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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

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Courses in RC Core


This page was created at 8:17 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 001 — THE GLOBAL BANQUET: PARADOXES IN THE WORLD FOOD SYSTEM.

Instructor(s): Catherine E Badgley

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/rccore/100/001.nsf

This course surveys the environmental and social dimensions of the current food system in the United States and around the world. Food has always been a basic necessity for survival and often a cause for celebration, but has also become a cultural signature, a mark of status, a political weapon, and an environmental catastrophe. We will explore some of the distortions and contradictions that pervade food production, marketing, and consumption today. For example, the global food system produces enough food to feed every person alive well, yet about 1 billion people endure chronic hunger. Second, most food consumed today is produced by industrial methods that employ massive quantities of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides and result in a host of environmental and health problems. Yet, small-scale producers employing ecological principles to raise many kinds of plants and animals have higher yields and higher environmental benefits. Third,40% of the world's grain is fed to livestock, even though animal production has severe environmental and health effects. Fourth, the United States subsidizes growth of major food commodities so that their price remains low; when these cheap commodities reach developing countries, they undercut the local farm economies and increase rural poverty.

The course will cover these and other issues as presented in current literature, documentaries, and field trips to farms and farm-related organizations. Students will write short weekly essays, a longer research paper, and a grant proposal. As a writing seminar, the course will emphasize analytical reading and writing, and organizational, stylistic, and bibliographic skills. Texts include Fatal Harvest (Andrew Kimbrell, ed., paperback version), The Atlas of Food (Erik Millstone and Tim Lang), and an electronic coursepack of stories, essays, and current articles by authors including Wendell Berry, Vandana Shiva, Will Weaver, and Aldo Leopold. Each student must also read and report on a book from a list of fiction and non-fiction about food, farming, and rural culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 002 — Unteaching Racism.

Instructor(s): Helen Fox (hfox@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 003 — Children Under Fire.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth N Goodenough (lizgoode@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Theme Semester

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Suffering and remembering longest, children lose most in war. Recent memoirs by "hidden children" of the Holocaust, adolescent diaries from war zones, and oral histories of teenage victims of domestic and urban violence challenge stereotypes of war stories. Examining the sense of lost childhood and fear of violence which pervade our society, this seminar explores how trauma has been constituted and problematized in children's literature. How do these texts portray young killers and consumers, soldiers and refugees, victims and survivors of crisis? In what ways do fairy tales, as well as empire and frontier, continue to influence media, film, and popular culture for the young? What roles do gender, classic war stories, national identity, family resilience, issues of guilt and innocence, cross-writing, amnesia and recovered memory, terrorism and expectations of a happy ending play in representing children under fire?

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RCCORE 100. First Year Seminar.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 004 — Topic?

Instructor(s): Claire A Conceison

Prerequisites & Distribution: SWC Writing Assessment. Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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RCCORE 101. Academic Writing.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbra Smith Morris (barbra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RC First Year Seminar. (1). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students who have completed the Residential College Freshman Seminar in the Fall term, and are identified as needing further intensive attention to their writing, enroll in this course. Subject matter includes: organization of content, style and substance, and attention to grammar and coherence. Students write and revise three papers, which are ultimately assembled into a representative portfolio. Attendance at all class meetings and conferences is mandatory in order to receive credit for the class. Class participation includes oral presentation, peer responses to essays, and impromptu in-class writing. Schedules and due dates must be adhered to in order for the requirements to be met.

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RCCORE 191. Intensive German I.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Erica Kuhra Paslick (ekp@umich.edu) , Janet Hegman Shier (jshie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100, 101, 102, or 103.

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

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RCCORE 194. Intensive Spanish I.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga Maria Lopez-Cotin (olcotin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 100, 101, 102, or 103.

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCCORE 205. Independent Study.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (1-8).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 209. Study Off-Campus.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (Arr).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students must submit a written proposal approved by at least two faculty sponsors outlining the proposed project, the readings, and the final product.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 290. Intensive French II.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dominique M Butler-Borruat (dborruat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCCORE 190. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in FRENCH 230, 231, or 232.

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency exam. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker, in spoken and written language. Students must be able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature, and of a general (non-literary) interest.

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RCCORE 291. Intensive German II.

Foreign Language

Section 001 — Taught in German.

Instructor(s): Erica Kuhra Paslick (ekp@umich.edu), Karein K Goertz (goertz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCCORE 191. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230, 231, or 232.

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jshie/Germancourses.html#core1

Intensive German II covers second-year German in one term. The goals of the course include review and expansion of the grammar and vocabulary presented in RCCORE 191 and further development of students' reading, writing, and speaking skills. As in the other RC German courses, all instruction is conducted in German. Classroom instruction includes discussions, impromptu speaking exercises, performance of skits, numerous writing assignments, and listening and reading exercises. Reading materials include short prose, fairy tales, poetry, and magazine and newspaper articles. A primary objective which RCCORE 291 students strive to meet is "passing proficiency." Achieving this goal gives students a sense of pride and accomplishment. The proficiency exam serves as a qualifying exam for the next required course in the sequence, RCCORE 321 (German Readings).

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RCCORE 293 / RUSSIAN 203. Intensive Second Year Russian.

Foreign Language

Instructor(s): Alina Udalchenko Makin (resco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCCORE 193 or RUSSIAN 102. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RUSSIAN 201 or 202.

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~resco/lvl26.html

See RUSSIAN 203.

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RCCORE 294. Intensive Spanish II.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria I Rodriguez (mrodri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCCORE 194. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SPANISH 230, 231, or 232.

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

RCCORE 294 is a second-year intensive course designed to achieve proficiency in Spanish. The lecture component emphasizes understanding of advanced grammatical structures and syntax, whereas the discussion is devoted to the critical analysis of authentic texts addressing issues relevant to Hispanic experiences in the United States. Through their interaction with the texts and instructors, both in formal and informal contexts, students develop their speaking, aural comprehension, and writing skills. By the end of the term, students are able to read journalistic or academic prose with ease as well as write essays of an academic nature with a minimum of English interference.

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RCCORE 295 / LATIN 295. Intensive Latin II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gina Marie Soter (soter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: LATIN 102, 103, or 193/504, or RCCORE 195. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~soter/RCLatin/

This course meets for two hours per day four days per week and covers in one academic term the equivalent of two terms at the level of a non-intensive second-year collegiate course. Through the reading and study of primary texts from Latin authors, students will develop their understanding of grammatical and syntactical structures of Latin, increase their vocabulary, and expand their knowledge of the Roman world. Readings revolve around the intersections of gender politics, insurrection, and rhetoric. In addition, students will work with earlier material remains, such as inscriptions and documentary papyri. The course will conclude with literature from Medieval Latin. Skills will be enhanced through writing, hearing, and speaking the language; content and format alike will encourage students to consider ways in which Latin continues to be very much a part of our world today.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCCORE 305. Independent Study.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (1-8).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students must submit a written proposal approved by a faculty sponsor outlining the proposed topic, the readings, and the final product of the project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

RCCORE 307. RC Practicum in College Team Teaching.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-4). (Excl). (Independent). May be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is for the student who wishes experience in college teaching. The student-teacher functions as a teaching intern in a course. Regular staff meetings and individual conferences with the person in charge ensures that the intern shares in the overall planning and management of the course. The student may receive credit only once for student-teaching in the same course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

RCCORE 309. Study Off-Campus.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (Arr).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students must submit a written proposal approved by at least two faculty sponsors outlining the proposed project, the readings, and the final product.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 314. Accelerated Review-Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lourdes Cornejo-Krohn (lcornejo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for students with a fairly extensive background in Spanish who have already taken the equivalent of three/four academic terms of language but still need further reinforcement in two or more linguistic areas and are too advanced for second year intensive. The main focus of this course is the discussion of primary source materials of a literary, cultural, and political nature pertaining to the Spanish-speaking world, as well as the review of advanced grammar. Students work towards proficiency in listening and reading comprehension, language structure, and composition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCCORE 320. Seminaire en français.

Foreign Language

Section 001 — Au coeur de l' Amitie: a Multidisciplinary Study of the Concept of Friendship.

Instructor(s): Dominique M Butler-Borruat (dborruat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The abundance of treatises on friendship throughout history and the profusion of research on the subject nowadays attest not only to the importance of this human phenomenon — present in all cultures in different forms — but also to the enduring interest in piercing its mystery.

What is friendship? What is at its fundamental core? How and why does it emerge between two individuals? Is it a form of love? Does it originate from or against collectivity? Does it have enemies? Does it even still exist in today's world dominated by relations based on self-interest? How does it manifest itself in other cultures?

These are some of the questions which will be discussed in this seminar. We will glean answers from three different fields of investigation, namely psycho-sociology, philosophy, and cultural anthropology, which we will consider in turn.

First, we will discover how friendship manifests itself presently both in the United States and in France. Our readings in psycho-sociology will help us understand the modes of construction of relations of friendships, the practices in which it engages, and the representations which it mobilizes. The social dimension of friendship in both these countries will also be highlighted.

Given that any discourse on friendship opens upon the world of sophia, of philosophy, we will then go back in time to the ancient Greek city where the Western idea of friendship was born, and we will see how this idea was transmitted through the Romans, the Christians, the Renaissance and "l'Ancien Régime", up to today. We will read what the main representatives of this tradition had to contribute to this concept.

We will pursue our study by taking a world tour and examine the importance of friendship and its practices in non-Western societies, and conclude our investigation by focusing on the cultural differences at play between the way Americans and French people live their friendships.

Readings will be selected from various sources: chapters of psycho-sociological and cultural anthropological studies, articles from professional journals, excerpts of philosophical treatises on friendship, as well as correspondence.

Students will be required to actively contribute to class discussions and write several essays, both creative and theoretical.

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RCCORE 320. Seminaire en français.

Foreign Language

Section 003 — Food and Culture: A French Perspective.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Anderson-Burack (caburack@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Food has long been celebrated and enjoyed as an important aspect of French culture. What are the origins of this celebrated cuisine? How are French attitudes towards food different from our own? How are the French protecting this part of their culture?

We will also look into nutrition and health issues. Do the French have different ideas about what foods are considered "healthy"? What are their concerns about the safety of what they eat? What is the so-called "French paradox"?

Through readings from a variety of sources, we will attempt to answer these and other questions. After reading about the development of the French interest in gastronomy starting with the Gauls, we read texts from La Fontaine, Dumas, Baudelaire, Proust, and Duras among others. Other readings will be current articles from newspapers and magazines such as France-Amérique and Sciences et Avenir. Readings, discussions and written work will be in French. Students will give two oral presentations and complete a final research project. Students will also prepare two French meals. Course evaluation will be based on both creative and analytical papers, oral presentations, class participation and preparation.

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RCCORE 321. Readings in German.

Foreign Language

Section 001 — Introduction to German Prose: Literature of the Uncanny.

Instructor(s): Karein K Goertz (goertz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This German Readings course offers post-proficiency students an introduction into German literature. Through fairy tales, short stories, poems and two novels we will cover subjects ranging from the uncanny, dreams, and the imagination to narratives that are firmly anchored in the historical, cultural and political events of the 19th and 20th century — war and fascism, division and reunification, urbanization, multiculturalism. Through reading and discussion, oral presentations and written essays, students will strengthen all of their skills in German.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 321. Readings in German.

Foreign Language

Section 002 — Play Production Seminar: German Theater.

Instructor(s): Janet Hegman Shier (jshie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jshie/dttheater04.htm

In this course, students will read several modern German plays and will become familiar with the 20th century German theater that grew out of the Cabaret tradition. In addition to reading 6-7 plays, students will read several of Brecht's writing about epic theater, do scene work using Brecht's "Lehrstueck" model, and will ultimately participate as technical crew and actors in a multi-media play production of RC "Deutsches Theater" in March/April. In addition to participating in all rehearsals and the final performances, students will be required to give one oral "Referat" on a topic relevant to course readings and to keep a course portfolio containing reflections on readings and scene work, original sketches, and materials collected for possible inclusion in the production. Students may travel at their own expense with the course instructor to Munich over Spring Break to see theater productions. RC German readings is a prerequisite for this course, but some students who have not had German Readings may be eligible to participate with permission of the instructor. Students who have participated in RC "Deutsches Theater" in the past are welcome to enroll in the course again.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 001 — Women Writers in Latin America: Home, Nation and Identity in the 20th Century.

Instructor(s): Olga Maria Lopez-Cotin (olcotin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to different constructions of the female subject in relation to the physical, metaphoric and geographical spaces depicted by several Latin American women writers. The first part of the course focuses on the home as a conventional repository of the female identity and refuge from an external world perceived as hostile, and explores how writers have subverted this public/private duality to create multiple meanings: the physical and psychological barriers of the bourgueoisie home, hidden rooms as representations of confinement, the imaginary natural spaces of eroticism as vehicles for alternative realities. In the latter part of the course, we will focus on several geographical areas in Latin America to explore how women writers have defied institutional violence: race and class conflicts in the Caribbean, social unbalance generated by institutionalized poverty in Central America, and the Southern Cone military dictatorships. These social conflicts have brought along a redefinition of the home as a fragmented and dispersed space by the absence of those disappeared; the disorder of objects and daily gestures; the imprisonment and sexual/political violence exerted on the female body. Along with some theoretical reflections on the notion of space and discussion of the specific historical processes, we will read essays, fiction and poems by María Luisa Bombal,, Rosario Castellanos, Nancy Morejón, Rosario Ferré, Claribel Alegría, Luisa Valenzuela, Cristina Peri Rossi, and others.

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RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 002 — El teatro campesino.

Instructor(s): Maria I Rodriguez (mrodri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will be an introduction to the topic of migrant workers in the US and the artistic representation of their experiences through El Teatro Campesino. There will be a brief historical account of the migrant workforce in the US, specifically California. We will analyze the different economic and political forces that have shaped the migrant stream since the late 1900s, analyzing both the bracero program and its present H-2 worker program. Throughout this historical account there will be readings pertaining to individual experiences in health, education, and social contexts in order to gain a more complete understanding of the informal lifestyle of the migrant, and how it contrasts with the American institutional bureaucracy. This social and historical perspective will be complemented with plays from El Teatro Campesino, a forum in which this invisible and marginalized community gains control of their own voice and narrate their experiences. There is a possibility of a final public performance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 003 — Ciudades y Medio Ambiente en Amirica Latina: Problemas, Actores y Discursos.

Instructor(s): Moira Liliana Zellner (mzellner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/rccore/324/003.nsf

Las ciudades son manifestaciones físicas de procesos sociales, económicos y políticos, delimitados en un tiempo y un espacio que comparten con los procesos biológicos del ambiente. Esta compleja interacción se traduce en mecanismos de adaptación mutua y permanente. Las ciudades no son estáticas, sino dinámicas y están continuamente sufriendo cambios. Reconocer este aspecto vivo de las ciudades permite situarlas en contexto, e identificar más claramente los factores que son importantes en su forma, función, e identidad, y cómo afectan la calidad de vida de sus habitantes.

En este marco, exploraremos algunos de los aspectos importantes en la formación de ciudades latinoamericanas, por ejemplo, los procesos históricos y culturales, la política y el poder, las políticas urbanas y de desarrollo económico y social, y el rol de los espacios y recursos públicos. Se hará énfasis en la interacción de estos factores y en su impacto sobre la forma urbana, la integración social y económica, y la calidad ambiental. Las discusiones se centrarán en la comparación con ciudades norteamericanas.

Latin-American Cities

Cities are physical manifestations of social, economic, and political processes, set in specific temporal and spatial frameworks that are shared with the biological processes of the environment. This complex interaction translates into mutual and permanent mechanisms of adaptation. Cities are not static, but dynamic, and are continuously going through change. To recognize this living aspect of cities allows us to set them in context, and more clearly identify the important factors that shape their form, function and identity, and how these in turn affect the quality of life of their inhabitants.

Within this framework, we will explore some of the important aspects in the formation of Latin-American cities, e.g. historical and cultural processes, politics and power, urban policies and economic and social development policies, the role of public spaces and resources. The interaction of these factors will be emphasized, and the impact on urban form, social and economic integration, and environmental quality. Discussions will focus on comparisons with North American cities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 004 — What is a Latin American? The Problems in Constructing a Transnational Identity

Instructor(s): Beatriz Eugenia Ramirez (beatrize@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Cuban essayist and editor of the journal Casa de las Americas, R. Fernandez Retamar, published an essay in 1972 answering the question, posed by a European: "Is there a Latin American culture?" Caliban, the name of his essay, followed on a long tradition of Latin American writers trying to position themselves within a transnational cultural unity. In this course we will examine the debates regarding constructions of Latin American culture. We will read in depth a selected group of political and cultural essays as well as some fiction, from three main areas of Latin America: the Caribbean, Mexico and the South Cone. This selection reflects the prevalence of some discourses over others and also of the conflicts and contradictions between them. Students will be required to write a two page critical diary every week, give an oral presentation which will be the start of their final research paper as well as take a midterm evaluation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 005 — The Family and Spanish American Drama.

Instructor(s): Lourdes Cornejo-Krohn (lcornejo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. Permission of instructor required. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will explore family systems (structure, dynamics, function/dysfunction and communication) as they are presented in Spanish and Latin American dramas. We will consider traditional family structures, gender roles and restrictive demands made on each family member. The conflict between child and parent will be studied as an oppressive patriarchal structure for the child as well as a challenging and often unfulfilling responsibility for the parent. Likewise, we will look at the relationship between wife and husband as a source of frustration for both sexes confined by rigidly defined roles in the family unit. The family as a subsystem will also lead us to a discussion of the larger systems of class and culture.

Tentative reading list includes: La casa de Bernarda Alba and Yerma by Frederico García Lorca; El rastro by Elena Garro; El gesticulador and El niño y la niebla by Rudolfo Usigli; Historia de una escalera, Antonio Buero Vallejo; La Mordaza, Alfonso Sastre; La noche de los asesinos, Jose Triana.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 334. Special Topics.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 001 — Impressionism & Modernity. [3 credits]. Meets with HISTART 394.005.

Instructor(s): Simon James Elmer

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See HISTART 394.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 334. Special Topics.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 003 — English Grammar and Writing. [4 credits].

Instructor(s): John M Lawler (jlawler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jlawler/gramsyllabus.html

Talking, like walking, is a natural biological function for humans. Pretty much everybody walks and talks, we learn it automatically, and we do it so well that we rarely even think about it. Writing, by contrast, is unnatural for humans — as unnatural as driving a car or playing a guitar, a matter of technology and art rather than nature and biology — a skill that almost everybody can learn, though not everybody does. Even when one can write, however, it is still the case that some do it better than others, and pretty much everybody is aware of their shortcomings as writers.

In any art, there is a medium, and the medium of writing is language. In our culture, that language is English, and the U.S. educational system teaches its students almost nothing about the English language, beyond a vague anxiety that somebody knows more than you do about what's "correct". Consequently, Americans are largely innocent of knowledge about the grammar of English, and therefore have a much harder time writing than they ought to, like a painter who has never heard of colors or shapes.

This course, which is open to non-R.C. students is designed to alleviate this situation. We will study the medium of writing — English syntax — with particular attention to the construction of effective phrases, sentences, and paragraphs, and their assembly into coherent and interesting writing.

For that purpose we will analyze topics like relative clauses, subject and object complements, modal auxiliaries, negation, adverbial clauses, verb inversions, conjunction reduction, cleft and pseudo-cleft sentences, transitivity, prepositional phrases and government, pronominal coreference and deletion, and subject-verb agreement, among others. The ultimate goal of the course is to enable the habit of conscious attention to one's use of language; thus, in every piece of writing submitted, students will be expected to be able to justify their use of any word or construction they use, listing the alternatives considered and the reasons for their rejection.

Naturally, this takes practice. There will be weekly writing, a midterm paper with revisions, and a final term paper, with an initial draft and revision. The text is McCawley's The Syntactic Phenomena of English (2nd edition, University of Chicago Press, 1998). Recommended but not required is Crystal's The Cambridge Encyclopedia of the English Language (Cambridge University Press, 1995). Recommended as a prerequisite is some prior preparation in English grammar, such as Prof. Lawler's "English Grammar and Meaning" course in Fall Term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCCORE 405. Independent Study.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Laboratory fee may be required.

Credits: (1-8).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee may be required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students must submit a written proposal approved by a faculty sponsor outlining the proposed topic, the readings, and the final product of the project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor/department

RCCORE 409. Study Off-Campus.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (Arr). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (Arr).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students must submit a written proposal approved by at least two faculty sponsors outlining the proposed project, the readings, and the final product.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCCORE 410. Senior Project.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-8). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (1-8).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An individual project in the field of concentration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

RCCORE 489. Honors Independent Research.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent study under the supervision of an honors thesis advising committee to do preliminary research for a potential honors thesis. A primary purpose of this course is to determine if, in fact, the proposed thesis is feasible.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

RCCORE 490. Honors Thesis.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An individual Honors project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of department


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