Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in History of Art (Division 392)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for History of Art.


History of Art 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from History of Art 101 to History of Art 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


Hist. Art 102. Western Art from the End of the Middle Ages to the Present.

Instructor(s): Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed 104 and 105, or 150. Two credits granted to those who have completed one of 104 or 105. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/W2000/102-001.html

A chronological survey of major achievements in Western painting, sculpture, and architecture from the 14th century to the present, this course proposes both to reveal the uniqueness of great creative personalities (how, through the manipulation of their art forms, they gave expression to profound feelings) and to place these masters within their sociocultural contexts (with their shifting conceptions of human relationships to the physical and spiritual worlds). Along the way, a variety of art-historical methodologies will be pressed into action. What we will study gives visual form to human thought and aspirations of seven centuries, and in challenging, stirring, and teaching us will reveal to us hitherto hidden truths. Except for commitment a willingness to become intellectually and emotionally involved there is no prerequisite. Course materials include a textbook, a set of study prints, and a syllabus. Students will be evaluated by way of midterm and final examinations, informed participation in discussion sections, and a short museum paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 103. Arts of Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (qning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/W2000/103-001.html

This course will take a topical approach to the arts of Asia rather than attempt a broad survey. One segment will trace the transmission of Buddhist arts (particularly architecture, painting, and sculpture) across northern Asia from the tradition's origins in India across China and into Japan. The Ming/Qing capital of Beijing and the Tokugawa capital of Edo (modern Tokyo) will be analyzed as symbols of political power. The course will also examine the social values inscribed in secular painting and graphic arts such as Chinese landscape painting, Indian miniatures, and Japanese wood block prints. Course work will include two short essays, a midterm, and a final examination. No prerequisites. First- and second-year students especially welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 113/Art and Design 113. Introduction to the Visual Arts.

Section 001 Non-Art Students Only.

Prerequisites & Distribution: This course is for non-art majors only. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Visual arts are a part of the human experience in all cultures and all time periods. The ability to appreciate, to understand, and to assess the quality of visual art can enrich a person's life and broaden one's thinking. This course will introduce students having no formal art or art historical background to the major forms of visual expression through human history from the Stone Age to the present. We will examine works of art in various media such as painting, drawing, printmaking, photography, sculpture, architecture, graphics, and industrial design. Students will learn how artists use the language of form to communicate information, to express emotion, to explore the world of nature and the world of the mind. Students will learn the basic techniques of the various media. Students will learn how the art of a time and place defines and expands the boundaries of that culture. Assigned readings and visits to museums and galleries will help students become critical consumers of the visual culture as they learn to see, appreciate, and assess art forms. Requirements include periodic quizzes, a final exam, and a term paper. Students will also make some ungraded drawings and paintings as analytical tools.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 001 In the Service of the Empire: Photography and Imperialism.

Instructor(s): Jasmine Alinder (jalinder@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/W2000/194-001.html

The invention and popularization of photography corresponded with a flurry of expansionist projects by European powers and the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This course will explore the uses of photography at different moments of colonial expansion in Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, and Latin America. We will examine how photography was used by imperialists to represent both themselves and the colonized to the people "at home." At the same time, the course will consider how colonized peoples adopted photography and put it to their own uses. The role of photography as a supposedly objective recorder of "exotic" societies will receive special attention.

Throughout the course, we will take advantage of photographic collections at the University of Michigan, including the Bentley Historical Library and the Museum of Anthropology, which have particularly rich holdings in the area of the U.S. presence in the Philippines, Cuba, and Puerto Rico.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 210. Norm and Storm: Rebellion in Art.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin Powers (mpow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/W2000/210-001.html

This is a course about rebellion in art. By "rebellion" is meant the questioning, breaking or subversion of norms as expressed in art or in action. The image of the rebel is a familiar one in the late twentieth century, being employed in the entertainment industry, in political platforms, and in international culture wars. This course seeks to offer a critical, historical basis for assessing claims in contemporary media by tracing the histories of rebellion in China and in Europe, with one portion being devoted specially to how individuals have challenged authorities in the past, but periodically we will read recent editorials and cultural criticism. The aim is that students should acquire a sense of the political behavior; artists whose reputation is associated with such behavior; and works which question or subvert racial, gender or class/occupational norms. We will also consider how rebellion itself can be pressed into service as a special kind of norm. Requirements include one short paper, a midterm, and a final examination. (III.4)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 212/Architecture 212. Understanding Architecture.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Not open to students enrolled in Architecture. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/W2000/212-001.html

This three-credit course is the principal introductory survey course in architecture. Using historical and contemporary examples, it examines the architect's role in society and the role of architecture and urban design in shaping the built environment. Upon completion of the course the student is expected to be able

The format consists of two one-hour lectures per week. Several design-related exercises requiring the student to experience, analyze, interpret, and report on aspects of the built environment will be required. The course is enhanced by weekly recitation sections, which are run by five graduate teaching assistants. Recitation sections focus on improving the student's ability to venture into and sustain architectural discourse.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 222/Class. Arch. 222. Introduction to Roman Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Susan Alcock (salcock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~ipcaa/222/

See Classical Archaeology 222.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 260. European Painting and Sculpture of the Seventeenth Century.

Section 001 http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/faculty-staff/naginski.html

Instructor(s): Erika Naginski (naginski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/W2000/260-001.html

This course will explore the visual culture of a historical period marked by the last great flourish of royal power, by secularization and the rise of Enlightenment philosophies, and by the subsequent collapse of political regimes. Against this volatile background, we will trace out the transformations, both innovative and reactionary, that underlie artistic practices from the High Baroque period to the French Revolution of 1789. Lectures and sections will address selected themes as they appear: the image of absolutism; the Arcadian landscape; the establishment of the hierarchy of genres; Rococco eroticism; still-life and opticality; the impact of art criticism, the Salon, and the art market; the archaeological imagination; history painting and its lessons; the artist as visionary; and the culture of radicalism. Artists to be considered include Velázquez, Rubens, Bernini, Poussin, Watteau, Piranesi, Boucher, Chardin, Hogarth, Kauffman, Blake, and David among others. Readings will range widely to include both period texts and recent critical analyses, the aim being throughout to situate works of art in relation to social values, aesthetic philosophies, institutional structures, and political change. Two papers, midterm, and final. (IV.3)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 272. 20th-Century Art: Modernism, The Avant Garde, The Aftermath.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria Gough (mgough@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/W2000/272-001.html

In this course we will explore, more or less chronologically, the work of major 20th-century European and American artists. Two fundamental issues will dominate the survey. The first concerns the way in which avant-garde artists, beginning with Picasso's influential attack on traditional pictorial conventions in Les Demoiselles d'Avignon (1907), have repeatedly, in their artistic practice over the course of the past ninety years, interrogated the nature of signification itself (in other words, how form produces meaning). Relatedly, the second issue that we will consider is the avant-garde's ambitious but theoretically highly controversial relationship to revolutionary politics. The course is designed so as to help you develop the vocabulary, the analytical and visual tools, that are necessary in order to come to grips with the great diversity of works and critical debates that constitute the history of 20th-century art. Course requirements: attendance at lectures and sections, midterm and final exams (both in-class), and two 5-8 page papers. (IV.4)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 332/Amer. Cult. 332. Art on Trial: American Public Monuments and Political Controversy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Diana Linden (dllinden@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($20) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($20) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/W2000/332-001.html

"Professor Linden, do all murals cause problems, or just the ones you're interested in?!?!"
Curious student.

Good question, astute student. It has been noted that public art with a social orientation would seem an ideal genre for a democracy. Yet loud objections over funding, placement, and representation often follow the unveiling and dedication of public works of art. Such controversies enable us to examine how the patrons, artists, and public view each other and social events. In this class, we will discuss American and Mexican public murals, monuments, and memorials from the 19th and 20th centuries. How has public art been used to communicate national values and create a pantheon of national heroes? Which events and people become memorialized, and which excluded? Among the topics and objects we will consider are the commemoration of Emancipation and the Civil War, tributes to 19th-century labor leaders and anarchists, art and fostering of civic pride, Diego Rivera's murals for the Detroit Institute of Arts, representations of and by African Americans and white ethnics in New Deal murals, Detroit's tribute to boxer Joe Louis, and the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. (IV.4)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 360/CAAS 380. Special Topics in African Art.

Section 001 African Diaspora Arts.

Instructor(s): Dana Rush (danarush@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 108 or 214. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/W2000/360-001.html

This course explores African diaspora arts grounded in the many diverse aesthetic, philosophical, historical, political, and religious consciousness of peoples of African descent living in the Caribbean and the Americas (Haiti, Jamaica, Brazil, Surinam, and the United States). A short introduction to the major African visual and religious traditions that survived the trans-Atlantic slave trade and flourish to the present in the Caribbean and the Americas will be presented first to establish a comparative foundation for the class. Then, the class will focus on the centuries-strong preservation and ongoing transformation of African visual and religious cultures surviving in African diaspora communities from the period of the trans-Atlantic slave trade to the present. Diverse art forms ranging from sculpture and shrine arts to music and performance traditions will be examined. Classes will be part lecture, part discussion complemented by a range of movies and videos. Course requirements: weekly readings, midterm exam, final exam, and research paper. (II.4/V.4)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 380/Class. Arch. 380/Anthro. 380. Minoan and Mycenaean Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bryan Burns (bryburns@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 221 and 222. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~classics/ca/380/index.html

See Classical Archaeology 380.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 382/ACABS 382/Cult. Anthro. 381. Introduction to Egyptian Archaeology.

Section 001 Meets with ACABS 686.

Instructor(s): Janet Richards (jerichar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies 382.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 391. Survey of Japanese Painting.

Section 001 Meets with Asian Studies 380.001.

Instructor(s): Maribeth Graybill

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course deals primarily with Japanese painting and prints of the mid-16th through the mid-19th centuries, with close attention to their cultural milieu. During these three centuries, the political order changed dramatically, from a fragmented feudal society where real power came from the sword or gun but the imperial court and Buddhist church continued to wield great cultural prestige to a unified state under strict military rule, where paradoxically a new urban bourgeoisie found the time and means to create an utterly secular and modern culture. In this highly contested arena, paintings and prints were used by all monied classes to construct public and private identities. Among the genres we will examine are: wall paintings for Zen monasteries and warlords' castles; "classicizing" paintings for the imperial court and its partisans; "occidentalizing" images of Europeans and European-style painting; idyllic landscapes by Sinophile poets and eccentrics; and popular prints of actors, courtesans, erotica, and cityscapes for the mass market. There will be two short papers, a midterm, and a final exam. (III.3/4)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 393. Junior Proseminar.

Section 001 The Dialogue with Asia in Modern Art.

Instructor(s): Martin Powers (mpow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concentration in history of art. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/W2000/393-001.html

This seminar aims to explore ways in which the art of "Asia" has been adopted, adapted, or represented in the art and criticism of Europe and the U.S. since the 18th century. This course is unusual in that students will have the opportunity to encounter, not only Western accounts of Asia in modern art, but Asian perspectives as well. This should help students to appreciate more fully which ideas and techniques were adapted from Asian practices, which were fabricated, and whether the Asian connection was broadcast or suppressed and why.

The bulk of the reading will focus upon China, with a substantial section on Japan. The reading material will be divided into three areas in which references to Asia have been historically significant, namely:

  1. the "natural" garden and Rousseauian rhetoric;
  2. Japonisme and formalism;
  3. "Zen" painting, the "gestural" brush, and other arenas in which "Eastern" philosophy has been recruited into the language of modern art.

In addition to participating in class discussion, students will write one short paper on accounts of Asia in narratives of modern art, and one longer research paper in one of the three areas of interest listed above. (III.3)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 001 Museums in U.S. Society: Culture, Nation, and Power. Meets With RC Core 334.001.

Instructor(s): Diana Linden (dllinden@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/W2000/394-001.html

This course will focus on the history of museums in the United States and the ways in which museums present America's past and contemporary society. Art museums will be our primary concern, but we will also consider historic homes, ethnic and culturally specific institutions, history museums and recent exhibitions (and art work) that critique museum practices. Among the topics we will discuss are: issues of audience and interpretations; ethical issues facing museum professionals and who these professionals are; the representations, misrepresentations and self-representations of gender/race/ethnicity/class in museums. We will combine the theoretical with the practical with in-class assignments and exercises. Museum visits (as a class and individually) and meetings with museum workers are planned. (museology)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 002 Medieval Architecture.

Instructor(s): Robert Maxwell (maxwell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/W2000/394-002.html

This course provides an introduction to the built environment of the Middle Ages from the fall of Rome to the dawn of the Renaissance. Students will become familiar with the architectural traditions of the great cathedrals, hallowed pilgrimage churches, and reclusive monasteries, as well as castles, mead halls, and other civil structures. We will integrate the study of architecture with the study of medieval culture, exploring for example the impact of the cult of saints, princely courts and civil authority, religious reform and radicalism, crusading and social violence, and rising urbanism. In this way we will explore how the built environment profoundly affected medieval audiences and shaped daily life. (IV.2)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 003 Auguste Rodin

Instructor(s): Erika Naginski (naginski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/W2000/394-003.html

In 1903, the poet Rainer Maria Rilke described Auguste Rodin's sculpture in terms of a discovery of the surface, "the differently great surface, varied, accentuated, accurately measured, out of which everything must rise." This course will assess the relevance of this claim both for Rodin's achievements and for the rise of avant-garde sculptural aesthetics in the wake of Romanticism's great experiments. Our deciphering of Rodin's formal systems and artistic philosophies will be inserted into the larger historical context of sculptural practices in the late 19th century-the point of departure being the urban transformation of Paris under Haussmann, which not only prompted a new awareness of sculpture's presence in the spatial fabric of city, but also drew attention to the increasingly tenuous line to be drawn between the architectural frame and the sculpted object. Rodin's works will provide the testing ground for this radical reformulation of sculptural idioms, through which the intermingling of previously distinct genres (the portrait bust, the decorative objet d'art, the political allegory, the commemorative monument) fueled a conceptualization of sculpture as emotive fragment, as unique vehicle for tactile and optical operations, and as singularly equipped to make manifest the controversial eroticism of the nude. Requirements: short written responses to weekly readings, in-class presentation, one research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 004 History of Architecture II. Meets with Architecture 323. Prerequisite: Arch 313.

Instructor(s): Glover

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A continuation of Arch 313, this course is the second in the undergraduate two-course sequence (Arch 313/323) surveying the history of architecture from antiquity to the present. The course examines leading developments in the history and theory of architecture and urban design from the Baroque through the 20th century. Consideration is given to the role of innovation and change in architectural conception, stylistic expression, building typology and construction technique. Also examined is the way architecture has historically been shaped by varying combinations of the formal and theoretical intentions of the architect, the preferences and needs of the client and the particular mix of social, economic, cultural and technical factors operating to define the specific characteristics of a given time and place.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 396. Honors Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 393. Open to students admitted to Honors in History of Art. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Individual Honors research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of instructor and Honors in History of Art

Hist. Art 399. Independent Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Supervision of each student's work is assigned to an appropriate member of the staff.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4, Permission of instructor

Hist. Art 403/NR&E 403. History of Human Interaction with the Land.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Brabec (ebrabec@umich.edu), A Bullock

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/W2000/403-001.html

The intent of this course is to survey the human management and design of open space throughout history. The discussions will focus on gardens, urban open spaces and regional and environmental planning. Prototypes will be viewed and analyzed not only within the cultural context of their own time and place, but also in terms of the influence each has had in shaping 20th-century perceptions of the landscape. The course will also introduce students to specific areas of knowledge and expertise which currently comprise the practice of landscape architecture. The potential roles landscape architects will play in shaping and managing the environment in the future will be discussed. The course will consist of slide-illustrated lectures by the instructor and guest lecturers. There will be no regularly scheduled discussion section. Questions are welcome and encouraged during the lecture. In addition to taking a midterm and a final exam, there will be a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 440/Class. Arch. 440. Cities and Sanctuaries of Classical Greece.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nassos Papalexandrou (papalexa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in archaeology. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 440.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

Hist. Art 471. Investigations of Recent Art.

Section 001 Representing Reality: the History of Documentary Photography.

Instructor(s): Jasmine Alinder (jalinder@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 272. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/W2000/471-001.html

Since its invention in 1839, photography has served as our most reliable tool for documenting the world as it is. Or has it? Perhaps it is more accurate to say that photographs are artificial representations that create the illusion of reality in order to induce the viewer to accept what is ultimately only the perspective of the image-maker. This course will use this latter supposition as a launching pad for the examination of the history of the photograph as document. We will consider the use of photography in the nineteenth century as a tool for scientific documentation and evidence including the cataloguing of human types, the representation of the Civil War, and the invention of the criminal mug shot. We will then examine the birth of social documentary photography just before the turn of the century with photographs of urban squalor by John Thomson and Jacob Riis. We will continue to trace the history of the social documentary style through the twentieth century with Lewis Hines' campaign against child labor, the Farm Security Administration photographs of the Depression, World War II images of the Holocaust and Japanese-American internment, and photographs of Vietnam and political demonstrations in the 1960s. We will conclude by examining a group of contemporary photographers, including Martha Rosler and Allan Sekula, whose work openly questions the truth-telling properties of documentary photography. (IV.4)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 473. Twentieth-Century Architecture.

Section 001 Meets with Architecture 543.001

Instructor(s): Anatole Senkevitch (senkanat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 102. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/W2000/473-001.html

The course offers a critical examination of the transformations in architectural theory and practice from the late 19th through the 20th century, with emphasis on elucidating the leading struggles for definition, meaning, and form in the architecture of this period. Also considered is the link between theory and practice; the relationship between conceptual and aesthetic as well as technical factors; and the cultural, economic, social, and political context out of which they evolved. (IV.4)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Hist. Art 487/Chinese 475/Asian Studies 475/RC Hums. 475/Phil. 475. The Arts and Letters of China.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Chinese 475.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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