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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Sociology


This page was created at 7:54 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sheila Bluhm Morley (sbluhm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in SOC 300. Seniors must elect SOC 300. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 195 or 300. No credit for seniors. May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/100/001.nsf

Sociology is the exciting and systematic study of individuals within the context of their society. This introductory course offers new perspectives by which to examine the world on a micro (individual or personal) sociological level, as well as on a macro (global) level. Students are introduced to the Sociological Imagination and its application to social interaction and issues of social inequality (class and stratification, gender and sex, age, race and ethnicity).

In the latter part of the course these principles are applied to two specific areas of examination. The first is the American health system, including availability and affordability of health care, issues of mental health, alternative medical treatments, inequalities in the health care delivery system, and other concerns within the field of Medical Sociology. The second is the American family, which explores family structures, love, commitment, child and domestic abuse, maltreatment, neglect, and violence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Instructor

SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 020.

Instructor(s): Cedric De Leon (cdeleon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in SOC 300. Seniors must elect SOC 300. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 195 or 300. No credit for seniors. May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Sociology is the study of the interaction between "social structure" and "agency" in every sphere of social life. That is, it seeks to explore the relationship between patterns or trends among groups of people on the one hand and the individual freedom of those people on the other. Such patterns or trends may include racial inequality, colonial domination or poverty just to name a few. No matter what the issue, sociology compels us to ask certain key questions of each other. For example, how much freedom does each of us really have? Are there constraints to our freedom, and if so, which ones? Why do we believe what we believe? Can patterns of injustice be changed?

This course is about the greatest knock-down, drag-out fights over the proper way to conceive of the relationship between structure and agency. The first part of the course deals with this debate in the area of identity politics and inequality. The second part asks whether culture has any influence on everyday life. Finally, the course wraps up with the study of large-scale transformations such as globalization and the rise of nation-states.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 040.

Instructor(s): Anthony S Chen (chentony@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in SOC 300. Seniors must elect SOC 300. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 195 or 300. No credit for seniors. May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~chentony/teaching.html

This course provides a broad introduction to sociology as a both mode of inquiry and field of scholarship. It begins with a survey of classical social theory; then turns to a discussion of the various methodological approaches used by sociologists to frame research questions, gather data, and draw inferences; and concludes with a consideration of exemplary scholarship in core empirical areas of the field.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 102. Contemporary Social Issues: An Introduction to Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terence McGinn (tjmcginn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take SOC 300 or 401. (4). (SS). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through SOC 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different. No credit for seniors. May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/102/001.nsf

Sociology is the study of human beings and their social arrangements. One can view the academic discipline of sociology as a method for asking questions, a group of authors, a collection of writings, or a set of issues. This course helps students to explore sociology using contemporary social issues or "problems" as the entry point.

During the Winter '04 Academic Term, we will examine several social problems as they present themselves both in the United States and globally. We will also consider various approaches that have been proposed as solutions to these problems, again using international examples. Issues to be considered include: the economy and poverty; health; environmental destruction; crime; war in the media; racial/ethnic conflicts; gender and sexual orientation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 110 / SI 110. Introduction to Information Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert L Frost (rfrost@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.si.umich.edu/~rfrost/courses/SI110/

The vaunted Information Revolution is more than Web surfing, 'Net games, and dotcoms. Indeed, it is the foundation for an economic and social transformation on a scale comparable to the Industrial Revolution of the nineteenth century. As a culture we have learned from earlier such transformations and it is important to recognize those lessons and chart a path toward intellectual and practical mastery of the emerging world of information. At the School of Information, we take pride in our tradition, inherited from librarianship, of "user-centeredness" and public access. For this reason, not only will you, the user of this course, be given unusual attention, but intellectually, we will approach information technology from the perspective of end-users and their concerns.

This course will provide the foundational knowledge necessary to begin to address the key issues associated with the Information Revolution. Issues will range from the theoretical (what is information and how do humans construct it?), to the cultural (is life on the screen a qualitatively different phenomenon from experiences with earlier distance-telescoping and knowledge-building technologies such as telephones and libraries?), to the practical (what are the basic architectures of computing and networks?). Successful completion of this "gateway" course will give you, the student, the conceptual tools necessary to understand the politics, economics, and culture of the Information Age, providing a foundation for later study in Information or any number of other academic fields. Topics will include:

  • problems of intellectual property (copyrights and patents) in the Digital Age
  • the culture of open-source software, coding, hacking, and innovation
  • the implications of databases and Internet activity tracking on privacy
  • government accountability in the age of e-mail and digital documents
  • the "new economy" as business models and e-commerce strategies
  • post-9/11 security and surveillance measures and what they mean for the Internet
  • how the new information environment is organized, and how search engines work
  • the implications of recent Internet filtering requirements for libraries
  • and, of course, the basic structures of computers and the Internet

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 111 / ENVIRON 111 / GEOSCI 172 / GEOG 111 / NRE 111 / AOSS 172 / ENSCEN 172. Introduction to Global Change: Human Impacts.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ben van der Pluijm (vdpluijm@umich.edu), David Ellsworth (ellswort@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit for seniors. May not be included in a concentration plan. Satisfies the geography requirement for State of Michigan certification for social studies teachers.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.globalchange.umich.edu/globalchange2/

See ENVIRON 111.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SOC 122 / PSYCH 122. Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001 — Dialogues on Race, Gender, Sexual Orientation, Religion, or Ethnicity.

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits. May not be included in a concentration in psychology or sociology.

Theme Semester

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/dialogues.html

See PSYCH 122.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 210. Elementary Statistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): George Philip Mason (gpmason@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sociology Honors students should elect this course prior to beginning the Honors Seminar sequence. Sociology concentrators should elect this course during their third year. (4). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in STATS 100, 350, 265, 311, 350, 405, or 412, or ECON 404 or 405.

Full QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/210/001.nsf

The course is designed to introduce students of the social sciences to the basic statistical methods. Various statistics will be introduced and students will learn how to analyze and understand social situations. Students are not expected to have prior knowledge of statistics or mathematics beyond that of college stream high school education. Students will be introduced to frequency distributions, measures of central tendency and variability, cross-tabulation, hypothesis testing, regression, chi-square, and other statistical techniques.

This course introduces to the student three important aspects of quantitative research. First, the methods in which data collection is conducted by researchers such as opinion polls, surveys, experiments, and sampling. Second, the description of the data collection including graphical and numerical procedures for summarizing and describing a data set. Third, the ways in which researchers use data to make decisions, predictions and draw inferences.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 303 / CAAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sheila Bluhm

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or CAAS; CAAS 201 recommended. (4). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

Theme Semester R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/303/001.nsf

This course in race and ethnicity will focus on social explanations of inequality and its social construction within the United States and throughout the world — with a particular focus on the difficulties arising from the categorization and stratification of people within minority groups. As well, students will be introduced to a sociology of inequality and the methods to study inequality. This will include an examination of the social history and social construction of race and ethnicity in the United States. However, the class will go beyond examining visibly different ethnic groups and will take a broader and comparative view of race and ethnicity to examine the categorical creation of the "Other" and "White Privilege" in the United States.

This course will be divided into five distinct sections. The first section of the course will include a discussion of the definitions and concepts related to the study of minority groups. The second section will examine the structure of ethnicity and the social construction of race. The third section of this course will review the social history and social change of race and ethnicity. The fourth section will examine the social consequences of stratification based on class, race, and gender. Finally, the fifth section will conclude with an examination of the political, social, and economic inequality of contemporary society.

This class will participate in the Winter Theme Semester.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Instructor

SOC 304 / AMCULT 304. American Immigration.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Silvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

That America is a nation of immigrants is one of the most common place, yet truest of statements. In this course we will survey a vast range of the American immigrant experience: that of the Irish, Germans, Jews, Italians, Chinese, Japanese, Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, and Mexicans. Immigration to America can be broadly understood as consisting of four major waves; the first one, that which consisted of Northwest Europeans who immigrated up to the mid-19th century; the second one, that which consisted of Southern and East Europeans at the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th; the third one, the movement from the south to the north of Black Americans and Mexicans precipitated by the two world wars; and the fourth one, from 1965 on, is still ongoing in the present, of immigrants mostly from Latin America and Asia. At all times, our effort is to understand the immigrant past of these ethnic groups, both for what it tells us about the past as well as their present and possible future. Course requirements: the written requirements for this course consist of two exams. Both the exams will be in-class tests, consisting of short answer questions that will draw from the lectures and our discussion of the readings. Each exam will be worth 50 percent.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 305. Introduction to Sociological Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeremy Brooke Straughn (straughn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One sociology course. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 405.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/305/001.nsf

An introduction to various problems in the analysis of social organization as they are treated in the works of several seminal figures in sociological thought. Several theorists, including Comte, Spencer, Marx, Tonnies, Weber, Durkheim, Simmel, Cooley, and Parsons, are studied. It asks how these thinkers accounted for the emergence, growth, and ordering of social organization and how they accounted for social change. In the context of this analysis, students are be introduced to various accounts and uses of such theoretical concepts as structure, function, norm, power, solidarity, integration, differentiation, communication, stratification, adaptation to environment, social control, and deviance. Attention is also given to the way in which the organizational concepts developed in sociological theory have been used in modern sociological research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 310. Introduction to Research Methods.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kristi R Jenkins

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology; or completion of one social science course in economics, anthropology, political science, psychology or other sociology course; Sociology concentrators are strongly encouraged to elect this course in the Junior year. Sociology Honors students should elect this course concurrently with SOC 397. (4). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing Full QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce you to a range of basic research methods used by sociologists, including surveys, experiments, unstructured interviews, focus groups, diaries/calendar methods, observation, and archival/historical methods. The course also addresses causality and reasoning in social science research and exposes students to important methodological issues in the field.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 320 / PSYCH 310. Processes of Intergroup Dialogues Facilitation.

Instructor(s): Charles F Behling (cbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor (admission by application). Intended for juniors and seniors. SOC 122 recommended. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Theme Semester R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/facilitate.html

See PSYCH 310.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. For registration info go to www.umich.edu/~igrc or call 936-1875.

SOC 321 / PSYCH 311. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SOC 320 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/facilitate.html

See PSYCH 311.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 325. Sociology of Service Learning.

Section 001 — Instructor permission only. Course is only for students facilitating SOC 389. Contact Project Community (763-3548) for permission to register.

Instructor(s): Mark Chesler (mchesler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Course is only for students facilitating SOC 389. Contact Project Community (763-3548) for permission to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Course is only for students facilitating SOC 389. Contact Project Community (763-3548) for permission to register.

SOC 344. Marriage and the Family: A Sociological Perspective.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sheila Bluhm (sbluhm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in Sociology. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/344/001.nsf

Sociology 344 will provide a sociological examination of marriage and family life. The course will consider the meaning of marriage and family life and the ways that these social institutions are embedded within the larger social system. Of particular importance are the ways in which marriage and family systems intersect with, define, and are defined by the social and economic structures of society. The course will study various dimensions of marriage and family patterns, including structures, processes, relationships, and changes. The course will examine the ways in which family structures and relationships are influenced by social, economic, and personal forces and how family structures and processes, in turn, influence personal and social life. Several main aspects of marriage and family life will be investigated: kin relationships and household structure; division of labor and authority; courtship and mate selection; union formation and dissolution; and childbearing. Both historical and comparative perspectives on these marriage and family issues will be considered. A text book is typically required. Grading is based on a combination of exams and essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Instructor

SOC 345. Sociology of Sexuality.

Section 001 — Meets with WOMENSTD 484.001.

Instructor(s): PJ McGann

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Human sexuality is often thought of as a realm of experience outside of or unmarked by society. In contrast, this course introduces students to the myriad ways in which sexual desire is structured by social relations, and to the ways that sexuality, sexual practices, and sexual identities vary in time and space. Different social scientific theories of sexuality are considered, and accounts of sexual practices are reviewed. Other topics include the historical emergence of sexualities and categories of sexual orientation, sexual identities, sexual subcultures and communities, and the ways in which sexuality as a social institution intersects with hierarchies of race, class, and gender.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 368(468). Criminology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): PJ McGann (pjmcgann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One sociology introduction. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the sociological study of crime, criminality, and criminal victimization. We begin with our exploration by surveying differing definitions of "crime" itself, including the politics involved in the creation of new criminal categories such as "hate crime." After analysis of the problematic nature of official criminal statistics, we then review major theoretical explanations of the nature and causes of crime. The social patterning of criminal acts and criminal victimization is then investigated across a variety of crime types, including violent crime, property crime, white collar crime, and the crimes of elite members of society. Throughout, much attention is given to the ways crime and criminality vary in relation to race, class, gender, and sexual orientation, and to the gendered nature of crime and crime categories.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Instructor(s): Mark Chesler (mchesler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits. Up to four credits of SOC 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/pc/courses.html

SOC 389, Project Community, Is a Service Learning Course. Prior to registering all students must view the course homepage for site time requirements.

SOC 389 is known as Project Community. Students combine three to four hours of weekly service in community settings with weekly student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning, reflection and problem–solving.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in the weekly seminar as well as regular participation at the designated community service site. Students will be asked to complete reflective journal assignments, a short midterm written assignment, and a final paper/project.

Over 35 community service settings are available. They include schools, hospitals, correctional facilities, a domestic violence shelter, advocacy agencies, and care organizations. For details, please see the specific section description on website.

PRIOR to registering for a SOC 389 Project Community section all students must view the web site: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/pc/courses.html

Questions and override requests must be directed to the Project Community Office, 1024 Hill Street, 647-8771, Sean de Four, seafour@umich.edu.

NOTE: All sections of SOC 389 will commence in the first week of class. There will NOT be a delayed start.

Transportation to off-campus service sites is provided to all students and is coordinated through the Project Community office.

If a particular section is full, please e–mail Sean de Four (seafour@umich.edu) to be added to the waitlist.

EDUCATION

Section 100 - THURSTON ELEMENTARY ENRICHMENT. (3 credits).
Section 101 - ANN ARBOR: PITTSFIELD ELEMENTARY. (3 credits).
Section 102 - AMERICA READS: ISSUES IN LITERACY. - 2 CREDITS.
Section 103 - DETROIT: LATINO FAMILY SERVICES: TEEN AFTERSCHOOL PROGRAM. (3 credits).
Section 104 - DETROIT: HARDING ELEMENTARY. (3 credits).
Section 105 - DETROIT: VETAL SCHOOL. (3 credits).
Section 106 - GUIDANCE CENTER:AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS. (3 credits).
Section 107 - SCARLETT MIDDLE SCHOOL TUTORS. (3 credits).
Section 108 - KCP: COMMUNITY OUTREACH. (3 credits).
Section 109 - ANGELL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL. (3 credits).
Section 110 - FEMINIST MENTORS. (4 credits).
Section 111 - GLOBAL OUTREACH: EDUCATING KIDS ABOUT THE WORLD. (3 credits).
Section 112 - TAPPAN MIDDLE SCHOOL TUTORS. (3 credits).
Section 113 - YOUTH BUILD TUTORING. (3 credits).

HEALTH

Section 200 - UM HOSPITAL: MOTT/WOMEN'S. (3 credits).
Section 201 - UM HOSPITAL: ADULT SERVICES. (3 credits).
Section 202 - ELDERLY: SUNRISE ASSISTED LIVING. (3 credits).
Section 203 - HIV/AIDS EDUCATION (HARC). (3 credits).
Section 204 - FULL CIRCLE: MENTAL HEALTH. (3 credits).

HOUSING/HOMELESSNESS

Section 300 - SOS: AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAM. (3 credits).
Section 301 - SAFE HOUSE: WOMEN. (4 credits).
Section 302 - SAFE HOUSE: CHILDREN. (4 credits).
Section 303 - OZONE HOUSE TEEN SHELTER. (4 credits).
Section 304 - HOMELESS OUTREACH (SAWC). (3 credits).

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Section 400 — DETENTION CENTER WRITING TUTORS. (3 credits).
Section 401 — DETENTION CENTER: RECREATION. (3 credits).
Section 402 — JAIL: CREATIVE WRITING SEMINAR. (3 credits).
Section 403 — W. WAYNE (women) CREATIVE WRITING SEMINAR. (3 credits).
Section 404 — ADRIAN PRISON (men) CREATIVE WRITING. (3 credits).
Section 405 — ADRIAN PRISON (men) DEBATE. (3 credits).
Section 406 — W. WAYNE (women) PRISON DEBATE. (3 credits).
Section 407 — JAIL: DIALOGUE ON MULTICULTURALISM. (3 credits).
Section 408 — (SAPAC/SAFE-HOUSE) COURTWATCH PROGRAM. (4 credits).

MICHIGAN COMMUNITY SCHOLARS PROGRAM(MCSP)/LUCY

Section 500 — MCSP: ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TUTORING. (3 credits).
Section 501 — MCSP: MENTORING MIDDLE SCHOOL STUDENTS. (3 credits).
Section 502 — MCSP: MIDDLE SCHOOL HOMEWORK CLUB. (3 credits).
Section 503 — LUCY: TBA. (3 credits).

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Section 600 — COMM. DEVELOPMENT: WARREN CONNOR DEVT. COALITION. (4 credits).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 393 / REES 396 / SLAVIC 396 / HISTORY 333 / POLSCI 396. Survey of East Central Europe.

Section 001 — The Political Economy of Transformation in Eastern Europe.

Instructor(s): Katherine M Verdery

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397. Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/anthrcul/317/001.nsf

See REES 397.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 395. Directed Reading or Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/soc/dl/Ugrad/indtstudy.pdf

For undergraduate students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Student should contact faculty member with whom they want to work to arrange topic and workload.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SOC 397. Junior Honors in Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Anthony S Chen (chentony@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SOC 210; prior or concurrent enrollment in SOC 310 or 512; and Honors standing in sociology. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/397/001.nsf

This seminar is the first in a three-course sequence designed to help students to write an Honors thesis in sociology. All three academic terms are very work-intensive, but particularly this first one. In this course, students will:

  1. review the literature in their area of interest
  2. construct a sociological research question about their topic
  3. design a methodology to collect data toward answering that question
  4. write a prospectus that outlines the project
  5. find a faculty member who will mentor them throughout the project.

This course is organized primarily as a workshop to help students accomplish all of these tasks. This course is also meant to help students improve their social science writing skills and to become comfortable with the process of writing. Finally, the course requires students to do a lot of work independently.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 399. Senior Honors in Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Laurie A Morgan

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors standing in Sociology. SOC 210 and 310, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The objective is preparation of a significant research paper. Possible projects are canvassed in fall seminar meetings; students then do research under a faculty member until March; papers are presented to the seminar for criticism in the Spring.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 425 / GERMAN 432. The German Model: Business, Labor, and the State in the 20th Century.

Section 001 — Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Jeremy Brooke Straughn (straughn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Taught in English. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/german/432/001.nsf

See GERMAN 432.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 447 / WOMENSTD 447. Sociology of Gender.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): PJ McGann (pjmcgann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the sociological study of gender that focuses on how gender is embedded in social life. At the individual level, gender is an essential aspect of personhood and personal experience; at the institutional level, gender is a major way that societies differentiate their members. At both the individual and institutional levels, gender intersects with race, class, and sexuality to structure rights, privileges, and opportunities. Specific topics include gender identity, how individuals "become" gendered and "do" their gender(s), gender and sport, analysis of the binaric nature of the North American gender order, transgenderism, and intersexuality.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 450. Political Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffery M Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introduction to political sociology with a particular emphasis on the relationship between economics and politics. Basic concepts such as power, state, nation, and class will be introduced and applied to the analysis of the development and change of political systems in historical and comparative perspective. The course examines (a) the historical origins of democracy, fascism, and communism as political systems, (b) imperialism, development, and revolution in the Third World, and (c) class, class coalitions, and the state in post New-Deal U.S. politics. Introductory courses in sociology or political science desirable but not required. Lecture/discussion; midterm and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 454. Law and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel H Sharphorn (dsharpn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One sociology introduction. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to examine the organization of law in society and the relationships between law and society. The approach will be primarily from a sociological perspective; however, we will also explore the views of legal scholars, anthropologists, political scientists, philosophers, and others. While the course will be a survey of "law and social organization" in general, we will focus on current topics of special interest as a device for our study: the death penalty, rape laws, affirmative action and anti-discrimination laws, university rules and regulations, and others. Students will be expected to gain an understanding of the extent of the study of law and social organization and the leading theories and ideas about it, and will be asked to think critically and independently about legal systems and the role of law in society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 455 / RELIGION 455. Religion and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terence James McGinn (tjmcginn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/455/001.nsf

Since 9/11/01, religion has moved center-stage in the American consciousness. From the "War on Terror" to the "Pledge of Allegiance" case, religion is centrally involved in many of the social conflicts and movements that fill today's headlines: as a social identity, as a core set of beliefs, as a basis for social judgment, as a motivation for action.

This course uses sociological methods to explore the interplay of sacred and secular in modern society. What is religion and the religious? How is the sense of the sacred affected by the social? In what ways does religion, in turn, affect other areas of social life?

The class employs a variety of learning formats, including discussions, study groups, lectures, videos, and student research presentations. During the course we will also have 2 or 3 "virtual" guests (real-time web feed) who are either scholars in the field or "living cases" — individuals involved in current events related to religion and society.

Required readings are primarily in course pack form and include the writings of both classic and contemporary sociologists ranging from Weber and Durkheim to Berger and Bellah.

Students' understanding and integration of the material is demonstrated through a series of quizzes, three short papers, and a group presentation project.

Junior status or above is required. Upper-level sociology or religion concentrators may request overrides if the course is fully subscribed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor

SOC 458. Sociology of Education.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Schoem (dschoem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Theme Semester

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the purposes and roles of schooling in society. We will explore issues of socialization, stratification, the social organization of schools and classrooms, and the uses of both formal and hidden curriculums. We will examine issues of inequality, race, class and gender, cultural transmission and social change in K-12 and higher education. We also will explore the role and experience of participants in schooling. Finally, we will examine contemporary issues in schools and possibilities for change in schools and change in society. Students are expected to be active participants in discussions and presentation of class readings and topics. There will be one short paper and a take-home exam. Students also will be expected to devote considerable time and effort to a research paper on some aspect of school change. Note: this Winter academic term, the class will participate in a number of the Brown vs. Board of Education Theme Semester events.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 472 / PSYCH 381. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christian Waugh (waughc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: STATS 350 and PSYCH 280. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/psych/381/001.nsf

See PSYCH 381.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 475 / MEDCARE 475. Introduction to Medical Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Renee Anspach (ranspach@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore social aspects of health, aging, and the health care system in American society. We will examine such issues as the social causation of disease, relationships between doctors and patients, the health professions, health care among women and the poor, current health care crisis in a national and cross-cultural perspective.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 001 — Nations and Nationalism. [3 credits].

Instructor(s): Genevieve Zubrzycki (genez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/soc/495/001.nsf

Nationalism has been one of the moving forces of the 20th century. In view of increasing "global" exchanges and the restructuring of political, economic and cultural life along supra national lines, some observers have been inclined to predict the "end of nationalism". The last decade has instead witnessed increased nationalist activity throughout the world. This course will introduce students to the main theories of nationalism and to approaches to national identity from various disciplines (sociology, history, anthropology, and political science). We will investigate the nature of nations and nationalism and the social processes behind their emergence as well as the causes of nationalist movements and conflicts. In the first part of the course, we will examine the main paradigms in the field: primordialist-perennialist, modernist, marxist, and culturalist. The second part of the course will be devoted to the close examination of thematical issues based on empirical cases.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, 5: Permission of Instructor

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 002 — Detroit: Its History & Future. Meets 3/16, 3/18, 3/23, 3/25 with field trip on Sat. 3/20. [1 credit]. (Drop/Add deadline=March 19).

Instructor(s): Ren Farley (renf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Theme Semester Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Detroit was the world's most important metropolis during the Twentieth Century. The world's most popular means of transportation was developed there — a means of mobility that produced social change and revolutionized economies on all populated continents. The system of modern industrial production was perfected in Detroit and then spread around the world, giving us low-priced, high quality consumer goods. The modern American blue-collar middle class developed first in Detroit thanks to the emergence of effective unions. More so than in other US cities, the wealth of Detroit's families in the 1920s led to a magnificent array of breath-taking buildings, homes and monuments. The Allies defeated the German and Japanese dictators in World War II because of the engineers and production line workers in Detroit — the world's true Arsenal of Democracy. Yet, more so than any other U.S. city, economic conflict was vividly played out in Detroit. Equally devastating has been racial conflict. Detroit is the only U.S. city in which the federal military has been called to the streets four times to stop whites and blacks from killing each other. Detroit, once the symbol of U.S. industrial prowess became, following World War II, the symbol of racial, economic and geographic polarization.

This mini course will examine social, economic and racial trends in metropolitan Detroit, looking both at their history and implications for the future. The course will consist of four classroom meetings and an all-day bus tour of metropolitan Detroit on a Saturday.

This section will meet on Tuesday, March 16 and Thursday, March 18th. Saturday March 20 will be spent touring metropolitan Detroit. Then this course will meet on the following Tuesday, March 23 and Thursday, March 25.

I strongly encourage the enrollment of both undergraduate and graduate students.

Classroom sessions will be devoted to a presentation and discussion of materials about Detroit linked to the readings. A portion of the final class will be devoted to a quiz about materials covered in the course. Assigned readings include the following:

Devil's Night and Other True Tales of Detroit by Ze've Chafets (New York:Random House, 1990). Copies may be borrowed from the instructor but must be returned to him. This book should be read before the first meeting of the course.

Detroit Divided by Reynolds Farley, Sheldon Danziger and Harry Holzer. (New York: Russell Sage Foundation, 2000)

The Origins of the Urban Crisis, Race and Inequality in Postwar Detroit, (Princeton,: Princeton University Press, 1996). Available in paperback for about $15-$16.

One section of Someone Else's House: American's Unfinished Struggle for Integration by Tamar Jacoby, (New York: The Free Press, 1998). Available in paperback for $14.40.

Chapters will be assigned from the several books listed, and these will be available from the University Library's on-line reserve system.

Requirements for this one-credit course include attending the four classroom sessions, the Saturday tour of metropolitan Detroit, the assigned readings and satisfactory completion of the quiz.

To obtain credit for this course, it will be necessary to attend every one of the four class meetings and the all-Saturday tour of Detroit.

For additional information or for a copy of the tentative syllabus, please send a message to the instructor: renf@umich.edu.

This will be an interesting and valuable course with a special appeal to those who are interested in metropolitan planning, in the history of cities or in those social, economic and racial trends that have shaped metropolitan America.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 003 — SOCIOLOGY OF JAPAN. Meets January 12, 26, Febraury 2, 9, 16. [1 credit]. Meets with CSJ 450.001. (Drop/Add deadline=January 26).

Instructor(s): Hiroshi Ishida

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

mini/short course

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CJS 450.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 004 — Steam Engines and Computers, From Industrial Proletarians to Information. [3 credits]. Meets with HISTORY 498.001 and RCSSCI 461.001.

Instructor(s): Thomas O'Donnell (twod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~twod/steam/

See RCSSCI 461.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 005 — Native American Social Movements. [3 credits]. Meets with AMCULT 453.001 and WOMENSTD 457.001.

Instructor(s): Andrea Lee Smith (tsalagi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See AMCULT 453.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4


SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 006 — THE POLITICS AND POLICIES OF GLOBAL MIGRATION. Meets March 9th- April 15th [1 credit].

Instructor(s): Jenny Bedlington

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The history of humankind is a history of migration — for survival, for betterment of living conditions, for adventure and discovery. In the 21st century, migration and refugee protection are the subject of intense and often polarized debate, part of the wider debate about the benefits and costs of globalization, but rooted in deeply personal views of the stranger. Sending states can see migration as a solution to unemployment and as a potential source of foreign exchange, or as a drain of the very people they need to build their nation and its economy, while receiving states are required to balance the aspirations of potential migrants and the economic and cultural benefits they can bring, with such domestic concerns as employment, access to services, public health and security.

The issues of migration and of refugee flows have traditionally been considered separately. However, over the past few years, it has been more widely recognized that the asylum/migration nexus is key to understanding modern people flows.

The course is designed to acquaint students with a basic understanding of the elements of the policy debate about migration and refugees, and of their interrelationships. The course will show how a cross-disciplinary approach to considering policy rationale and alternatives is essential — one that recognizes the inadequacy of a solely legal, economic, political science or sociological approach.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


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