Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in French (Division 371)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for French.


Registration and Waitlist Policies: French & Spanish Elementary Courses (101-232)

On the first day of classes, instructors will receive a class list for each section of a class showing the names of students currently registered. They will also receive a list of students registered for the waitlist for the section, if applicable.

Instructors should take attendance at the first two class meetings, using the class list, the waitlist, and writing down the names and Social Security Numbers of any students attending class whose names are not on either list. Instructors should ask LSA seniors who wish to add the class to identify themselves, and to produce proof of their class standing.

After the first two meetings of the class, the instructors will meet with the course coordinators, and fill any openings in the class sections. Any student who has not attended the first two class meetings may be dropped from the registration list or from the waitlist, at the course coordinator's discretion.

Openings will be filled, in order of priority, by:

  1. LSA seniors who are registered on the waitlist and have attended the first two class meetings.
  2. LSA seniors who have attended the first two class meetings, but are not registered on the waitlist. If the number of eligible students in this group exceeds the remaining number of spaces, the course coordinator will make the selection by a random method.
  3. Others registered on the waitlist, in the order in which they are listed on the waitlist, provided they have attended the first two class meetings.
  4. Others not registered on the waitlist, but who have attended the first two class meetings. If the number of eligible students in this group exceeds the remaining number of spaces, the course coordinator will make the selection by a random method.
  5. Coordinators will provide a list of students (and their Social Security Numbers) who are to be issued overrides, to the department office staff. Staff will provide confirmation of overrides issued to coordinators or instructors on request.

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school must take the Placement Test to determine the language course in which they should enroll. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction in high school. It is strongly recommended that students who began French at another college or university also take the placement test. Students must check with the Course Coordinator for any exceptions to the Placement Test level.

Placement Exams

Tue., Nov. 16, 4:00-5:30 p.m.

Spanish 2440 Mason Hall
French 3410 Mason Hall
Italian 3447 Mason Hall

Wed., Nov. 17, 4:00-5:30 p.m.

Spanish 3442 Mason Hall
French 3410 Mason Hall
Italian 3415 Mason Hall

The following are additional Placement Exam dates:

Tue., Dec. 14, Wed., Dec. 15, Thur., Dec. 16, Fri., Dec. 17 - *10:00AM 11:30AM

Spanish Angell Hall Aud. C
French 3439 Mason Hall
Italian 3435 Mason Hall

Monday, December 20*10:00AM 11:30AM

Spanish Angell Hall Aud. D
French 3439 Mason Hall
Italian 3435 Mason Hall

Tuesday, January 4*10:00AM 11:30AM

Spanish Angell Hall Aud. C
French Angell Hall Aud. D
Italian 3402 Mason Hall

Additionally, we will have 2 make up exams. One will be January 6th and the other January 10. Time and place still to be determined.


French 101. Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The sequence of French 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture which are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials. Classes meet four hours per week in sections of 20-25 students. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as midterm and final examinations and speaking tests. Class participation is graded. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102 and 103.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 102. Elementary French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See French 101. French 102 is the continuation of French 101. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. It is STRONGLY suggested that transfer students see H. Neu for advice regarding placement in the appropriate course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 103. Review of Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~pascal/French103.html

French 103 is a course for students with some prior language study in French, and covers the same material presented in French 101/102. Entrance into the course is by placement or with the permission of the course coordinator. Because students are expected to be already familiar with some of the material, the course moves at a rapid pace, and students will need to plan on spending at least 8-10 hours each week preparing daily lessons. The objectives and methods of instruction are similar to those of French 101/102. Quizzes (with both oral and written components) are administered to check students' assimilation of material. There are three hourly exams, a final, compositions, and speaking tests. By the end of the course, students will have a good working vocabulary and strong listening comprehension skills; they should be able to express themselves in French (both in writing and orally) using most of the basic structural patterns in the language. Students will also have a general knowledge of French-speaking cultures. Technology (multi-media, computer-based writing programs, the web) will be used to aid in acquiring listening and writing skills, and cultural competency.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 112. Second Special Reading Course.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 111. French 111 and 112 are designed for juniors, seniors, and graduate students interested in gaining a reading knowledge of the language. Completion of French 111-112 does not satisfy the LSA language requirement. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230, 231, or 232. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to increase the reading proficiency gained in French 111. It begins with an intensive and comprehensive review of grammar and idioms, followed by special work for sight-reading. Toward midterm, students select several articles of a book in their field of specialization for outside reading, and they complete their reading on their own with frequent consultation with the instructor. Classes meet in sections of 25 students. They meet four times per week. There are weekly quizzes, course-wide midterm and final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 231. Second-Year French.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students whose last French course was NOT at U of M Ann Arbor must take the placement test. French 231 builds and expands upon the work done in French 101/102 or French 103. The primary goals of French 231 are to:

Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of CD-ROM activities, writing exercises, and laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099

French 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In French 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos and songs to explore three major themes. We will begin by studying the culture and literature of several francophone countries or regions (other than France),examining cultural similarities and differences as well as the various roles of the French language. We will then focus on some important historical periods of 20th century France, notably World War II and changes in French society from the 40's until the present.

Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be two compositions, three tests, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

French 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001, 002 Advanced Practice in French Through Contemporary Social Issues

Instructor(s): Yannick Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in French.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will be dealing with some of the issues and problems facing today's French/Francophone society through readings (press and textbook articles), videos (documentaries, news program exposes, film) and CDs:

This "cultural" approach will offer us a jumping-off point for oral and written communication (respectively 40% and 60% of the final grade): three individual oral presentations (30%), three medium-length essays (30%), and a number of written exercises (30%). Active class participation (10%) and regular attendance are expected. (Coursepack French 235, 2 vols., Viers) at Dollar Bill [611 Church Street, (734-665-9200)]; French Grammar Usage by Hawkins and Towell and a good bilingual dictionary (bookstores).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

French 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Roger Butler-Borruat (rebb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in French.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will be dealing with some of the issues and problems facing today's French/Francophone society through readings (press and textbook articles), videos (documentaries, news program exposes, film) and CDs:

This "cultural" approach will offer us a jumping-off point for oral and written communication (respectively 40% and 60% of the final grade): three individual oral presentations (30%), three medium-length essays (30%), and a number of written exercises (30%). Active class participation (10%) and regular attendance are expected. (Coursepack French 235, 2 vols., Viers) at Dollar Bill [611 Church Street, (734-665-9200)]; French Grammar Usage by Hawkins and Towell and a good bilingual dictionary (bookstores).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 Women and Letters

Instructor(s): Melinda Waterhouse (melinw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the literary genre most frequently associated with women: the epistolary form or the letter. By comparing and contrasting letters of both authentic and fictional correspondences of women from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries, students will learn to identify the major themes of epistolary expression for women and will come to understand the uniqueness of the letter for female self-expression. For example, women have explored their roles as mother, wife, lover, outsider and professional in letters which, thanks to the distinctive elements of the epistolary form, facilitate self-awareness as a woman and bonds with other women that are not as successfully fostered by other literary forms. Possible works, either in their entirety or in excerpts, to be studied include: Sévigné, Correspondance; Guilleragues, Lettres portugaises; Charrière, Lettres de Mistriss Henley; Graffigny, Lettres d'une Péruvienne; Staël, Correspondance générale and Delphine; Colette, La Vagabonde; Roy, Ma chère petite soeur; and Bâ, Une si longue lettre.

In addition to providing an introduction to the epistolary expression of women, this course will help students develop reading, writing, and speaking skills for literature in French. A weekly journal, two short papers (3-5 pages), an oral presentation, a final paper (5-7 pages) and daily class participation will be required and will provide the basis for grading.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002 Francophone Artists of the 20th Century

Instructor(s): Melinda Waterhouse (melinw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How have francophone artists expressed themselves and their life stories through the arts of the twentieth century and how have they come to be artists? Taking a chronological approach which will divide the twentieth century into three distinct periods (1900-39, 1940-68, and 1969-99), the course will offer a response to this question by concentrating on both visual and audio media such as literature, painting, film and music. In addition to the actual artistic production of the artists chosen from each time period, we will read selections from autobiographical works (for example, letters, diaries, personal essays and interviews) that directly address the artist's pursuit of self in his/her art. Specifically, we will explore the identities artists create when contemplating nation, gender, race, class, war, revolution, sexuality, family and society in their artistic production.

Beyond providing an introduction to the major artistic movements of the twentieth-century francophone world, this course will enable students to develop reading, writing and speaking skills in French. A weekly journal, two short papers (3-5 pages), an oral presentation, film viewings, a final paper (5-7 pages), and daily class participation will be required and will provide the basis for grading.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 274. French and Francophone Societies and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 Les Pensees Cachees: Censorship During World War II

Instructor(s): Rachael Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

During the Vichy Regime, life in war-torn France was difficult on many levels. Collaboration with the Nazis was the only acceptable way to act in the open. Behind closed door and on the printed page, it was another matter. Patriotism, although repressed, was rife; and in many instances it was members of the literary elite who were able to fool the censors and reach out to their compatriots in this time of confused allegiances. During the academic term, we will study texts and films written and produced under German censorship. We will try to discover just what and how was slipped by the watchful eyes of the censors discovering the specific literary and artistic elements that helped the French maintain their patriotism and eventually triumph over the occupation of their beloved land. Modern censorship theory (Foucault, Bourdieu) will lay the groundwork and give us a springboard from which to approach our texts.

We will watch 2-3 films and read works or excerpts from authors such as: Sartre, DeBeavoir, Camus, Malraux, Gide, Prevert, Celine and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 274. French and Francophone Societies and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002 The Gargoyle in the Church: Laughter and Literature in the Middle Ages

Instructor(s): Liz Fackelman (facklelm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This introductory course features a sampling of medieval French literature (in modern French translation), juxtaposing the various themes of "high literature" with their comic and paradoic counterparts and placing both in their historical and cultural context. We will meet the noble kings, brave knights, the saints, beautiful ladies and damsels in distress, but we will also meet their shadow selves: the peasant who would be a knight, the unfaithful ladies, a gambling Saint Peter disguised in a long black beard, a shepherd who outfoxes a lawyer and the Fox himself, Renard who gave his name to the animal with the bushy tail. No prior knowledge of the Middle Ages is assumed, and we will review language as needed. The course is taught in French.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 333. French Phonetics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helene Neu (hneu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course, conducted in French, is designed to introduce basic concepts in phonetic theory and to teach students techniques for improving their own pronunciation or that they can use in teaching French to others. We will examine the physical characteristics of individual sounds, the relationship between sounds and their written representations, the rules governing pronunciation of "universal" French, and the most salient phonological features of selected regional varieties of French from within France and from other parts of the francophone world. In class, but mainly as independent and regular work with audiotapes, students will have opportunities for oral practice in the production of French consonants and vowels, syllabification, intonation, liaison, and deletion/retention of the "mute E".

Homework for each class consists of reading theory, writing phonetic transcriptions using the International Phonetic Alphabet, and oral practice with tapes. Participation, 1-2 oral quizzes, and the final oral exam will evaluate proficiency in pronunciation. Written homework, phonological problems sets, quizzes, a midterm, and a final written exam will evaluate ability to use the phonetic alphabet and knowledge of basic theory. This is NOT a conversation class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

French 335. Composition and Stylistics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yannick Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course aims at helping you strengthen and develop your written and interpretative skills. More specifically, we will address the following objectives: 1. Review and presentation of some essential narrative, stylistic, grammatical components and tools of textual interpretation and composition. 2. Uses of dictionaries. 3. Written (and oral) analyses and productions of texts representative of various genres. Your final grade will be based on written exercises, assignments and compositions, creative written (and oral) textual analyses, and very active class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 342. French and Francophone Film Taught in English.

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

Section 001 Situation and City. Taught In English. Meets with Architecture 509.

Instructor(s): Carina Yervasi (cly@umich.edu), Jason Young (jty@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"It will be a means of knowledge and a means of action."
Ivan Chtcheglov

"In defending the freedom of creation, we intend in no way to justify political indifference."
Andre Breton and Leon Trotsky

Ask yourself: How is a city a process?
How do cities implicate themselves in your studies?
What is your practice in the city?
What is your situation within practice?

SITUATION AND CITY is an interdisciplinary course on the historical and cultural processes of urban modernization. The course is meant to be a pragmatic and interpretive study of the contexts of the city: the formal and spatial as well as the visual and literary. Through readings and projects on the modernization of Paris, the development of art action groups such as the Situationist International and the impact of their activities in the city, we will chart via the analogous space of our own city and campus the changes in Paris' infrastructure (arcades, boulevards, sewers and subways), urban industrialization, and as a center for the production of culture through the arts. At the core of SITUATION AND CITY are several fields of inquiry including but not limited to novels, city planning maps, newspapers, photography, and film.
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


French 350. Special Topics in French and Francophone Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 The Fantastic in 19th-Century French Culture

Instructor(s): Alina Clej (aclej@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will explore the various forms that "the fantastic" takes in 19th-century French fiction, from the "gothic" narratives of the first part of the century, to the "decadent" fantasies of the fin-de-siècle. Besides engaging students in the specific study of a literary genre (i.e., the fantastic), the course is also designed to offer a broader perspective on 19th-century social and political issues, as they become "translated" or disguised in temporally remote or exotic settings. We will focus in particular on such issues as: historical memory (of the French Revolution), the re-distribution of power-roles in 19th-century French society, and the social anxieties related to the introduction of new technologies. Readings will consist of short pieces by Nodier, Balzac, Gautier, Flaubert, Merimee, Villiers. Evaluation will be based on class discussion and three short papers in French.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 375. Cinema and Society in the Francophone World.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 Social Perspectives and New Trends in French African Cinema

Instructor(s): Freida Ekotto (ekotto@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to the cinematic productions of the French speaking Africa. We will examine the constitution of cinematic practice as a discourse, and the role it plays in both resisting and contributing to the reproduction of social relations in particular the relations of race, class and gender.

Over the past decade there has been a general historical shift in cinematic production in Africa. By focusing on the reproductive aspects of cinema we will be able to give priority to examples that foreground the articulation of oppositional situations. Our aim will not be simply to catalogue different articulations, but to clarify what constitutes an oppositional cinematic discourse by examining what organizes the diversity of the positions we examine.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 379. Studies in Gender and Sexuality.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 AIDS in France: Literature and Politics.

Instructor(s): David Caron (dcaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 8 credits in courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

France is the European country with the highest rate of HIV and AIDS. After almost a decade of silence and denial about the seriousness of the epidemic, there has been a recent shift in public perceptions and reactions, along with an sudden increase in literary and cultural production addressing the crisis. A large number of texts have emerged essays, novels, plays, first and third person testimonials, etc.; some were so successful their authors became household names; certain films and TV programs were widely seen; activism is on the rise: AIDS has finally entered French society.

This course will focus on both the literary and the sociopolitical aspects of the AIDS crisis in France. It will address issues such as: the reasons for the initial period of denial, the cause(s) of the shift described above, the construction of the AIDS patient in the media and in literature, literary and political resistance to the dominant discourses on AIDS, the problems in representing the unspeakable (disaster, one's own death), the relation between the AIDS crisis and previous constructions of sameness and otherness in French culture, the way in which AIDS criticism may provide the basis for a rethinking of social relations in France today, etc.

(Tentative) Reading List:

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 380. Intermediate Business French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 French for Management. Meets with Business Administration 415.

Instructor(s): Rachael Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235 and one additional course numbered 250 and above. A maximum of six credits of French 380, 414, and Business Administration 415 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to familiarize students not only with the language of business transactions in France, but also the differences associated with cultural aspects of doing business in a French-speaking country. We will study both written and spoken commercial French. Themes covered during the class will include various aspects of the business world such as: banking, advertising, claims and disputes regarding products, organization and hierarchy of the enterprise, applying for a job in France, and what to expect if you get one. Writing exercises will concentrate on commercial correspondence and will stress the formal nature of written business French.

We will use some cultural videos to study differences between the U.S. and France in a business setting. The textbook will be French for Business and there will be a course pack available at Dollar Bill.

Attendance is mandatory. No auditors. Maximum enrollment is 25. Prerequisite: French 235 and one additional French course numbered 250 or above.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 391. Junior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Reading of selected works from French literature. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 392. Junior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Reading of selected works from French literature. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 399. Independent Study.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232; permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Readings and topical studies relating to French-speaking cultures (in Europe, Africa, North America, and Indian Ocean) not addressed in other courses, as well as to aspects of French and Francophone culture that may require special treatment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 450. Special Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 Revisiting Negritude and Creolite. Meets with French 670.001

Instructor(s): Freida Ekotto (ekotto@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Theorization of identities between France and the Caribbean from the middle to the end of the 20th century by French speaking African and Caribbean writers. We will study major texts of the foundational movement of Negritude, i.e. the initial confrontation with the presence of African-ness within the Black French speaking communities and of créolité. ( Créolité being the rethinking of the relevance / irrelevance of that African presence.) By reading texts by such pivotal authors as Aimé Césaire, Léopold Sédar Senghor, Léon Damas, Frantz Fanon, Maryse Condé, Edouard Glissant, Raphael Confiant, Jean Bernabé, etc. We will be able to revisit the major theoretical issues raised by the concepts of Negritude and Créolité such as identity, language, hegemony, legitimacy, etc.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 491. Senior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Supervised independent studies; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

French 492. Senior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Supervised independent studies; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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