Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in Classical Civilization (Division 344)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for Classical Civilization.


The Department of Classical Studies believes that the literature, monuments, and social institutions of the ancient world, together with the reflections of the Greek and Roman thinkers about their own cultures, are of unique value in themselves, well worth our contemplation and understanding; and that as we attempt to learn about and appreciate classical civilization, we necessarily learn as well a variety of contemporary methodologies and disciplines.

The department offers three groups of courses for distribution, those in Classical Civilization (introductory courses that require no knowledge of Greek or Latin), courses in Classical Archaeology, and upper-level language courses in Greek and Latin authors or genres. While only a few courses are repeated in yearly or biennial rotation, most courses are offered less regularly. This system guarantees that the instructor approaches the subject each time with fresh impetus. We believe in a healthy change and variation in our course offerings.

Classical Civilization offerings include the general surveys of Greek and Roman civilizations (CC 101 and 102), which provide (through readings, lectures, and discussions) a broad understanding of the literatures, thought, and social development of ancient Greece and Rome, and thus provide the student with knowledge of and appreciation for our cultural origins, as well as an acquaintance with modern methods for understanding an ancient culture. These courses are taught each year. CC 101 is offered in the Fall and CC 102 is offered in the Winter. Other courses provide understanding of particular aspects of the ancient world, approached from a variety of disciplines and studies literary, philosophical, historical, sociological, and so on. Some students (particularly those who have already developed special interests in such disciplines) may wish to explore one of these topics without having had a broader introduction.

Courses in this division do not require a knowledge of Greek or Latin. They are intended for students who wish to acquire knowledge of ancient literature, life, and thought, and of the debt modern civilization owes the Greeks and Romans.


Class. Civ. 102. Classical Civilization II: The Ancient Roman World (in English).

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Benjamin Acosta-Hughes (bacosta@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to provide a general overview of one of the great civilizations of the Ancient Mediterranean, a civilization which albeit very different in many respects from our own continues to have great influence on the societal, cultural, and educational norms of modern America. Through a select yet broad reading of the surviving literature of Ancient Rome we shall examine together the development and importance of several political and cultural institutions, e.g., the structures of Roman government, the Roman theater, Roman patronage. Throughout the course we will devote particular attention, in discussing texts from a wide and diverse period, to the Roman individual's perception of the self, of self-identity, both within his/her immediate civic and cultural surroundings and within the larger context of the Ancient Mediterranean. This course will hopefully provide the students an introduction, in addition to the exposure for its own sake, to some of the great poetry and prose writings of Ancient Rome, an appreciation of another culture with its own conventions of public and private life.

The course will principally highlight five areas: the mythohistorical foundations of Rome; the Catilinarian conspiracy and the end of the Roman republic; the Augustan "peace"; Rome of the emperor Nero; and sociocultural images of the Roman empire. We will read historians (Livy, Sallust, Tacitus), poets (Vergil, Catullus, Horace, Ovid) and other writers (Cicero, Petronius, Plutarch, Apuleius). Lectures will follow a number of selected common themes, with some presentations of special topics (slavery, gender, violence, and entertainment). Some attention will be given to daily life through slide lectures.

There will be two short papers (40% of the final grade), a midterm (15%) and a final exam (35%). 10% of the final grade will derive from the student's performance in the discussion section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 121. First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Composition).

Section 001 The Culture of Contemporary Greece: Between Antiquity and Modernity.

Instructor(s): Artemis Leontis (aleontis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (4). (Introductory Composition).

First-Year Seminar, Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/winter/lsa/classciv/121/001.nsf

Famed for its antiquity, vibrant in modernity, Greece provides countless examples of a society at work to preserve but also adapt itself to changing times. With Greece as a focal point, we will study how contemporary societies with a rich past reshape their present. Through discussion and writing, we will explore whether antiquity and modernity are poles of opposition or complementary ideas that change in relation to one another.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 454. The Roman Army.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Shean (jfshean@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Romans regarded themselves, and were regarded by their contemporaries, as a particularly warlike people, and the acquisition and maintenance of their empire by military force played a great part in determining the nature of their social and political institutions. Thus, an appreciation of the nature of the Roman army is important to any study of Roman history. This course will provide an introduction to the Roman army itself and its wars; its weapons, organization, tactics, fortifications as well as issues such as recruitment and terms of service. In addition, there will be consideration of the wider social, political, and economic significance of the army and warfare in the Roman world. Background information on Greek and Hellenistic warfare will be provided too. Forms of evidence to be examined will include primary written sources and archaeology. Assessment will be by a written assignment, a midterm, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 457/Religion 457. Witchcraft: An Introduction to the History and Literature of Witchcraft.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Derek Collins (dbcollin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This lecture and discussion course will explore witchcraft as a cultural phenomenon, and survey the theories that have been advanced to explain it. Given the enormous size of the topic, we will necessarily concentrate on selected aspects of witchcraft, especially as they form part of a larger social process. We will begin by looking at witchcraft from several cross-cultural perspectives that involve non-European traditions (sub-Saharan African traditions in particular), which emphasize the role of witchcraft accusation and resolution in the formation of community. We will then look at classical and medieval examples of witchcraft in history and literature, with emphasis on the pre-modern history of official attitudes toward witchcraft in Europe and especially the changing views of secular and religious authorities in the late medieval period. Finally, we will examine the "witch craze" of the early modern period in Europe and America and some of the possible reasons for it. This will include a close scrutiny of witchcraft cases from Scotland, Sweden, and America (Salem Village). Some attention will be paid to the changing image of the witch as portrayed in the folklore, literature, and films of Europe and America. We shall also look briefly at contemporary witchcraft viewed as a religious system. Students will be required to take one quiz, midterm and final exam, as well as completing the required reading.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 463. Greek Drama.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Scodel (rscodel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.personal.umich.edu/~rscodel/drama.html

This course will emphasize both the modern relevance of Greek drama and its original context. We will read selections from Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripedes, as well as Aristophanes and Menander. We look at the archaeological evidence for how the plays were performed in ancient times, and video recordings of modern productions and versions. There will be two short papers, one on a Greek play, one on a modern version (play, film, opera, or other) and a short creative project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 465. The Individual in Greek Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sara Forsdyke (forsdyke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine relations between the individual and his or her community in ancient Greece from approximately the eighth through fourth centuries B.C. Topics to be addressed include:

We will read excerpts from ancient authors in translation (Homer, Sophocles, Thucydides, Aristotle) as well as modern scholarship. Although some knowledge of ancient Greek civilization would be an asset, no previous knowledge is required. Students will be required to give one class presentation and write two papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Class. Civ. 472. Roman Law.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Frier (bwfrier@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Not open to first-year students. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course acquaints students with the fundamental concepts of Roman private law, with their origin in the society and government of the High Roman Empire, and with their all-important influence in the development of Western European legal theory and institutions. The course aims primarily to meet the interests of undergraduates with a bent toward law as a profession, but it is open to all students (except freshmen). We will use a direct application of the American case-law method to the teaching of Roman law. Our basic text will be a series of actual problems from the Roman jurists, which we will discuss in class; only as the occasion demands will the instructor "fill in the gaps" with short lectures on other relevant legal material. Thus, students should develop a feel for legal analysis and for the contribution made through such analysis by the Roman jurists; at the same time, students will learn Roman law in a form that will be directly relevant to future legal studies. Besides the handouts, one general introduction to Roman law (ca. 250 pages) will be required reading. There will be one hour test on material covered in class, in addition to the final examination; one paper (10 pages) will allow the student to analyze in detail a particular legal problem.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Class. Civ. 480. Studying Antiquity.

Section 001 The Nile in Myth and History

Instructor(s): Grant Parker (grparker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Class. Civ. 101 or 102, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A detailed consideration of the river Nile, from a variety of perspectives, as part of both the lived experience and the thought-world of ancient peoples. We shall examine sources (literary, documentary, visual) from Herodotus and its archaeological record. The delta, the lengthy valley, and the two basins will be considered in turn. We shall move systematically upstream, combining the approaches of ecological history and intellectual history all the way: we'll start with Alexandria, and move southward through Lower Egypt, Upper Egypt, and the Nubian/Sudanese regions; we'll end with the Ethiopian (Axumite) and equatorial African areas, less familiar to ancient Greeks and Romans but still the subject of much interest and speculation.

This course will meet as a seminar designed to bring together students with different backgrounds in the study of ancient societies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Page


LSA logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1999-2000 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.

This page was created at 5:45 PM on Thu, Jan 27, 2000.