Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in History (Division 390)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for History.


History 111. Modern Europe.

Section 001 History of Modern Europe, 1715 to the Present.

Instructor(s): Greg Shaya (gshaya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 110 is recommended as prerequisite. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~gshaya/h111/index.html

An introduction to the history of Europe in this grand and cataclysmic age, from the Enlightenment to the wars of the twentieth century and after (1715 to the present). We will survey some defining episodes of European history the French revolution, the Napoleonic wars, the revolutions of 1848, the scramble for empire, the world wars of the twentieth century, the Holocaust, the democratic revolutions of 1989. We will examine developments in society, culture and ideas industrialization and urbanization, changing gender roles, the emergence of new aesthetic forms (from the novel to the film), scientific explanations of racial difference, mass culture and the birth of a consumer society. We will look to Europe's role in the wider world, from the grand colonial projects of the nineteenth century, to decolonization and immigration in the twentieth. Throughout, we will ask: How were these developments experienced? How were they remembered and retold? What is their legacy?

There are no prerequisites, but for a desire to escape the "tyranny of the everlasting present." Course readings/viewings include a lively selection of original sources recollections of revolution, classic political statements, soldiers' accounts of the experience of war, a worker's autobiography, propaganda posters, documentary films, historical novels as well as classic works by historians of Europe. Three films are required viewing. The format of the course is two hours of lecture and two hours of discussion each week. Requirements include three short writing assignments (1000 words), occasional ten-minute quizzes, a midterm and a final examination. Throughout the class we will emphasize critical thinking and active engagement with the material, not rote memorization.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 122/Asian Studies 122. Modern Transformation of East Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ernest Young (epyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/W00/HS122/index.html

The course treats the modern experience of China, Japan, and Korea. We shall discuss comparatively the social and political orders in each country before the advent of a powerful Western intrusion, and then explore the ways that these old civilizations handled new forms of power in the 19th and 20th centuries. We will take a broad look at the many sources of change and the varieties of their expression in the modern period. Topics will include the resulting cultural turbulence and reconstruction, reform and revolution, colonialism and liberation, the changing roles of women, the economic transformation of recent decades, and the interplay of authoritarianism and democracy. The course combines lectures, including guests from various departments, and discussion. Readings will be drawn from historical narratives and translated expressions of East Asian voices. There will be a midterm exam, a term paper, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2-3 Waitlist Code: 4

History 142/Japanese 150/Asian Studies 152. Introduction to Japanese Civilization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Keller Kimbrough (kimbroug@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Japanese is not required. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Japanese 150.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 144(249)/Korean 150/Asian Studies 154. Introduction to Korean Civilization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Eun-su Cho (eunsucho@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Korean 150.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 160. United States to 1865.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan Juster (sjuster@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A survey of early American history from the period of initial colonization through the Civil War. The course will be organized around the interactions of the three dominant cultures which came together in early America: Native American, European, and African. We will explore the internal dynamics of each culture (family life, religious beliefs, political system, labor arrangements, gender roles) and how the clash of cultures shaped the experience of Americans in the colonial and national periods. Specific topics will include the problems of forming communities in an alien environment, the transition to slave labor and the origins of an African-American society, the American Revolution and the creation of the republic, the emergence of sectionalism, and the impact of early industrialism. Students will attend two lectures each week, and read a series of monographs and primary documents. A short paper and a final exam are required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 4

History 161. United States, 1865 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Penny Von Eschen (pmve@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

History 161 surveys the lives and experiences of Americans after 1850. Through a combination of lectures, books, class presentations, and other sources students will explore the development of the nation's political economy. As a result, we will take a close look at the ways in which leaders and average citizens directed the nation during the last 150 years. Chronologically the course spans from the 1850s through the 1990s. Thematically, we will examine the Civil War and its causes, post-emancipation, the expansion of industrial America, immigration and migration, the World Wars, social protest, Cold War policy, the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights movement, and the enduring tension between consent and dissent. More than most survey courses, students will take an active role in the course and its presentations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 171/German 171. Coming to Terms with Germany.

Section 001 Germany and the New Europe

Instructor(s): Andrei Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See German 171.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 001 History of the West. Meets With American Culture 102.001.

Instructor(s): Maria Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 102.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

History 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 002 Gender, Race, and Class. (Honors)

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students will use the techniques of historical analysis to unravel how gender, race, and class have functioned in American History. We will also explore the historiography of these subjects how historians have identified, analyzed, and written about them and how approaches have changed over time. Students will be introduced to the concept of social construction the idea that race, gender, and class structures are not fixed, universal biological entities, but are shaped and determined by cultural values, time, and place. They will also be urged to think about how these categories intersect. This seminar is intended to be a small reading and discussion class, so regular attendance and participation are mandatory. There is a strong writing component.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 003 Religion and Power in the Graeco-Roman World

Instructor(s): Beate Dignas (bdignas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This First Year Seminar will explore important characteristics and social contexts of ancient religion. There are Zeus, Aphrodite, Apollo, and mythical stories that illustrate the power of these gods over an individual's life; or the impressive remains of temples many of us visit while traveling through Greece or Turkey. Gods and goddesses, prophecy and oracles, myths and festivals, mysteries and sacrifice what was their place within the religions of the Greeks and Romans? Who was involved in religious activity? How did religion relate to power and authority? How can differences of "religious systems" be explained and interpreted? It is challenging to draw the threads together, and the topic gives wide opportunity to look at anthropological issues as well as historical facts and developments. Participants will be introduced to a wide range of sources, both material culture and literary texts: sacred laws and sacrificial calendars, temple architecture and representations of myth and ritual, historical accounts and festive poetry, they all bring ancient religions to life for us.

Grading will be based on two exams, two papers and participation in discussions. Readings will include many passages from ancient authors and inscriptions. Modern scholarship will include M. Beard/ J. North, Pagan Priests, M. Beard/J. North/S.R.F. Price, Religions of Rome, W. Burkert, Creation of the Sacred and Ancient Mystery Cults, R. Shepard Kraemer, Her Share of the Blessings, S.R.F. Price, Religions of the Ancient Greeks, R. Turcan, The Cults of the Roman Empire, D. Ulansey, The Origins of Mithraic Mysteries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 197. First-Year Seminar.

Section 001 Culture and Politics In Modern Korea. Meets with Asian Studies 254.001.

Instructor(s): Henry Em

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Asian Studies 254.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 197. First-Year Seminar.

Section 002 Paris and Vienna, 1890-1920

Instructor(s): Rudi Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In the generation before 1920 many of the issues that remain unresolved at the end of this century arose in the societies of Vienna and Paris. Using the writings of contemporary authors, their music, art, architecture and cinema, we shall explore those issues and their emergence. Among the topics treated are the elaboration of total war, the acceptance and rejection of a new physics and astronomy, the modern movement in architecture, the discovery of the unconscious, the role of fashion in sport, and the growth of the cinema. This is a discussion seminar, and students should expect to devote some time to listening and viewing assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 201. Rome.

Section 001 The Roman Empire and its Legacy.

Instructor(s): Raymond Van Dam (rvandam@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A survey of Roman history from the consolidation of the Roman empire in the second century B.C. to the rise of its political heirs in the Mediterranean world in the eighth century A.D. Topics to be discussed include Rome's overseas expansion; the administration of a large empire; the impact of Christianity; the conversion of Constantine; heresy and the imposition of orthodoxy; barbarian kingdoms; Justinian's reconquest; the rise of Islam; and the coronation of Charlemagne as a revived Roman emperor.

Readings will include many ancient texts in translation and some modern scholarship. Final grade is based on two tests, frequent written exercises, and participation in discussions. No prerequisites; everyone welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1, maybe 2 Waitlist Code: 1

History 211/MARC 211. Later Middle Ages, 1100-1500.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Diane Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will study the institutional, economic, and intellectual development of Europe from the time of the Crusades, when contacts with the East were reestablished, to the discovery of the New World, when European expansion moved west over the Atlantic. Some important themes will be the nature of institutions of governance; patterns of economic and demographic development; movements in religious and intellectual life. Particular attention will be paid to the relations between cultures: the central European nations and the peoples incorporated by European expansion; Christian, Jew, and Muslim; European West and Chinese/Mongol East. Modern interpretations of the period will be supplemented with texts from the period. In addition to a midterm and a final examination, students will write two short papers. There are two lectures and one discussion session per week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

History 218. The Vietnam War, 1945-1975.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Victor Lieberman (eurasia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the wars that were fought in and around Vietnam from 1945 to 1975, with primary emphasis on the period of heavy American involvement starting in the mid-1950's. The course seeks to assess the origins, strategy, and impact of U.S. intervention,and to relate that involvement both to U.S. domestic politics and to wider global concerns. At the same time the course will explain the motivation and domestic appeal of the Vietnamese Communists and of their indigenous opponents. In short, the Vietnam war will be analyzed both as the longest and most controversial foreign war in American history, and as the climax to an Asian social revolution that began during the colonial period. Meets three times a week for 50 minutes, plus one 50-minute discussion section. Midterm, final exam, and optional paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 225. Europe and the New World.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael Wintroub (wintroub@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The first European observers of America saw a world populated alternatively by savages or by angels, they saw peoples apparently without laws, religion, rulers, or indeed clothes. Yet much of what they saw was conditioned by what they expected to see. This course will set out to explore the social and intellectual world(s) of those who first came to the Americas. It will follow these explorers, conquerors, and chroniclers on their journeys from the Old World to the New, and will analyze not simply their impact on the New World, e.g., "the narrative of the conquest" but how the experience of this New World interacted with and fundamentally changed the way Europeans thought about themselves and the universe(s) they inhabited.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 241. War and Society in the Modern Middle East.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Juan Cole (jrcole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jrcole/syls.htm

Covers the history of warfare since the 18th century from Algeria to Afghanistan. Examines imperial warfare and statemaking through Muhammad Ali Pasha (d. 1848), then the colonial wars of France, Great Britain, and Russia; the two world wars; and the subsequent Arab-Israeli, Gulf, and Afghanistan conflicts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 255. Gandhi's India.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sumathi Ramaswamy (sumathi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History 151 recommended. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This survey course on modern India introduces the subcontinent in all its rich historical and cultural diversity, focusing in particular on the period of British colonialism from the 18th century to 1947. We will look at this history through the eyes of "Mahatma" Gandhi and several of his contemporaries, whose perceptions we will supplement with novels, women's writings, and films. The aim of the course is to understand the extent to which the "India" of Gandhi's times is a product of both its traditional past, as well of the modern global processes of colonialism, capitalism, and nationalism.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 281. Comparative Study in History and Culture.

Section 001 Technology, Politics, and Culture. Meets with RC Social Science 271.001.

Instructor(s): Gabrielle Hecht (hechtg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


History 306/ACABS 321/Rel. 358. Israel Before the Exile (587 BCE): Its History & Religion.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Brian Schmidt (bschmidt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 321.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

History 307/ACABS 322/Rel. 359. History and Religion of Ancient Judaism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gabrielle Boccaccini (gbocca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: May be elected independently of Hist. 306. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 322.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

History 319. Europe Since 1945.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey Eley (ghe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to provide a comprehensive critical introduction to European society, culture, and politics since the Second World War. Lectures and readings will cover both Eastern and Western Europe, the international arena and the national histories of particular countries, and social and cultural life as well as political developments. The course aims to explore the shaping of the contemporary world and to introduce students to societies and political cultures which are both structurally similar and fundamentally different from their own. Instruction will be via lectures and ad hoc discussion, evaluation via midterm exam and end-of-term essay. No special background is required; prejudices and preconceptions about European societies are enough.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 321. Postwar Britain.

British History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): W. Schwarz

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 221 is recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide an episodic history of the United Kingdom from 1940 to 2000. It emphasizes the connection between politics and culture. The basic story is simple enough. I will suggest that out of the second world war there developed a social consensus built around a leftish politics (welfare plus a degree of social democracy); a conformist culture; and a conservative global context (empire and cold war). Arguably, this held in place from 1945 to 1956. In the years from 1956 to 1964 this consensus unraveled socially most spectacularly in cultural terms, but also critically around the end of empire. The period from 1964 to 1979 comprises a variety of attempts from both Labour and Conservative politicians to put back together again the consensus politics, remaining (largely) within the terms of the consensus itself. These years were experienced by many in Britain as a period of prolonged crisis. Mrs. Thatcher's arrival in 1979 signaled a radical attempt to break through this impasse, and to create a new political and moral order. Although Mrs. Thatcher herself came unstuck in this attempt, we need to ask whether in the longer term she might not have been successful. We shall close the course by exploring the degree to which New Labour, under the leadership of Mr. Blair, has constructed a new social settlement. That's the story.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 333/REES 396/Poli. Sci. 396/Slavic 396/Soc. 393. Survey of East Central Europe.

Section 001 Eastern Europe Since 1900. Meets with History 439.001

Instructor(s): Brian Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397. (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~baporter/syl43900.html

See History 439.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 336/CAAS 336/WS 336. Black Women in America.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michele Mitchell (mmitch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 336.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

History 359. Visions of the Past.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jonathan Marwil (jmarwil@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course rests on the proposition that most of what most people have ever known about the past has come from deliberated aesthetic forms such as monuments, paintings, novels, and films. Many more Americans have read or seen Gone With the Wind than have ever read a history of the Civil War; films like Schindler's List have been the primary means by which Americans and Europeans have conceptualized the destruction of European Jewry. This course, therefore, will examine how and why history is represented in the various aesthetic forms, and how those representations have created our sense of what is important in history. We shall read a half dozen novels and plays, see several films, look at a variety of art and architecture, and listen to several musical forms. Classes will be lecture and discussion, and there will be one or two papers besides a midterm and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 363. U.S. Foreign Policy and International Politics Since World War II.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Matthew Connelly (mattconn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/winter/lsa/hist/363/001.nsf

In this course students will explore contemporary international history by reading the works of some leading scholars in the field and discussing why they differ. Classes will focus on the conflict and cooperation of the U.S. with other states in the Cold War, decolonization, and regional crises. But lectures will also analyze how non-state actors, cross-border migration, new means of communication, and global markets are transforming the international system as a whole.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 366. American Science and American Culture.

U.S. History

Section 001 Meets With American Culture 301.004

Instructor(s): John Carson (jscarson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to provide a general overview of the place of science within American culture from its beginnings until the second world war. The lectures and readings are intended to introduce those taking the course to the variety of ways in which science and culture have been mutually intertwined and interactive in the history of modern America. The course will examine selectively aspects of the physical, biological, and human sciences including ideas, institutions, practices, and technologies and investigate their relations to political, social, and cultural transformations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 371/WS 371. Women in American History Since 1870.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine how social constructions of gender, race, class, and sexuality have shaped women's lives in the U.S. from the Civil War to the present, and how some women have pushed at the boundaries of those constructions through, for example, changing patterns of work, leisure, education, and intimacy; through political activism; through labor organizing; through involvement in a variety of social movements; and through popular culture. We will emphasize the diversity of women's historical experiences by region as well as by social category, and will situate those experiences in the larger contexts of social, economic, and political change on local, national, and even global levels. Requirements include a midterm, a final, and a paper, as well as active participation in discussion sections. Films will be shown.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

History 375/WS 375. A History of Witchcraft: The 1692 Salem Trials in Historical and Cross-Cultural Perspective.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carol Karlsen (ckarlsen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on a single historical event, the Salem witchcraft outbreak of 1692. It explores "what happened" during this highly dramatic episode in early American history, where the Salem story fits in the larger history of witchcraft in Europe and its American colonies, and why it continues to have such a powerful hold on the popular and scholarly imagination. Beginning with original trial records and other primary documents concerning witchcraft and religion in Europe and its American colonies, students will analyze a variety of sources, including scholarly accounts of the Salem events, recent films and other fictionalized versions of it, and images of witches and witchcraft in other segments of contemporary American culture. Among the central questions to be addressed in the course are why most accused witches in the European and Euro-American witchcraft traditions were women and why the witch figure continues to be repressed primarily as female in today's popular culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 377/Amer. Cult. 312. History of Latinos in the U.S.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria Montoya (mmontoya@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an exploration of the history and culture of Latinos in the United States from the colonial era to the present. We will examine the diversity among groups that make up the Latino population of the United States, paying particular attention to the three largest subgroups of Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Cuban origin. Topics will include the varied experiences of colonialism and immigration; the role of race prejudice and discrimination in shaping social mobility; cultural transformation and regional variations in language, religion, and music; gender as a central variable in defining issues of identity and opportunity; and the birth of a Latino civil rights movement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

History 384. Modern Jewish History 1880-1948.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Todd Endelman (endelman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course surveys the history of the Jewish people in Europe, America, and the Middle East over the last one hundred years. The course begins with the rise of virulent forms of semitism at the end of the nineteenth century and examines how this undermined Jewish assimilation in Western Europe and dashed all hope for emancipation in Eastern Europe. The course then considers the various ways in which Jews responded to this new crisis: nationalism, revolutionary socialism, emigration, assimilationist defense activities, and conversion. The last third of the course is devoted to the drama and often tragic events of the twentieth century that totally changed the face of world Jewry the Bolshevik revolution, the Holocaust, the creation of the State of Israel, and the emergence of the American Jewish community as the largest and most secure community in the history of the diaspora. There will be a midterm and a 10-12 page paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

History 392. Topics in Asian and African History.

Section 001 Hinduism: History and Culture. Meets with Anthropology 298.002 and S&SEA 225

Instructor(s): Rich Freeman (richfree@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 298.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 393. Topics in U.S. and Latin American History.

Section 001 Walt Whitman's America: U.S. Culture, Society & Politics from the Jacksonian Era to the Gilded Age. (3 Credits). Meets With American Culture 301.003.

Instructor(s): O. Frankel (ofrankel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will employ Whitman's poetry as the organizing principle for exploring fundamental themes and major events in United States history during the middle decades of the 19th century (from the 1830s to the 1870s). The main emphasis will be on the emergence of modern mass society: (1) the formation of a new political culture organized around vigorous participation in the political arena, the rift between parties (the two party system) and regions, and the exclusion of women (and African Americans) who, at the same time, asserted themselves through a myriad of reform organizations; (2) social transformation through immigration, the growth of urban centers and, as significantly, the rise of the middle class with its rituals, institutions and redefinition of masculinity and femininity; (3) the appearance of consumer-based popular culture as manifested in the success of P.T. Barnum's enterprises, the celebrity of cultural icons (David Crocket, Jenny Lind), the spread of new genres (black-face), and further enhancement of a national public sphere through print culture. We will also look into counter-cultures experimentation with radicalism, feminism, sex, property and marriage as well as the imprint of technology (railroads, telegraph), Western expansion and racial constructs on American society. The course will conclude with the experience of the Civil War and its aftermath. Also examined critically will be the way in which Whitman's writings and personality came to epitomize American democratic culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 393. Topics in U.S. and Latin American History.

Section 002 Working Class America: Emancipation to Suburbanization, 1863-1980.

Instructor(s): Robert Self (rself@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the dynamics of class and race in the United States from the end of slavery to contemporary transformations in urban geography. In between we will examine how the American working class, formed from the descendants of four continents, shaped and was shaped by American history. This course takes a multi-dimensional approach to social and political history, exploring broad transformations such as emancipation, industrialization, urbanization, immigration, migration, the growth of the federal government, and suburbanization in the context of the lives, families, and politics of working people. Our readings and topics focus on the relationship between work and various forms of racial power, on gendered divisions of labor, on the role of unions and labor politics in American history, and on the historical position of U.S. workers relative to the world economy and the global division of labor.

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History 395. Reading Course.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman.

Credits: (1-4; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an independent 1-4 credit course open only to history concentrators by written permission of the instructor.

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History 396. History Colloquium.

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

No Description Provided

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History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 001 Michigan In the Era of Industrialization. Meets with American Culture 496.002

Instructor(s): Francis Blouin (fblouin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~bhl/bhl/franclas/syllabus.htm

This course will focus on the period in Michigan history from 1880-1930. It will examine several themes in that period including immigration, industrialization, settlement patterns, etc. A general familiarity with United States history is required. History colloquia are conducted in the seminar format and are limited to a small number of students. As a result, emphasis is placed on student participation in discussions. Each student will be required to write a major research paper that will draw on the resources of the Bentley Historical Library, which contains original manuscripts and archives relating to the history of the state. The course provides an opportunity for students to gain familiarity with a critical period in the industrial and social history of the of the U.S. and do original historical research. Grades will be based on a midterm exam, class discussion, and a seminar paper.

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History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 002 History, Memory, and Identity

Instructor(s): Stephanie Platz (splatz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Memories and interpretations of the past figure prominently in most peoples' understandings of "who they are" and "how they came to be" that way. Yet accounts of the past whether personal or popular, individual or collective are inevitably selective. How are narratives of the past formed, how do they figure in the practice of daily life, how are they used or politicized by individuals, groups, and nations, and how are people influenced by them? Using Armenian historical consciousness in the late twentieth century as a case study to be explored in depth, this course will also examine in theoretical and comparative perspective the ways in which accounts of history can circumscribe or interact dynamically with conceptions of personal, ethnic, or national identity. In readings and class discussion, particular attention will be paid to approaches to ethnicity and the relationships among history and territoriality; historiography, political philosophy, and nationalism; historical narratives and state-building; and ideologies of tradition and modernity.

Students will write and revise two short (5-8 page) papers, and will write and revise one longer (10-15 page) final paper.

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History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 003 Tolerance and Persecution: Medieval Minorities, Heretics, and Outcasts

Instructor(s): Stefanie Siegmund (siegmund@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Do processes of inquisition, segregation, discrimination or persecution produce minority identities or transform their configuration? To investigate this theme we will consider a selection of medieval case studies, studying the historical development of church and state policies concerning people labeled as heretics, Jews, sodomites, prostitutes, lepers, and Gypsies. Our readings will include some medieval philosophical discussion of the notion of tolerance. We will also consider the images of these social types as presented in visual or literary sources, and, where possible, the self-definition or response of these groups to the dominant society. Students will have the opportunity to pursue their interests by focusing term papers and presentations on one particular minority group or identity in the medieval Christian world.

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History 396. History Colloquium.

Section 004 Origins of the Idea of the West

Instructor(s): Tomoko Masuzawa (masuzawa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will examine critically the questions that most academic and popular discourses presume to know the answer to and therefore take for granted: Where/What/Who is 'the West' (Occident)? Since when, under what circumstances, and on what grounds has Europe identified itself as a distinct region? Is 'the East' (Orient) a complementary counterpart to the West, as we often seem to imagine, or is the real opposite of the West simply 'the Rest'? Is Western-ness today virtually the same thing as modernity? Even though the idea of the Occident doubtless has had a long history prior to the modern era, we will focus particularly on the period between the late 18th century and the early 20th century. During this period, a momentous transformation of the self-conception of 'the West' seems to have taken place. We will look at several significant moments of this transformation: (1) New science of philology (study of ancient languages) discovers the common origin of the European languages and the languages of Persia and India. (This discovery gives rise to the notion of "Aryan" peoples). (2) Classical scholars and various literary writers establish the notion that the origin of the West was in Ancient Greece. (3) New "science" of race begins to assert that Europeans (at least most of them) are "white" and the rest of the world is variously "colored." (4) The traditional assumption of the brotherhood of three monotheisms (i.e., Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) in contrast with pagan idolatry gives way, as other religions (such as Buddhism and Hinduism) begin to be identified. (5) The "race and ethnicity" of Jesus, the founder of Christianity, begins to be seriously debated by the gentile and Jewish scholars. We will look at these developments in light of the concurrent establishment of European hegemony over the rest of the world. For by the 19th century, European nations and their allies achieved the position of overwhelming advantage in the lucrative international "trade" once dominated by medieval Muslim nations and empires.

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History 397. History Colloquium.

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

No Description Provided

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History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 001 Mid-Century America Through Film

Instructor(s): Robert Self (rself@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course approaches film as one of the most important and influential cultural media of mid-century America, a powerful and persuasive entertainment "space" in which Americans told, watched, and invented stories about themselves and others. As such, film is an extraordinary, though not uncomplicated or transparent, historical source. How did American films of mid-century, 1935-1955, deal with the major social and cultural issues of these decades? Gender and sexual politics? Race and pluralism? Class and wealth? War and neo-imperialism? The anxiety of modernity? How did films' narrative structure appear to resolve dilemmas over complex social questions? Did films teach Americans to think and understand themselves in conventional ways, or could viewers read against their messages? These are the kinds of questions we will ask as we explore mid-century American culture and society through film. This course is above all a critical study of society, culture, and media, an exploration of the complicated historical contexts in which images and stories are produced, circulated, and debated. The course requires a substantial investment of time: in reading, watching films, and writing (approximately 25-30 pages).

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History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 002 Writing History: Modern Applications and Ancient Chinese Traditions

Instructor(s): Chun-schu Chang

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Writing History: Modern Approaches and Ancient Chinese Traditions. This course is on and for intellectual controversies in the study and writing of history in modern times. We will examine these controversies by taking up the areas of the most fundamental concerns in historical studies: the nature and concept of history as an intellectual discipline, the defined domain of sources and "raw materials" for historical research, the functions of history and "historical studies," the issue of multi-dimensional or unitary methodology in historical research, open philosophical versus social-science interpretive structures in historical writing, narrative versus analytic style in historical discourse, and the current state of debate on the direction of historical writing and teaching among historians. During our discussion comparisons between Western and Chinese historiographic traditions will be drawn to see the origins, history, and trifling nature of these controversies in modern historical studies. What will be the true "New History" in view of our critical discussion in the course? The instructor has already offered his own in his writings. Each member of the class will be required to write a paper on the subject.

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History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 003 Wars in Southeast Asia

Instructor(s): Rudolf Mrázek (rdlf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

There will be reading of scholarly accounts, novels, memoirs, and trial transcripts; watching and discussing movies. The theme will be war and violence in Southeast Asia since the anti-colonial princely rebellions of the 19th century, through the Philippines War of Independence, the Pacific War and the Vietnam Wars until the current violence in East Timor and Aceh, Indonesia. Hopefully, we will learn something about colonialism, nationalism, and, more broadly, about the sense of order, peace, and freedom as they emerged from the wars.

Each student will be required to participate actively in the sessions, and to present a research paper of about 15-20 pages on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor.

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History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 004 Varieties of Religious Experience in Medieval Europe

Instructor(s): Diane Hughes (dohughes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will consider the ways in which religion was experienced and expressed on the European continent from the time of Rome's official adoption of Christianity in the fourth century until the Protestant Reformation in the sixteenth. Some topics to be included will be the struggle between Christianity and paganism and the ways in which the practices of the latter left an imprint on Catholic religious expression; the tension between an organized Church which insisted on the primacy of rites performed by a priestly elite and a laity which desired more direct access to the divine; the struggle between orthodoxy and heresy; the role of women within a Church organized around a male priesthood; the place of mediating saints (and the Virgin Mary); and the relations between Christians and Jews. Consideration of a variety of original sources will also include artistic representation, from icons to narrative painting.

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History 397. History Colloquium.

Section 006 Towards a New Century: A Cultural History of Germany at the Turn of the 20th Century

Instructor(s): Dorothee Wierling (wierling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will explore some of the many changes in German society and culture between 1880 and 1930. This period is generally regarded as one of extreme modernisation, marked by rapid urbanisation, new perspectives on the human body and soul, (such as psychoanalysis), youth culture, new gender roles and new concepts of a rationalised work sphere as well as the development of mass culture such as film.

On the other hand, these rapid changes produced many anxieties and counter movements, which will also be examined in the course. In addition, we will take into consideration that these were phenomenons typical for all industrial societies of the time, and must be analysed accordingly. This is certainly the case for World War I, which was a crucial and traumatic experience, marking the final step toward the 20th century.

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History 398. Honors Colloquium, Junior.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Gabrielle Hecht (hechtg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students and junior standing. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Studies in historical philosophy and in the history of historical writing. Readings, reports, and discussions related to the senior Honors thesis project.

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History 398. Honors Colloquium, Junior.

Section 002 Topic?

Instructor(s): Michele Mitchell (mmitch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors students and junior standing. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Studies in historical philosophy and in the history of historical writing. Readings, reports, and discussions related to the senior Honors thesis project.

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History 399. Honors Colloquium, Senior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rudi Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors student, Hist. 398, and senior standing. Only 12 credits of History 394, 395, 396, 397, 398, and 399 may be counted toward a concentration plan in history. (1-6). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a workshop for Honors thesis writers. It concentrates on practical and theoretical problems of research and writing with special reference to methodological questions.

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History 401. Problems in Greek History II.

Section 001 Alexander the Great, Dynasty and Cult

Instructor(s): Beate Dignas (bdignas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/W00/HS401/index.html

Browsing the Web for links to Alexander the Great is an evening-filling program, some are more serious than others, some are more entertaining than others the number of angles taken is vast. This course wants to introduce participants to the Hellenistic World and study Alexander's impact on some of its features. A central focus will be Alexander's attitude towards religion, above all his own deification.

We will also look at Alexander's interaction with conquered peoples and whether later dynasts followed patterns introduced by him.

Last but not least, it is important to examine other perspectives: how were Alexander or his successors perceived and approached by contemporaries and later times?

Participants should eventually show knowledge on the history of the 4th and 3rd centuries B.C., develop a critical approach to primary and secondary sources, and should be able to form a well-founded opinion on central questions. Our discussion-topics will include exotic interpretations, novels (e.g., Mary Renault's Alexander Trilogy) and documentary videos (e.g., M. Wood's In the Footsteps of Alexander the Great).

Grading will be based on two exams, two papers and participation in discussions. Readings will include both ancient texts in translation (such as Plutarch's Life of Alexander, Arrian's and Quintus Curtius' History of Alexander, and the Alexander Romance) and modern scholarship (Bosworth, Alexander and the East, Briant, Alexander the Great, Man of Action, Man of Spirit, Habicht, Athens from Alexander to Antony, Lane Fox, Alexander the Great, Roisman, Alexander the Great. Ancient and Modern Perspectives.)

No prerequisites, everybody welcome.

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History 419(521). Twentieth-Century Germany.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dorothee Wierling (wierling@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in History 420. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Modern German history is characterised by extreme ruptures in the political as well as economic and social sphere. Beginning with an analysis of German society before World War I, we will follow the historical path of Germany through this war, revolution, the first democratic Republic of Weimar, the transference of power to Hitler, the road to World War II and to the holocaust. We will then examine the two postfascist societies in East and West Germany, their relationship during the cold war and finally their unification in a postwall Germany. While the political history of Germany will be presented as a framework, our focus will be on the social and cultural changes in time. Throughout the course, we will reflect on the contrasting "meanings" of German history in the 20th century: one being a narrative centered around the catastrophe of Nationalsocialism, WW II and the holocaust; the other a success story whose focus is a unified and democratic Germany.

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History 427(508). Magic, Religion, and Science in Early Modern England.

British History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 220 and junior standing are recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is about the "first three minutes" of the modern mental universe in actuality, about three centuries of historical time (1500-1800). It concentrates on how the "big bang" of the Protestant Reformation blasted apart a world view and a culture that had slowly developed over a thousand years. The explosive force of that strangely contingent event, renewed by subsequent eruptions of religious conflict and civil war, divided the English people culturally as never before. Magic declined, miracles and malevolent witches disappeared, the prestige of the ancient sciences of astrology and alchemy eroded. New and powerful philosophical ideas about human understanding and physical reality flourished; scientific explanations for a vast array of celestial, earthly, and mental phenomena proliferated and were embraced by laypersons as the basis of a new faith, the faith in (someone else's) reason. The world view that dominates modern English (and Western) culture emerged from almost three hundred years of charged conflict and began rapidly to evolve into contemporary scientism. And yet the shattering effect of the events that powered cultural change also made it impossible for secularization and rational religion fully to triumph. The hold of rational religion and secularism on the minds of the majority of ordinary men and women remained less complete than on the minds of the educated, governing classes. The result finally was a cultural and social realignment. The elite fashioned a "superculture" that is dominated by religious rationalism and scientistic faith; the dissenting sects, the lower classes and marginalized groups have sustained and created subcultures that are characterized by supernatural wonder and sudden infusions of spiritual and emotional energy. Much has changed since 1800 when this process was more or less completed, but these cultural and class divisions have not disappeared, and they have complicated ethnic relations as well as politics. In sum, this course is finally a meditation on how England lost its medieval mind and found its modern, divided sensibility. Principal readings will include all or part of Eamon Duffy, The Stripping of the Altars; Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic; James Sharpe, Instruments of Darkness: Witchcraft in England, 1550-1800; Peter French, John Dee: The Life of a Renaissance Magus; and Steven Shapin, The Scientific Revolution. A course pack of articles and original sources will also be required. Students will be asked to write three short (five page) papers on the readings for class; an in-class, midterm examination and a two-hour final examination.

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History 431. History of the Balkans Since 1878.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Fine

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/W00/HS431/index.html

This is a lecture course which surveys the history of the modern Balkans the area which consists of the ex-Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Greece, and Albania from roughly 1878 to the present. There are no prerequisites nor required background. Interested first-year students should feel welcome. Grading is based on: one hour exam, a one-hour written exam, writing on one essay question out of about four, one course paper (approximately 15 pages, topic according to student interest but cleared with instructor), and a written final exam (two essay questions to be chosen from a list of about eight questions). Major issues to be covered are: the crisis of 1875-78 with international involvement ending with the Treaty of Berlin, Croatia and Bosnia under the Habsburgs, the development of Bulgaria after 1878, the Macedonia problem, terrorist societies, World War I, the formation of Yugoslavia, nationality problems in Yugoslavia between the Wars, German penetration and the rise of dictatorships in the inter-war Balkans, World War II with Yugoslav and Greek resistance movements (including the Greek Civil War), Tito's Yugoslavia, its 1948 break with the USSR and Yugoslavia's special path to socialism. Nationality problems, the break-up of Yugoslavia, and the ensuing wars.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

History 432. Russia to Peter the Great.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Valerie Kivelson (vkivelso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Since medieval times, Westerners have brought back tales of exoticism and barbarism from Russia to their homelands, but few have taken the time to understand the nature of Russian society and culture. This course attempts to examine early Russian society in its own terms, while also studying the historiographic tradition and the issues at stake for the various historians of the field. The course spans the history of Russia from the ninth century, when written records begin, to Peter the Great at the end of the seventeenth century. Topics include the formation of the Russian state, the conversion to Orthodox Christianity, the invasion of the Mongol horde, and the reign of Ivan the Terrible. The course emphasizes interpretive issues, historiographic debates and questions of historical method. Class sessions will combine lecture and discussion. Students will be evaluated on the basis of two short papers (5-7 pages), a midterm and a final exam. There are no prerequisites.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

History 434. History of the Soviet Union.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): D. Field

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

With the collapse of the Soviet Union and the emergence of fifteen independent republics, the experience of Communism in Russia and Eastern Europe is being rethought as if the seeds of destruction had been planted already in the revolution. This course looks at the complex evolution of political structures, social developments, and cultural responses during the 70 years of the Soviet system. Beginning with the prerevolutionary crises and political movements, it surveys the rise of Stalin, the building of a "totalitarian" state, and the successive reforms that ultimately unraveled the system. Students are required to attend two lectures and one discussion section each week, prepare a term project, and take two take-home examinations (midterm and final).

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History 439. Eastern Europe Since 1900.

Section 001 Meets with Russian and East European Studies 396.001

Instructor(s): Brian Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~baporter/syl43900.html

During this century Eastern Europe has been at the center of two World Wars and at least three major revolutions. The people of this region experienced the birth of independent national states after World War I and the overthrow of communism in 1989, but in between they suffered through decades of oppression by regimes of both the right and the left, and witnessed the monumental nightmare of World War II and the Holocaust. History 439 will explore the glories and the tragedies that the 20th century brought to Poland, Czechoslovakia, and Hungary. Multimedia presentations will help bring alive the crushing poverty of peasant life, the richness of Eastern Europe's multiethnic tapestry, the unspeakable horrors of war, the gray (but not necessarily black-and-white) realities of communism, and the hopes and disappointments of the century's concluding decade.

Course requirements include two take-home essay projects and an in-class midterm and final. Students may sign up for this class for 3 credits (as History 439) or 4 credits (as REES 396). The latter option will include a weekly discussion section.

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History 448/CAAS 448. Africa Since 1850.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): M. Diouf (mdiouf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a survey of modern African history. It covers particularly the colonial period and will include close looks at particular topics and reading and discussion of novels and original documents, as well as of historical scholarship.

The class meets Monday and Wednesday, from 11: 30 to 1: 00. This format will allow for combinations of lecture and discussion during each session

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History 449. Topics in Middle Eastern History.

Section 001 Cultural Memory, Cyclical Time, and the Writing of History In Early Modern Iran. Meets with AAPTIS 591.001 and Humanities Institute 511.001

Instructor(s): Kathryn Babayan (babayan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 591.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 461. The American Revolution.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julius Scott (jsscott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This lecture course covers the period from about 1760 to 1815, focusing on the origins, character, and aftermath of the American Revolution. It revisits many of the familiar themes of this period the rise of opposition to Britain, the nature of the military conflict that ensued, republican experiments that followed independence, and the new order established by the Constitution. Much of the inquiry, however, will center on the Revolution "as a social movement." To what extent did the Revolution act as a force for change within America? What role did conflicts over class, gender, and race play? Where does the American Revolution fit within the history of the "Atlantic world" during this period? Readings, which include monographs as well as a broad selection of primary source material, average about 150 pages per week. Written assignments include a midterm and a comprehensive final exam and two essays (each 8 pp., typewritten, double-spaced).

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History 463. The Origins of the American Civil War, 1830-1860.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J. Mills Thornton (jmthmtn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/W00/HS463/index.html

This course attempts to understand the causes of the American Civil War. It begins with a description of the society of the ante-bellum South; turns next to a portrait of Jacksonian politics and political ideology; then takes up that transmutation of Jacksonian ideals in the 1840's and 1850's through which hostile sectional stereotypes were defined. It culminates with an exploration of the sense in which the intellectual, social, religious, and economic conflicts in America came to be summarized by the slavery question during the period, because of the demands of political competition. There will be a midterm exam, a research paper of ten pages, and a two-hour final examination. Reading will average about 250 pages a week. Enrollment will be limited to forty students, in order to facilitate class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 4

History 467. The United States Since 1933.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sidney Fine (sidneyf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course provides a comprehensive view of American history and of life in America from the Great Depression to the present day. Among the subjects treated are the New Deal; World War II; the Cold War; McCarthy and McCarthyism; the Fair Deal; the New Frontier; the Great Society; the turbulence of the 1960's (the Black revolt and Black power, the counterculture and youth revolt, the new feminism and women's liberation); the war in Vietnam; Nixon and the Watergate affair; the 1980s and the Reagan presidency; and the presidencies of Bush and Clinton. Several paperbacks are assigned for the course, but no textbook is used. There is a midterm and a final examination in the course, and a paper is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

History 471. Gender & Sexuality in India.

Section 001 Meets with Women's Studies 483.002

Instructor(s): Sumathi Ramaswamy (sumathi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar considers the transformations of gender and sexual relations through time and across regions and social communities in different parts of South Asia. We will begin the course by considering the historiographical and theoretical problems that confront scholars interested in women's history. We will next move to a broad survey of the history of women in the subcontinent from ancient times to the present. With this background, we will go on to consider in some detail the following topics: gender and religion; the impact of colonialism, nationalism and religious fundamentalism on the economic and culture realities of women's lives; women, law and the state; women and politics; and the emergence of feminist movements in post-colonial India. Though the bulk of the course will focus on women, we will also construe "gender" and "sexuality" broadly to consider the multiple ways in which ideas of masculinity, femininity and homosexuality have been constructed in pre-modern and modern India. Readings for the course include both primary writings by women themselves as well as scholarly analyses and treatments. Because the course deliberately adopts a longue durée approach to the study of gender, readings will be drawn from the precolonial, colonial and postcolonial periods. No prior knowledge of Indian history or culture is necessary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 473/Asian Studies 473/Korean 473. Modern Korea.

Section 001 Meets with Asian Studies 381.001

Instructor(s): Henry Em

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Korean 473.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 477. Latin America: The National Period.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sueann Caulfied (scaul@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the history of Latin America from the early nineteenth century until the present. The approach is both thematic and chronological, focusing on:

  1. the colonial heritage, political independence, and the development of new forms of political rule;
  2. agrarian transformations and labor systems;
  3. urban growth and industrialization;
  4. nationalism and struggles to define national cultures;
  5. social constructions of racial, ethnic and gender identities; and
  6. revolutionary movements and military responses.

Selected regions will be discussed under each topic, with a particular emphasis on Haiti, Mexico, Brazil, Cuba, the Andean republics, and Central America.

Section 004 Languages Across the Curriculum. Students who enroll in this section should also enroll in University Course 490.001, a one-credit course will count towards a certificate in advanced second-language competence. Students will complete extra reading and writing assignments in Spanish and discussion will be conducted in both Spanish and English. Please note meeting time for this section is longer. This is for undergraduates. Students should have fourth-term Spanish competency. PLEASE NOTE YOU WILL NOT BE ABLE TO ENROLL IN UC 490.001 UNTIL AFTER THE TERM BEGINS. Instructions on how to do this will be explained in the first few class meetings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 487/Engl. 416/WS 416. Women in Victorian England.

British History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martha Vicinus (vicinus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 416.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

History 491/Econ. 491. The History of the American Economy.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Whatley (wwhatley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 or 102. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/winter/lsa/econ/491/001.nsf

See Economics 491.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

History 512. From Oligarchy to Reform: Georgian Britain, 1714-1832.

British History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael MacDonald (mmacdon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 111 or 221. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Political, economic, and social developments from the age of the Whig oligarchs to the era of the Great Reform Bill; the classical constitution and its breakdown; the triumph of ideology and reform; the American revolution and the reconstruction of the British Empire; and the Industrial Revolution and the transformation of British society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 518(MARC 425)/MARC 425. Jews and Christians in Late Renaissance Italy (1400-1650).

Section 001 Meets with History 591.003.

Instructor(s): Stefanie Siegmund (siegmund@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The separate histories of the Church and of Jews in the Italian states provide context for the critical interactions between the two. Moving chronologically and reading secondary and primary sources that include legislation, inquisitorial transcripts, sermons, plays and visual iconography, we examine three main topics: the activities of itinerant preachers in the 1470s, the inquisition of Marranos and Lutheran heretics, and the program of the Catholic Reformation. What can we learn about the history of Christianity from discussions of Jews in Christian laws, sermons, plays and art? How important was the "otherness" of Christians for Jewish self-definition, or of Jews for Christian self-definition? In addition to thematic papers, a paper based on a primary source (in translation or in the original language) will allow you to deepen your understanding of the relationship between Jews and Christians in late Renaissance Italy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 523. France, 1661-1789.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dena Goodman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A history of France, with the emphasis on the interplay of shifting attitudes and social change in preparation for the French Revolution.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 535/Armenian 535. Armenia and the Armenians in the 20th Century.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephanie Platz (splatz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 287 recommended but not required. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An in-depth investigation of the history of the Armenian people in the last century, especially the period of the massacres in the Ottoman Empire and the rebuilding of Armenian society in the Soviet Union.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 536/AAPTIS 462. The Rise of Islam.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael Bonner (mbonner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 462.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

History 550. Imperial China: Ideas, Men, and Society.

Section 001 Meets with MARC 411.001

Instructor(s): Chun-schu Chang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a systematic analysis of state, society, people, and ideas in Imperial China from 221 B.C. to the end of the 18th century. Each dynasty or period is examined by its characteristic development and unique features. The following topics are to be covered: (1) the concept and structure of empire; (2) emperors and political culture; (3) great thinkers, influential political leaders, and powerful rebels; (4) wars and foreigners; (5) Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism; (6) class, gender, and race; (7) writers, literature, and the structure of feeling; (8) science and technology; and (9) eating culture, art of entertainment, and daily life. Special features of the course include reading of Classical Chinese poetry, singing of Peking opera, and discussion of the Scientific Revolution and the birth of "Modern China" in the 17th century. The course is open to all undergraduates and graduates.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

History 552. Topics in the Early Modern History of Mainland Southeast Asia.

Section 001 Topic?

Instructor(s): Victor Lieberman (eurasia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course examines the history of Burma, Thailand, Cambodia and Vietnam from roughly 1400 to 1850, on the eve of European colonial conquest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 569/LHC 412 (Business Administration). American Business History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Lewis (lewisdl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior, senior, or graduate standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The origins and development of and growth of business are studied. The course traces the beginnings of business enterprise in Europe and describes business activities during the American colonial, revolutionary, and pre-Civil War periods. It then discusses economic aspects of the Civil War, post-Civil War industrial growth, business consolidation and the antitrust movement, economic aspects of World War I, business conditions during the 1920s, effects of the 1929 depression and the New Deal upon business, economic aspects of World War II, post-war business developments and current business trends.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

History 591. Topics in European History.

Section 002 Citizenship and Development of Human Rights. Meets with Political Science 688.001

Instructor(s): Albert Van Goudoever (albertvg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The genesis of the nation-state in the 19th and 20th centuries went hand in hand with the political emancipation of the states' inhabitants. The liberal and socialist movements resulted eventually in the participation of all citizens. These intellectual movements originated in the idea of human rights (including political, social, and cultural rights) extending to all people instead of being restricted to privileged estates. At the same time, they gave rise to the modern notion of citizenship, which entailed numerous obligations of the citizen toward the state (education, military service, identification, etc.) as part of a system requiring discipline of the citizenry. The modern state has extended its power while, particularly in the case of dictatorships, usurping the powers of citizens, such that the citizen has had to be protected against the state. And as the formation of the nation-state has entailed the identification of the individual citizen in national terms, minority problems have arisen as well. Such antagonistic factors brought about a new human rights movement, now involving protection on an international scale (e.g., by the League of Nations after World War I, and by the United Nations after World War II). This course will trace the intellectual origins and various manifestations of the human rights movement, and its effects in international law and politics. It will also trace the origins and manifestations of the modern notion of citizenship. We shall discuss the problem of the universality of human rights (or are they a mission of northwestern Europe?), the problem of collective versus individual protection, and, centrally, the application of human and civil rights in real situations. The course is constructed along the imagined line of approach of a book that does not exist except in the common activity of all participants in the class. Careful attention will be paid to current events in the news.

Expectations: active participation in discussion, one or more oral presentations, and a term project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 591. Topics in European History.

Section 003 Jews and Christians in Early Modern Italy (1400-1700). Meets with Medieval and Renaissance Collegium 425.001 and History 518.001.

Instructor(s): Stefanie Siegmund (siegmund@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The separate histories of the Church and of Jews in the Italian states provide context for the critical interactions between the two. Moving chronologically and reading secondary and primary sources that include legislation, inquisitorial transcripts, sermons, plays and visual iconography, we examine three main topics: the activities of itinerant preachers in the 1470s, the inquisition of Marranos and Lutheran heretics, and the program of the Catholic Reformation. What can we learn about the history of Christianity from discussions of Jews in Christian laws, sermons, plays and art? How important was the "otherness" of Christians for Jewish self-definition, or of Jews for Christian self-definition? In addition to thematic papers, a paper based on a primary source (in translation or in the original language) will allow you to deepen your understanding of the relationship between Jews and Christians in late Renaissance Italy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

History 592. Topics in Asian History.

Section 001 Asian Women in Transition. Meets with American Culture 510.001

Instructor(s): Kathleen Uno (ksuno@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upper-class standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the experiences of Asian women who have migrated to the U.S. from Korea, China, Japan, the Philippines, Vietnam, and South Asia from the late 19th century to the present examining women's lives in Asia and the U.S. with some consideration of Philipinas in diaspora. Major units include women and changing families and sexualities, shifting patterns of women and work, and women's issues and movements. A lecture-discussion course for undergraduate and graduate students interested in Asian, Asian American, and women's studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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