spend most of the time necessary to meet course requirements working in a laboratory (i.e., in the 'lab section'). Therefore, each student must register for a 'lab section' offered by a specific faculty member. These sections are identified by individual faculty INDI numbers (see below). Each student will be expected to devote approximately 10-12 hours/week in the laboratory to meet course requirements. What the students do during this time will vary depending on the nature of the research in each specific lab. Admission to a lab section is by permission of that instructor only. Students should first examine the list of the laboratory sections to be offered in a given academic term (see below), decide on what section they want, and then apply for admission using the following procedures. Students are encouraged to apply for a lab section as soon as possible after the enrollment period opens. Application Procedures: Note: To be admitted to PSYCH 331, a student must first get permission from an individual faculty member to work in his/her lab.

Please follow these procedures:

  1. Fill out an application form (obtained in the Cognition & Perception/Biopsychology Area Office, 4029 East Hall or the Undergraduate Psychology Office, 1343 East Hall.)
  2. Hand in the application form directly to the Professor in whose lab you wish to work. If you apply to two labs, the maximum number allowable, hand in a separate form to each Professor, and note this on the application.
  3. After the Professor has reviewed the application he/she may set up an appointment for an interview.
  4. You should contact the professor again before the end of the term in which you submitted an application to learn whether you have been accepted into the section. The professor "accepting" your application will authorize the Psychology Undergraduate Office (1343 East Hall) to issue you an 'override form' allowing you to register for both the lecture section (001) and their specific lab section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Admission to PSYCH 331 is by application, which will be available in the Psychology undergraduate office, 1044 East Hall.

PSYCH 335. Introduction to Animal Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary R Ten Eyck (teneyck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology or BIOLOGY 162. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/335/001.nsf

This course presents a broad introduction to animal behavior from the perspective of evolutionary biology. The prerequisite for this course is an introductory course in Psychology or Biology and is well suited for any student interested in animal behavior, biological psychology, or the relationship between evolution and social behavior. Introductory lectures present the basic principles of organic evolution so that all students have the same knowledge foundation from which other course topics can be examined. Course topics include, among others, the relationship between genes and behavior, inclusive-fitness thinking and social interactions between close genetic relatives, the evolution of sex differences, mating systems and their ecological correlates, and sexual selection. Terms such as nepotism, altruism, aggression, and reproductive behavior are considered in light of how they have evolved by natural selection and how they contribute to daily survival and reproductive success. Examples from a wide variety of animal species are used to help emphasize various points. A lecture format is used, and students are encouraged to question and comment during class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 341. Advanced Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology.

Sections 001 and 002 satisfy the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s): James H Hoeffner (jhoeff @umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 240 or 345. (4). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/341/001.nsf

This "how-to" course covers the design, execution, and analysis of behavioral experiments using methods from Cognitive Psychology. A major emphasis in the course is to take the student out of the "listener" role and support learning by "doing." In small sections, students actively participate in laboratory tasks that demonstrate the range of activities in experimental research. Students learn to define an experimental hypothesis, design and conduct experiments using common test methods, appropriately analyze and interpret data from experiments, and present results in reports following the standard format for psychology research. The laboratory activities require working closely with groups of students using specialized software, so regular class attendance and participation is important. These activities also provide practice with more general critical thinking skills; for example, questioning what can be known from experiments vs. our experiences, deciding what conclusions are valid from observations, and evaluating scientific studies in other fields. Grading is based on written reports of research projects, exams, and in-class laboratory exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 351. Advanced Laboratory in Developmental Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer T Myers (jeniferm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250 and STATS 350. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to provide students with training in the skills necessary for designing, conducting, evaluating, and communicating about research on human development. The course is a combination of lecture and discussion of research issues and methodology, activity-based laboratory sessions, and the implementation of individual and class research projects. Students are provided with "hands-on" research opportunities, interviewing school-age children and conducting observational studies. The course meets the Psychology Laboratory course requirement.

Required text: Methods in Behavioral Research by Paul C. Cozby.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 352(451) / LING 352. Development of Language and Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan A Gelman (gelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/352/001.nsf

This course will examine how children acquire their first language, from babbling and first words through complex grammar. Topics include: word meanings, syntactic development, pragmatics, relations between language and thought, influence of parental input, second-language acquisition, critical periods in development, and more. We will discuss major theoretical approaches as well as a variety of current research evidence. The course is a lecture format, but with the small class size discussion will be encouraged. Requirements: three exams and a term project.

Required text: Language Development (2nd. edition) by Erika Hoff. A course pack with additional readings will also be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 359(459). Psychology of Aging.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marion Perlmutter (perlmut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Questions about aging are becoming increasingly important at both an individual and societal level. As life expectancy increases, personal life plans should be reconceptualized, and as the number and proportion of older adults in our society increases, expectations about population needs and potential should to be re-evaluated.

This undergraduate course will examine adulthood constancies and changes in biology, behavior, and thought. We will learn about typical adult aging patterns, explore the variability, causes, and plasticity of these patterns, and consider the individual and societal implications of them. By the end of the term, students should be able to characterize the usual and possible patterns of development and aging in adulthood. They should have new understanding of changes they are likely to experience as they get older, and the things they can do to affect these changes. In addition, they should gain an understanding of the needs of older persons and of their potential value to society.

We will begin with an overview of the context of aging in the U.S., including discussions of attitudes about the old, the demographics of past, present, and future older populations, and conceptual issues relevant to theory and research methods of development and aging. Adulthood age differences in biological, psychological, and social competencies will constitute the core of the course. Topics to be considered include physical capacities, health, health care, death and dying, sensation, memory, intelligence, reasoning, expertise, creativity, wisdom, personality, self concept, emotions, relationships, and roles associated with family, work, and community. The final portion of the course will address gender, ethnic, and cultural diversity in aging, as well as societal services, policies, and careers related to the old.

The course involves a fairly heavy reading and writing load, and relies extensively on a course web site. All assignments are described on the web site and are to be submitted through it. The web site contains links to many readings and research materials needed for completion of assignments, as well as a place for student discussion. It is essential that all students do reading and writing assignments before the class in which they are covered. Students also are expected to participate actively in class and web discussions. Class sessions will primarily involve student discussion, but also will include videos, instructor lectures, group work, and student presentations. Grades will be based on the number of points students accumulate by completing assignments and exams, and participating in class and web discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Attend first day of class. Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 361. Advanced Laboratory in Organizational Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth E Wierba (wierba@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 260. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/361/001.nsf

This is a project-oriented advanced laboratory in organizational psychology. The lab is designed: to provide students with opportunities to gain practical organizational research experience; to introduce students to selected general research methods in organizational psychology (e.g. field experiments, experimental simulations, survey research); and to provide practical knowledge about research design, analysis, and scientific writing.

Student research teams will engage in the design, data collection, analysis, and write-up of organizational research projects. The instructors have contributed their expertise to the architecture of the research. Student teams will contribute their effort and ingenuity to further refine the research designs and to conduct the research. Together, we will analyze and interpret the findings. Team members can support and learn from each other.

Instruction will be delivered by lecture, workshops, and discussions. Readings will focus on theories, research issues, and methods. Evaluation will be based on contributions to the research team (peer evaluations), on collaborative written reports, and on exams reflecting course readings. Energetic and thoughtful participation in research projects is an absolute requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 361. Advanced Laboratory in Organizational Psychology.

Section 002.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 260. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/361/001.nsf

This is a project-oriented advanced laboratory in organizational psychology. The lab is designed: to provide students with opportunities to gain practical organizational research experience; to introduce students to selected general research methods in organizational psychology (e.g., field experiments, experimental simulations, survey research); and to provide practical knowledge about research design, analysis, and scientific writing.

Student research teams will engage in the design, data collection, analysis, and write-up of organizational research projects. The instructors have contributed their expertise to the architecture of the research. Student teams will contribute their effort and ingenuity to further refine the research designs and to conduct the research. Together, we will analyze and interpret the findings. Team members can support and learn from each other.

Instruction will be delivered by lecture, workshops, and discussions. Readings will focus on theories, research issues, and methods. Evaluation will be based on contributions to the research team (peer evaluations), on collaborative written reports, and on exams reflecting course readings. Energetic and thoughtful participation in research projects is an absolute requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 371(372). Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology.

Sections 002-005 satisfy the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s): James H Hansell (jhansell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 270. A basic statistics course (e.g., STATS 350) is recommended although not required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/371/001.nsf

PSYCH 371 is an advanced exploration of the topic,s methods, and controversies of abnormal psychology. Using a variety of sources, we will examine research questions and findings in the field and conceptual issues of contemporary importance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 371(372). Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology.

Section 010 — Alcoholism & Other Behavior Disorders in Community Settings, I.

Instructor(s): Robert A Zucker (zuckerra@umich.edu) , Frederic C Blow (fredblow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 270. A basic statistics course (e.g., STATS 350) is recommended although not required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/371/010.nsf

The Division of Substance Abuse (http://www.med.umich.edu/psych/sub/index.htm) and its research arm, the University of Michigan Addiction Research Center (UMARC) provide an opportunity for students to gain research experience in community settings as part of the Center's ongoing program of field research studies. Current projects include:

  • a program for screening substance use problems and depression among pregnant women who come for general health care, which may involved the opportunity to conduct follow-up interviews with these women;
  • a project focused on the relationship between alcohol and injury in the Emergency Department which will involve conducting in-person and telephone interviews with patients;
  • a descriptive study of the development of risk for substance abuse and other trouble in Latino and African American families;
  • other developing field research studies being carried out by Center scientists. Projects provide students with the opportunity to obtain research experience in the social, behavioral, and health sciences.

A focused, collateral series of weekly seminars allows students to interact with Center scientists carrying out a variety of studies pertaining to the etiology, course, and treatment of substance abuse. Students administer brief questionnaires to persons in primary care offices, in home to families, and also conduct telephone follow-up interviews with participants in the Health and Pregnancy Study as well as the Emergency Department Study.

Requirements include: interest in social sciences or health sciences; attendance at the weekly seminar; ability to travel to project sites (car preferred); excellent interpersonal skills; and experience interacting with the public. Students will gain valuable experience in multidisciplinary research, in the areas of alcohol problems, depression, other drug problems, and behavioral health screening.

Those who register for the course will be required to attend a research meeting, a one hour weekly seminar/lecture, and 7.5 hours of field work each week during the academic term. Students also are required to write a research paper.

Requirements: Junior or Senior status, a strong interest in learning about research in communities. Fluency in Spanish is desirable, but not required. A car is not required.

Candidates must be interviewed before they can register. Interested applicants should contact: Stephanie Herzberg shz@med.umich.edu or call 615-6060

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. CALL 615-6060 FOR REG. INFO.

PSYCH 374(471). Marriage and the Family.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sandra A Graham-Bermann (sandragb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is focused on both the normal development and clinical psychopathology of the family. That is, we will study dating, love, mate selection, stages of marriage, parenting, sibling relationships, divorce, remarriage, as well as marriage in old age. Topics of clinical interest include domestic violence, child abuse, sibling violence and substance abuse. Lectures will include evidence from research studies, theoretical contributions, and discussion of controversies in the field of family studies. Issues are illustrated through the presentation of clinical case material as well as multiple media. There is a midterm and a final exam. The prerequisite is one course in Introduction to Psychology.

The text consists of a composite of readings that are bound together and available at campus bookstores.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 381 / SOC 472. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christian Waugh (waughc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: STATS 350 and PSYCH 280. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/381/001.nsf

This course provides a hands-on exploration of social psychological research methods. In the first half, students are introduced to different research methods and concepts and learn to analyze survey data they collect. The second half of the course revolves around an original, experimental research project (topic varies) in which students design the study, collect and analyze the data, and write a written APA style report. SPSS is used throughout the course. Grades are based on write-ups of research projects, numerous homework assignments, quality of class participation, and knowledge of research methodology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 385 / ENVIRON 361 / NRE 361. The Psychology of Environmental Stewardship.

Section 001 — Meets with NRE 561.001.

Instructor(s): Raymond K De Young (rdeyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.snre.umich.edu/nre361/

See ENVIRON 361.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 391. Advanced Laboratory in Personality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Peregrine Silverschanz (pgrin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: STATS 350, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PSYCH 290. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This lab course aims at making students familiar with the process of research in personality psychology. Groups of students will read the literature on one of several optional topics in personality research formulate hypotheses, collect data, analyze these data using statistical methods, write an APA style research report, peer-review the research reports written by other students, and present their research in the form of a short talk in class. Students will be introduced to experimental, survey, and archival strategies of data collection and hypothesis testing, diverse instruments for the assessment of personality, and statistical approaches to analyzing data that involves measures of personality. Grades will be assigned on the basis of class participation, written research reports, and performance on a statistics test.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 001 — Exploring the Psychological Underground of Power. [3 credits]. Meets with Honors 493.005.

Instructor(s): David G Winter (dgwinter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits. Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/honors/493/005.nsf

This course examines power from several related psychological perspectives. We begin with a survey of the phenomenology of power — that is, what it "feels like" to exercise power over another person or group. We discuss interpretations of this phenomenology by Freud, Canetti, and other theorists.

We then explore several topics relating to power:

  1. some possible biological and physiological bases of these feelings
  2. psychological theories about the nature and meaning of the power experience,
  3. the effects of power on others — both good effects (e.g., inspirational leadership) and bad (oppression),
  4. the effects on the powerholder,
  5. links between power, aggression, and sexuality,
  6. power and the creation of "difference" among people,
  7. the psychological and cultural origins of power drives, and
  8. whether (and how) power can be tamed or even given up completely.

The readings will be drawn not only from psychology but also from other social sciences, and from literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 002 — Psychology and Consciousness. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Richard D Mann (rdmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits. Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the evolution of human consciousness, as a collective development of increasing awareness and as an individual process moving through stages of increasing subtlety and scope. We will explore the uses of artistic expression, personal narrative, and abstract conceptualization. The work of Ken Wilber, Robert Kegan, Jenny Wade, Don Beck and others present the integral approach to theory, but the primary task of the course is to find uniquely personal, meaningful, and expressive ways to exemplify the many stages and stages of consciousness. Understanding the various means for seeking personal and collective transformation and the numerous obstacles to such development will be a major goal of our work together.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 003 — Foundations in Intergroup Relations. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits. Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation.

Theme Semester

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/401/003.nsf

This introductory course will examine the history of various social identity groups in the United States (with a primary emphasis on race and ethnicity but also including gender, religion, socioeconomic class and sexual orientation). This course will also examine the theory behind how social identity groups form, and how bias develops (prejudice, stereotyping, and discrimination). We will also explore how people develop an understanding of their own social identity group membership, how groups are impacted by privilege and power dynamics, and how to develop advocacy for groups to which one does not belong. Students can expect to participate in class through individual and group projects as well as class discussion. While there will be some lecture, this course will also bring in videos, activities/exercises, and guest speakers to explore these issues. This course is part of the Brown v. Board of Education theme semester

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 004 — Advanced Intergroup Relations Capstone: Social Justice in the Real World. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Sharon D Vaughters (sdvaught@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits. Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A capstone course for students who have studied intergroup relations, that is, social power, privilege, prejudice and discrimination related to race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, ethnicity, socioeconomic class, ability, or other social identities. How will you continue the dialogue given your personal strengths and weaknesses, interests and values, the current economy and world events? This course will address these issues in relation to life after college, including one's personal and professional life and one's career choices.

The course will explore intergroup relations, dialogue, and career development theory and provide exposure to how people "in the real world" maintain social justice work after initial training. Topics include: development of personal vision/action plans; life after college (featuring former intergroup relations dialogue participants/facilitators); examination of world leaders and others forwarding intergroup relations work; exploration of multiple identities; relevant intergroup relations and career development research; grounded career exploration and decision making; integration of career/life planning with social justice work. Students will work to reflect upon and incorporate previous experiences into goals and action plans for the future.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 005 — Middle School Girls: Theory and Practice. [4 credits]. Meets with WOMENSTD 484.020.

Instructor(s): Reid, Stubbs

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits. Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See PSYCH 484.020.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 402. Special Problems in Psychology.

Section 001 — Mind and Brain in the Creative Process. [4 credits]. Meets with RCSSCI 254.001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey E Evans (jeevans@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory Psychology. (2-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits. Only 6 credits of PSYCH 400, 401, 402 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology, and a maximum of 12 credits may be counted toward graduation.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RCSSCI 254.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 404. Field Practicum.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and permission of instructor. (1-12). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-12).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members, and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 405. Field Practicum in a University Setting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and permission of instructor. (1-5). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 5 credits. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Arrangements must be made with individual faculty members and faculty permission must be obtained in order to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 405. Field Practicum in a University Setting.

Section 052 — Social Psychology in Community Settings. [1-2 credits].

Instructor(s): Patricia Y Gurin (pgurin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290; and permission of instructor. (1-5). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 5 credits. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of PSYCH 322, 323, 404 and 405 for a combined total of fifteen credits of PSYCH 211, 322, 323, 404, and 405. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

PSYCH 405 (Social Psychology in Community Settings) presents theories and research on intergroup relations within residence hall communities. Students taking the course have been accepted in a staff position (or as an alternate) in the residence halls for the next academic year, and may register with an override only. Residence staff at Michigan are involved on a daily basis in the articulation and enforcement of community living standards. This course provides social science materials and opportunities for in-depth discussion on building supportive and stimulating multicultural communities in the residence halls. PSYCH 405 uses readings, large group sessions, small group discussions, classroom exercises, and practical experience to enhance each student's ability to analyze approaches to building positive multicultural communities, differences and commonalities among cultural groups, foundations of justice and injustice, and young adult personal and social development

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 411 / WOMENSTD 419. Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jane A Hassinger, Julieanne Mae Muir

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in women's studies or psychology. WOMENSTD 240 is recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See WOMENSTD 419.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 418 / RELIGION 448. Psychology and Spiritual Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard D Mann (rdmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the stages of spiritual development, beginning with awakening and initiation, through the deepening of direct experience and the formulation of a coherent spiritual path, including the notion of an ultimate attainment. It explores the function of spiritual groups and teachers in facilitating this development. Of particular interest are: the spiritual seeker's experience of 'little death,' the mode of apparent discontinuity when the 'old life' is supplanted by a new identity and mode of living; times of crisis, adaptation, and 'the dark night'; and the experience of 'physical death,' as seen from the perspective of a lifetime of encountering both relative and absolute reality.

By means of personal narratives and fictional accounts, this course explores how diverse traditions create and value these moments of surrender and transformation. Lectures and readings by Hesse, Thich Nhat Hanh, Wilber, Batchellor, and others will form the basis of one short paper and one long final paper. There will be no final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 420(507). Faculty Directed Advanced Tutorial Reading for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and approval of the Department of Psychology Committee on Undergraduate Studies; and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A combined total of six credits of PSYCH 420, 421, 422, and 423 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to further explore a topic of interest in psychology as a natural science under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

PSYCH 421(507). Faculty Directed Advanced Tutorial Reading for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and approval of the Department of Psychology Committee on Undergraduate Studies; and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A combined total of six credits of PSYCH 420, 421, 422, and 423 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to further explore a topic of interest in psychology under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 422(505). Faculty Directed Advanced Research for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and Committee on Undergraduate Studies, and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. STATS 350 and one methods-based laboratory are recommended. This course is generally elected after a student has completed PSYCH 322. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A combined total of six credits of PSYCH 420, 421, 422, and 423 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course. Note: This course is generally elected after a student has completed PSYCH 322.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

PSYCH 423(505). Faculty Directed Advanced Research for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and Committee on Undergraduate Studies, and one of the following: PSYCH 230, 240, 250, 260, 270, 280, or 290. STATS 350 and one methods-based laboratory are recommended. This course is generally elected after a student has completed PSYCH 323. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. A combined total of six credits of PSYCH 420, 421, 422, and 423 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research of their own design under the direction of a member of the faculty. The course requires a final 15-20 page paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the Psychology undergraduate office after his/her petition has been approved. Students are responsible for properly registering for the course. Note: This course is generally elected after a student has completed PSYCH 323.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 424(510). Senior Honors Research I for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the Psychology Honors Program. STATS 350 and prior research experience is recommended. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (PSYCH 426), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/424/001.nsf

The primary focus of this course is the development of a natural science research plan of a student's own design with the Honors advisor and the writing of an extensive literature review on the Honors topic, culminating in an acceptable research proposal.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 425(510). Senior Honors Research I for Psychology as a Social Science.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the Psychology Honors Program. STATS 350 and prior research experience is recommended. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (PSYCH 427), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/424/001.nsf

The primary focus of this course is the development of a social science research plan of a student's own design with the Honors advisor and the writing of an extensive literature review on the Honors topic, culminating in an acceptable research proposal.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

PSYCH 426(511). Senior Honors Research II for Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001 satisfies the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 424 and admission to the Psychology Honors Program. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/424/001.nsf

The primary focus of this course is the implementation of the honors research design culminating in a final, acceptable honors thesis and poster preparation for the year-end poster session.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 427(511). Senior Honors Research II for Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 001 satisfies the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 425 and admission to the Psychology Honors Program. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/424/001.nsf

The primary focus of this course is the implementation of the honors research design culminating in a final, acceptable Honors thesis and poster preparation for the year-end poster session.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 433. Biopsychology of Motivation.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susana Pecina (pesu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 230. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will cover the biopsychology and brain mechanisms of affective and motivational processes in animals and humans. We will examine general motivational processes such as theories of motivation, the interaction of motivation with learning, and substrates of pleasure and reward versus pain and stress. We will also look at specific motivational systems such as hunger, sleep, sex, aggression, drug addiction, and their underlying brain circuitry. Students are expected to have taken a course in introductory biopsychology (e.g., through PSYCH 230) or equivalent. Course grade will be determined on the basis of essay exams, papers, class presentation and discussion. The course will be taught as a mixture of instructor lecture, student-moderated topic presentations, lecture, and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 436. Drugs of Abuse, Brain and Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terry E Robinson (ter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 230. BIOLOGY 162 and chemistry are recommended. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/436/001.nsf

This course provides a basic introduction to the neuropsychopharmacology of drug abuse and addiction, and has a strong natural science (neuroscience) orientation. Prerequisites include PSYCH 230 (Introduction to Biopsychology) and an interest in biological approaches to the study of behavior. Introductory Biology and Chemistry are also recommended. The acute and long-term effects of selected drugs of abuse on behavior, mood, cognition, and neuronal function are discussed, and material from studies with humans is integrated with basic studies on the neurobiological basis of drug action and drug abuse — including detailed coverage of synaptic transmission and the distribution, regulation, and integration of brain neurotransmitter systems. The focus is on addictive or illicit drugs, and all the major classes are discussed, including: opiates (heroin, morphine, opium), sedative-hypnotics (alcohol, barbituates, chloral hydrate), anxiolytics (benzodiazepines), psychomotor stimulants (amphetamine, cocaine), marijuana, hallucinogens (LSD, mescaline), hallucinogenic-stimulants (MDA, MDMA), and dissociative anaesthetics (PCP).

A lecture format is used, with required readings from a text. The course is intended primarily for juniors or seniors concentrating in biopsychology, biology, or the biomedical sciences (e.g., pre-med).

Required Text: R.S. Feldman, J.S. Meyer and L.F. Quenzer, Principles of Neuropsychopharmacology, Sinauer, 1997.

Exams and Grading: The course grade will be based on the outcome of three multiple choice/short answer type exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 437. Current Topics in Biopsychology.

Section 001 — Behavior of Wolves and Dogs. Prerequisites: Two courses in animal behavior. [3 Credits].

Instructor(s): Barbara Boardman Smuts (bsmuts@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 230. (3). (Excl). (BS). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/437/001.nsf

This course reviews the behavior of the dog family (Canidae), within the theoretical framework of evolutionary biology and behavioral ecology. The course emphasizes social behavior, including social structure, reproduction, parental care, cooperation, competition, and communication. We will focus on domestic dogs and their ancestors, grey wolves, as well as other wild dog species (such as coyotes, jackals, and African wild dogs). Video footage of dog and wolf behavior will be shown during class, and there will be opportunities to observe "live" social interactions among domestic dogs.

Domestic dogs and wolves are very close relatives; they produce fertile hybrids, and recent genetic analyses suggest that they could be considered a single species. Yet wolves and dogs show some consistent physical and behavioral differences. A detailed look at the behavior of wild wolves will serve as a foundation for investigating questions such as:

  1. How are wolves and dogs similar and different behaviorally and physically?
  2. When, why, and how did wolves first begin to associate with humans, and how did they evolve into dogs?
  3. How has human selection altered (or failed to alter) the basic nature of the wolf?

Investigation of these and other questions will help students refine their knowledge of conceptual issues relevant to animal behavior in general.

This is a seminar, and active participation in discussions is mandatory. Grades are based on several short essays, a 10-15 page research paper, regular participation in discussion, and occasional quizzes on the readings. The reading load is heavy and includes a number of research articles from the primary literature. To enroll in this course, you must have already taken at least two courses in behavioral ecology/animal behavior and get permission to enroll from the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 437. Current Topics in Biopsychology.

Section 002 — Mean & Mechs in Mind-Body Medicine. Meets with PSYCH 477.004.

Instructor(s): J Anne Murphy (jamurphy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 230. (3). (Excl). (BS). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar will explore the relations of mind (culture and psychological processes) and body that define mind-body medicine and that impact states of health and the healing process. The core topics will include: the illness experience (empathy and the patient-physician relationship), psychoneuroimmunology (that is, the study of interactions between behavior, the brain, and the immune system), placebo responses, and mood disorders. Other topics will be determined by the interests of the students. Grades will be based on class participation, short written assignments on the core topics, and an individual topic paper on the student's area of interest. Each student will choose a class reading for their topic and be responsible for presenting and leading group discussion.

Required Texts:

Jamison, Kay Redfield (1995). An Unquiet Mind. New York:
Manning, Martha (1994). Undercurrents. New York: Harper Collins.
Sapolsky, Robert M. (1998). Why Zebras Don't Get Ulcers. New York:Freeman.
Tolstoy, Leo (1981). The Death of Ivan Ilyich. New York: Random House.
Whybrow, Peter (1998). A Mood Apart. New York: Harper Perennial.
Course pack at Excel

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 442. Perception, Science, and Reality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert G Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/442/001.nsf

The course focuses on basic perceptual phenomena and theories. It also examines the general relationship between perception and scientific observation. Topics include: sensory transduction and psychophysics; Gestalt organization; constancy and contrast effects; expectation; selective attention; perceptual learning; and symbolic representation.

While this course is oriented toward the natural sciences, it also considers social, philosophical, and aesthetic perspectives, since at its most general level, human perception concerns the questions of how and why human beings use sensory information to conceive of, and experience immediate reality the way they do.

The instructor assumes no particular psychology background, and non-psychology concentrators are welcome. Grades will be determined on the basis of two short papers (worth a total of 35% of the grade) and one longer paper (worth 50% of the grade). In addition, there will be a short final test that will count 15% of the grade.

Questions concerning this course can be e-mailed to pachella@umich.edu.

Reading: Neisser, U. "The processes of vision." Scientific American, September, 1968.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5 Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 447. Current Topics in Cognition and Perception.

Section 001 — Curr Topic in Cog Neuroscience. Cognitive Neuroscience: The higher mental processes. Meets with PSYCH 808.001.

Instructor(s): Edward E Smith (eesmith@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 240. (3). (Excl). (BS). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/447/001.nsf

Cognitive Neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field. Essentially, it is an attempt by cognitive psychologists and neuroscientists to discover how mental activities are implemented in the brain. The approach focuses on human cognitive processes and relies heavily on the methods and findings of neuroscience.

While much of the research in Cognitive Neuroscience has dealt with the sensation and perception, this course will focus on mental processes that are thought to be at a higher level. Such processes include:
  1. Long-term memory
  2. Short-term or working memory
  3. Executive processing
  4. Mental imagery
  1. Mental calculation
  2. Decision making
  3. Concepts & categorization
  4. Language use

These eight processes comprise the major topics covered in the course. For each topic we will consider findings about how the process breaks down under certain forms of brain damage, as well as evidence about how the processes operates normally as revealed by neuro-imaging techniques.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 458(558). Psychology of Adolescence.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kai Cortina (schnabel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/458/001.nsf

This course will provide an overview of adolescent development. We will cover many psychological and social aspects including biological and cognitive development. Family, peer, and school influences are analyzed partly based on original research literature and several popular movies that highlight normative and problematic psychosocial development.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

PSYCH 464. Group Behavior in Organizations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karen Epstein (kepstein@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 260. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/464/001.nsf

The course will cover state-of-the-art theory and research on the nature of group behavior in organized work settings, and fundamental factors that lead to group effectiveness. We will examine both contextual factors (for example, organizational resources, the design of the task, rewards) and factors within the group (for example, feelings of safety among group members). In addition, we will evaluate organizations' use of groups and teams through cases. My goals for the course are to enable every student to: understand and explain fundamental factors that lead to or hinder group effectiveness gain first-hand experience in team work by participating in a term-long learning team, reflect on the challenges and benefits of group work, and demonstrate skills for increasing group effectiveness become a more informed evaluator of organizations use of teams as a current or potential employee, manager, and owner. We will work together to accomplish these objectives by the end of the course. Class sessions will be part lecture, part activities, and part discussion of readings assigned for that week.

Pre-requisite: Students are expected to have completed a course covering fundamental topics of organizational behavior, such as PSYCH 260.

Evaluation: Students are evaluated with two in-class exams, a term group project with peer evaluations, and participation in class discussion and activities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 467. Current Topics in Organizational Psychology.

Section 001 — Schools as Organizations.

Instructor(s): Tabbye M Chavous (tchavous@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 260. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/467/001.nsf

This course provides a multi-level approach to considering the impact of educational systems on groups and individuals. This field is rooted in three academic disciplines: psychology (social, developmental, organizational), education, and sociology. The readings and theoretical approaches covered in this course draw on these three disciplines. Thus, a primary focus is on exploring the ways in which societal contexts shape school cultures and their subsequent impact on the motivation and psychological well-being of individuals within those settings. In exploring this, a survey of some of the specific problems and contemporary issues of concern related to schools will be discussed and will include elementary, secondary, and higher educational contexts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 467. Current Topics in Organizational Psychology.

Section 002 — Gender in Organizations.

Instructor(s): Margaret J Shih (mjshih@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 260. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

We will examine the impact of race, gender and culture on organizational processes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 473(573). Developmental Disturbances of Childhood.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Albert C Cain (cainac@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 250 and 270. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on children's developmental disturbances. It includes basic points of view, selected syndromes, relevant research data, and etiological concepts. It suggests fruitful ways of analyzing and conceptualizing issues and data in the field, also alerting students to gaps in our knowledge. In addition, the instructor hopes to interest some students in this field in itself, and to encourage others to incorporate certain knowledge, and ways of approaching issues into their own fields. Student work is evaluated on the basis of exams, as well as written exercises and/or papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 477. Current Topics in Clinical Psychology.

Section 001 — Gender & Sexual Identity in Current Theory & Cinema.

Instructor(s): James H Hansell (jhansell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 270. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/477/001.nsf

This course will explore the psychology of gender and sexual identity through the medium of popular cinema. We will begin with theoretical readings that will provide a context for our analysis of various films dealing with gendered aspects of identity, coming of age issues for males and females, and the psychodynamics of gender and sexual identity development. Students will be expected to make presentations to the class and to write on these topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 477. Current Topics in Clinical Psychology.

Section 002 — Children, Race, and Poverty.

Instructor(s): Rosario E Ceballo (rosarioc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 270. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Approximately one out of every six American children lives in poverty (U.S. Census Bureau, 2000), and numerous studies have found an association between poverty and the presence of emotional and behavioral problems in children. Families in poverty typically face a conglomeration of chronic and persistent life stressors and environmental conditions (e.g., inadequate housing, unemployment, inferior schools, poor medical services, high crime rates, and destitute neighborhoods). This course will rely upon psychological research, scholarly papers in related fields, newspaper articles, and public policy reports to explore how poverty influences the lives of children in American society. We will specifically consider the following types of questions:

  • Why are poverty rates for racial minority children so high?
  • How does poverty affect children's psychological well-being, physical health, academic achievement, and transition to adulthood?
  • How do poor environmental conditions, like dangerous neighborhoods, influence families?
  • What role does parenting behavior, parental mental health, and chronic stressors play in the lives of poor children?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 477. Current Topics in Clinical Psychology.

Section 003 — Insanity and Humanity.

Instructor(s): Laura P Kohn-Wood (lpkohn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 270. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/477/003.nsf

This course is an advanced level undergraduate psychology seminar that examines the depiction of modern mental illnesses in popular media, including film, literature and art. We will first review major mental disorders (based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) then focus on critically analyzing the portrayal of these disorders in our culture through artistic media. Students will be tested on their knowledge of psychopathology as well as their ability to critically compare artistic depictions and analyze the effect of these portrayals on society's perspective and understanding of mental illness. Both Introductory Psychology and Introduction to Psychopathology are required prerequisites of this seminar.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 485 / WOMENSTD 485. Gender, Mentoring, and Technology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Abigail J Stewart (abbystew@umich.edu), Tiffany Vera Marra

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~tmarra/class/index.html

See WOMENSTD 485.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, PERMISSION OF INSTRUCTOR

PSYCH 487. Current Topics in Social Psychology.

Section 001 — Stereotyping and Gender/Racial Diversity in School and Work Settings.

Instructor(s): Denise J Sekaquaptewa (dsekaqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 280. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine psychological research addressing the influence of social stereotypes and race/gender diversity on performance and other outcomes. Topics include: stereotyping; racial and gender identity; the influence of stereotypes on the performance of women, African-Americans, Asian-Americans, and other groups; the consequences of underrepresentation in terms of race or gender; social and public policy implications. This course requires reading scientific articles in social psychology, and discussion of the readings. Grades will be based on quizzes and writing assignments (e.g., research paper).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 487. Current Topics in Social Psychology.

Section 002 — Intelligence & the Social Brain.

Instructor(s): Oscar Ybarra (oybarra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 280. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Ask 20 people what intelligence is and you are likely to get 20 different definitions. Nevertheless, in all of these definitions there is bound to be a common theme, and that theme in all likelihood will deal with a person's capacity to adapt to the environment. Although the environments humans have populated are quite diverse, one feature the human mind had to be sensitive to was navigating a web of social relations. The course will provide a different perspective on intelligence by placing it in the broader context of what it means to be human — to have and maintain social relations with others. The ability to have social interactions and social relations is predicated on distinct social cognitive processes. Such a perspective runs counter to the prevailing and usually decontextualized views of intelligence and the recommendations given to people as to what they can do to maintain their cognitive health.

Students who sign up for this course are expected to have a background in psychology and preferably to have taken a course in social and or cognitive psychology. The readings for the course will be a combination of scientific articles and book chapters on the subject matter. The course is seminar format with the expectation that students will participate actively and on occasion help to lead discussion. At times, part of each class session will be devoted to performing class activities to reinforce concepts from class. Student evaluation will be based on mini exams, execution of discussion topic, and general participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 498 / WOMENSTD 498. Gender and the Individual.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ramaswami Mahalingam (ramawasi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 111. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/498/001.nsf

Examines how gender shapes and is shaped by individual women and men. We draw on psychological theories, feminist theories, and the empirical research literature to examine how gender operates for women and men. The course considers ways in which gender is constructed socially; examines particular domains in which gender is experienced and performed; and examines sources of gender in biology, lifespan development, and socialization.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PSYCH 532 / BIOLOGY 541 / PHYSIOL 541 / ANAT 541. Mammalian Reproductive Endocrinology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Theresa M Lee (terrilee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 310 or 311, or BIOLCHEM 415. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/532/001.nsf

See PHYSIOL 541.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

PSYCH 541. Advanced Topics in Cognition and Perception.

Section 514 — Experimental Methods in Language Processing Research. Meets with PSYCH 547.001.

Instructor(s): Julie E Boland (jeboland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: PSYCH 240. (3). (Excl). (BS). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/ling/547/001.nsf

See PSYCH 547.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


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