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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Russian


This page was created at 8:21 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



RUSSIAN 101. First-Year Russian.

Language

Instructor(s): Snejana J Tempest (tempest@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (5). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 103 or 111.

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, the student is introduced to the basics of Russian pronunciation and grammar. The course begins with an intensive study of the Russian sound system and orthographic rules (the alphabet and correct spelling). Students spend an average of 1.5-2 hours per day working with tapes and writing exercises. The course is supplemented by video shows. Students who intend to concentrate in Russian Language and Literature or in Russian and East European Studies might consider taking the intensive class, RUSSIAN 103.

Textbook: Nachalo I.

There is a required grammar section (LEC) for RUSSIAN 101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RUSSIAN 102. First-Year Russian, Continued.

Language

Instructor(s): Snejana J Tempest (tempest@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RUSSIAN 101. (5). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 103, 111, or 112.

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/russian/102/001.nsf

In this course, the sequel to RUSSIAN 101, students complete their survey of Russian grammar, expand their vocabulary, and learn to express themselves in Russian about topics of interest including Russian history and culture. The course is supplemented by video shows. Students are expected to complete 1-2 hours of oral and written homework every night. Textbook: Nachalo II.

There is a required grammar section (LEC) for RUSSIAN 102.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 202. Second-Year Russian, Continued.

Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: RUSSIAN 201. (5). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 203.

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~russians/Pedagogy2/page3.html

This course assumes students' knowledge of the fundamentals of Russian grammar, and involves the use of verbs of motion (with and without special prefixes), the formation and usage of participles and verbal adverbs. Students read and write texts of increasing complexity, discussing Russian and Soviet history, culture, and other topics of interest. The course requires 8-12 hours of homework per week. Textbook: V Puti by Frank Miller and Olga Kagan.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 203 / RCCORE 293. Intensive Second Year Russian.

Language

Instructor(s): Alina Udalchenko Makin (resco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RUSSIAN 102 or 103. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 201 or 202.

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~resco/lvl26.html

An intensive course meeting eight hours a week + Language lunch table and Russian Tea, this course covers the material which is usually covered in two terms in RUSSIAN 201 and 202. Special emphasis is placed on speaking, writing, comprehension, and vocabulary building. The course is proficiency oriented and is especially recommended for students who intend to concentrate in Russian Language and Literature or in Russian and East European Studies and who want to gain rapid mastery of Russian. The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency examination. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker in spoken and written language. Students must understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature.

Required textbooks and materials:

  1. V puti: Russian Grammar in Context by Olga Kagan and Frank Miller, Prentice Hall, 1996. (PAK includes textbook, workbook and labtapes).
  2. Stories from Today's Russia: A Reader from Today's Russia by Derevyanchenko, Tschakh and Kokoryshkina, National Textbook Company, 1997.
  3. Course pack, available for purchase at Ulrich's.

Recommended, but not required textbooks and materials:

  1. The Russian Reference Grammar: Core Grammar in Functional Context by J. Watzke, J.Sweigert, Jr., Kendall/Hunt1997, ISBN 0-7872-4467-8.
  2. Russian-English, English-Russian Dictionary by Katzner.

Cost: over $100

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RUSSIAN 222. Russia Today.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael Makin (mlmakin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/russian/222/001.nsf

This course is intended to introduce aspects of Russia today to a general student audience, with special emphasis on contemporary Russia as a "multi-national" country. No background in the subject is required. Among the many issues which this course intends to raise are: the complexities and contradictions of the multiple national identities characteristic of Russia's extraordinary ethnic mix; the attempt to recover the past in Russian culture today; the ways we look at the Russians through our own media; the economic and political transformations of Russia, as reflected in culture and everyday life. Particular attention will be paid this year to the Chechen conflict, its meaning for Russia, and its representation in Russian culture. There are three informal lectures per week, and a discussion section. Assignments will include readings, film viewings, and regular surveys of English-language media for news about Russia today. Written assignments for the course are: two short papers and a weekly journal. There also will be three in-class examinations of one hour each, as indicated in the syllabus. Each one-hour examination is worth 10% of the final grade; each paper is worth 20% of the final grade; the journals in total are worth 10% of the final grade. Work in sections (participation in discussions) is worth 20% of the final grade. There is no final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 225(SLAVIC 460). Russian for Heritage Speakers.

Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Svitlana Rogovyk (srogovyk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Native or near-native speaker. (3). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 302. Third-Year Russian.

Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alina Udalchenko Makin (resco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RUSSIAN 301. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 303.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~russians/Pedagogy/page8.html

During the course of the academic term, we will continue to work on the development of all four skills — readings, writing, speaking, and listening. We will review difficult grammatical points and work on the expansion of both passive and active vocabulary in the areas of politics, political news, national security, and economics. Students will be introduced to more complex vocabulary and syntactic structures typical of political texts.

Upon the completion of this course the student should be able to understand feature-length unabridged political texts from Russian printed media, understand short reports (four- to five-minute newscasts as well as political speeches), and to carry out a prolonged conversation with a native speaker, show developing argumentative and hypothetical skills, discuss social and political events and abstract notions, write three- to four-page essays on political topics.

Required textbooks and materials:

  1. Political Russian (Third Edition) by N. Simes and R. Robin, 2002. ACTR/Kendall Hunt, ISBN 0-7872-9270-2.
  2. On the Air: Russian Television and Politics by N. Simes, R. Robin and L. Guslistov, 1999. ACTR/SAIS/Kendall/Hunt, ISBN 0-7872-6035-5.

Recommended, but not required textbooks and materials:

  1. The Oxford Russian Dictionary: English-Russian, Russian-English, edited by Paula Falla. Oxford University Press, 1998. ISBN 0198601530.
  2. A Comprehensive Russian Grammar by T. Wade, Blackwell, 1997. ISBN 0-63117502-4.
  3. A Grammar Workbook by T. Wade, Balckwell, 1996. ISBN 0-63119381-2.

Cost: over $100

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

RUSSIAN 348(452) / RCHUMS 348. Survey of Russian Literature.

Literature

Section 001 — Russian Fiction of the Late Nineteenth Century. Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Olga E Maiorova

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. Taught in English. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the major masterpieces of Russian fiction written in the last third of the 19th century. Among the works to be studied are such classics of world literature as Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and Dostoevsky's Brothers Karamazov. We also will read some of Chekhov's best short stories. Texts will be analyzed in the context of the monumental changes Russian society was undergoing at that time. We will trace how writers positioned themselves with regard to the social, intellectual, and religious issues dividing their contemporaries. Topics include gender relations, violence and repentance, utopia, suicide, love and modernity, the metaphysics of beauty, Russia and the West. Final test and two papers. No knowledge of Russian literature or history is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RUSSIAN 355. Supervised Reading of Russian Literature.

Literature

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students develop a term-long reading and writing project on a topic or topics in Russian literary or linguistic studies, in consultation with a member of the faculty. Readings may include substantial amounts of Russian. Weekly meetings with the supervisor may be conducted in English or Russian. Writing assignments made according to the number of credits elected, but must correspond to writing expectations of upper-level department courses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

RUSSIAN 402. Fourth-Year Russian.

Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vitalij V Shevoroshkin (vvs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RUSSIAN 401. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 403.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continued work on vocabulary combined with the mastery of oral fluency and freedom of self-expression in speech and writing. Readings taken from Russian short stories and the press.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 410 / EDCURINS 437. Teaching of Russian.

Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Snejana J Tempest (tempest@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An exploration of the multiple aspects of language teaching, including theoretical background. Topics of discussion include intercultural understanding, drilling, testing, computer-assisted instruction, and multi-media technology. Emphasis on development of practical skills for classroom instruction. Optional textbook: Omaggio Hadley, Teaching Language in Context, 2nd edition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

RUSSIAN 460. Russian Social Fiction.

Literature

Section 001 — Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Russian picaresque humor, satire, fantasy, and science fiction in the 19th and 20th centuries against the background of the occidental and oriental traditions. Textbooks:

  • Gogol, Dead Souls;
  • Erenburg, Julio Jurenito;
  • Tolstoy, The Garin Death Ray;
  • Il'f and Petrov, The Twelve Chairs; The Little Golden Calf;
  • Babel', The Forgotten Prose;
  • Bulgakov, The Master and Margarita;
  • Solov'ev, The Beggar in the Harem: impudent adventures in old Bukhara.

Lectures and discussion. Knowledge of Russian not required. Midterm reports and final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 464. Tolstoy.

Literature

Section 001 — Taught in English. Meets with RUSSIAN 857.001.

Instructor(s): Olga E Maiorova

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will cover some of the major works written by Leo Tolstoy throughout his long and extremely productive artistic life — from the 1850s through the beginning of the twentieth century. We will examine his masterpieces in connection with the religious, political, and social phenomena that shaped Russian intellectual life of that period. At the same time we will learn how Tolstoy's writing changed the Russian intellectual landscape. This course will emphasize the main existential problems Tolstoy was deeply interested in, as well as his extraordinary views on literature and fine arts. We also will focus on Tolstoy's artistic devices and narrative means. The course will alternate lectures with discussions of assigned readings. All readings are in English translation. It is designed both for those with general interest in Russian literature, and for those with a specific, scholarly or literary interest in Tolstoy. No prior knowledge of Russian literature and culture is necessary. Evaluation of students' work will be based on essay, final test, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 476. Russian Literary and Cultural Theory and the West.

Literature

Section 001 — Taught in English. Meets with RUSSIAN 856.001.

Instructor(s): Andreas Xavier Schönle (aschonle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines twentieth-century Russian critical theory in its relationship with Western literary and cultural theory. Translated works by the Russian Formalists, Soviet semioticians (Lotman and Uspensky), Bakhtin and his circle, as well as contemporary post-modernists will be discussed in the light of comparable Western approaches. Emphasis will be placed on the relationship between literature and the cultural environment. We will discuss issues such as literature as device, literature in its institutions, poetic form and play, aesthetic value and ritual, the theory of narrative and the search for a masterplot, the semiotics of literature, culture as text, dialogue and the novel, Marxist criticism, postmodernism and Stalinist ideology, and the mythology of everyday life in Russia and America. Among Western critics we will read works by Genette, Williams, Barthes, Hernstein Smith, Iser, Greenblatt, Jauss, de Man, Jameson, and Baudrillard. Very short weekly essays, one oral presentation, and one 15-page paper. Knowledge of Russian not required. All texts read in translation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RUSSIAN 479. Vladimir Nabokov and World Literature II: The American Years.

Literature

Section 001 — Meets with ENGLISH 482.003.

Instructor(s): Omry Ronen (omronen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Knowledge of Russian not required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course is the second part of the survey of Nabokov's life work. It will be devoted entirely to the American period of Nabokov's writing and cover his novels Bend Sinister, Lolita, Pnin, Pale Fire, Ada, Transparent Things, and Look at the Harlequins, as well as most of his English-language short stories and poems. Special attention will be paid to his activities as a translator, literary scholar, and educator. Students will be expected to read a wide selection of scholarly and critical works on Nabokov. Undergraduates concentrators in any field, including natural sciences, especially biology; graduate students of Slavic, English, Romance, German, and comparative literature, linguistics, and visual arts.

Three hours, lecture. Intensive reading; participation in class discussion; midterm report on secondary reading; final take-home examination or a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RUSSIAN 492. Senior Honors Course.

Literature

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Approval of departmental Honors Committee. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits. Credit is granted for a combined total of six credits of RUSSIAN 491 and 492. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of RUSSIAN 492, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

During RUSSIAN 492 (the second half of the year-long Honors course) the student produces a draft of a thesis of fifty to one hundred pages on a topic in literary or linguistic studies, and then, in consultation with a thesis supervisor and the Honors advisor, the final version of the thesis. Regular meetings with supervisor, participation in informal seminars, and successful submission of thesis lead to the award of an Honors degree in Russian. An oral defense may be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

RUSSIAN 499. Advanced Seminar in Russian.

Literature

Section 001 — Images of the "Provincial" in 19th- and 20th-Century Russian Culture. Taught in Russian.

Instructor(s): Michael Makin (mlmakin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RUSSIAN 302 or 303, and 351. Taught in Russian. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/russian/499/001.nsf

In Russia, the "provinces" begin at the edges of Moscow and St Petersburg — everything beyond the two "capitals" is "provincial" in the world's largest country. Thus the vast majority of Russians live in the "provinces", although the country's culture (as its economy and politics) is dominated by the two capitals. The geographical extent of Russia, the inaccessibility of even major centers of population, a very centralized institutional structure, obvious economic imbalances, and many other factors go into sustaining the sense that "provincial" Russia is remote, backward, and homogeneous. At the same time, opposite claims are often heard: that here is the "real" Russia, uncontaminated by non-native influences, unchanged by time, pure, and beautiful — a model from which the capitals have deviated to their own detriment.

This course will examine a series of images of the "provincial" in nineteenth and twentieth-century Russian culture, using readings not only from fiction, poetry, and travel narratives, but also from beyond the realm of belles lettres (there will be significant use of Internet resources, for example).

In a series of course modules we will explore how the Russian provinces have been imagined, presented, and distorted by those who inhabit them, by those who mythologize them, by those who dread them, and by those who love them. Three short papers, a final presentation, and a term paper. The course is taught in Russian, with participation in discussions required. All assignments are in Russian.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1


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