Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in Political Science (Division 450)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for Political Science.


Poli. Sci. 111. Introduction to American Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret Howard (meghow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/winter/lsa/polsci/111/001.nsf

Political Science 111 covers all the basics about American national government and politics: the Constitution; civil liberties and civil rights; the three branches of U.S. government; and, how ordinary citizens relate to government, through political parties, interest groups, campaigns and elections, and by expressions of public opinion. Our emphasis is on national government; we do not address state and local matters or national policy questions much in this class. The readings not only inform, but also challenge you to decide if the U.S. really is a democratic republic, as it claims. What could we, as a nation, do better? Don't worry if you have never had a political science course in your life before taking PS 111: We assume that you have not! This class is open to all concentrators. In the mass lecture and the section meetings of 25 students or fewer, we demonstrate how American national government affects all of us daily in ways we don't stop to consider very often.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 140. Introduction to Comparative Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines how democracy evolves and functions in different settings around the world. We start with the emergence of democracy in Western Europe, examining the factors that give rise to it and help it survive. We then examine the origins of fascism in Germany and Japan; and the rise of communism in Russia and China, attempting to understand why these alternatives to democracy flourished in those settings and why they later collapsed. This leads to an analysis of the current struggle between reformers and hardliners over the move to market economies and liberal democracy in Russia, China, and Eastern Europe, and an assessment of the prospects for democracy in Mexico and Nigeria. Finally, we examine the probable evolution of democracy in advanced industrial societies. In addition to two lectures, there are two meetings a week in relatively small discussion sections, designed to encourage active discussion of these topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 160. Introduction to World Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Harold Jacobson (hkj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://polisci.lsa.umich.edu/faculty/Jake/160.html

This course explores the functioning of the contemporary global political system. Principles are illustrated with contemporary material. The first section examines the structural features of the system. It considers the development of states and nationalism and assesses the importance of actors other than nation states, particularly international governmental and non-governmental organizations and multi-national corporations. Factors that shape the foreign policy of states such as geography and technology, political culture and public opinion, economic systems and relationships, political structures and processes, and the preferences and behavior of individual leaders are considered in the second section. The third section deals with the instruments of foreign policy the use or threat of military force, economic aid and sanctions, and diplomacy and negotiations. The fourth section deals with international law and institutions. It analyzes the patterns of collaboration and cooperation that states have developed to promote security, prosperity, and respect for human rights. The final section considers possible future developments in the global political system.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 3

Poli. Sci. 390. Practicum for the "Michigan Journal of Political Science."

Instructor(s): Daniel Levine (dhldylan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission of the chair.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course allows students to gain experience working on the journal under the direction of the chair or other appropriate faculty member. This experience involves editing the Michigan Journal of Political Science. In addition to taking part in working on the year's issue, students wishing credit for working on the journal would do readings and write book reviews and research notes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 396/REES 396/Hist. 333/Slavic 396/Soc. 393. Survey of East Central Europe.

Section 001 Eastern Europe Since 1900. Meets with History 439.001

Instructor(s): Brian Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397. (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~baporter/syl43900.html

See History 439.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 401. Development of Political Thought: Modern and Recent.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ted Miller (tedhm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing or two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course covers the history of modern political thought from Hobbes through Nietzsche. We will focus on conceptions of political society, the state, authority, the nature and value of political participation, liberty, equality, class conflict, and nihilism through readings of Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, John Stuart Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. Brief selections from other authors will be included (this year, Filmer and Priestly). There are no secondary textbooks for this class; we will focus on original texts. Two meetings per week will be devoted to lecture and discussion. Students are expected to keep pace with the course's reading assignments, and lectures will reflect this assumption. Participation though questions and comments in class are welcome, as are office hour visits. There will be two brief papers and a final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 402. Selected Topics in Political Theory.

Section 001 Resistance, Civility, and Politics.

Instructor(s): Dennis McEnnerney (dennismc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 101 or 400 or 401. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dennismc/W00-PS402.htm

Resistance has long occupied an ambiguous place in modern political thought: while recognized as a basic right to be invoked in the face of tyranny, actual acts of resistance have typically been treated as illegitimate if not criminal in most situations. Recently, however, both passive and active resistance have become part of the landscape of political thought and practice. This course will explore the history of these developments and inquire into the challenges and dilemmas presented by new resistance practices. Course readings will include theoretical works by Thoreau, Locke, Elshtain, Gandhi, Sartre, Camus, and Foucault, as well as novels, histories, and memoirs having to do with various kinds of resistance (ecological, women's, anti-colonial, racial, sexual). This winter's PS 409 will be a writing-intensive course that satisfies the Advanced Writing in the Disciplines (or ECB) requirement. Students in PS 409 will ALSO have to enroll in and attend one of two discussion sections: PS 491.002 (Fridays 10-11) or PS 491.003 (Fridays 11-12). To enroll in the sections, contact the instructor for an electronic override.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 410. American Policy Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton (hantonjr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the creation and implementation of public programs in the United States. Lectures, discussion, readings, and written assignments focus on the policy-making roles of Congress and the presidency and the policy-implementation roles of the bureaucracy and courts. We will pay special attention to the way the federal branches share power, and we will examine the contribution of various levels of government to policy formulation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 414. The Politics of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dow

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl). May be repeated twice, for a total of six credits.

No Description Provided

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Poli. Sci. 419/CAAS 418. Black Americans and the Political System.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vincent Hutchings (vicenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors and creators and initiators in the political process. And the course will focus upon the inputs, the responses of the decision makers and the outputs in terms the political process. And the course will focus upon the inputs, the responses of the decision makers, and the outputs in terms of public policies. And finally the various controversies will be explored and analyzed in regard to African American politics.

Student evaluation will be based on two exams and a ten-page paper. Of course, participation in each seminar is expected. The course will have three to four texts that will be selected later. Finally, the methods of instruction will include lectures and classroom discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 420/Comm. 484. Mass Media and Political Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nick Valentino (nvalenti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Communication Studies 484.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 421. American State Government.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott Allard (sallard@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/winter/lsa/polsci/421/001.nsf

State governments occupy an increasingly more important and vital space in the American Federal system today than even ten years ago. As the Federal government continues to devolve policy responsibilities to subnational government, governors and state legislatures have become more active in a range of new policy-making activities.

This course will examine the basic institutional features of state government, the changes that state government has undergone in an era of devolution, and the policy-making challenges that will confront state leaders in the coming decade. The course also will focus upon how the relationships between state and local government will affect how our leaders address issues of poverty, economic development, transportation, and social service provision.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 422/WS 422. Feminist Political Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joan Sitomer (jsitomer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the politics of gender, as articulated by various feminist theorists. Readings are drawn from multiple disciplines (e.g., political theory, philosophy, psychology, sociology) and from different national and international perspectives. The two-fold aim of the course is to explore how feminist analyses complicate and enhance the study of politics, and how assumptions shape the study of gender.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 439/Econ. 325. Inequality in the United States.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank Thompson (fthom@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 and 102. (3). (SS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Economics 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 441. Comparative Politics of Advanced Industrial Democracies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Madeleine Hosli (mhosli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is concerned with the politics, institutional structures and electoral systems of European states. It provides an overview of theoretical approaches to study electoral procedures and coalition-formation in multiparty systems and illustrates how governments are elected and operate in several European states. The focus is on both large European states, such as Germany, France, and the United Kingdom, and smaller ones, including the Benelux countries. It indicates the relationship of these states with the institutions of the European Union (EU) and with European states that are not (yet) EU members. Analysis of multiparty government in the past decades will be compared with recent data on elections, governments and policy outcomes in Europe. Grades are on the basis of two short (six to ten page) papers, class participation (which may include a short presentation), a midterm and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 444. Government and Politics of Russia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Judith Kullberg (kullberg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The focus of this course is the politics of the states that emerged from the Soviet Union, especially Russia and the member nations of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). Although the emphasis is thus on the present, the ongoing political and social transformation of the region will be examined within the broader context of Russian and Soviet history. We will explore how Gorbachev's attempt to restructure Soviet socialism was partially a consequence of the development of the Soviet system since the 1917 revolution, but also a response to mounting social, economic, and political problems. Many of the problems of communism that existed prior to 1985 political corruption, economic irrationality, and inter-ethnic conflict, to name only a few were not solved, but aggravated by Gorbachev's reforms.

The collapse of the Soviet Union initiated a second period of rapid change, in which the former republics have struggled to establish viable states and economies. Although several republics have made considerable progress toward democracy, continuity of Soviet institutions, behavioral patterns, and culture has impeded the performance of new democratic institutions, and continued economic decline threatens their existence. As a means of conceptualizing the dynamics of post-soviet politics and identifying possible solutions to ongoing crises, the course will draw upon comparative theories of democratization and institutional change.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 452. Israeli Society and Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Zvi Gitelman (zvigitel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Israel is a microcosm of important political processes and issues common to many polities around the world. This course examines some of these, including ideology and nation-building; how the state manages a multi-ethnic society; the intersection of ethnicity, religion and the state; the role of political parties; the relationship of domestic to foreign policies; the nature and consequences of proportional representation and coalition formation. We take up some of the more contentious issues in contemporary Israel politics: the role of religion in public life, relations between Jews and Arabs and between Ashkenazi and Sefardi Jews, the resettlement of immigrants from Ethiopia and the former Soviet Union.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 453. Government and Politics of the Middle East.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): I Sunar

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

After defining the Middle East in geographic, cultural, historical and political terms, the course will explore the origins, processes and outcomes of state-building in various Middle Eastern countries. Authoritarianism and democracy, religion and ethnicity, economic development, and opposition movements will be studied in terms of their relationship to patterns of state-building. The nationalist patterns in Turkey, Egypt and Syria, the Islamic model in Iran, the consociational state in Lebanon, the "traditional" monarchy in Saudi Arabia will be analyzed as different modes of state-building with differential political, social and economic outcomes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 455. Government and Politics of China.

Section 001 China in the International Arena

Instructor(s): Ellis Joffe (ejoffe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course addresses three questions: What does China want in the world and why? What means does it have at its disposal to achieve its objectives? What have its leaders done in the international arena since the establishment of the communist regime until today. The first part examines China's traditional world view and traces how its collapse gave rise to modern nationalism. The second analyzes the significance of China's economic and military power in its foreign relations. The third part looks at the 50-year record of its activities abroad. Requirements: exam at the end of the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 471. The American Foreign Policy Process.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): J. David Singer (jdsinger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course has several objectives: to provide the advanced undergraduate student with: (a) an understanding of the global and domestic context within which U.S. foreign policy is formulated, executed, evaluated, and modified; (b) alternative interpretations of the policy process and context; (c) methods by which these interpretations can be compared and tested against the empirical evidence; and (d) the ability to evaluate past policy decisions and propose future ones. We also hope to enhance the student's ability to read, analyze, and write in a manner that is conceptually precise, analytically rigorous, and semantically clear.

There will be a few short abstracts, memos, and analyses, plus one larger written assignment. There will be assigned reading in: (a) two or three required texts; and (b) in the scholarly journals. This is not an "oral textbook" course; therefore lectures will be minimal and informal, but rigorous and interactive. This is not the best course for students who are passive, or excessively concerned with admission to law school.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1-2 Waitlist Code: 1, To get an override, the student must be a graduating senior and bring writing samples and a copy of transcript.

Poli. Sci. 472. International Security Affairs.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Paul Huth (phuth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course students will study three topics related to international security affairs: (1) The conditions under which states are able to resolve long-standing disputes through negotiated settlements; (2) the impact of democratic political institutions on diplomacy and the use of military force by state leaders; and (3) the effectiveness of policies of deterrence in preventing war. Readings will focus on basic research on each of these topics while lectures will supplement the readings by considering how current international events and US foreign policy behavior compare with the findings of more basic research. All students may also elect the advanced writing option in addition to the required exams. If students select the writing option, they will be required to write three papers over the course of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 481. Junior Honors Proseminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mark Brandon (mbrandon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to Honors concentrators with junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Documents.center/psjr/slide1.htm

This is a seminar that is designed to introduce students to the Honors program in political science and the process of research design leading to the defense of a thesis prospectus. Students must be admitted to the program before enrolling in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 482/Econ. 483. Positive Political Economy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yan Chen (yanchen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 401. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~yanchen/econ483/econ483.html

See Economics 483.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 483. American Political Parties and Electoral Problems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Samuel Eldersveld (sjelders@umich.edu) , Hanes Walton (hantonjr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Poli. Sci. 111, 140, 410, or 411. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/W00/PS483/index.html

The objective of this course is to acquaint the student with the American system of party politics. We will emphasize the development and operation of our parties as organizational systems, their impact on the political behavior of the public, and the roles or functions they play in our political system. In addition we will often compare the American party system with party systems in other societies. Throughout the course we will be inquiring what types of structures parties are, what activities they engage in, and how well they meet the needs of the American people. In this context we will naturally consider a variety of proposed reforms of the party system. This will be a lecture and discussion course. It is hoped that the student will be involved in discussions during many sessions of class. The student is responsible for the text materials assigned. In addition, at least four items should be selected from the reading list supplied. Written reports of 2-3 pages in length on these readings will be due at roughly 3-4 week intervals. A research paper is required, due on the last day of class. The nature of this paper will be discussed in class. There will be a mid term exam, plus a final exam. Students will be graded on the following basis: Midterm exam (20%), Final exam (30%), book reports (20%), research paper or report (30%).

Text: Eldersveld and Walton, Political Parties in American Society. (1999).

Supplementary Reading: (see class outline reading list)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 486. Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vincent Hutchings (vicenth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides a selective survey of the vast literature on public opinion in the contemporary United States. Our purpose will be to understand public opinion and to assess its place in the American experiment with democracy. A central theme underlying the readings will be the role that various groups play in evaluating, and ultimately holding accountable, political leaders. Students are assumed to have some familiarity with public opinion literature and the American political system. Grades will be based on a midterm and final examination and, depending on enrollments and assignment of teaching assistants, on a series of short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 491. Directed Studies.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

No Description Provided

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Poli. Sci. 492. Directed Studies.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A directed study course on an individual research topic that is developed between an individual student and a faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 494. Senior Honors Proseminar.

Section Contemporary Political Thought: Modernity, Science, and Political Judgment

Instructor(s): John Campbell (jccamp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to senior Honors concentrators. (4). (Excl). No more than four Honors credits may be elected as part of a concentration plan in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT).

No Description Provided

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Poli. Sci. 495. Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory.

Section 001 Science and Technology: Societal Effects Debates, Late 19th Century to the Present

Instructor(s): Ted Miller (tedhm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The effects of science and technology on society have been an ongoing topic among modern (and "post-modern". political theorists. We trace elements of this debate in this course from the late 19th Century to the present. We will ask, "What is it to claim a capacity for political judgment?" and then we will consider how scientific and technological developments have challenged such claims (especially in the context of the modern state). We will follow debates that have since ensued. We will consider the enthusiasm that accompanied early attempts at a scientific approach to politics, and the counter-claims of its critics. Readings will include works by Nietzsche, Weber, Engels, Lippman, Dewey, Oakeshott, Gadamer, and Foucault. Particular attention will be devoted to Herbert Marcuse's One Dimensional Man, and Hannah Arendt's The Human Condition.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Section 001 Political Parties and Party Systems

Instructor(s): Pradeep Chhibber (pradeepc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

No Description Provided

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Poli. Sci. 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Section 002 Democratization in Global Perspective

Instructor(s): Ronald Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

No Description Provided

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Poli. Sci. 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

Section 002 History and Politics of Chemical and Biological Warfare and Disarmament. Meets with RC Interdivisional 450.001

Instructor(s): Susan Wright

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Documents.center/disarm.html

See RC Interdivisional 450.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 529/Public Policy 529. Statistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John Chamberlin (johnch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior coursework in calculus or concurrent enrollment in Math 413, and permission of instructor. Previous coursework in statistics is not required. (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided

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Poli. Sci. 592. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400 level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Advanced Internship requires careful, individual planning between senior students in Political Science and individual faculty members who approve the internship and provide instruction. To register for the course, the student must complete the internship form and obtain an override to enter the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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