Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in Lloyd Hall Scholars (Division 445)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for Lloyd Hall Scholars.


Lloyd Hall Scholars 113. Studies in Social and Political History II.

Section 001 From the Kennedys to the Simpsons: The Family in Western Societies and Scholarship

Instructor(s): Rothman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (3). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do you feel about living with your parents in your thirties? What do you think of same-sex families? Do you want to have children?

These are very personal questions. However, our answers to them depend not only on our personal inclinations, but on values and customs shared by others in our society. What can different perspectives (economic, psychological, sociological) tell us about our personal experiences? What can different families teach us about the things we take for granted?

In this course we will take a look at our families, as well as at certain celebrity families, like the Simpsons and the Medicis the famous banker family that ruled Florence during much of the Renaissance. We will explore what different academic disciplines, such as cultural anthropology, social history, gender studies, economics, and media studies can tell us about these families. The class will join current debates about the effects of e-mail on family ties, homemaking and career, and state support to single-parent families. We will discuss the ways other cultures have defined the family and its obligations to its members. By linking individual life histories to larger social and cultural processes, this course will let us transform personal experiences into an examination of how societies work. Finally, by becoming acquainted with key concepts and methodologies of different academic fields, we'll appreciate the unique contribution of each discipline to our understanding of human families.

This course does not assume prior knowledge of the fields discussed. Rather, it is aimed at introducing these fields by reading selected articles about the family from different viewpoints, by visiting academic units across campus, and by having guest faculty in class to tell us about their research projects on specific aspects of the family. In addition to reading, course work will include writing a few papers and small-scale assignments that will demonstrate your understanding of key concepts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 114. Literature and the Arts in Society, I.

Section 001 Designing the Perfect Place: Can You Create Your Perfect World?

Instructor(s): Tanya Topolewski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (3). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Do you like where you grew up? Or were you bored where you lived? Did everything you saw look the same to you? Or did you ever wish you could play Sim City with your neighborhood, town, or city and create it from the ground up: a brand-new, fabulous place that had all the entertainment, houses, great schools, and character you've ever imagined? In this course you will have the chance to play God and create your perfect world.

This course will prompt your creativity by reading the works of visionary designers from Le Corbusier to Aldo Leopold. We will compare their ideas to our own about what makes perfect places and then we will contrast these ideas with what America looks like today. Using Ann Arbor as a model, we will critically assess its neighborhoods, city, and suburbs, and discuss how growth is reshaping this town and how it could be directed toward "perfection." We will explore the complexities of creating environments by examining the interrelationship of social status, wealth, class, ethnicity, and race as exemplified in films like Edward Scissorhands. Lastly, we will explore how America has become the way it is by looking at the history of governmental and social programs that have shaped the American attitude toward land.

This course will start with your ideas, creativity, and ability to critically comment on what you see and read and then challenge you to create your perfect world. You will develop designs for portions of growing cities and learn to make physical models and simple drawings that vividly illustrate your perfect place.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 120. Political and Social Problems I.

Section 001 Jobs vs. the Environment: Money-Grubbing or Tree Hugging. Meets with SNRE 306.003

Instructor(s): Teresa Buckwalter

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (3). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Do you want to make a lot of money? Do you also want to protect forests and wild animals? Are you afraid that you have to choose one or the other: Scrooge or the Unibomber? Well you don't.

In this class, we will explore the often-misunderstood relationship between our economy and the environment. You will come away with a better understanding of the economic system you live in, as well as a better understanding of how this system impacts the environment. Discover that you, as a consumer and money-maker (eventually), have more power than you think. We'll examine current ideas in the environmental movement, such as "sustainability," and find out the strengths and weaknesses of the sustainability movement that promises to create jobs, reduce taxes, increase social spending, AND restore the environment.

These topics will be explored through writing and discussion, through your own study, evaluating to what degree a local business, organization or even your own family is economically viable and environmentally sustainable. You will not only come away with better writing skills, but also better speaking and computer graphic skills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 121. Political and Social Problems II.

Section 001 From Designer Babies to Jurassic Park: The Future of Genetic Ethics

Instructor(s): Karen Mauprivez

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (3). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Do you ever wonder if Jurassic Park could be more than a movie? Should the Lost World become a reality? Upon completion of the Human Genome Project (HGP), many questions will remain unanswered.

This introductory course in genetic ethics will cover the issues that can be seen in the headlines on a daily basis. We will discuss values, morality, and personal stances regarding everything from designer babies and cloning to the rights about privacy for individuals, employers, and whole communities concerning and individual's genetic make-up. Classroom initiatives and current events will provide a forum for in-class debates, small group discussions, and essays. Some of the topics we will cover include: genetic privacy; sex selection; newborn screening; and DNA databasing. Legal issues and policies concerning genetics will also be presented.

Readings will include A Brave New World, Boys from Brazil, and a course pack comprised of recent news stories and medical journal articles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 001 From Kindergarten to College: Issues in Education

Instructor(s): Jocelyn Flint

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

You have arrived! As a first-year college student, you have made it through 12 years of schooling, standardized tests, and applications. About to embark on four pivotal years at a university, and at an age where grammar and secondary school experiences are not too distant memories, you are at an ideal position from which to engage in a critical look at the education system through which you have traveled. How were you taught in grammar school? Were your school's educational standards fair to all students? What did your high school English curriculum contain and how useful a curriculum was it? What are your expectations of a college education and can they be realized? All of these questions touch on educational debates of recent public interest.

This course will allow you to trace your educational path, from grammar school to the first year of college, while targeting some of the more critical issues that arise along the way: affirmative action in college admissions; multiculturalism in the classroom; standardized testing; public funding and government responsibility; tracking and its effectiveness; and finally, the academy and its organization.

Students will be asked to accompany class readings with reflections on personal experience. We will use these experiences as starting blocks for class discussion, while working to effectively integrate such personal anecdotes into argumentative writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 002 Beyond O.J. and Nicole: The Realities of Sexual and Domestic Violence

Instructor(s): Melissa Dreyling

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Everyone has his or her opinion about the guilt or innocence of O.J., but how many have thought about the complicated dynamics of domestic violence that led to the trial of O.J. Simpson?.

In this course, we will examine the cultural and legal history of domestic and sexual violence and explore how this type of violence affects families, communities, and individuals. We will also explore a variety of issues that many people identify as the sources of sexual and domestic violence like pornography, prostitution, media representations of women, and gender roles of men and women.

Many sexual assaults that happen on college campuses involve acquaintances and go unreported. We will explore questions such as why women are not reporting assaults. We will also look at how other factors, like alcohol, play a role in campus assault and examine some of the myths about sexual assault. For example, is acquaintance rape just a matter of women not being forceful enough when saying no?.

Assignments will include four papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 003 The Psychopathology of Everyday Life: Writing about Psychology and Culture

Instructor(s): Jean Leverich

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What does it mean to be "normal"? How do communities decide who or what is normal? Likewise, what does it mean to be "abnormal" or deviant, and how far from the norm does one need to stray to be labeled deviant by the community? For example, are tattooing and piercing "normal" today? More seriously, what sense can we make of the recent high school shootings and bombings? Are these boys monsters or ordinary teenagers?

This course asks you to hone your writing and critical thinking skills by examining the complicated relationships among individuals, community, conformity, and deviance. Although the main focus of this course will be on your own writing, we will also explore a variety of challenging, provocative, discomforting, and otherwise engaging essays, stories, and films. Expect to read essays from psychology (Like Freud's Totem and Taboo), anthropology (Geertz's Deep Play: Notes on the Balinese Cockfight), and sociology (Goodman's Growing Up Absurd ). We'll also read articles from the popular media and view recent films such as Paris is Burning and Suburbia. Everything we read and discuss in this class is intended to serve as a springboard for you to develop and articulate your own arguments and analyses about the normality/deviance continuum, how individuals fit into communities, how communities define norms, and how communities scapegoat those who seem "different."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 004 The Sixties: Sex, Drugs, Rock and Roll...and Your Parents

Instructor(s): Joe Gonzalez

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What did your parents do in the Sixties? Did your father serve in Vietnam? Did your mother take birth control pills? Did they experiment with drugs or go to Woodstock? In this course, you the children of the Baby Boomers will explore the world your parents encountered when they were your age: the politics, the war, the popular culture, even the sexual revolution of the Sixties.

In order to explore the Sixties, we will read autobiographies, memoirs and works of history. But we will do more than read; we will also experience. We will watch some of the movies and television of the period and listen to some of its music. We will also experience the Sixties through the eyes of real people, like a Vietnam veteran and a social activist who live here in Ann Arbor and will visit our class.

We will also write. You will write five papers in two drafts, four relatively shorter ones and one longer one. You will also be expected to actively participate in class discussions about the material and the writing of other students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 005 Personal Environmental Activism

Instructor(s): Lani Pascual

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"On the morning of August 16, 1996, Greenpeace divers slipped into Seattle Harbour carrying chains to wrap around the propellers of five U.S. factory trawlers which fish off the northwestern shores of Washington State. While the divers were in place twelve more protesters attached themselves to a floating boom and formed a human barricade."

In this course we will explore the personal reasons that inspire ordinary people to work on environmental causes from recycling to ecoterrorism. We will also discuss the many definitions of "environmentalism." We begin by reading Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, the book which launched the environmental movement, and end with a class survey project that explores why people do or do not consider themselves environmentalists. Not only will you leave the class with a greater understanding of how you can personally affect your relationship to the environment, but you will also leave with a strong understanding of college writing. We will compose five critical essays on the impact of environmentalism on policy, populations, groups, and individuals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 125(165). College Writing.

Section 006 Race and Medicine in American History

Instructor(s): Alyssa Picard

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

If you arranged your friends in order of skin color, from lightest to darkest, where would the line between white and Black be? Race is more than just pigment: it's a social construction, a product of our ideas about what makes someone "white" or "Black" or anything else. And, as a social construction, race has changed over time.

Sickness and health, too, are social constructions. They are products not only of biology, but of our ideas about what it means to be healthy, of our ability to detect and define "normal" and "abnormal" physiological and psychological states, and of our mastery of technologies that allow us to control or change the bodies with which we are born.

From Conquest to the present day, medical practitioners and patients have participated in the social constructions of both race and health. This class will explore those constructions with an eye towards understanding how race and medicine have brought each other into existence over the five hundred years since contact between the old world and the new. We will examine the cultural and biological reasons for Native American population declines (and increases), the ways in which medical ideas about race functioned during slavery and after, the encounters of Southern and Eastern European immigrants with American medicine, the long legacy of eugenic thought in American history (continuing to today), and the racial politics of venereal disease and teenage pregnancy. Our goal is to better understand both race formation and the development of medical ideas about race in the American context.

Because this course is also intended to introduce you to the critical analysis and rhetorical principles of college writing, you will compose and revise several essays, and will write constantly in other genres. We will communicate through in-class writing and over e-mail. As part of my ongoing experiment with democratic pedagogy, you will participate in devising the grading standards for the class, and you will workshop one another's written work on a regular basis. Your final grade will be based on a portfolio of your written work, and on your participation in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 140. Arts and Humanities.

Section 001 Introduction to Painting, Drawing, and Thinking About Art

Instructor(s): Annie O'Kane

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides you with two things: studio experience in drawing and painting, and an opportunity to explore the concepts and language of art criticism. Not only will you become familiar with the tools and techniques of painting, but you will also explore your thoughts and feelings about art in a series of art critiques designed to bolster your knowledge and authority on the subject of art.

What's more important: individualism and self-expression, or working in a rich tradition? Are great artists self-made, or do they build upon their predecessors? Certainly Michelangelo studied Cimabue and Giotto: and Monet surely studied all three. But none was held captive by the past; each did something new. Most artists are indebted to those who preceded them, but not slavishly so; predecessors serve best as sturdy partners in an ongoing dialogue that helps to inform one's present creative vision.

LHSP encourages all of you to develop your artistic talents, especially if you're not in the School of Art. Because studio art classes at the University are restricted to art majors, we offer you professionally-taught classes, taught in the Alice Lloyd Art Room. This class is open to all LHSP students in all colleges, and requires no previous training or experience in art. All students are responsible for providing their own art supplies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 150. Focused Studies.

Section 002 Life and Death Decisions: First Aid Training for Common Student Emergencies. (1 credit). Meets January 26-April 12. (Drop/Add deadline=February 9).

Instructor(s): Natalie DeNooyer, Sarah Smith

Prerequisites & Distribution: Lloyd Hall Scholars. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of four credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Your friend is passed out, lying in a pool of vomit. What do you do?

Your roommate suddenly begins choking at dinner. What do you do?

This class will prepare you to deal calmly with those emergency situations that punctuate college life. This is not a pre-med class; instead, this is a class where you will learn to how to handle situations that you might encounter on a Thursday night in the dorm, or at your own house, or in the dining hall. You will also learn how to perform CPR and rescue-breathing on adults and infants. (Don't get too excited, we use dummies!!) We will cover a lot of emergencies and have tons of fun acting them out. And for passing the class, you will get official certification cards from the Red Cross.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 001 Jewelry Making and Metal Working. Meets January 24-April 10. (Drop/Add deadline=February 7).

Instructor(s): Annie O'Kane

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Have you ever wanted to design your own necklace? Or give a good friend a ring you made especially for her or him? Or sculpt an object in metal? In this class, you will learn the basics of metal working by designing and constructing your own pieces of jewelry or metal objects. You will receive instruction in designing, forming, joining, and stone setting using copper, brass, nickel, silver, and semi-precious stones. All students are responsible for providing their own art supplies.

LHSP encourages all students to develop artistic talents, especially if you're not in the School of Art. Because studio art classes at the University are restricted to art majors, we offer you professionally taught courses, held in your own art room in Alice Lloyd Hall. Our studio art classes are open to all students and require absolutely no previous training or experience in art.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 002 A Sense of Place: Home and Ann Arbor. Meets January 27-April 13. (Drop/Add deadline=February 9).

Instructor(s): Ralph Williams

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do we see and understand the world around us? What can our hometown tell us about ourselves how are our experiences shaped by the space in which we live? In exploring these themes we will take a preliminary look at the social and physical archaeology of three cities Jerusalem, Rome, and Venice. These examinations will prepare us for a study of Ann Arbor, and then of your hometown. The final project will be a study of your hometown along the lines of those you have done for our other cities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 003 Leadership Challenge. Meets January 25-April 11. (Drop/Add deadline=February 8).

Instructor(s): Jonah Burakowski

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an interdisciplinary course designed to take the student from the theory component of leadership development to the practical process. Course activities will cover the basic concepts essential to personal skill development and behavioral leadership, while discussion and experiential exercises will allow students to self-initiate skill development and examine their beliefs.

This seminar will cover a list of topics, with the student responsible for bringing to class further information on the topic of the day. This seminar will provide students with the experience in theorizing and applying these theories to aspects of leadership. This exercise will help to improve the ability to conceptualize logically and imaginatively while focusing on communication skills. Students will also gain experience in using interpersonal skills in group dynamics.

Students will (1) Develop critical thinking skills; (2) Improve writing skills; (3) Refine interpersonal communication skills which will enable the individual to lead a group meeting, mediate conflict, and practice successful design making; (4) Develop decision-making skills for on-the-scenes responses to crisis management; (5) Develop strategies for adapting leadership styles to given situations; (6) Begin to build awareness of and sensitivity toward individual differences in socialization, race, religion, sexual orientation.

Students will be able to (1) Use critical thinking skills to become an effective decision maker; (2) Use interpersonal skills to build rapport with individuals and be viewed as an approachable resource; (3) Use ability to read the climate of a given situation and adjust leadership styles to benefit all; (4) Use an approach to leadership that Honors various "human circumstance"; (5) Inspire and motivate others toward a common purpose; (6) Build a cohesive and spirited team.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 004 History of Israel. You must also register for t ACABS 321/Hist. 306/Rel. 358. Meets January 26-April 12. (Drop/Add deadline=February 8).

Instructor(s): Brian Schmidt

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will discuss topics from Ancient Civilization and Biblical Studies 321, that students want to pursue in more depth. This class gives you an opportunity to pin the professor down, get him to explain what it is that he is really saying, and make him come clean about his assumptions. In LHSP 151.004, you have a unique opportunity to get behind the lecture, and to find out how your professors think about your education. If you would like to take this mini-course, you must also register for the main course. (ACABS 321/Hist. 306/Rel. 358)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 151. Focused Studies.

Section 005 Get on the Bus: Travelling the Highway of America's Civil Rights Movement.

Instructor(s): Joe Gonzalez

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits. A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What are you doing for spring break? Are you going to Ft. Lauderdale? Cancun? Or do you want something different something you will remember long after a sunburn heals and a hangover fades? If you do, then look no further. We'll get you out of Ann Arbor and out of the classroom. We'll take you places that you have never seen before. We'll show you what it was like to be your age and risk your life for the cause of freedom.

In this course, you will visit the people and places of America's Civil Rights Movement. You will see not only the site of Martin Luther King's most famous speech, but also the balcony where he was assassinated. You will visit other places as well: Greensboro, North Carolina, where young African-Americans sat at a "Whites Only" lunch counter and demanded to be served; Selma, Alabama, the location of two famous civil rights marches; and Meshoba County, Mississippi, where the Klan murdered three young civil rights workers during the Freedom Summer of 1964. Along the way, you will meet people who were there on the front line in the fight for civil rights.

The course requirements are simple. You will keep a detailed journal during the trip, recording your impressions. You will also write a short paper after you return, due at the end of the semester.

So leave your books, your computer and your sunblock behind. Come experience history with your own eyes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Lloyd Hall Scholars 200. Advanced Leadership and Service Learning.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and participation in Lloyd Hall Scholars Program. No credit granted to those who have completed LHSP 100. (1). (Excl). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

LHSP 200 is intended for second year students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program; students who have taken LHSP 100 may not enroll in this course. The focus of the course is the student's engagement with, and assessment of, community service in any one of a variety of forms. Engagement will require that a student identify and serve with a community service agency for a sufficient period of time to gain an insight into the strengths and weaknesses of the particular activity. Assessment will require group discussion and a series of written essays that evaluate both the individual experience of service and the variety of political and philosophical arguments offered both for and against such service.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4: Restricted to students in the Lloyd Hall Scholars Program

Lloyd Hall Scholars 299(200). Independent Study.

Instructor(s): David Potter (dsp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). A maximum of 20 Lloyd Hall Scholars Program credits may be counted toward a degree.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Lloyd Hall Scholars Independent study.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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