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Winter Academic Term 2004 Course Guide

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Courses in RC Humanities


This page was created at 7:15 PM on Wed, Jan 21, 2004.

Winter Academic Term, 2004 (January 6 - April 30)



RCHUMS 220. Narration.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Suggested assignment: 1250 words of prose fiction every two weeks. Rewriting is emphasized. The class meets as a group up to two hours per week. Collections of short fiction by established writers are read. Every student meets privately with the instructor each week.

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RCHUMS 221. The Writing of Poetry.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The amount of poetry each student is required to submit is determined by the instructor. The class meets three hours per week as a group. In addition, each student receives private criticism from the instructor every week. Contemporary poetry is read and discussed in class for style. Students are organized into small groups that meet weekly. RC students have priority for registration.

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RCHUMS 230. Biblical, Greek, and Medieval Texts: Original Works and Modern Counterparts.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frederick G Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu), Hubert I Cohen (hicohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we shall study foundational texts from the Greek, Old Testament, New Testament, and Medieval worlds and a number of modern works — books, essays, and films — that employ the themes and situations originally set forth in these classical works.

First, we shall examine literature central to the world view of four cultures that have helped shape and continue to inform modern Western consciousness and art. Our focus will be on questions and perspectives concerning the individual's relationship to the divine order, to earthly society, and to the private self that are embodied in such works as: (I) Greek literature: Homer (The Iliad or The Odyssey); Sophocles (Oedipus, Antigone); Euripedes (Medea), Plato (Socratic dialogues); (II) Old Testament: (Genesis, Job); (III): The New Testament (The Gospels of St. Matthew and St. John); (IV): Medieval literature: Dante's The Inferno, Gottfried's Tristan.

In conjunction with these works, we will examine, where feasible, modern counterparts (or adaptations or recreations) of the classic stories or conflicts found in these classical texts. We will read essays and novels, and see films which deal with the same or similar-and perennial-ideas and conflicts. (We will also examine those values and experiences expressed in the original works that seem alien to modern consciousness.) Some of the modern works we will scrutinize are Roman Polanski's Chinatown, Max Frisch's Homo Faber, Martin Luther King's Letter from Birmingham Jail, Martin Scorsese's The Last Temptation of Christ, Ingmar Bergman's The Seventh Seal.

The chief merit of our approach, besides giving the student the opportunity to read and see important and exciting stories, is in the juxtaposing of the old and the new so as to make the student more appreciative of the rootedness in the past of many of our current ideas, problems, and situations. There will be two papers and a midterm and final exam.

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RCHUMS 235. Topics in World Dance.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 — Meets with DANCE 337.001.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu), Jessica Fogel (jkfogel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/dance/337/001.nsf

This course will survey a diversity of dance traditions throughout the world. Students will gain insight into the functions, aesthetics, history, and cultural context of dances within specific societies. Theatrical, religious, popular, and social dance traditions will be examined in a variety of cultures including groups in Africa, Japan, India, South America, Aboriginal Australia, Indonesia (Bali, Java), the Mideast, and others. A variety of broad comparative issues will be explored: How does dance reflect the values of the society which produces it? How are gender, class, relationships between individual and group, and political and spiritual values displayed through dance structures and movements? What is the creative process for producing these dance works? How is the visual imagery of dance movement designed and how can an audience decipher it? What are the basic elements of dance choreography? How do choreographic structures differ cross-culturally? How do the training, preparation, and performance practices of dancers differ cross-culturally? How do the dances of these cultures employ or integrate other art forms such as music, theater, and costume design? How are dance productions evaluated and critiqued within different cultures? In addition to lectures and readings, the class will feature several guest artist/speaker presentations, viewings of films and videos, and observations of dance rehearsals, classes, and performances.

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RCHUMS 250. Chamber Music.

Music

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Katri Maria Ervamaa (kervamaa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (CE). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-2; 1 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All students who are interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two hours credit at the discretion of the instructor. Audition is only for placement in ensembles. Every student must register for 001 for one hour; those who fulfill the requirements for two hours of credit MUST also select Section 002 (with an override from the instructor) for the additional hour of credit. For one hour of credit, students must participate in one ensemble; for two hours of credit, students must participate in two or more ensembles. Responsibilities include three to four hours of rehearsal time per week per credit hour (i.e., 6-8 hours of practice, rehearsal and coaching for two credits), six studio classes and participation in one or more concerts per term. Course may be used to fulfill the Residential College's Arts Practicum Requirement. Ensembles have included: mixed ensembles of winds, strings and brass; string quartet; woodwind quintet; chamber orchestra; duos and trios, including piano, harpsichord, guitar and voice. This is a full-term class! Sign up early, as the ensembles fill quickly.

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RCHUMS 251. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 001 — Improvisation: Jazz Performance and Its Impact on American Art and Literature.

Instructor(s): John Frederic Behling (jbehling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will approach jazz as an improvisatory practice that has influenced developments in American art, fiction, and poetry. No musical expertise or prior coursework on jazz is required, though students are expected to have some familiarity with twentieth century art, literature, or music. Topics addressed will include the musical characteristics of jazz improvisation, theoretical issues related to musical improvisation, and the consideration of writers and painters who in some way make use of improvisation in their work. The course's interdisciplinary methodology will involve secondary texts from several disciplines including ethnomusicology, philosophical aesthetics, and literary theory, as well as musical performances and recordings, works of poetry and literature, paintings, and films of artistic and literary performances. Much of our attention will fall on music, art, and literature produced between the late 1940s and early 1980s though some more recent works will be included as well.

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RCHUMS 252. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 001 — Afro-Cuban Percussion Ensemble.

Instructor(s): Michael Gould (gould@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Come and experience hands-on the drumming of Cuba. The class will learn the basics of conga playing, clave and other percussion instruments associated with Afro-Cuban music. The class will learn and play a variety of styles of Cuban music that will culminate in a small concert at the Residential College. Each student is expected to practice daily using a practice conga supplied by the instructor. Improvisation. Lab Fee $50.

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RCHUMS 253. Choral Ensemble.

Music

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carole Jean Ott (cott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (CE). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits. Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Group rehearses twice weekly and prepares a thematic concert of music. Vocal skills, sight singing, and basic musicianship are stressed. No prerequisites, but a commitment to the group and a dedication to musical growth within the term are required. No audition necessary.

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RCHUMS 280 / ENGLISH 245 / THTREMUS 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jane Westlake (jewestla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 281.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jewestla/

See THTREMUS 211.001.

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RCHUMS 281. Introduction to Comedy and Tragedy.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Katherine Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu) , Martin W Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RCHUMS 280.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An intensive introduction on how to read a play and interpret it for live stage production. Students will engage the viewpoints of director, actor, and dramaturge (literary/historical specialist) in practical exercises and prepared scenes in a stylistic continuum from Realism through Poetic Realism to the Absurd. Work will focus on modern American one-act plays or scenes from full-length plays beginning with Arthur Miller's A View from the Bridge followed by a midterm performance project, Richard Nelson's collection of scenes Roots in Water. Final project is likely to be Caryl Churchill's Cloud Nine. Theoretical readings and written exercises will complement Midterm and End-of-Term studio productions of works acted and directed by the members of the course under the direct supervision of the instructors. (Required course for the proposed "Text-into- Performance" minor.)

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RCHUMS 291. The Experience of Arts and Ideas in the Nineteenth Century.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The nineteenth century was marked not only by revolutionary changes in society but by artistic revolution. By the beginning of the twentieth century the conventions of style and subject matter of virtually every major art form — painting, music, dance, and literature — had been radically altered and the role of the artist in society had been radically redefined. This interdisciplinary course will examine some of these changes and offer an introduction to major movements in European art and cultural history of the nineteenth century — Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, and Symbolism — by analyzing and comparing representative works of literature, dance, music, and the visual arts. Among possible works studied will be paintings by Delacroix, Courbet, Manet, Degas, Monet, and Van Gogh, novels by Zola, Brontë, and Flaubert, music of Berlioz and Debussy, and ballets of Perrot and Bournonville.

We'll be asking some of the following kinds of questions: What is the revolution of style and subject matter brought about by Romantic art? How do Coralli and Perrot's ballet Giselle and the Symphonie Fantastique of Berlioz reflect these changes and the new attitude of the artist towards himself and his art? Can we find similar aims in certain realist novels of Zola and the realist painting of Courbet and Manet? Can we compare the revolution in the structure and subject matter of painting brought about by the Impressionist and Symbolist painters to the revolution in form brought to music by Debussy? What can we learn about the evolving view of women's place in society by comparing the portrayal of women in paintings by Berthe Morisot and Edouard Manet and the portrayal of women in literature by Ibsen and Edith Wharton? These and other questions will be considered by Beth Genné and class.

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RCHUMS 312 / SLAVIC 312. Central European Cinema.

Arts and Ideas

Race, Ethnicity, and Gender Issues. Taught in English. Section 003 ONLY satisfies the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s): Herbert J Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. Taught in English. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit. Laboratory fee ($10) required in a full term.

Upper-Level Writing R&E Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required in a full term.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See SLAVIC 312.

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RCHUMS 314 / MEMS 314. The Figure of Rome in Shakespeare and 16th-Century Painting.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cynthia A Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will read a selection of Shakespeare's Roman plays, Titus Andronicus, Julius Caesar, Anthony and Cleopatra, and Cymbeline, in the light of their ancient sources, especially Ovid, Livy, Plutarch, Caesar, and Augustine. We will ask what the figure of "Rome" means in the context of each play, and how that historical reference point is used to frame problems of contemporary import in Shakespeare's own time. As comparison and contrast, we will also examine the reclamation of Rome by artists of the Renaissance and the Counter-reformation, especially Mantegna, Titian, and Caravaggio, in order to make arguments concerning antiquity and memory; martyrdom and authority; and the status of the image. We will complete our study by inquiring how (and why) Renaissance artists, historians, and antiquarians began to construct a pre-Roman paganism. What sources did they use? Was there a political or cultural motive behind this construction?

  1. Blood Cries out: Martyrdom and Authority.
    • Shakespeare, Titus Andronicus;
    • Ovid, selections from the Metamorphoses;
    • Livy, selections from the Early History of Rome;
    • Augustine, selections from The City of God;
    • Caravaggio paintings.
  2. The Lion and the Fox: Strategies of Power.
    • Plutarch, Lives of Julius Caesar and Brutus;
    • Shakespeare, Julius Caesar;
    • Niccolo Machiavelli, The Prince;
    • Mantegna paintings.
  3. The Snare of Love.
    • Plutarch, Life of Anthony;
    • Shakespeare, Anthony and Cleopatra;
    • Titian paintings.
  4. Inventing British Paganism.
    • Julius Caesar, Commentaries on the Gallic War (Selections);
    • Shakespeare, Cymbeline

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RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

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RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

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RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Laura Kasischke

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

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RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

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RCHUMS 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Derrick I M Gilbert (derrickg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor

RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RCHUMS 325.001.

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RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RCHUMS 325.002.

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RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Laura Kasischke

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RCHUMS 325.003.

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RCHUMS 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RCHUMS 325.004.

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RCHUMS 333. Art and Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 003 — Performing the Ramayan in South and Southeast Asia. [3 credits]. Meets with ASIAN 492.005.

Instructor(s): Susan Pratt Walton (swalton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 12 credits.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For the past two millennia, The Ramayana has been among the most important literary and oral texts of the world. Providing insights into many aspects of South and Southeast Asian cultures, this ancient Indian epic poem continues to be a viable vehicle for expressing profound human sentiments in modern South and Southeast Asia. This course focuses on performances (theater, music and dance) of The Ramayana. It will start with a discussion of orality, and will then examine three important dimensions of performances: word, image, and music using the Ramayana performances in Indonesia, Thailand and India to illustrate how these components of performances work. Students will read one of the many versions of The Ramayana and will watch video recordings of Ramayana performances. The Residential College will be mounting a danced version of The Ramayana in March 2004; this course serves as a complement to that effort. No prerequisites.

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RCHUMS 344. Tradition and Invention: Aspects of the Arts in 18th-Century Europe.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 — Neoclassicism and Romanticism in 18th-Century Literature and Art.

Instructor(s): Claudia Moscovici

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course looks at the end of Neoclassicism and beginning of Romanticism in European (and especially French) art and literature during the eighteenth-century. Neoclassicism viewed art as an imitation of aspects of the universe. The key vehicle for this kind of imitation was visual: a picture was viewed as best approximating the thing it was imitating. Poetry and literature were supposed to imitate painting, to focus upon visual imagery that produced a mental picture of the object it represented in the mind of the reader. Of course, it became obvious that no matter how much they tried and how skillful the artists were, neither pictorial nor written art could perfectly reproduce their object. In fact, all that could be claimed was that the artistic representation was like its object; that it was an analogue for its object. The representation, however, was not inferior to the object it is supposed to depict, but on the contrary, better (hence the French phrase, la belle nature or beautiful nature). Towards the end of the century, this model of art as an improvement of nature changed gradually into the Romantic understanding of art as the expression of inner self. We will see how philosophy, literature and art mark this transition from Neoclassicism to Romanticism by reading works by Diderot, Abbé de Prevost, Kant, Chordelos de Laclos, Johann Wolfgand Von Goethe, and Benjamin Constant in conjunction with looking at paintings by Watteau, Boucher, La Tour, Greuze, Fragonard and David.

Required Reading:

  • Diderot, Denis. Diderot on Art (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1995). ISBN 0300062524
  • Diderot, Denis. The Nun (New York: Viking Press, 1977). ISBN 0140443002
  • Goethe, Johann Wolfgand Von. The Sorrows of Young Werther (New York: Vintage Books, 1990). ISBN0679729518 Kant, Immanuel. The Critique of Judgment (New York: Prometheus Books, 2000). ISBN1573928372
  • Laclos, Chordelos. Dangerous Liaisons (New York: Viking Press, 1961). ISBN014044166
  • Prévost, Abbé de, Manon Lescaut (New York: Viking Press, 1992) ISBN0140445595

Evaluation: 3 short essays (75%), one oral presentation and class attendance and participation (25%).

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RCHUMS 348(452) / RUSSIAN 348. Survey of Russian Literature.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 — Russian Fiction of the Late Nineteenth Century. Taught in English.

Instructor(s): Olga E Maiorova

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. Taught in English. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RUSSIAN 348.001.

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RCHUMS 350. Creative Musicianship.

Music

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark Steven Kirschenmann (sonikman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This music theory-composition course is designed to give students the skills necessary to understand and to create music as a form of personal expression. Nothing is assumed in the way of musical background, and those who are apprehensive about composition will be welcomed and guided through a process that enables them to create music of their own. Many students in the course will have had instrumental or vocal performance experience; others may have taken music theory or history classes; and some will already be composers. All are welcome. Twenty students will be accepted. Each student works at his/her own level on the musical element under consideration (rhythm, melody, harmony). The course meets for four class hours, and students should plan to spend a minimum of 10-12 hours per week preparing materials for the RC Humanities 350 class. There will be a programmed theory text required, to be selected according to your own level of experience. The accompanying lab (RC Humanities 351) is required unless excused by the instructor.

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RCHUMS 351. Creative Musicianship Lab.

Music

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark Steven Kirschenmann (sonikman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: RCHUMS 350. (1-2). (CE). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a required lab course to be taken with RCHUMS 350; however, it can be taken by itself. It will deal with the three basic elements of music (rhythm, melody, harmony) through music reading, notation, sight-singing, and computer lab programs. The course will be divided into three or four sections according to ability and experience levels. Each section meets together as a group, and students will also work individually and with a lab partner. It may be elected for either one or two credits, depending on the amount of work one chooses to do. Attendance at both Monday and Wednesday class sessions is necessary whether you are taking the lab for one or two credits. Advanced students may be exempted from taking this lab by permission of the instructor.

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RCHUMS 357. What Television Means: Research, Analysis, and Interpretation.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbra Smith Morris (barbra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Social critic Raymond Williams reminds us that public forms of discourse/communication have evolved through a series of forms: repertory companies, commercial theatres, motion pictures, and television, for example. In each of these cases, he observes: "There has been a new sharing and integration of languages, at least of gesture and systems of signs. Moreover, these fresh inter-relationships are not merely available; in the course of their use and development, they are themselves transformative, and means of communication are transformed as they are employed." How does television shape our thinking? In this course, we will be researching and critiquing various genres of television discourse to apply relevant analytic tools to the content and to examine our own responses to the content in light of the cultural climate we inhabit. Much of what is said about television is inaccurate and superficial; we will examine what is on the screen and what experience, background, and point-of-view we bring to the text. Four papers on differing genres of text are required, as well as presentations to the class on individuals' research findings. Class discussion and screenings are regular required parts of the course each week. A long final paper is written on a topic agreed upon in individual conferences.

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RCHUMS 372. The Subject in the Aftermath of Revolution.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cynthia A Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Many people are accustomed to thinking about their identities in terms of individual selfhood, a category assumed to be natural, interior and realized in authenticity. Recent critical theory employs instead the term "subject," a term that questions notions of authentic selfhood. This course will outline the shift from "selfhood" to "subject," situating the change in the context of revolutions and their aftermath, when accepted conceptions of identity are severely disrupted. The problem will be approached through sets or groupings in literature and the visual arts, each set accompanied by a reading in theory or philosophy.

We will begin from a position at once topical and drastic, the notion of the radically constructed subject of 20th century revolutionary utopia — the subject conceived as a work of art. This subject is situated in a history believed to be inevitable, oriented towards an attainable future of social justice, requiring only the overcoming of reactionary obstacles to be realized. The "new man or woman" of this project operates both as the engine and the index of historical fulfillment. The course will then backtrack to trace the paradoxical genealogies of the revolutionary subject through the stages of essentialist romanticism; the willed, but "natural" self of 18th and 19th century progressive/enlightenment models; the ethical self of free choice; the arbitrary or semiotic subject of post-structuralism; and finally a return to the ethical subject, face to face with the Other that has emerged with special power at the end of this history of restless revision and reconstruction.

  1. The Sleep of Reason

    • Johann Wolfgang von Goethe The Sorrows of Young Werther
    • Caspar David Friedrich paintings
    • Mary Shelley Frankenstein

  2. Exhilaration of Revolution

    • Georg Buchner Danton's Death
    • Jacques Louis David paintings
    • Theodore Gericault paintings
    • G.W.F. Hegel Phenomenology of Spirit (selections)

  3. The Subject of History

    • Joseph Conrad The Secret Agent

  4. The Second Time as Farce

    • Peter Weiss The Persecution and Assassination of Jean-Paul Marat as Performed by the Inmates of the Asylum of Charenton Under the Direction of the Marquis de Sade
  5. Memory and Melancholy

    • Milan Kundera The Book of Laughter and Forgetting
    • Gerhard Richter paintings
    • Volker Schloendorff The Legend of Rita
    • Magdalena Abakanowicz sculpture

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 375(475) / ASIAN 360 / PHIL 360 / HISTART 387. The Arts and Letters of China.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-Fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2004/winter/asian/360/001.nsf

See ASIAN 360.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCHUMS 385. The Theatre of Bertolt Brecht.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin W Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu), Katherine Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The aim of this course is to arrive at an informed understanding of the generally used term "Brechtian." The course will feature an in-depth study of significant works from Brecht's long career as playwright, beginning with the Lehrstuck (Teaching Piece), Exception and the Rule and proceeding to Threepenny Opera andMother Courage and Her Children. Primary focus of the course will be upon The Caucasian Chalk Circle which will be prepared for a full production at the end of the term, after experimental stagings of the early Brecht short story "The Augsburg Chalk Circle" and the medieval Chinese play on which it is based. Substantial portions of Brecht's dramatic theory (from Brecht on Theatre ) and interaction with the Performance Network's Threepenny Opera production will also be included.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 410. Upperclass Literature Seminar.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 — Psychoanalysis and the Modern Novel.

Instructor(s): Frederick G Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

First, this course will offer a basic introduction to the Freudian and Jungian theory of human psychology and psychopathology; the nature of the personal and collective unconscious; theories of the instincts and their transformation; the development and function of the ego; the mechanisms of defense and repair, and theories and methods for the interpretation of dreams and works of art. Second, this course will conclude with two studies in applied psychoanalysis. (1) Kafka and Freud: Kafka's childhood and his relationship to his father will be examined in light of the trauma of the bourgeois nuclear family as described by Freud. Also, the Freudian theory of dream interpretation will be applied as a technique for the analysis of Kafka's literary fantasies of guilt, punishment and suicide. Texts: Freud's The Interpretation of Dreams; Kafka's short stories and The Trial. (2) Hesse and Jung: "the search for identity" of Hesse's protagonists will be examined in the perspective of Jung's individuation process, the persona, the shadow, archetypes of the Collective Unconscious, and man's quest for mystical illumination. Texts: selections from The Portable Jung; Hesse's Siddhartha and Steppenwolf. Kafka's and Hesse's lives will also be analyzed from the perspective of theories of neurosis and artistic creativity. Mid-term and final exams, and term paper required.

Books:

  • Introductory Lectures to Psychoanalysis, Freud, (Liverwright)
  • The Future of An Illusion, Freud, (Norton)
  • The Portable Jung, Jung (Viking)
  • Death in Venice, Mann (Vintage)
  • Siddartha, Hesse (Penguin)
  • Steppenwolf, Hesse (Henry Holt)
  • Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Stevenson (Boston)
  • The Basic Kafka, Kafka (Schocken)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001 — Open only to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RCHUMS 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002 — Open only to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RCHUMS 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003 — Open only to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

Instructor(s): Laura Kasischke

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RCHUMS 325.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004 — Open only to RC Creative Writing concentrators.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RCHUMS 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren J Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RCHUMS 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Kenneth R Mikolowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RCHUMS 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Laura Kasischke

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RCHUMS 325.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Laura Kathleen Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 16 credits.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See RCHUMS 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

RCHUMS 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001 — Medieval Comedy Workshop. [2 credits].

Instructor(s): Martin W Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-2). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 4 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

A practical workshop in late medieval farces, French and German (in translation) for the third annual "Carnival-in-Lent Show" in early March. Students of German can work on Fastnachtspeile in the original language through GERMAN 311.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor

RCHUMS 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 002 — The Playwrights/Directors/Actors Workshop. [2 credits].

Instructor(s): Katherine Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. Permission of instructor required. (1-2). (Excl). May be elected for a maximum of 4 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is a hands-on workshop in new play development involving the collaborative process of rehearsal and workshop production. Admission is by permission of the instructor only.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, 5, Permission of instructor


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