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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Spanish


This page was created at 8:18 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


Students who plan to take courses offered by the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures are strongly encouraged to familiarize themselves with our procedures for the registration process. Details can be found on the RLL website, specifically on the page entitled Overrides. We welcome and encourage student feedback throughout the registration process, which can be directed to rll.permissions@umich.edu.


SPANISH 101. Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s): María Dorantes (lourdes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish. Students with prior instruction in Spanish should take the placement test before enrolling.

COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES: SPANISH 101 is designed to introduce you to the Spanish language and the many facets of the culture. In this course you will develop your ability to communicate satisfactorily in Spanish in everyday practical situations while acquiring some of the skills necessary for effective reading and writing in Spanish. The course focuses on the introduction and development of the four language skills necessary for interpersonal communication in Spanish: listening, writing, reading, and speaking.

Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance is essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions in Spanish, initiating discussion, role playing, and other situational activities. The final grade is based on class participation, compositions, homework, a cultural project, pen pal letters, unit exams, oral exams, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 102. Elementary Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s): Ann Hilberry (hilberry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 101 with a grade of at least C- (Prerequisites enforced at registration). (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 103. SPANISH 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. Open only to students who have completed SPANISH 101 at the University of Michigan. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in SPANISH 103.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Continuation of SPANISH 101.

Course Objectives: Introduction to Hispanic language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Films and audio cassettes incorporated.

Goals: Students completing SPANISH 102 will speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communications like radio and television; read for practical information; writer simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 103. Review of Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s): Kristina Primorac-Waggoner (kprimora@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test or permission of department. Transfer students elect SPANISH 103 if they have completed the equivalent of SPANISH 101 elsewhere. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 102.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Accelerated refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to SPANISH 101 and 102 condensed into one term. Admittance into the course is by placement exam recommendation or permission of the coordinator only.

Course Objectives: Introduction to the Spanish language and culture task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette, and computer material incorporated.

Goals: Student completing SPANISH 103 will hear about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communication like radio and television; read for practical information; write simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Transfer students should take the placement exam to determine which course is most appropriate for their needs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 111. First Special Reading Course.

Special Elementary Reading Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juan Maria Arnau Navarro (arnau@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. May not be elected for credit by undergraduates who have already received credit for high school or college Spanish. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 101, 102, or 103.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

SPANISH 111 (and its subsequent course, SPANISH 112) is designed for students interested mainly in the acquisition of a reading knowledge of the language. They are open to graduates, juniors, and seniors; and to others by special permission. For graduate students a grade of B or better in SPANISH 112 satisfies the basic reading knowledge requirement for the doctorate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 231. Second-Year Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s): Raquel González (raquelng@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 112 or 230.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to improve the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills of students and to provide insight into the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking people. Meant to integrate and extend earlier learning, SPANISH 231 is intended to provide students with the timely opportunity — and challenge — of transforming themselves into truly active, thinking language users.

Course grade is based on a series of quizzes and exams (written and oral) designed to assess ability to read, write, and understand spoken Spanish, plus periodic written work and oral class participation.

Required materials:
* Bretz, Dvorak, Kirschner (2002). Pasajes cultura, Literatura y Lengua. New York, McGraw-Hill, Custom Course pack for Spanish 231.
* Bluebooks to be used for journal entries (available at bookstores).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Instructor(s): Kimberly Boys (ksboys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/special/home.htm

IMPORTANT INFORMATION REGARDING SPANISH 232: This course description is for the non-topics sections, specificallly sections 001 through 039. Before registering, students should be aware that sections 041 through 057 are special topics sections. Please read the appropriate course descriptions (keep scrolling) or visit www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/special/home.htm for section-by-section course descriptions before registering.

The principal aim of this course is to acquire a more profound understanding of the history, politics, society, culture, customs, and literature of the Hispanic world through listening, writing, reading, and speaking activities in Spanish. At the same time, students develop the language tools, both grammatical functions and vocabulary, necessary to discuss issues of relevance to Hispanic culture and to analyze these situations while expressing their own personal opinions, reactions, conclusions, and possible outcomes to hypothetical situations. Therefore, the practice and application of grammatical features and vocabulary is integrated into the content of the course, and students are expected to formally study and practice these structures individually through the explanations provided in the textbook and the practice activities assigned as homework. Materials include newspaper articles, cultural readings, videos, short lectures, audio cassette, and computer materials.

Work requirements/evaluation criteria: Regular attendance crucial. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing, and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, compositions, exams, and a final written and oral exam.

TEXTS:

  1. Required:

    • Fuentes: Special Edition for University of Michigan; Course pack; Rusch, Domínguez, Caycedo Garner (Houghton-Mifflin)
    • Fuentes: Activities Manual; Rusch, Domínguez, Caycedo Garner (Houghton-Mifflin)
    • Bluebook for Thematic Reaction Assignments
  2. Recommended:

    • Fuentes listening tapes (* If you wish to purchase the entire set of six cassettes you may do so in the bookstores. Otherwise, the three required cassettes are available in the LRC.)
    • English Grammar for Students of Spanish, Emily Spinelli (Olivia and Hill Press)
    • A good bilingual Spanish-English dictionary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 041 — Cataluña.

Instructor(s): Susanna Coll Ramirez (scoll@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/spanish/232/041.nsf

Introducción a una parte importante de la historia y la cultura de España. Estudio específico de la comunidad catalana: de su historia, de sus tradiciones, de su política y de su situatión actual en el mundo.

English translation: Introduction to an important part of Spanish culture and history. Specific studies of the catalan community: the history, the traditions, the politics and Catalonia's current situation in the world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 043 — The Camino de Santiago: A Pilgrim's Journey.

Instructor(s): Andrea Hesp (ahesp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The 500-mile Camino de Santiago — St. James' way — is one of the three major Christian pilgrim routes in the world — Rome and Jerusalem being the other two. The Camino began gaining popularity during the 11th and 12th centuries when pilgrims started trekking across Northern Spain in order to reach Santiago de Compostela where they could touch the relics of St. James. Most pilgrims undertook this arduous journey in hopes of curing ailments and receiving pardon for past sins. In the last fifteen years, the Camino's popularity has been reemerging, although on a much more secular level (in 1996 over 100,000 people walked along the Camino). Although, the experience of the modern pilgrim is obviously quite different than the medieval one, both share one important aspect: the traveler, regardless if he or she is a believer of St. James' power, is guaranteed an adventure.

It is the journey of the pilgrim, both the medieval and contemporary one, that this course will try to reconstruct. As we study the Camino we will make several stops to take in some of the literature, culture, and architecture that the pilgrimage has to offer, just as the pilgrims have been doing for hundreds of years. Students will come out of the class with a better understanding the Camino de Santiago, and have the tools to begin the pilgrimage on their own along the Camino, if they wish.

The course will emphasize speaking and reading, in addition to a solid review of grammar. The practice and application of grammatical functions and vocabulary will be integrated in the content of the course. Materials will be provided in a comprehensive course pack that includes the reading and grammar in a logical order that will take into account the lineal path of the Camino, as well as the students' ability. Requirements will include active class participation, quizzes, homework, compositions, a final project, and a final exam, both oral and written.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 045 — At the Far End of South America: Readings from Argentina, Chile, and Uruguay.

Instructor(s): Raquel N González (raquelng@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/special/home.htm

If you enjoy reading literature, join us to discover its unique power to explore the culture of the these countries through the eyes of selected authors. Other written and visual texts will be incorporated. Readings, class discussions and group or individual written projects will give the opportunity for intensive use of the language to further develop your ability to perform at a higher level of proficiency in the different skills (reading, writing, speaking and listening).

Course structure: The course will be divided into two parts. During the first part, texts, articles from the WWW, short stories, legends and movies will be used. The second part will primarily consist of individualized study of a chosen topic and country by each student. Materials developed will be kept in a personal portfolio that will form the basis of final written report and oral presentation. The report may (with student approval) be published in a Web-based newsletter.

Important note: Active participation in Spanish is expected from all students at all times.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 047, 051 — Contemporary Spain.

Instructor(s): Joaquin Florido-Berrocal (biligon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/special/home.htm

The aim of this course will be to expand the cultural understanding of Spain by studying its history, politics, society, customs and language. At the same time you will further acquire the language tools, both grammatical functions and vocabulary, necessary to discuss issues of relevance to Spanish culture and to express, in the past, present, and future, your own personal experiences, opinions, reactions, conclusions, and possible outcomes to hypothetical situations. Throughout the course of the term we will be focusing on the following general themes:

  • Chapter 1 — introduction to the course, meeting each other, differences in educational systems and the art of Pablo Picasso
  • Chapter 2 — a comprehensive review of Spanish History
  • Chapter 3 — Civil War, dictatorship in Spain and the democratic process today
  • Chapter 4 — the traditions, customs and life style in Spain

The emphasis of the course is on the development of the four skills (listening, writing, reading, and speaking) and interpersonal communication. The practice and application of grammatical features and vocabulary will be integrated into the content of the course. Most of these features will be review as you will have studied them previously; therefore, the goal will be to facilitate their acquisition and application in authentic and meaningful contexts. The course requires regular classroom participation and approximately two hours of outside preparation for every hour of class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 049 — Representing Lorca: Introduction to Spanish Culture and Performance of his Works.

Instructor(s): Jose Luis Fernandez-Garcia (kronox@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/special/home.htm

The aim of this course is to motivate students to learn Spanish using plays, poems, and the Spanish culture as background to put materials into context.

Most of the course content studied will reflect the world of Federico García Lorca, a well known Spanish playwright and poet. The course will expand on the significance of feelings, the life and death of the poet, analysis of his works, and, ultimately, attempts to involve students in discussion and examination of the ideas presented.

Throughout the course one of his works, Blood wedding, will be acted out by the students. Therefore, willingness to participate in it is a must.

We will as well expand on the linguistic abilities necessary to fulfill the aims of the course, that is:

  1. narrate and describe in the present, past, and future;
  2. express and support opinions, express feelings and emotions about present, past, and future events;
  3. hypothesize about the future and present.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 053, 055 — Introduction to the Hispanic World through Cinema and Popular Media.

Instructor(s): Andrew M Noverr (anoverr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/spanish/232/053.nsf

Using the medium of cinema and vast array of popular media sources available on the World Wide Web, the goal of this course will be to introduce participants to the cultural reality of the Hispanic world (Hispanic America and Spain) while they prepare issues of a course WebZine. The most important aim of the course is to provide participants with an experience of Hispanic history and society while contemplating how this experience is reflected in and influenced by popular media. At the same time, students will be exposed to the major communicative functions that characterize the intermediate mid/high levels of proficiency:

a. narrate and describe in the present, past, and future;
b. express and support opinions, express feelings and emotions about present, past and future events;
c. hypothesize about the future and present.

Some of the movies to be presented and discussed:

  • Todo sobre mi madre
  • La lengua de las mariposas
  • Men with Guns
  • Amores perros
  • Y tu mamá también

NOTE: Students will work individually and in groups to prepare materials for the course WebZine. NO knowledge of Web authoring software is necessary prior to the course. All students will participate in an introductory workshop that will familiarize them with the applications we will be using to publish the WebZine.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 057 — Las tres culturas en la España medieval.

Instructor(s): Juan Carlos de los Santos Plata (deloss@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 231; or assignment by placement test. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230 or 112.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/special/home.htm

The aim of this course will be to expand the cultural understanding of the coexistence of Christians, Jews, and Moors in medieval Spain by studying their history, politics, society, customs and languages so that the students can become more conscious about the past, present and future situation of these three communities. At the same time the student will further acquire the Spanish language tools, both grammatical functions and vocabulary, needed to discuss issues of relevance to the Spanish culture and to express, in the past, present, and future, his/her own personal experiences, opinions, reactions, conclusions and possible outcomes to hypothetical situations. Throughout the course of this academic term, we will be focusing on the following general themes:

Chapter 1, Introduction to the course, meeting each other. Political situation in 8th-century Spain after the Muslim conquest. First epic poem in Spanish language.

Chapter 2, The splendor of Al-Andalus under the Califato de Córdoba reign. First literary texts in Spanish.

Chapter 3, The Christian reconquest. 1492, Expulsion of Jews and Moors from Spain. "Escuela de Traductores de Toledo". (Translation School in Toledo)

Chapter 4, Who are the Sephardies' descendants? Current situation of the Sephardic community throughout the world. Analysis of the North African inmigration in Spain nowadays. Ladino, the language of the Sephardies.

The student will be expected to formally study and practice most of these structures individually through the course pack of the course, as well as to look for specific information in the Internet.

The course requires regular classroom attendance and participation, besides approximately two hours of outside preparation for every hour of class.

If you have any questions or doubts about any aspect of this course you can contact me through e-mail deloss@umich.edu

If you have any questions or doubts about any aspect of this course you can contact me through e-mail deloss@umich.edu

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 270. Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators.

Other Language Courses

Section 001, 002 — Cinema for Spanish Conversation.

Instructor(s): Ann M Hilberry (hilberry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 275 or 276. May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Important information regarding Spanish 270: Sections 001 and 002 are topics sections. Please read the course description for section 003 if you are interested in a non-topics section.

This is a practical Spanish course for non-concentrators interested in Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic films. Students will view 6-7 films from North and Central America, South America, and the Caribbean during the course of the semester. In class, we will have discussions, debates, oral presentations, and role-plays based on the films that we view. Students will also write reaction papers in response to the movies. During the course of the academic term, students will work on improving pronunciation, building vocabulary, and honing listening and writing skills. Attendance and participation are mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 270. Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators.

Other Language Courses

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Dennis Pollard (dennisdp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 275 or 276. May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

SPANISH 270 is a practical Spanish course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary, and listening skills. Class format includes group discussions, debates, oral presentations, and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades will also be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as letters, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 275. Grammar and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Dennis Pollard (dennisdp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/spanish/275/001.nsf

SPANISH 275 is intended to increase the accuracy of students' Spanish and to increase vocabulary and cultural knowledge through readings. The course is centered on a grammar-review text. Students do readings in Spanish, prepare compositions and other exercises, and expand vocabulary. Time is allotted to class discussion of readings and especially to the treatment of recurrent problems of grammar. Classes are taught in Spanish. The final grade is based on weekly translations, tests, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 276. Reading and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s): Dennis Pollard (dennisdp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 232. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/spanish/276/001.nsf

SPANISH 276 is intended to improve students' ability to read Spanish prose, as well as their skills in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students will be presented with a variety of written, visual, and audio materials designed to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students are required. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams, and participation in class discussions or presentations.

Text: Course pack. Part 1 at Excel (1117 South University); Part 2 will be prepared by the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

SPANISH 305. Spanish for Business and the Professions.

Other Language Courses

Section 001, 002 — Business Spanish.

Instructor(s): María De Lourdes Dorantes (lourdes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/spanish/305/001.nsf

ADVISORY NOTE TO STUDENTS: SPANISH 305 is not repeatable for credit, regardless of topics elected. Students who have a greater interest in other professional topics (such as Legal or Medical) should carefully consider this restriction before electing sections 001 or 002 of this course.

This course is designed to increase Spanish vocabulary with the business administration context. We will be reading articles on line, doing power point presentation, and if possible on-line chats with students in Spain. We will work on the four skills: reading, writing, listening, and speaking.

Students must have SPANISH 276 (or equivalency) or instructor permission to enroll.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 305. Spanish for Business and the Professions.

Other Language Courses

Section 003 — Legal Spanish. Conducted primarily in Spanish

Instructor(s): Tara Halley Lord (tlord@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

ADVISORY NOTE TO STUDENTS: SPANISH 305 is not repeatable for credit, regardless of topics elected. Students who have a greater interest in other professional topics (such as Business or Medical) should carefully consider this restriction before electing this course.

This course assumes that the student has some familiarity with and/or interest in the US legal system, and basic legal concepts and vocabulary in English (such as, but certainly not limited to, law students, pre-law students or students with majors in Political Science or other related fields). The course will be conducted primarily in Spanish. We will learn Spanish legal terminology by practicing both oral and written expression. Our journey begins with a study of the fundamental differences between the legal systems and cultures of Anglosaxon and Spanish-speaking countries. We will briefly compare the Common Law and Roman/Civil Law systems, and take a closer look at the particular legal systems of select countries. Next, we will cover basic civil law concepts (marriage, divorce, wills), the government, contractual agreements, criminal law, the judicial system, and human rights issues. We will also do some role plays in order to develop particular vocabulary in criminal law and police enforcement, and I'd like to explore some of the issues of interpretation and translation in Spanish. There will be a few guest speakers who will talk about various issues in the legal systems of the Spanish-speaking world, and you will be given the opportunity to interview lawyers from Spanish-speaking countries. We will also take a look at some legal documents (cases, statutes, constitutions, etc.) in Spanish, but we will primarily focus on developing a legal vocabulary with which you can later successfully navigate in legal situations where Spanish is requisite. If you have any questions about this course, please email the professor.

Texts:

  1. Derecho y criminología: lecturas y vocabulario en español, Conrad J. Schmitt y Protase E Woodford, New York: McGraw-Hill, Inc., 1998. ISBN: 0-07-2304553.
  2. There will be a course pack as well. Most likely, I will have ACCU-COPY do this.
  3. Optional: a Spanish Legal Dictionary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 308(401/306). Workshop in Academic Writing.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s): Fernando Velasquez (fvelasqu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275, 276. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. SPANISH 401 may be elected prior to SPANISH 305. This course does not satisfy the language requirement. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for students who are currently registered in at least one other upper-level Spanish course, and who wish to refine their writing skills. Students will use class time to review points of grammar, principles of composition, and techniques of literary analysis, using writing assignments for their other Spanish courses as the material. Students will bring essays to class for peer-editing and assistance from the instructor. The emphasis will be on improving grammar and vocabulary for written expression.

The class will meet once a week, and students are required to meet with the instructor for peer-editing and consultation at least one additional hour per week.

Students who are not concurrently enrolled in other upper-level Spanish courses are not eligible for the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 310. Advanced Composition and Style.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 — Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Kimberly S Boys (ksboys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/spanish/310/001.nsf

Students in this course will acquire an advanced understanding of grammatical structures while further developing their writing skills in Spanish. They will engage in extensive writing practice using a process approach that involves successive revisions. In addition, students will acquire research skills and learn strategies for writing description, narrative, and argumentative essays.

Course requirements: three essays, three exams, research paper.

Course conducted in Spanish.

Intended audience: Spanish concentrators and other students with significant training in Spanish language.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Este curso aporta una visión panorámica de la literatura en lengua española, ofreciendo una serie de métodos de análisis según el género de que se trate. El material de trabajo para esta clase se compone de una selección de obras literarias de narrativa, poesía, teatro y ensayo, en los que se tratan algunas de las nociones más representativas de dichas áreas desde el punto de vista social, cultural y político. Complementadas con diversos textos audiovisuales (mapas, murales, grabados, pinturas, fotografías y películas), estas obras permiten una aproximación inicial a la literatura en lengua española por medio de los temas más recurrentes que se evocan en dichas lecturas: soledad, amor, opresión política, tensión racial, muerte, locura, religión, etc..

A través del estudio de este grupo de textos, el alumno entrará en contacto con géneros, tendencias, terminología y temáticas más relevantes dentro de la literatura de diversos países hispanohablantes. Adicionalmente, el alumno se familiarizará con las convenciones académicas en el campo de la literatura con miras a la especialización en literaturas hispánicas.

Método de trabajo

La lectura de los textos debe ser atenta y detallada, acompañada siempre de una reflexión final que sirva como base para la discusión en clase. Dicha reflexión debe permitir al alumno hacer una exposición clara del argumento, elaborar las implicaciones de los temas que se desarrollan en la lectura asignada, y profundizar con un espíritu crítico en la problemática que plantean. Del mismo modo, se anima al alumno a realizar una lectura comparada de estos textos con el fin de establecer conexiones entre ellos y con otras formas de expresión artística (cine, pintura, fotografía etc.) para adquirir, de esta manera, una perspectiva más rica de cada campo literario.

This course is taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 337. Poetry Workshop.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Sergio Hugo Moreno (shmoreno@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The basic purpose of this workshop is to cultivate the taste for reading and writing poetry. In the first few weeks students will acquire a basic set of conceptual and analytical tools.

These will help them identify the various components and materials of a poem, and to better articulate their oral and written responses to the poetry that they read, listen to, or write throughout the semester. They will also be exposed to some of the technical and ideological issues dealing with the act of reading and composing poetry. In the second part of the workshop, students will learn how to read and appreciate various specific types of contemporary poetry. We will use Molly Peacock's How to Read a Poem as our guide, and we will examine a different set of poems written in Spanish. The professor will pick some of these poems, but students will also get to make their own selections. We will read a limited number of poems in considerable detail. After reading and discussing individual poems, students will then have the opportunity to try their hand at composing a poem of a similar style and content, in either Spanish or English. Students will also be asked to maintain a journal that records their impressions, thoughts, and ideas as they read and write each of these poems, and where they reflect upon the experience of reading and writing poetry. The grade for this course will be based on the student's class participation and attendance, two exams, and a journal.

This course is taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 341. Introduction to Latin American Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Gareth Williams (garethw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Este curso presenta una introducción a la cultura de América Latina desde la etapa pre-colombina hasta el momento actual, prestando atención a elementos históricos, populares, literarios y artísticos. Se estudiarán las condiciones sociales y políticas de América Latina hoy, mediante el análisis de eventos políticos, manifestaciones artísticas, iconos de cultura popular y literatura. Los estudiantes asistirán a una conferencia semanal y participarán en dos sesiones semanales de discusión en grupos reducidos.

This course is taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 350. Independent Studies.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professor's guidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Spanish Undergraduate Curriculum Committee for approval.

Detailed instructions and proposal forms are available on the Romance Languages website. The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SPANISH 368. Literature and the Other Arts.

Literary and Cultural Studies

The Grit of Spanish Cinema. Taught in Spanish

Instructor(s): Juan Maria Arnau Navarro (arnau@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($20) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($20) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course will explore movies from 1962 to 2002, with the aim of offering introductory film concepts on theoretical and applied subjects. The goal is to bring together diverse aspects of Spanish films: narratives, scripts, technical readings of sequences and to promote cultural activities designed to encourage a higher understanding of Spanish culture and history as well as a common knowledge of the art of filmmaking.

Course will consist of:

  • Screening of selected movies from Spanish cinema (weekly).
  • Two seminars a week for discussion.
The class will include films by Amenábar, Almodóvar, Borau, Buñuel, Calparsoro, García Berlanga, Erice, Fernán Gómez, Franco, León.

This course is taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 372. Survey of Spanish Literature, II.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Luis Martin-Cabrera (loumarti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introductory survey of Spanish literature from the 18th century to the present. Lectures, readings, and reports. The course is conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 392. Junior Honors Course.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/Independent%20Study%20Form.pdf

Readings of selected works from the literatures of Spain and Spanish America and of Latino/as in the United States. Conferences, written reports, and term papers. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Spanish Undergraduate Curriculum Committee for approval.

Detailed instructions and proposal forms are available from the Romance Languages website. The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SPANISH 405. Introduction to Spanish Linguistics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 — Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Teresa L Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. Taught in Spanish. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. A maximum of 3 credits of SPANISH 405 may be counted toward the Spanish concentration or academic minor program.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is open to both graduate and undergraduate students. SPANISH 405 is an introduction to the main concepts and methods of analysis in linguistic theory, focusing on Spanish.

The course has three main goals: (1) to serve as a general introduction to the goals and assumptions of generative grammar (that is, to describe language as a property of the human mind), (2) to develop some beginning tools of formal linguistic analysis via the examination of selected syntactic(sentence structure), morphological (word formation), phonetic and phonological(sound system), and semantic (meaning) properties of Spanish, and (3) to examine the relationship between formal linguistics and other fields, looking in particular at the question, "What is Hispanic linguistics?" The main part of the course focuses on linguistic analysis.

This course is taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 410 / ROMLING 410. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 — Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Olga Gallego (ogallego@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will offer participants a theoretical foundation in Spanish phonetics and phonology. It includes the study of articulatory phonetics, phonological theory, distinctive feature analysis, practice in transcription, lab practice, contrastive analysis of English and Spanish sounds, with special attention to those sounds of Spanish that are most difficult for English speakers to acquire. The grade will be based on a midterm and a final exam, four quizzes, various homework assignments, and a final paper.

This course is conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 428. Internship in Spanish.

Other Language Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and two 300-level SPANISH courses. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course allows up to three credits for internships that involve the extensive use of Spanish, either abroad or within the US. Some of the internships may be offered in established study-abroad programs, others will be offered by companies or non-profit organizations.

Our department offers a community service course (SPANISH 448), but we do not have the means to organize individual internships. Therefore, students will have to take the initiative to locate, arrange, and propose the internships. We highly recommend the non-profit organization, Amigos de las Americas, a well-established volunteer program that places students in public-health projects throughout Latin America. In addition, students may find helpful links that could lead to internships on our department website.

Before the internship, you must arrange the following:

  1. Find a sponsoring faculty member who will advise you, suggest readings, and evaluate the written work that you will submit during and/or after you complete the internship.
  2. Submit a letter from the director or supervisor of the internship program. This letter must:
    • describe the service work you will perform
    • confirm that you will primarily use Spanish in that service work
    • specify how many working hours are involved (a minimum of 100 contact hours is required for a three-credit course, or 33 hours per credit if enrolled for less than 3 credits)
  3. Submit a proposal that includes a reading list and written assignments. The proposal should include:
    • An introductory paragraph that describes the work site and the services you will perform. Also, you should indicate how the work relates to your academic interests and specialization (concentrations/minor) and to your future career plans.
    • A brief list of readings related to your service work (for example, 2-3 books, or 5-10 articles, or an appropriate mix of books and articles). You may choose readings yourself or ask your faculty sponsor for suggestions. We recognize that in an internship, most of your time is taken up by service work; the required minimum amount of related readings will help you to reflect critically and thoughtfully on your experiences.
    • A description of your writing assignments, which may consist either of several short papers or a final project, but must total 10 to 20 pages. You may write, for example, a narrative summary of your experiences, including critical reflections that also draw from the readings. Or you may write a research paper based on your experiences and the readings.
After completing the internship, you will submit to your faculty sponsor the remaining written assignments along with a second letter from your supervisor in the internship program. This letter should describe the work you performed and reconfirm that it met the requirements of 100 contact hours of primary Spanish usage (or 33 hours per credit).

Enrollment: You may enroll in this course, SPANISH 428, either during the term in which you are working as an intern (in which case you would submit the written work at the end of that term) or in the term after you return from the internship and submit your work then. In either case, you must make arrangements in our department before you begin the internship by finding a faculty sponsor and submitting a proposal for his/her approval. If you are already abroad when you find an opportunity for an internship, you may through e-mail seek a faculty sponsor and send a proposal to him/her before you begin work. In such a case, you should first contact professors with whom you have had class. If none is available to serve as a sponsor, review the complete list of faculty on the Romance Languages website. When you are ready to enroll for the credits, your faculty sponsor will notify our Student Services Representative, who will enter an electronic permission to allow you to enroll in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SPANISH 435. Independent Study.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course exists to enable students who have begun work on some author or topic to carry their study further under a professor's guidance. The work to be done should not be the same as that done in a regular course offering. A description of the project and the required exercises to be completed, as well as a list of pertinent bibliography must be submitted to the Concentration Advisor no later than the second week of the term, for the approval of the Spanish Undergraduate Curriculum Committee. ) The Committee is to receive a copy of any lengthy paper submitted in the course.

Detailed instructions and proposal forms are available on the Romance Languages website.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SPANISH 437. Introduction to Literature Studies and Criticism.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — La literatura como vocación. Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Sergio Hugo Moreno (shmoreno@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Históricamente, en Occidente el término "literatura" ha tenido distintos significados: como un tipo de saber, como cultura o erudición, como pilar de la cultura, como escritura, como un conjunto de determinadas obras escritas, como una disciplina académica, como un documento social, etc.. En este curso trataremos a la literatura como una vocación, es decir, como un llamamiento y como una pasión. Primeramente, leeremos algunos textos relacionados con el tema de la vocación en general y de la vocación artística y literaria en particular. Estos textos nos ayudarán a mejor entender el fenómeno de la vocación desde diversos puntos de vista: histórico, social, cultural, económico y filosófico. Luego leeremos algunos textos en que sus autores o sus personajes entienden y viven la literatura como una vocación. Posteriormente, leeremos capítulos de las memorias de algunos autores que han escrito sobre el despertar, el desarrollo y las particularidades de su vocación literaria. Hacia la segunda mitad del curso, leeremos algunos capítulos de diversos manuales que tratan sobre cómo canalizar eficaz y productivamente la vocación literaria. Nos concentraremos en algunos aspectos prácticos y técnicos sobre el arte de componer novelas (sobre el arte de la descripción, de creación de personajes, la construcción de la trama, el uso del lenguaje, el manejo del tiempo, etc.). Finalmente, dedicaremos las últimas semanas del semestre a la lectura y al análisis de dos novelas en que autores famosos figuran como personajes.

Aunque algunas de las lecturas serán en inglés, tanto las conversaciones en clase como la escritura en casa serán en español. La nota estará basada en la participación y la asistencia (25 %), una composición (25%) y un diario o cuaderno de memorias enfocado en el tema de su propia vocación, o su búsqueda de una vocación (50%).

This course is taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 440. Literatures and Cultures of the Borderlands: The Politics of Language.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Latino/a Literatures: Examining the Anxiety of Representation in a Growingly Conservative Culture. Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Lucía M Suárez (suarez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will engage in a sustained analysis of recent Latino/a Literary production and filmic representation. We will investigate the impact of memory, stereotyping, and trauma on the construction of Caribbean, Latino/a, Latin American identity politics. In particular, we will critically explore the political role literature and film do/or do not play to inform current education policies (i.e., affirmative action) and racial and ethnic representations (i.e., media glamour versus discriminatory vilification).

This is an advanced class, which will require intensive participation, focused readings, and additional research. You are expected to keep journals from which we will read in class. They will be collected once in the semester. Classes will be conducted in Spanish. Writing assignments will be expected in Spanish. Due to availability issues, a number of the texts are in English. This "bilingual condition" is central to our research and discussions and is reflected in both the way this syllabus is fashioned and the readings we will be doing.

This course is conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 448. Hispanic Culture Through Community Service Learning.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juli A Highfill (highfill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 300-level Spanish course. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is for students interested in using the Spanish language within a social context and through interactions with local Latino/a communities. It integrates service work within that community with academic readings and discussions about U.S. Latino or Hispanic culture.

Service work: Students will work as tutors with Latino children in a program operated by ALAS (Asociación de Latinos Alcanzando Sueños). On Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6:00 to 8:30, they will meet with the children and during the first hour, involve the children in learning activities in Spanish. Then during the second hour, the tutors will help them with their school work in English. The final half-hour, from 8:00 to 8:30, is designated for conferences with the parents and with the Director of ALAS. For the hour allotted to learning activities in Spanish, the tutors must prepare a syllabus of activities as well as learning activities and materials. They will also work in consultation with parents and teachers to set goals for each child during the term. In addition, tutors will keep a journal describing their work with the children and tracing their progress. At the end of the term, tutors will prepare a list of suggestions for the replacement tutor.

Weekly seminar and class-work: Students will meet once a week, Tuesdays, 2:30-4:00, to discuss the community service work and to exchange ideas and learning materials. In addition, each week we will discuss a short reading relevant to Hispanic culture and to the service work. The written assignments for the course are the same as those required by ALAS — a list of goals, syllabus, and journal — which students will submit to both the Director of ALAS and the professor. In addition, brief quizzes will be given on the readings to encourage reflection on the cultural issues faced in the service work.

Time commitment: Based on U-M guidelines, one credit is equivalent to one hour of class-time and two hours of work on average outside of class (LSA Bulletin, p. 28); hence, a 3-credit course assumes a total time commitment of 9 hours a week. The hours of work required for this course have been calculated accordingly: 1 1/2 hour of class, 5 hours of service work, 2 1/2 hours of work in reading, writing, and preparation outside of class. It is of the utmost importance that students make a commitment to the children we serve, which means that they must attend the tutoring sessions regularly and arrive on time.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 450. Middle Ages.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Catherine Brown (mcbrown@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. Permission of instructor required. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/spanish/450/001.nsf

"The past is a foreign country. They do things differently there." So says an English novelist in 1953. If the early 20th century feels like a foreign country, what about the Middle Ages? What to say about the Middle Ages in Spain? This class will think about travel and time, about time travel too, and about the confrontation with the "not-me" that any travel — historical, imaginative, or spatial — entails.

We'll read things written in the Iberian peninsula from the 10th through the 14th centuries: an epic about border-making and border-crossing (the Poema del Cid ), the tale of a wandering, skirt-chasing priest (the Libro de buen amor ); we may even watch some time-travel movies. We'll read first-person stories of journeys made by real medieval people (Benjamin of Tudela; a woman named Egeria), and study the greatest of all travel routes in the period, the pilgrimage road to Santiago de Compostela, at the very Western edge of what for Europeans was the known world.

Will we come back the same people from a trip to the end of the world?

This course is taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

SPANISH 456. Golden Age.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enrique García Santo-Tomás (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

I. Descripción y objetivos del curso

El presente curso estudiará una serie de textos canónicos desde una perspectiva contemporánea, enfatizando su contextualización socio-política, histórica y literaria, además de nuevos acercamientos que se adapten a la sensibilidad moderna. Se analizará poesía, teatro y narrativa, en un diseño que prestará atención cuestiones como el 'yo' poético en su transición del Renacimiento al Barroco, la creación de una dramaturgia nacional de sabor autóctono, y la inauguración de nuevos modos narrativos como la picaresca o la novela corta. Los autores a estudiar serán Garcilaso de la Vega, Fray Luis de León, Santa Teresa de Jesús, San Juan de la Cruz, Cervantes, Lope de Vega, Góngora, Tirso de Molina, Quevedo y Calderón de la Barca. El curso se completará con proyecciones audiovisuales sobre Velázquez, la Inquisición, Don Quijote y Fuenteovejuna. La clase será en español.

II. Criterios de evaluación y textos de clase

Preparación y participación: 25%. Tres exámenes parciales: 20% cada uno. Informe oral: 15%. Se requiere la compra del Course pack (DollarBill), del Lazarillo y de Fuenteovejuna (Shaman Drum).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 467. Literary and Artistic Movements in Latin America/Spain.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Questioning Everything: Literature and Thought in Early 20th-Century Spain. Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Juli A Highfill (highfill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Is it truly possible to question everything? Or, in any given place and time, do historical forces bring certain questions to the forefront while putting others off-limits? In totalitarian societies, of course, censorship works overtly to ban certain questions and utterances. But societies free of official censorship also set parameters that mysteriously circumscribe what can be asked, thought, and said, or even imagined. In this course, we will focus on the first few decades of 20th-century Spain, a time when those parameters suddenly expanded, giving writers, artists, and early film-makers remarkable freedom to posit provocative and irreverent questions. In their works, they challenged the Spanish nation and its "eternal myths"; questioned religious faith and the existence of God; mocked and defied political authority; destabilized notions of selfhood, sexuality, and gender roles; blurred the lines between life and art, sense and nonsense; and took up the new atomic physics to rethink concepts of matter and time. We will critically examine this questioning process in the early 20th century, considering both its freedoms and its limits. In the final class meetings, we will reflect critically on our own time and place, as we discuss what questions are — and are not — being asked and explored today in our culture. What are the forces that impinge on the creative questioning process today, both creating and limiting its possibilities?

Assignments include: two exams, two essays (6-7 pp. each), and a final "think-piece" (3-5 pp.) based on field-work and critical reflections. Active class discussion is an essential component of the course. Class will be conducted in Spanish.

Major texts include poetry by Antonio Machado, Sonata de otoño by Valle-Inclán, Niebla by Unamuno, El público by Lorca. Additional texts by these writers, along with short works by Zambrano, Salinas, Gómez de la Serna will be collected in a course pack. Other course materials include films by Buñuel and paintings by Dalí.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Hispaniola: One Island, Two Nations. Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Lucia M Suárez (suarez@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will examine the production of Dominican literature in relationship to Dominican-American (Latina/o) writing; and Haitian literature with respect to the literary production of the Haitian diaspora. We will investigate how the Trujillo and Duvalier dictatorships shaped discourses of nationality, ethnicity and race, and how these, in turn, stimulated a consequent literary reaction.

Fictional texts such as Julia Álvarez' In the Time of the Butterflies and Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones, have brought international attention to the poverty stricken region of Hispaniola. Mario Vargas Llosa's recent novel, La fiesta del chivo situates the Trujillo dictatorship among the chain of Latin American dictators of the twentieth century. In contrast Stephen Alexis' work points to the beginnings of Haitian nationalism as an exemplary model of independence gone awry. This region of intense violence and trauma is sculpted not by the silence and fear that it often witnesses, but rather, by courageous writers in exile. We will explore the meaning of writing fiction and its use as a tool of testimony.

This class is reading intensive. It will be conducted in Spanish. If any students read in French, recommendations for work not in translation will be made.

This course is taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 485. Case Studies in Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Literature.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 002 — Lorca. Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Juli Highfill (highfill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will focus on the poetry and drama of Federico García Lorca. As we read and discuss his works, we will also consider how his interests and activities shed light on "lived history." We will examine, for example, Lorca's years in the "Residencia de Estudiantes" with Dalí and Buñuel; his interest in gypsy and Andalusian culture; his involvement in surrealism; his year in New York, where he witnessed the stock market crash of 1929; his work in the traveling theater troupe "La Barraca" — a cultural program organized by the Spanish Republic; and his death in the first weeks of the Spanish Civil War. Primary texts include: El romancero gitano, Poema del cante jondo, Poeta en Nueva York, Yerma, Así que pasen cinco años, and El público. Assignments include: two exams, two papers (7-8 pp. each), and annotated bibliography (with 6 critical articles), and a group production of a scene from one of the plays. Class conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001 — Spanish in the United States. Taught in Spanish

Instructor(s): Teresa Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Spanish has been spoken in what is now the United States longer than English has. With the increase in Spanish speakers in U.S. cities both through internal generation and continued migration, there has also come fresh interest in several aspects of linguistic investigation. This course is open to graduate and undergraduate students. We will explore a variety of regional aspects concerning Spanish in the US, ranging from sociolinguistic issues among Dominicans in New York and Cubans in Miami to the adoption and adaptation of forms from Nahuatl and English in the southwestern US. The class will be organized into sections covering interpreting; historical perspectives; borrowings of words and phrases; codeswitching, narratives, and discourse; sociolinguistics and pragmatics; phonology, morphology, and syntax; and language attitudes and planning. The aims of the course are three-fold: 1) to show the range of Spanish across the U.S.; 2) to highlight both established and younger scholars who have made important contributions to the study of Spanish and to the field of linguistics; and 3) to illustrate the principal trends and methods of analysis in specific linguistic disciplines.

This course is taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 002 — Lorca. Taught in Spanish.

Instructor(s): Juli Highfill (highfill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SPANISH 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, we will focus on the poetry and drama of Federico García Lorca. As we read and discuss his works, we will also consider how his interests and activities shed light on "lived history." We will examine, for example, Lorca's years in the "Residencia de Estudiantes" with Dalí and Buñuel; his interest in gypsy and Andalusian culture; his involvement in surrealism; his year in New York, where he witnessed the stock market crash of 1929; his work in the traveling theater troupe "La Barraca" — a cultural program organized by the Spanish Republic; and his death in the first weeks of the Spanish Civil War. Primary texts include: El romancero gitano, Poema del cante jondo, Poeta en Nueva York, Yerma, Así que pasen cinco años, and El público. Assignments include: two exams, two papers (7-8 pp. each), and annotated bibliography (with 6 critical articles), and a group production of a scene from one of the plays. Class conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

SPANISH 490. Spanish Honors: Introduction to Literary Studies and Criticism.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One 400-level SPANISH literature course, and permission of Honors advisor. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (SPANISH 491), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/spanishhonors.pdf

Independent Study leading to the completion of an Honors thesis. Introduces the student to the fundamental principles of literary studies as a discipline. Details on the Spanish Honors Concentration are available on the Romance Languages website.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor/department

SPANISH 491. Senior Honors Course.

Literary and Cultural Studies

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/spanishhonors.pdf

Supervised independent study leading to the completion of an honors thesis and a program of selected readings including conferences, term papers or reports, and written examinations. Details on the Spanish Honors Concentration are available on the Romance Languages website.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


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