Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies (Division 314)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies.


ACABS 102. Elementary Biblical Hebrew II.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Brian Schmidt (bschmidt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 101. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A continuation of ACABS 101 with increased emphasis on the Biblical Hebrew verbal system and syntax as presented in Seow's A Grammar for Biblical Hebrew (revised). Additionally, students will be introduced to select readings from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament. Final grades will be based upon daily class performance and homework assignments, quizzes, and two exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

ACABS 202. Intermediate Biblical Hebrew, II.

Language Courses

Section Meets with ACABS 602.

Instructor(s): Charles Krahmalkov (crkrah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 201. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As a continuation of ACABS 201, the students will be introduced to additional elements of Biblical Hebrew syntax and other aspects of advanced grammar. Further selected Biblical texts will be read, and their historical and literary backgrounds analyzed and discussed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

ACABS 321/Hist. 306/Rel. 358. Israel Before the Exile (587 BCE): Its History & Religion.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brian Schmidt (bschmidt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course encompasses a series of studies in the cultural and political histories of ancient Israel. Early Israelite history and religion from their beginnings to the aftermath of the 6th century CE Babylonian exile will be examined within their respective biblical and ancient Near Eastern contexts (i.e., Palestine-Israel, Mesopotamia, Egypt, Syria, Persia, and Anatolia). Some selected topics for historical inquiry include Israel's origins, its pre-state civilization, the rise of the nation-state, and the post-monarchial and exilic communities. Central religious institutions, beliefs, and practices to be investigated include the palace, the temple, the rise of monotheism, prophecy, royal ideology, the priesthood, wisdom, magic, and the concepts of death and afterlife. No prerequisites. Critical reading and writing skills are cultivated and measured in a midterm exam requiring an analytical essay in addition to the student's response to various objective-style questions (30%) and in an end-of-the-term 15-page research paper (40%) submitted in two drafts, a preliminary and a final. Regular attendance (10%) and daily reading and written assignments (20%) are also essential components of the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ACABS 322/Hist. 307/Rel. 359. History and Religion of Ancient Judaism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gabrielle Boccaccini (gbocca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: May be elected independently of ACABS 321. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course covers the history and religion of ancient Judaism from the Babylonian exile (6th century BCE) to the emergence of Rabbinic Judaism (3rd century CE). The liveliness of the period is testified by its many names. For the Jew, it is the "Second Temple Period" the cradle of Jewish civilization. For the Christian, it is the "intertestamental period" between the Old and the New Testament the age in which Jesus was born and the Church arose. For the historian, it is all that and much more. It was an age of great conflicts, in which the Jewish people had to face powerful neighbors and rulers: the Egyptians and the Babylonians, the Persians, the Greeks, and the Romans. But it was also an age of great creativeness, in which different varieties of Judaism (including the early Christian movement) developed sophisticated and lasting theologies and restlessly struggled for supremacy or simply survival. No prerequisites. Course grade is based on attendance and daily readings of primary sources, midterm, final and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

ACABS 382/Hist. of Art 382/Cult. Anthro 381. Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology.

Section 001 Meets with ACABS 686.

Instructor(s): Janet Richards (jerichar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses specifically on the material culture and disposition of archaeological sites in ancient Egypt and Nubia from ca. 3200 bc. 285 ac. The logic and nature of both sacred and secular landscapes will be explored, and specific sites, some well-known (such as the extensive temple precinct at Karnak and the Meroitic pyramids), some less well-known (such as the town of Karanis and the city of Kerma), will be investigated as examples of different kinds of interpretive problems in archaeology. The course will also introduce a consideration of theoretical approaches to Nile Valley archaeological data and the ways in which they articulate with other sources of information. While it is complementary in subject matter to ACABS 281, which concentrates on the history of ancient Egypt of the Dynastic period through texts, this course is designed to stand alone. Course grade is based on midterm, final, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 393/AAPTIS 393/Rel. 393. The Religion of Zoroaster.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gernot Windfuhr (windfuhr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the emergence and development of Zoroastrianism, from its beginnings in central Asia to its rise as the religion of the pre-Islamic empires of Persian Achaemenids, the Parthians, and Sasanians, and its survival to the present day. Zoroastrianism is mostly recognized as the religion of the Magi. This course will offer students the opportunity to examine the authentic sources of this dualistic religion, in particular the prophetic-apocalyptic hymns of Zoroaster (ca. 1000 BC) and the Zoroastrian views on the world as the battlefield of the forces of Good and Evil, and the fundamental role of mankind in the fight against Evil, toward universal Salvation. In the latter part of the course, discussion will be on possible influence on Judaism, Christianity, and Classical and Modern Western Thought.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 395. Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies: Directed Readings.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ACABS 412. Akkadian Texts.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Norman Yoffee (nyoffee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 411. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Introduction to the Semitic language of ancient Babylonia and to the cuneiform writing system. The first term (411) concentrates on a presentation of basic grammar, and the second term (412) on the reading of several ancient texts in cuneiform. Grammatical lectures, student recitation, homework assignments. Weekly quizzes, midterm, and final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

ACABS 415. Elementary Hittite.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gary Beckman (sidd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will present the basics of Hittite grammar through lectures, student recitation, and reading exercises in transliteration. We will acquaint ourselves with the cuneiform writing system and consider the ramifications of the adoption of this script by the Hittites for the recovery of the linguistic realities of ancient Anatolia. Attention will be given to the role of Hittite within the Indo-European family of languages. Textbook: H.A. Hoffner Jr., An Introduction to the Hittite Language. Audience: Undergraduate and graduate students whose concentration is in Near Eastern Studies, Linguistics, and Classics.

Attendance at lectures and participation in classroom discussion and recitation. Quizzes, midterm and final exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

ACABS 486. Introduction to Middle Egyptian, II.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet Richards (jerichar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ACABS 485. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A basic introduction to Egyptian hieroglyphics and Middle Egyptian, the classical form of the ancient Egyptian language. We will use Alan Gardiner's Egyptian Grammar. (3rd Edition).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

ACABS 491. Topics in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies.

Section 001 The Epic of Gilgamesh

Instructor(s): Piotr Michalowski (piotrm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ACABS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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