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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Academic Term 2004 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Music History and Musicology


This page was created at 8:05 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)


It is possible for LS&A students to elect a concentration program in Theatre or Music, and these programs are described in the LS&A Bulletin. In addition, Theatre courses and Music courses are frequently elected by LS&A students not concentrating in either Music or Theatre. All courses in Music History/Musicology, Composition, and Music Theory are electable for LS&A credit; some but not all Theatre and Drama courses are available for LS&A credit. Some of these courses can be used in an area distribution plan. LS&A students may elect music PERFORMANCE courses for degree credit, but this credit counts toward the maximum twenty non-LS&A credit hours that can be applied toward an LS&A degree.

Courses in Theatre, Music History/Musicology, Composition, Music Theory, and Performing Arts Technology are listed in the Time Schedule under the School of Music.

The following courses count as LS&A courses for LS&A degree credit.


MUSICOL 140. History of Western Art Music: Music of the U.S. and Euro-American Music Since World War I.

Instructor(s): Mark Allan Clague

Prerequisites & Distribution: Limited to students enrolled in the School of Music unless admission is granted by the concentration advisor. (2). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 240. History of Western Art Music: Classic Era Through World War I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Roland J Wiley

Prerequisites & Distribution: Limited to students enrolled in the School of Music unless admission is granted by the concentration advisor. (2). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/musicol/240/001.nsf

MHM 240 is a survey of West-Eruopean music from the beginnings of classicism to World War I.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 341. Introduction to the Art of Music.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Albin J Zak

Prerequisites & Distribution: For non-School of Music students only. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 342. Introduction to World Music.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Amy K Stillman (akstill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: For non-School of Music students only. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/musicol/342/001.nsf

Through an exploration of musics from around the world and throughout history, the purpose of this course is to introduce students to the diversity of musical systems, soundscapes, and aesthetics in global circulation. We will do this from the perspective of ethnomusicology, a branch of scholarship that studies the role of music in society.

A one-semester course could not possibly cover the entire world comprehensively, so we will use a case-study approach to model processes of encounter, fact-finding, evaluation of sources, analysis of music, and critical consideration of the role of musical expression in society generally.

All human societies have some form of expression that we can consider "musical," leading to questions of what music means, how musical meaning is produced and understood, how musical performance is maintained and passed on, and how musical expression changes over time, as new forms come into being and old forms fade away. Through music, we have a powerful means of knowing who we are as individuals and members of society; we will explore the role of music in rituals that affirm relationships of different societies to spiritual forces and cosmological destinies. Since virtually no society is completely isolated, we will consider musical results of interactions among people, impacts of movements and migrations on music traditions, and how music facilitates both putting up and breaking down boundaries between groups of people. We will examine how music is deeply entangled in fundamental political processes of social life, and how discourses about music offer ways of understanding how ideologies work to empower — and disempower — different groups of people under different circumstances.

In our contemporary world, music is ubiquitous, as is the means to learn about virtually any kind of music from the furthest reaches on the planet. Encounters with music, and aural recognition of musical criteria will be the foundation in this course. From this foundation, you will explore the world of information on world musics available to you, and you will develop the means to critically evaluate information sources. Finally,

What You Will Learn

1.You will learn ways of describing what you hear in a piece or performance of music.
2.You will learn ways of distinguishing among major musical traditions in the world.
3.You will learn to locate, compile, and assess the reliability of sources of information on music, and to communicate those findings in writing.
4.You will learn how diverse societies organize music systems and performance differently.
5.You will learn ethnomusicological perspectives for thinking about music.
6.You will be an informed consumer of music.
7.You will be cognizant of the power of music as a social good.

Required Reading — available at Shaman Drum Bookstore, Textbook dept (upstairs) Bonnie C. Wade. Thinking Musically. Philip V. Bohlman. World Music: A Very Short Introduction Pocket Atlas of the World

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

MUSICOL 346. The History of Music.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles Hiroshi Garrett (smeng@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: For non-School of Music students only. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

MUSICOL 405. Special Course.

Section 001 — Race & Identity in Western Art Music. [3 credits]. Meets with MUSICOL 505.001, WOMENSTD 483.004, WOMENSTD 698.001, and HONORS 493.006.

Instructor(s): Naomi A André (nandre@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See WOMENSTD 483.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

MUSICOL 406. Special Course.

Section 001 — Music of the Philippines. [3 credits]. Meets with MUSICOL 506.001 and Asian 492.003.

Instructor(s): Felicidad Afable Prudente

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2-4; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/musicol/406/001.nsf

See ASIAN 492.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

MUSICOL 408. Special Course.

Section 001 — Music of the American Avant-Garde: Cage, Partch, Cowell, Nancarrow. [3 credits]. Meets with MUSICOL 508.001.

Instructor(s): James E Wierzbicki

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3; 1-2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Permission of Instructor

MUSICOL 414. History of Opera: 19th and 20th Centuries.

Section 001 — Meets with MUSICOL 514.001.

Instructor(s): Roland J Wiley (rjwiley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/musicol/414/001.nsf

A review of important repertoires and particular works in western European opera, moving forward from the year 1800

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5 Permission of Instructor

MUSICOL 421. Music of the Classic Period.

Section 001 — Meets with MUSICOL 521.001.

Instructor(s): Steven Moore Whiting

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/musicol/421/001.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

MUSICOL 423. Music of the Twentieth Century.

Section 001 — The Emergence of Modernism.

Instructor(s): Albin J Zak III

Prerequisites & Distribution: MUSICOL 240. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/musicol/423/001.nsf

For composers of concert music in the twentieth century, the burden of history was unprecedented. By the dawn of the century a selective, idiosyncratic historical awareness had become a fundamental of musical composition. In both their music and their rhetoric, composers displayed a marked self-consciousness in the face of a grand musical legacy, which influenced their conception of the compositional project and many of the creative choices they made. There is a basic tension inherent in the work of such "progressive" composers as Schoenberg, Stravinsky, Ives, and Bartók: their work is based on nineteenth-century ideological beliefs, aesthetic attitudes, and compositional techniques, yet the conventional underpinnings that anchor even the most advanced nineteenth-century music no longer pertain. Indeed, the norms of common practice musical language were abandoned precisely in response to the imperatives of the Romantic belief in individual vision.

In this course, we will explore — through their music and their prose — the aesthetic worlds of some of the most influential composers of the first half of the twentieth century. As we do so, a prevailing theme will be the nature of the composers' relationship with the concert music tradition they inherited; the sources of evidence for this relationship will be largely the composers' own words and works.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

MUSICOL 458. Music and Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Judith O Becker

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


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This page was created at 8:05 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.


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