Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in Afroamerican and African Studies (Division 311)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for Afroamerican and African Studies.


CAAS 105. Introduction to African Studies.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yaw Twumasi (yawt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Contemporary Africa has certain striking cultural, social, political, and economic characteristics. These characteristics range from cultural diversity and creativity, colonially-created national boundaries, high rates of population growth, and economic underdevelopment to passion for development and political stability. This course is designed to address the basic question: Why and how did African countries acquire these characteristics? We will seek to provide, in a broad and wide-ranging survey, a coherent explanation for the transformation of African cultures, societies, politics, and economies, in relation to internal developments and to the effects of external forces. Special emphasis will be placed on major historical and social processes and their relation with one another. The historical evolution of Africa will be traced, but this will be done as a means of shedding light on the conditions and circumstances of contemporary Africa. The underlying approach is to seek to integrate whatever is known of the pre-colonial and colonial past (as revealed by archaeology, anthropology, history, etc.) with an understanding of post-colonial societies and politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 274/Engl. 274. Introduction to Afro-American Literature.

Literature and the Arts

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 274.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 327/Psych. 315. Psychological Aspects of the Black Experience.

Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

Section 001 Social Psychology of the African Family

Instructor(s): Denis Ugwuegbu (dcugwueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in psychology or Afroamerican and African Studies. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Social Psychology of the African family is a course aimed at 300-level students in Psychology, the Center for Afro-American and African Studies, and other related social science disciplines. The principle objective of the course is to lead the students through lectures, group discussions, individual and group presentations to help students explore the traditional and contemporary psycho-dynamics of the African family. The family is a flexible unit that adapts deliberately to influences acting upon it both from within and without. In its interaction with these forces it must adapt to prevalent customs and mores. Internally, the family also must come to terms with the basic biological bonds of man and woman, and of mother and child. The second objective of the course is to assess how the African family is meeting these needs and expectations.

The course begins with the examination of psychology and the study of the family. This will be followed by in-depth and detailed analysis of types of traditional African family, the psychology of the African marriage systems, the centrality of children in African family and culture, and family roles. Special emphasis will be given to the analysis of the European intrusion into the African family life such as the slave trade, colonialism, and industrial labor. Finally, the course will consider the new threats to the survival of the African family system, such as wars, hunger and diseases, and assess the coping strategies by which the African family is surviving the stresses of social change and the demand for change.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 335/Rel. 310. Religion in the Afro-American Experience.

Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Norman Miles

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Religion 310.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 336/Hist. 336/WS 336. Black Women in America.

Historical Perspectives

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michele Mitchell (mmitch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As an exploration of African-American women in the twentieth century, this course seeks to consider varieties of experience including class, sexuality, and region as it provides an historical framework for analyzing overarching issues facing contemporary Black women in the United States. We will also discuss Black women's relationships to both interracial and broader communities. In particular, we will assess how the nexus of race, gender, and class have influenced Black women's work, activism, political involvement, and creative output. Whereas this course is structured as a history course, it takes an interdisciplinary approach to Black women's lives: readings will draw from literature, sociology, women's studies, psychology, film studies, and legal theory. The method of instruction combines lecture and discussion. Successful completion of this course is contingent upon regular attendance, active participation, and appropriate preparation for each class meeting. Additional requirements included completion of short written assignments and a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 342/Theatre 233. Acting and the Black Experience.

Literature and the Arts

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Glenda Dickerson (glendad@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor (brief interview). (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 233.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 2, 4

CAAS 348/Dance 358 (Music). Dance in Culture: Origins of Jazz Dance.

Literature and the Arts

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robin Wilson (robinwil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an exploration of the origins of Jazz Dance through movement, as it relates to African-American vernacular dance, the African Diaspora, and American culture as a whole, placing African-American vernacular dance right at its center and providing a broader understanding of the influence of African-American dance and its legacy within 20th-century concert dance. Starting from the early dances of enslaved Africans in the Americas to the present, this course investigates the relationship of African-American vernacular dance to jazz dance forms. Its focus in this context is the influence of African-American vernacular dance and the identification of specific movement motifs and concepts, such as rhythm, improvisation, theme, syncopation, balanced asymmetry, and body carriage, as a clear retention of African culture and rooted deeply in the African aesthetic, as evidenced in the work of George Balanchine, Martha Graham, Jerome Robbins, and Jack Cole. It will identify the commonalities of movement and aesthetics of both, as well as the sociocultural conditions that contributed to their creation and influence in American dance and culture. The course utilizes movement sequences, as well as lecture, group discussion, supplemental readings, film, and video components, to provide both an experiential and theoretical understanding of these concepts. Class will also incorporate improvisation as an essential element through the class, as a basic concept in all African Diasporic forms. Course requirements: Studio participation and regular attendance at all lectures; reading assignments; take-home midterm; midterm choreographic phrase; final research project, and final choreographic phrase. This course is intended for Dance majors, CAAS students, and the wider university community. Two meetings a week, 1.5 hours per session, in a format mixing lab with lecture and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 361. Comparative Black Art.

Literature and the Arts

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jon Onye Lockard (jmlockaz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 360. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a continuation of AAS 360, an accelerated course which provides an interdisciplinary overview of Afro-American culture and art. AAS 361 develops further information and dialogue for a closer examination of the interrelationship of the arts, and of how they influence and are influenced by society. The approach continues to be interdisciplinary, and Afrocentric. The Afro-American cultural experience and its various forms of existence and encounters are brought under close scrutiny in a variety of contexts: these will range from the historical and political to the philosophical, the religious, and the aesthetic. In the process, this course also examines the relationship of West African cultures to both South and North American insistencies. The course also recognizes and will examine the controversies surrounding the impact of the Afrocentric aesthetic on Western culture and lifestyles. Slides, films, and guest appearances will supplement lectures. But this course is also designed to be interactive and communal and to create opportunities for students to strengthen their skills and establish a clearer, more substantial concept of identity, focus, and direction.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

CAAS 380/Hist. of Art 360. Special Topics in African Art.

Literature and the Arts

Section 001 African Diaspora Arts.

Instructor(s): Dana Rush (danarush@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 108 or 214. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History of Art 360.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 384/Engl. 384/Amer. Cult. 406. Topics in Caribbean Literature.

Literature and the Arts

Section 001 Contemporary Caribbean Diasporian Literature

Instructor(s): Ifeoma Nwankwo (icn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/winter/lsa/enll/384/001.nsf

See English 384.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 410. Supervised Reading and Research.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For students who can show appropriate preparation in courses previously taken, the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies offers course credit for independent study. A full-time faculty member must agree to supervise the undertaking and to meet with the student during the term. The proposed course of study may not duplicate the material of any course regularly offered by the Center. The reading and writing requirement should be comparable to that required in a regular course for the same number of credits; and all the work must be completed by the final day of class in the term. After consultation with and approval from a CAAS faculty member, applications for independent study along with statements describing the schedule of readings and of writing assignments must be filled out. Such applications must be signed by the faculty member involved and turned in before the end of the second week of the term. It is therefore advisable to submit applications (available in 200 West Hall) in advance of the beginning of the independent study term and, upon approval, an electronic override will be issued.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 418/Poli. Sci. 419. Black Americans and the Political System.

Politics, Economics, and Development

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vincent Hutchings (vicenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Political Science 419.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 422/Anthro. 411. African Culture.

Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell Owusu (omk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 411.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

CAAS 427/Anthro. 427/WS 427. African Women.

Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elisha Renne (erenne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in African Studies, anthropology, or women's studies. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course considers differences in African women's experiences (raising the question of whether the term African women is a meaningful category) as well as the experiences that women living in the various sub-Saharan African countries share. We will begin with the theoretical question of African women's power and their role in the domestic sphere, focussing on marriage (as institution, as ritual, as strategy, as site of reproduction) for women in Kenya, Liberia, Niger, and Nigeria. Since marriage was affected by colonial policies, changes in marriage practices as well as other aspects of women's lives will be discussed. Some of these changes provided opportunities while others restricted women's options. Cote d'Ivoire, Nigeria, and South Africa, Zaire, and Zimbabwe responded to these new situations in various ways. Specific African women's interpretations of these present-day events will be examined through readings of selected autobiographies and novels. The course based on readings from books, journals, newspapers, and African films will be evaluated through one short paper, class participation, and midterm and final exams (with the option of a research paper).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 448/Hist. 448. Africa Since 1850.

Historical Perspectives

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mamadou Diouf (mdiouf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 448.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 451. Law, Race, and the Historical Process, II.

Politics, Economics, and Development

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald Woods (rcwoods@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 450 recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is the second half of a two-course sequence on the constitutional and legal history of African Americans. It covers the phase of this history beginning with the advent of the Modern Civil Rights Movement and extending to the present. In this course, we will approach law as an institution which is constantly shaping and being shaped by the cultural, economic, political, and social environments around it. In looking at the interaction between law, race, and historical process in the latter half of the twentieth century, the course will explore the reciprocal relationship between law and the societal order, the role of law in the philosophical and social discourse of African Americans, and the function of law in the developmental strategies adopted by them. This course will routinely examine the constitutional and legal experience of African Americans as a case study in how ideas are transformed by historical forces in malleable principles of law.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 452. Education of the Black Child.

Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Teshome Wagaw (twagaw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course deals with overlooked but crucial questions related to the education of Black children in the United States. The area of primary concern will be public schooling, and the emphasis will be laid on analyzing the social, cultural, political, and economic forces which act to influence the learning experiences of Black children. This course will thus consider, on the one hand, the theoretical framing of ideas about the growth, development, and learning of children in different life settings and styles, and, on the other, the existing structural, sociopolitical attempts to find ways and means of relating the philosophy and objectives of public education to the needs of Black children. In the process, this course examines the defects of present-day educational theories which are based on empirical data drawn from studies of less than 1% of the population. The course will test for the applicability and generalizability of such data to other population groups, examine their implications for different cultural systems, and assess what is thus contributed to cognitive variation and performance and competence in the learning process.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 453. Culture, Class, and Conflict in Southern Africa.

Politics, Economics, and Development

Section 001 Contemporary Issues and Continuing Debates in Southern Africa

Instructor(s): Sinfree Makoni (smakoni@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course is an overview of key issues in the politics, education, health, and language dispensations of contemporary South Africa including a close analysis of two of the most important events in South Africa's recent history the drafting of the final constitution and the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.

South African societies are in a state of flux as they attempt to address the inequities which are part of the legacy of apartheid. The objectives of the course will be to explore the various ways in which different sectors of South African life such as health, education, political institutions are responding to pressures for change, through a study of the work by key South African personalities and academics from different disciplines. The course will be structured around a series of lectures, 'talks' by invited guests researching different areas in South Africa, complemented by a series of films on South Africa.

The following are the basic texts for the course:

  1. Mandela, Nelson, Long Walk to Freedom. Little Brown and Company 1994
  2. Marks, Shula, The Ambiguities of Dependence. Edward Arnold. London 1996
  3. Nuttall, Sarah and Cotzee, Carli. Negotiating the Past. The Making of Memory in South Africa. Oxford University Press. Cape Town 1998.
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 454/Anthro. 453. African-American Culture.

Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in the social sciences. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 453.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

CAAS 457/Econ. 476. Political Economy of Black America.

Politics, Economics, and Development

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101. (3). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/winter/lsa/afam/457/001.nsf

This course will cover the economic history of Africans in America from the 15th century to the present, with emphasis placed on the historical roots of contemporary African-American life. Students will leave the class with well-informed opinions on the following topics: the contributions of African Americans to American economic development; the economic foundations and legacies of racial slavery in the United States; the economic significance and meaning of freedom and citizenship; the economic thought of African Americans; the economic structure of Jim Crow and the responses of African Americans to it; the economic causes and consequences of the Black migration to the north; the economics of the Civil Rights Movement; the changing class structure of the Black community; the economics of Black family structure; markets vs. the state in Black economic development; an accounting of contemporary Black economic resources; African Americans in the global economy; and economic strategies for the future.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 4

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 001 Contemporary State Relations in Africa.

Instructor(s): Yaw Twumasi (yawt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Over the last decade and a half, the ways in which scholars think about Africa's political problems have changed and have come to be profoundly influenced by the theoretical debates concerning weak and strong states in the international community. This is a course in comparative politics designed to explore two closely related dimensions of contemporary state relations in Africa. First, we will explore the strengths and weaknesses of the diverse interpretations of "stateness" in the context of how African states establish effective governments and manage to exercise control over the permanent populations under their jurisdictions. We will note any tensions between the theoretical concerns of the analysts and the political realities of Africa. Second, we will examine relations among African states, paying particular attention to Africa's catalog of contemporary conflicts: boundary disputes; conflict resolution successes and failures; refugees; wars and the prospects for peace on the continent.

The course is recommended for juniors and seniors. A previous background in African studies is not a prerequisite. It will be taught as a seminar, but the instructor will give a few lectures, interspersed with a lot of class discussions and student presentations. Students will be required to give class presentations on topics to be defined in close cooperation with the instructor. Students will also be expected to build on their presentations and develop them into substantial research papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 002 Black Expatriate Writing

Instructor(s): Kevin Gaines (gainesk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will explore writings by several Black diaspora intellectuals who either elected to become expatriates or were political exiles during the Cold War, the African American freedom movement, and movements for African liberation from colonialism. We will examine the precedents for Black international intellectual communities in Harlem, Washington D.C., London and Paris, setting a context for our close textual readings of this body of political writing. Authors include Richard Wright, James Baldwin, William Gardner Smith, Maya Angelou, Frantz Fanon, Maryse Conde, Kamau Brathwaite, Jan Carew, Florence Ladd, John A. Williams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 003 Interculturalism and the Representation of Memory in African Arts

Instructor(s): Dieudonné-Christophe Mbala Nkanga (mbalank@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Through selected readings and visuals, this course will look at the politics of arts and performance in representing the past and the experience of encountering the other, the European and the Asiatic.

The class will look at social constructions of memory in masquerades, masks, paintings, memorials and commemorations, festivals, museum installations, autobiography and fiction, theatre, and many other activities dealing with representing the human experience. Key concepts such as: shared memory context and contextualization interpretation adaptation inception reproduction inscription of meanings will be discussed. The students will take turn in interrogating and critiquing the reading and visual materials. A final original research paper dealing with issues and debates raised in class is required for the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 004 African American Religion Between Christianity and Islam. Meets with AAPTIS 491.002 and Religion 402.001

Instructor(s): Sherman Jackson (sajackso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 491.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 005 Seminar in Psychology of Underdevelopment in Africa. Meets with Psychology 401.003

Instructor(s): Denis Ugwuegbu (dcugwueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

When economists discuss the development of Africa, they often forget the psychological component of social and economic development. "The Psychology of Underdevelopment in Africa" is a seminar course that is designed to lead students through lectures, discussions, and demonstrations to explore the psychological causes of the contemporary underdevelopment of the nations of Africa. Emphasis will be placed on the behavioral aspect of development, and will cover topics such as colonial underdevelopment policies in Africa, neo-colonial theories of development, the new nations of Africa and their alternative plan for development, and psychological principles of development.

Special considerations will be given to topics such as attitudes, motivation, and trust and development. Finally, the place of education and human resources planning as important aspects of development efforts will be examined.

Since this course will attract students with various educational backgrounds, students who are ready to make insightful and innovative contributions to the understanding of the causes and possible eradication of development problems of Africa are encouraged to register for it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 458. Issues in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 006 Conflicts in Black Nationalism and Pan-Africanism. Meets with English 417.009.

Instructor(s): Ifeoma Nwankwo (icn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Over the course of the academic term, we will investigate one of the major ongoing conflicts in among Black political leaders the battle over the relevance of the Caribbean and Africa to U.S. Black Nationalism. We will consider key African-American and Caribbean figures' answers to such questions as: should African-Americans just focus on struggles here or should they view their struggles here as part of an international Black struggle? What should African American's connection with Caribbean and African Blacks be? Is racial identity more important than national affinity?

To help us in our investigation, we will explore the writings and speeches of four fathers of Black Nationalism
Marcus Garvey (Jamaican born Back-to-Africa movement leader);
W.E.B. DuBois (The Souls of Black Folk);
Frederick Douglass (slave narrator and consul to Haiti); and
Martin Delany, (author of "the first pan-African novel").

Students will also learn or hone archival research skills by analyzing historical documents, contemporaneous newspaper articles, personal and official correspondence, and diaries. Course requirements: short essay, research project (on any aspect of the topic using literature, music, and/or film), and a presentation (sharing your research with the class).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 489/Engl. 479. Topics in Afro-American Literature.

Literature and the Arts

Section 001 The Slave Narrative

Instructor(s): Xiomara Santamarina (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 274 and/or 338 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 479.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 001 Memory and the Other in Popular African Arts. (1 credit). Meets March 7-April 6. (Drop/Add deadline=March 10).

Instructor(s): Mbala Nkanga (mbalank@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (1-2). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Through selected readings and visuals, this course will look at the politics of arts and performance in representing the past and the experience of encountering the other, the European and the Asiatic. What is the relationship between memory and African arts and performance. What is the relationship between performance (and writings) of historical events and the historical records? How do Africans and African-Americans remember? What is at stake in remembering and forgetting the past? Who has the right to formulate what counts as group memory? To what extent are memories embodied or recalled? The class will look at social constructions of memory in masquerades, masks, paintings, memorials and commemorations, festivals, museum installations, autobiography and fiction, theatre, and many other activities dealing with representing the human experience. Key concepts such as: shared memory context and contextualization interpretation adaptation inception reproduction inscription of meanings will be discussed. The students will take turn in interrogating and critiquing the reading and visual materials. A final original research paper dealing with issues and debates raised in class is required for the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 510. Supervised Research.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual study under the direction of a departmental staff member. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 521/Soc. 521. African American Intellectual Thought.

Individual Behavior, Cultural Systems, and Social Organization

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alford Young, Jr. (ayoun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to explore some debates and arguments constructed by African American scholars on the "Negro Problem." The objective will be to ascertain how African American scholarly debate and commentary has framed definitions of, and has posed solutions for, the social condition of the African American community throughout the twentieth century. More specifically, we will consider how these scholars framed their arguments within larger intellectual and disciplinary frameworks. In doing so, we will attend to the historical contexts that circumscribe these arguments. This course will involve seminar-style discussion. Students will be evaluated on a research paper that explores some dimension of African American scholarly inquiry on a social issue of pertinence to Black Americans. There also will be brief written assignments that will facilitate the development of the term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 001 African Soundscapes. Meets with Anthropology 558.002. Permission of Instructor.

Instructor(s): Kelly Askew (kaskew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

If there is one concept inextricably linked in popular imagination to the continent of Africa it is drumming. Yet African soundscapes are home to a variety of instrumental traditions (kora, 'ud, mbira, and marimba, to mention but a few) and vocal traditions each of which is embedded in its own sociocultural, geographical, and historical milieu. How a single facet of African music came to be synonymous with the vast array of cultures that live within this enormously diverse region is quite perplexing, but will nonetheless constitute the departure point for our discussion. We will review the background literature on African music and read recent analyses that relate music to the aesthetics, politics, social relations, and economics of its production and reproduction.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 002 African Textiles History and Social Life.

Instructor(s): Elisha Renne (erenne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the ways in which African textiles, their styles, and associated production techniques relate to particular social, religious, political, and economic contexts. In the first part of the course, distinctive textile technologies, relations of production, and the economics of consumption found in several West and Central African societies are considered. These distinctive production technologies are reflected in contemporary textile aesthetics, as exemplified by strip-woven textiles. The second section focuses on the symbolic, social, and political aspects of African textiles, based on their use in funeral, kingship, and marriage ritual and in masquerade performances among people in Zaire, Madagascar, Nigeria, Ghana, and Mali. In the final section of the course, the history of the intersection of African and European textile traditions is discussed, with an examination of "traditional" African textiles made by European textile firms or manufacturing techniques, contemporary African-style dress fashions, and textiles produced for the tourist trade. The course evaluation will be based on two short essays (40% of grade), a research paper (40% of grade), and class participation (20%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 003 Memory, History, and Subjectivity in Contemporary African American and Caribbean Literature. Meets with English 653.002

Instructor(s): Arlene Keizer (arkeizer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As the sociologist Orlando Patterson has noted, we should not be surprised that the Enlightenment could accommodate slavery; we should be surprised if it had not. The concept of freedom did not emerge in a vacuum. Nothing highlighted freedom if it did not in fact create it like slavery.

Toni Morrison, Playing in the Dark

History, especially the history of slavery, haunts contemporary African-American and Caribbean literature. As we move into the new millennium, as the history of slavery recedes even further into the past, it seems to loom larger in the Black literary imagination. This course will examine novels and plays published from the 1960s through the 1990s and the ways in which they address memory (especially the memory of trauma), oral and written history, and the formation of Black subjectivity. If, as novelist Charles Johnson argues "each plot. . . is also an argument," then a major function of this course is to analyze the arguments about memory, history, and identity embedded in contemporary fiction and drama from the African diaspora, as well as the idea of literature as a form of theory.

Literary texts include

We will also read a range of theoretical and critical texts addressing the course themes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 558. Seminar in Black World Studies.

Independent Study and Special Topics

Section 004 The Harlem Renaissance and Modernity. Meets with English 648.001

Instructor(s): Marlon Ross (mbross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What role does race play in claims to and contests over the meaning of modernity? How have literary, historical, anthropological, sociological, and cultural notions of the modern helped to shape constructions of race and racial identity? This course explores these questions by focusing on the literatures, histories, and theories emerging out of notions of the "New Negro" and the "Harlem Renaissance." It examines the ideologies of modernity shaping and shaped by representations and practices of literary modernism, uplift philanthropy and social work, progressive reform, migration, urbanization, technical inventiveness, innovations in social scientific method, unconventional sexuality, and media marketing of the "Negro Problem." We'll study various kinds of textual, musical, artistic, and filmic materials by the New Negroes themselves, including work by Alain Locke, Wallace Thurman, Nella Larsen, W.E.B. DuBois, Aaron Douglas, Billie Holiday, and Oscar Micheaux. We'll study a variety of materials composed by white writers interested in the Negro Problem as a metaphor for modernity, including Carl Van Vechten's writing and photographs, Robert E. Park's sociological theory, Franz Boas' anthropological theory, Gertrude Stein's and Blair Niles' fiction, Eugene O'Neill's drama, Winold Reiss' art, and Mary White Ovington's memoirs and social work practices. Considering the ongoing debate concerning the Renaissance movement and modernism, we'll take a look at some of the recent theoretical and critical work on race and modernity, including excerpts from Houston A. Baker, Jr., Farah Griffin, Hazel Carby, Paul Gilroy, James de Jongh, Ann Douglas, George Hutchinson, and Susan Gubar. Requirements include one prospectus, one short (5-page) essay, and one article-like paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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