Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in Psychology (Division 455)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for Psychology.


The Department of Psychology offers three introductory courses: Psychology 111, Psychology 114 and Psychology 115. Any of the three courses meets the prerequisite requirement for the concentration and serves as a prerequisite for the area introductory courses. Psychology 114 and Psychology 115 are Honors introductory courses open to Honors students and others with permission of the instructor.

Department of Psychology disenrollment policy for Psychology 111, 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, and 390. Students must attend discussion section by January 15 or contact the GSI, or they may be disenrolled from the course.


Psych. 110. Learning to Learn.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Priti Shah (priti@umich.edu), W.J. McKeachie (billmck@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a course in cognitive psychology and motivation intended for students who wish to improve their skills and strategies for learning and memory. The topics to be covered will include: an introduction to cognitive psychology; the comprehension of both oral and written language; attention; memory and retrieval; mnemonics; organization, memory; cognitive skills; problem solving; creativity; learning styles, motivation, anxiety; learning in groups; and self-regulation. The class will include a lecture hour two days a week and weekly two-hour laboratory. The laboratory session is essential for helping to improve student learning and thinking. Nonetheless, simply carrying out the exercises in laboratory would be meaningless if students did not have a clear understanding of the conceptual base which will enable them to generalize beyond the specific exercises of the laboratory. Thus the lectures and readings are also an essential part of the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ann Merriwether (annmerri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 111 serves, as do Psych. 114 or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112, 113, 114, or 115. (4). (SS). Psych. 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/111.060

This course is a broad introduction to the field of psychology. We will cover many topics, including perception, the nervous system, learning and memory, psychological development, intelligence, and psychopathology. There will be discussion sections offering students an opportunity to examine and discuss lecture material.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Psych. 111. Introduction to Psychology.

Section 030 Students Registering For Section 030 Should Register For Either a Discussion or a Lab.

Instructor(s): Anne Merriwether (annmerri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 111 serves, as do Psych. 114 or 115, as a prerequisite for advanced courses in the department and as a prerequisite to concentration. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112, 113, 114, or 115. (4). (SS). Psych. 111 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 111 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a broad introduction to the field of psychology. We will cover many topics, including perception, the nervous system, learning and memory, psychological development, intelligence, and psychopathology. There will be discussion sections offering students an opportunity to examine and discuss lecture material.

Sections 047, 048, 049, 050, LABS. The lab sections of Psych. 111 will meet once a week for two hours. Students in these sections will have a unique opportunity to apply knowledge from the text and lectures using hands-on demonstrations and experiments each week. The goal of the labs is to help students develop a deeper understanding of how experiments test psychological concepts and theories. Students in these sections will be required to attend the labs weekly, actively participate in all lab activities, and write a series of brief reports. The lab sections are designed to foster active participation and learning. Students who register for the labs do not need to register for a discussion section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Psych. 114. Honors Introduction to Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marita Inglehart (mri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students; others by permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 112, 113, or 115. (4). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 114 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to explore contemporary psychology. At the end of this term, the student should realize that psychology covers a tremendous variety of topics and that the approaches to studying these topics are equally numerous. In order to achieve these goals, this course will cover a broad area of topics: Part 1 is a general introduction to psychology (definitions, history, methods). In Part 2, we will look at psychology on four different levels of analysis, namely on a biological level (the brain, evolution and the biological basis of behavior, behavioral genetics), a level of studying basic processes (perception, learning, information processing, motivation, and emotion), on the third level of understanding the person (development, personality theories, psychopathology, treatment of mental disorders), and finally understanding the individual in a social context (social cognition, social influence, social interaction: intra- and intergroup processes). In Part 3, we will look at one specific problem, namely the student's transition from high school to college, and how this problem can be approached on a biological level (stress and infectious diseases), on a basic process level, on the level of looking at one person (the personality characteristics that might make an adjustment to a transition easier) and on a social level (how does social support influence our adjustment to transitions in our life). The text used is Gleitman, Psychology Norton. A course pack will be available at Dollar Bill Copying

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 115. Honors Introduction to Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jun Zhang (junz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to Honors students; others by permission of instructor. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 111, 112, 113 or 114. (4). (NS). (BS). Psych. 115 may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Students in Psychology 115 are required to spend five hours outside of class participating as subjects in research projects.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will provide an overview of the field of psychology from a natural science perspective. Topics to be covered include nervous system, sensation and perception, learning and memory, language, cognition, motivation and emotion, sex, human development, biological rhythm and dream, drug action, and mental disorder, with an emphasis on underlying brain mechanisms. Although there is no prerequisite, students are expected to have basic knowledge and good background in chemistry and biology. Attendance to lecture/discussion is mandatory. Students are evaluated based on exams, papers, as well as preparation, presentation and discussions in the class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 001 Health & Healing: Mind & Body.

Instructor(s): Anne Murphy (jamurphy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will explore conceptions of health and healing within a broad range of traditions, from conventional allopathic medicine to shamanism. We will study the mind/body relation within these traditions as well as consider current scientific studies that elucidate how the mind-body connection impacts on health. This seminar will encourage a broadening of our conception of health to include physical, mental as well as spiritual well-being. Students will examine their personal beliefs and understanding of health as well as study the influence of culture on medical practices. Other topics will include stress, pain, addiction, and depression. Grades will be based on short written assignments, class participation, and a small self-designed project. There will be some choice in determining the basis for the grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 120. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 002 Psychology and Non-Ordinary Experience

Instructor(s): Richard Mann (rdmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will explore the experimental, anecdotal, and theoretical work that suggests that we humans are capable of intuition and knowledge that seriously challenge the prevailing conceptions of human potential and sensory-based reality. Experiences of non-ordinary reality are accepted as valid across a wide range of cultures and under varied conditions. However, it is only recently that such phenomena as remote viewing and holistic mind-body connections have begun to cross the boundary into the scientific community, stimulating both research and strenuous efforts to debunk what has been reported in the literature. We will review this literature and its critics. We will explore the possibility of replicating or extending some of these studies. And we will review efforts to make theoretical sense of what has been found to date.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 121. First-Year Seminar in Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001 The Human Mind and Brain

Instructor(s): Thad Polk (tpolk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (NS). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~tpolk/psych121/

How are mental processes like memory, language, and attention implemented in the brain? What is the neural basis of insanity? Of emotions? Of sleep? What, if anything, can the brain tell us about consciousness? Within the last few decades, science has made significant progress on these and related questions by studying the effects of brain damage and by recording brain activity in intact individuals. In this seminar, we will survey this exciting field. We will first familiarize ourselves with the structure of the human brain and then learn what is being discovered about how the brain implements a variety of mental processes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 122/Soc. 122. Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001 Dialogues on Race, Gender, Sexual Orientation, Religion, or Ethnicity

Prerequisites & Distribution: Intended primarily for first- and second-year students. May not be used as a prerequisite for a concentration in psychology. (2). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration in psychology or sociology. May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/index3.html

In a multicultural society, discussion about group conflict, commonalities, and differences can facilitate understanding and interaction between social groups. In this course, students will participate in structured meetings of at least two different social identity groups, discuss readings, and explore each group's experiences in social and institutional contexts. Students will examine psychological, historical, and sociological materials which address each group's experiences, and learn about issues facing the groups in contemporary society.

The goal is to create a setting in which students will engage in open and constructive dialogue, learning, and exploration. The second goal is to actively identify alternative resolutions of intergroup conflicts. Different sections of this course focus on different identity groups (for example, white people/people of color; Blacks/Jews; lesbians, gay men, bisexuals, and heterosexuals; white women/women of color; Blacks/Latinos/Asians; men/women).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 204. Individual Research.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research under the direction of a member of the staff. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 206. Tutorial Reading.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual plans of study under the direction of a member of the staff. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 211. Outreach.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee ($15) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Project Outreach enables students to do field work in local community settings. The purpose is to gain an understanding of yourself, the agency in which you will work, the people whom you will serve, the psychological concepts observed in action, and to provide a genuine community service. Outreach includes approximately 45 agencies in which you can provide direct service to children in day care settings, adolescents in after-school programs, handicapped children and adults, women, physically ill adults and children, persons legally confined to criminal institutions, and others. All sections are two credits, requiring six hours of work per week including four hours of fieldwork; journal writing, readings, papers; one hour lecture and one hour discussion. Students need to check the Time Schedule for lecture/discussion times and meeting places per section. Students are invited to stop by the Undergraduate Office at 1044 East Hall beginning November 15, 1999 to pick up an Outreach Booklet and receive information regarding registration, field work, and general course information for the Winter Term 2000. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Sciences concentration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 211. Outreach.

Section 001 Working With Preschool Children. (2 credits).

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee ($15) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Students will work at a placement with infants, toddlers, and preschool children. The children with whom you work will come from a variety of backgrounds including some children "at risk" due to such factors as living in single-parent or low-income households, or experiencing special educational or emotional needs. Lectures and discussion will address the diversity of experiences that impact young children and their development in our culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 211. Outreach.

Section 002 Big Sibs: Community and Opportunity. (2 credits).

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee ($15) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Through the Big Sibs program you will become involved in a one-on-one friendship with a child in the community age four through fifteen years. You will develop a meaningful individual relationship with a child in need of a role model, mentor, and companion. The program enables you to become involved in the larger Ann Arbor community as you and your little sib participate in free or low cost, educational and fun activities. The corresponding lecture series addresses various issues that impact childhood, including poverty, racism, and divorce.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 211. Outreach.

Section 003 Juvenile Delinquency & Criminal Justice. (2 credits).

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee ($15) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

The Juvenile Delinquency and Criminal Justice section of Project Outreach is designed to provide students with experience in and knowledge of the criminal justice system. The course consists of a field placement, a lecture series, and group discussions. The field placements match students with juveniles or adults in a number of placement settings in the criminal justice system. These include Maxey Boys Training School, Arbor Heights, Boysville, the Forensics Center, Adrian Training School, and COPE Alternative. The lecture series is intended to expose students to issues relevant to juvenile delinquency and criminality such as the influences of sexism and racism in the criminal justice system, the antecedents of delinquent and criminal behavior, the effects of child abuse, the intersection of substance abuse and mental illness with criminality, and the treatment programs available in institutions. It is our hope that you will not only learn about the system but have the opportunity to reach out to juveniles and adult criminals and have a positive impact on their lives.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 211. Outreach.

Section 004 Working With School-Age Children and Teens. (2 credits).

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee ($15) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Establish meaningful friendships with and serve as positive role models for teenagers or adults whose behavior is in conflict with the rules and laws of our society. Work in group settings at correctional facilities or individually where juvenile delinquents or adults live or go to school. Help plan and carry out activities that will foster individuals' self-esteem and permit them to recognize and develop their skills and strengths. Learn about juvenile delinquency, criminality, the criminal justice system, gang behavior, institutionalization, and rehabilitation.

Students will work at a placement with elementary, middle school, or high school students. The individuals with whom you work will come from a variety of backgrounds are considered "at risk" due to such factors as living in single-parent or low-income households, or experiencing special educational or emotional needs. Lectures and discussion will address contemporary issues which impact children and their development in our culture. Students also learn about the wide range of career opportunities for working with youth.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 211. Outreach.

Section 005 Health, Illness and Society. (2 credits).

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee ($15) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Help patients and families in medical and other health care settings by offering empathy, emotional and practical support in waiting rooms, at bedside, in community health clinics and in other settings. Provide supervised occupational, physical, rehabilitative, educational, and recreational therapy and support for people with special physical or health needs: senior citizens; children who are physically impaired; people who are HIV positive; and people with chemical dependency problems, or work with groups trying to prevent particular health problems, to promote health education, or those that are advocating for improved health services. Learn about health care, health promotion, and how people cope with stress.

This course will have two major components: classroom and fieldwork. These components will interface so that the student has an opportunity to do direct work with patients, family/friends, and staff in a medical setting or with groups working on issues in the health field and then consider the experience within the framework of a series of lectures which will be presented in class. Class time will be divided between a Presentation Series including lectures, films, guest presentations, and small discussion groups with students. Important Note: For this section, students are required to complete four hours weekly of volunteer placement for a total of 40 hours minimum during the academic term.

For those students intending to volunteer at University of Michigan Medical Center: Hospital placements can only be started when a student has been through all the orientation and processing steps required by the University Hospitals. Explanation of these requirements will be given on the first day of class. At this meeting the Coordinator of Volunteer Resources at the University of Michigan Hospitals will give you the information you need to begin the process of becoming a hospital volunteer. After this meeting you will be able to sign up for an interview at one of the placements. DO NOT MISS THE FIRST CLASS! Students interested in Adult Services may call 936-4327 to schedule an interview as soon as they have registered for the term and been accepted into the class. Check the on-line version of the Time Schedule to learn where this first meeting will be held. Also, be prepared to attend a mandatory general orientation meeting at the University Hospital the second or third week of classes. Details of these meetings will be given on the first night of class. The other placements provide their own orientation at times to be arranged. You are encouraged to contact these placements to arrange to find out more about them or to volunteer.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 211. Outreach.

Section 006 Exploring Careers. (2 credits).

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in introductory psychology. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits may not be included in a concentration plan in psychology. Two separate sections of Outreach count as an experiential lab for the Psychology concentration; they do not count as a lab for the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Laboratory fee ($15) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/211/

Exploring Careers will help students explore how their understandings of themselves, their interests, their values, and their skills relate to ideas about college major and career possibilities. The aims of this section are twofold: (1) to provide students with a psychological perspective on the development of career identity and decision making processes and (2) to encourage the development of the skills needed to identify career options, become familiar with occupational resources, and to practice job or internship search strategies.

Topics for lectures and discussions will include career decision making, self-assessment and exploration, social and cultural issues that affect people's career paths, job search strategies, and how to make the most of available resources at Career Planning and Placement. In addition, students will have the opportunity to hear from guest speakers and panel members from a variety of occupations who will share information and discuss their own experiences.

Exploring Careers is structured so that students will benefit from attending and participating in all sessions and completing assignments based on personal goals. The instructors encourage a friendly, open atmosphere where students can actively explore areas of interest and discuss the challenges and hurdles along the way.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 302. Special Problems Lab in Psychology/Natural Science.

Section 001 Laboratory in Cognitive Neuroscience. (3 credits). This course satisfies one of the advanced laboratory requirements for psychology concentrators.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Hutsler (hutsler@umich.edu), James Hoeffner (jhoeff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psychology 330 or 340. (3-4). (Excl). (BS). May be used as a lab in the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration with advisor approval.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/winter/lsa/psych/302/001.nsf

This computer-based laboratory course will introduce students to research models used in the fields of biopsychology and cognitive neuroscience. With the help of simulations, students will learn about such topics as neuroanatomical organization, neurophysiology, the behavior of neuronal networks, conditioning, and behavioral psychology. Through hands-on experience with these topics students will gain practical knowledge about research design and methodology, data analysis, and the written preparation of research findings. Grading will be based upon in-class laboratory exercises as well as written lab reports, research papers, and examinations.

This course satisfies one of the advanced laboratory requirements for psychology concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 001, 002 Michigan Mentorship Program. (3-4 Credits). Contact equart@umich.edu for Enrollment Information.

Instructor(s): Ellen Quart (equart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. Psychology 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycdept/mmentor/

This experiential learning course is designed to provide mentoring experiences for students in the Ann Arbor Public Schools who are regarded at risk for low achievement. We will pair college students with elementary and high school students in order to help students with homework, to encourage effective learning strategies, to set goals, and to help them develop appropriate coping strategies. College students who can relate to younger students' concerns are a tremendous resource for their learning and motivation. Conversely, college students can learn a great deal from children and adolescents as they work through issues.

The course will provide a personal relationship and useful academic information in order to help grade school students become more successful and more motivated in school. University students will be expected to participate in mentoring a minimum of six hours per week, read related background information, keep a weekly journal, and write a 5-10 page paper. Students will meet in seminar, weekly (Tuesday or Wednesday evening) to discuss relevant issues. Students must have Junior standing. Admission is by application only.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5: Attend general informational meeting to receive application. E-mail Dr. Quart for days and times (equart@umich.edu)

Psych. 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 003 Child Care Practicum Pound House. (2-4 credits). Course Requires Practicum Hours At Pound House Children's Center, Contact Carolyn Tyson At 998-8399.

Instructor(s): Toni Antonucci (tca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. Psychology 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This experiential learning course is designed to provide mentoring experiences for students in the Ann Arbor Public Schools who are regarded at risk for low achievement. We will pair college students with elementary and high school students in order to help students with homework, to encourage effective learning strategies, to set goals, and to help them develop appropriate coping strategies. College students who can relate to younger students' concerns are a tremendous resource for their learning and motivation. Conversely, college students can learn a great deal from children and adolescents as they work through issues.

The course will provide a personal relationship and useful academic information in order to help grade school students become more successful and more motivated in school. University students will be expected to participate in mentoring a minimum of six hours per week, read related background information, keep a weekly journal, and write a 5-10 page paper. Students will meet in seminar weekly to discuss relevant issues. Admission is by application only. (Contact Carolyn Tyson At 998-8399.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 004 Tutoring Children in Schools

Instructor(s): Scott Paris (sparis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. Psychology 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Psych. 305. Practicum in Psychology.

Section 010 Alcoholism and Other Behavior Disorders In the Community Setting, II. (3 credits). Call 998-7952 For Registration Information.

Instructor(s): Robert Zucker (zuckerra@umich.edu) , Fredric Blow (fredblow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (1-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. Psychology 305 must be taken for at least three credits to count as an experiential lab in the psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The University of Michigan Alcohol Research Center (UMARC) provides a continuing opportunity for students to gain valuable research experience in community settings as part of the Center's ongoing program of field research studies. Current projects include; (a) a program for screening substance use problems and depression among pregnant women who come for general health care, which may involved the opportunity to conduct follow-up interviews with these women; (b) a project focused on the relationship between alcohol and injury in the Emergency Department which will involve conducting in-person and telephone interviews with patients; and (c) other developing field research studies being carried out by Center scientists. Projects provide students with the opportunity to obtain research experience in the social and health sciences.

A focused, collateral series of weekly seminars allows students to interact with Center scientists carrying out a variety of studies pertaining to the etiology, course, and treatment of substance abuse. Students administer brief questionnaires to persons in primary care offices, and conduct telephone follow-up interviews with participants in the Health and Pregnancy Study as well as the Emergency Department Study.

Requirements include: interest in social sciences or health sciences; attendance at the weekly seminar, ability to travel to project sites (car preferred); excellent interpersonal skills; and experience interacting with the public. Furthermore, students will gain valuable research experience in the areas of alcohol problems, depression and behavioral health screening. This course is the second term of a two-term practicum sequence. The sequence satisfies both lab requirements for students pursuing the Psychology concentration. Those who register for the course will be required to attend a research meeting, a one hour weekly seminar/lecture, and 7.5 hours of field work each week during the academic term. Students also are required to write a research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5: Contact fredblow@umich.edu or hflynn@umich.edu for interview.

Psych. 306. Project Outreach Group Leading.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jerry Miller (jmmiller@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology, Psychology 211, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides students with knowledge and practice in areas related to enhancing the educational experience of undergraduate students involved in community service learning placements in a community setting. Students will learn to supervise and evaluate the placement activities of others, and gain essential skills in facilitating small group discussions which integrate field experiences with theoretical concepts. Students will be evaluated on the basis of two projects, a number of other regular written assignments, and the quality of the small group discussions which they facilitate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 307. Directed Experiences with Children.

Section For Enrollment Information Call 998-8070.

Instructor(s): Karey Leach (karey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. (3-4). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of 7 credits.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Join professional early childhood educators in a classroom with children who vary in age from 18 months through kindergarten within one of the two UM Children's Center laboratory preschool programs. Classroom placements require eight to twelve hours per week (scheduling four-hour blocks of time).

Together the professional teaching staff and university students work as a team in each classroom. Seminar relating theoretical issues to applied practice is held every two weeks. No prerequisites required. Course is intended to introduce students to children in a setting designed for observation, participation and research, while providing young children with an exemplary preschool experience. The Children's Centers are open to the public.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor required for all students. Call (734) 998-7600 to arrange permission.

Psych. 308. Peer Advising Practicum in Psychology.

Section 001 Applications In the Undergraduate Office (1044 East Hall) 11:00 AM to 4:00 PM weekdays or Call 647-3711.

Instructor(s): Lisa Damour (ldamour@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology and permission of instructor. (2-3). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (2-3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycdept/peeradvising/

This course is a supervised practicum for Psychology concentrators who wish to learn to help other Psychology students through academic advising/counseling. Students are selected by application (available in the Peer Advising office, 1044 East Hall, and due on November 17) and interview for the training and supervised practicum.

Required training in peer facilitation and Psychology concentration requirements is scheduled on Sunday, January 9 and Sunday, January 16, 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. A two-hour, faculty-supervised weekly class is required. Required also are weekly journals and a final research paper. The purchase of one paperback text, three editions of the Peers and Preventions journal and a course pack are necessary.

In addition to experience with individual academic advising, students in this course may elect to help facilitate "focus groups" on subjects of interest to Psychology concentrators. The class is limited to about 20 students in order to promote discussion, training, and supervision of the practicum. For further information, please call Dr. Lisa Damour at 647-3920 or send e-mail to ldamour@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 3

Psych. 310/Soc. 320. Training in Processes of Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001 Mandatory Retreat Jan 7 Through Jan 8 and Mar 11.

Instructor(s): Ruby Beale (rubeale@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. Open to juniors and seniors. (3). (Excl). May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration. A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/index14.html

This course is designed to give students a foundation in awareness, knowledge, understanding, and skills needed to effectively facilitate multicultural group interactions including structured intergroup dialogues. This course will focus on content and process issues in an academic and applied setting. The topics of this course include social identity group development, prejudice and stereotyping and their effects on groups; difference and dominance and the nature of social oppression; culture, cultural cues and judgments, basic group facilitation skills and their applications in multicultural settings. This is a highly interactive and intensive course which includes group projects outside as well as in class. There are mandatory retreat dates listed in the time schedule for the class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5: Permission of instructor. Contact 936-1875 for details.

Psych. 311/Soc. 321. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles Behling (cbehling@umich.edu), Pat Gurin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psychology 310 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). A total of six credits of Psychology letter-graded experiential courses may be counted for the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This practicum is open to students who have completed Psychology 310, and requires applied work in facilitating intergroup dialogues. Students serve each week as peer facilitators in Psych/Soc 122, "Intergroup Dialogues." Additionally, students also participate in weekly supervision seminars to discuss their work in the dialogue groups, and to discuss theory and practice of group observation, in-outgroup conflict intervention skills, intergroup communication and community building, methods of attending to personal issues when facilitating.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

Psych. 312. Junior Honors: Research Methods in Psychology.

Section 001 (Honors). Permission of Instructor required

Instructor(s): Toni Antonucci (tca@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors concentrators in psychology. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended to help students identify a research topic and develop a research plan for the senior Honors thesis. Students will become familiar with a broad array of research methods in psychology, and will read and critique published research papers. By the end of the term each student will have written a research proposal that can serve as the introduction and methods sections of the Honors thesis and will have identified one or more faculty members who are willing to supervise the research project in the following year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 312. Junior Honors: Research Methods in Psychology.

Section 002 (Honors). Permission of Instructor required

Instructor(s): Park

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors concentrators in psychology. (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Psych. 315/CAAS 327. Psychological Aspects of the Black Experience.

Section 001 Social Psychology of the African Family

Instructor(s): Denis Ugwuegbu (dcugwueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in psychology or Afroamerican and African Studies. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 327.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 317. Community Based Research.

Section 001 Requires Concurrent Enrollment in Psych 318. Meets with American Culture 309.001.

Instructor(s): Lorraine Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology, and concurrent enrollment in Psych. 318. (3). (Excl). Psych. 317 and 318 may be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycdept/Detroit.Initiative/

This course will cover research methodologies that are useful in understanding how communities function. These include community needs assessment, analysis of census and other statistical information on communities, evaluation of programs offered by community organizations, and surveys of community residents. Through readings, lectures, and discussion, the class will consider what is involved in each of these methods and when each is appropriate for studies of communities. Students will use one of these methodologies to carry out a research project in collaboration with a community organization in Detroit. Results from this project will be communicated through a paper and poster session. Requirements include readings, lectures, and a write-up of the research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 318. Laboratory in Community Research.

Section 001 Students Will Select One of the Following Times: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Or Thursday from 2:00-6:00. Requires Concurrent Enrollment In Psych 317. Meets with American Culture 309.001.

Instructor(s): Lorraine Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in Psych. 317. (1). (Excl). Psych. 317 and 318 may be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycdept/Detroit.Initiative/

This experiential lab involves one visit per week to an African-American, Arab-American or Latino community in Detroit. Students will be assigned to work with community-based organizations on projects to improve the well-being of children and families. Projects involve such activities as tutoring, developing outreach activities, assisting in child care settings, and working in community education projects.

Internships will be supervised by the instructor and program staff. Students must be enrolled concurrently in Psychology 317: Community Based Research. This type of direct experience provides for a better understanding of course concepts, more in-depth learning, and a location to participate in a community research project.

This lab requires attendance at training sessions or community participation three hours each week. Students will turn in weekly attendance sheets that document their work. Transportation will be provided. An experiential journal, readings, and group project reflecting this experience will be completed for Psychology 317.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 330. Introduction to Biopsychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stephen Maren (maren@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~maren/psych330.html

This course surveys the field of biopsychology, an area of study concerned with biological and evolutionary explanations of perception, cognition, and behavior. Because these functions depend on the nervous system, a major focus of the course will be on the structure and function of the brain with an emphasis on brain-behavior relations. Topics will include: evolutionary perspectives on the brain and behavior; anatomy and development of the brain; neural signaling (neurotransmitters, drugs, hormones); and neural mechanisms of sensory processing, motor control (movement, action), motivated behavior (feeding, drinking), emotion, mental disorders, learning and memory, and language and cognition. Students must register for the lecture and one discussion/practicum session. This course is a prerequisite for many upper-level courses in biopsychology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Psych. 331. Laboratories in Biopsychology.

Section 001 ONLY satisfies the Upper-Level Writing Requirement

Instructor(s): Theresa Lee (terrilee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 330. (4). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This four-credit course is designed to provide an opportunity to gain direct, hands-on experience working in a biopsychology or cognitive science laboratory. There are 2 components to the course: the general, seminar/discussion section for all students; and the individual, lab-specific component with a faculty supervisor.

The majority of your effort in Psych 331 will result from work you do in an individual faculty member's lab. You will determine this with your faculty supervisor within the first week of the course, usually involving 10-12 hours per week in laboratory. Psychology 331 requires a considerable amount of effort and time commitment. This class is designed to allow students to receive a research experience, including non-laboratory aspects of research, comparable to that of a beginning graduate student.

Work in the seminar/discussion section of Psych 331 will include four tasks, which are sufficient to meet the Upper-Level Writing Requirement: (1) Write a short description of the laboratory you are working in, the primary research questions and methods used to approach those questions. (2) Write a research proposal that describes the specific project you are working on and the methods used to address the questions. (3) Deliver an oral presentation in the seminar session, describing your research to your peers. (4) Prepare a final written report of your research in a journal format.

Admission to Psychology 331 is by application, which will be available in the Psychology undergraduate office, 1044 East Hall.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

Psych. 335(430). Introduction to Animal Behavior.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology or Biol. 162. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course presents a broad introduction to animal behavior from the perspective of evolutionary biology (sociobiology). The class is open to sophomores and is appropriate for any student interested in animal behavior, biological psychology, or the relationship between evolution and social behavior. Introductory lectures present the basic principles of organic evolution so that all students have the same foundation of knowledge from which other course topics can be examined. Course topics include, among others, the relationship between genes and behavior, kin selection and social interactions among genetic relatives, aggression, parent-offspring relations, sex differences in behavior, mating systems and their ecological correlates, sexual selection (competition for mates and mate choice), affiliation, communication, and animal emotion and cognition. These and other behaviors will be considered in light of how they have evolved by natural selection and how they contribute to daily survival and reproductive success.

Examples will be drawn primarily from "case studies" on mammals and birds. Each case study will focus on social behavior in one well-studied species, such as: lions, zebras, wolves, ground squirrels, hyenas, baboons, chimpanzees, bottlenose dolphins, acorn woodpeckers and African bee eaters (a communally-living bird). For each case study, students will read several scientific articles covering different aspects of that animal's behavior. Case study readings, plus videos shown in class, will provide students with an in-depth feeling for the behavior of selected species. We will also briefly consider the evolution of human social behavior. Grading is based on a multiple choice quiz, two in-class short essay exams, a couple of exercises involving observations of animal behavior, and a short research paper on a species or topic of your choice. There is no final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 340. Introduction to Cognitive Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William Gehring (wgehring@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psych340/

The topics to be covered include various aspects of the psychology of human perception, attention, memory, thinking (including problem solving and reasoning), and consciousness. The material will include data and theory about the relationship between cognition and brain function. The course will emphasize not only the content material represented by these topics, but also the process by which researchers develop theories and collect evidence about relevant issues.

Students are required to have taken an introductory psychology course that included material on psychological experimentation. Performance will be evaluated via objective examinations that will stress knowledge of the material and understanding of the relationship between theory and data. Readings will be drawn from a text and several primary sources. The course will include lecture, discussion, demonstrations, in-class experiments, and practice on problem-solving exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Psych. 341. Advanced Laboratory in Cognitive Psychology.

Section 001, 002, 003 This course satisfies one of the advanced laboratory requirements for Psychology and Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentrators. Sections 001, 002, and 003 satisfy the Upper-Level Writing Requirement

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 330 or 345. (4). (NS). (BS). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This "how-to" course covers the design, execution, and analysis of behavioral experiments using methods from Cognitive Psychology. A major emphasis in the course is to take the student out of the "listener" role and support learning by "doing." In small sections, students actively participate in laboratory tasks that demonstrate the range of activities in experimental research. Students learn to define an experimental hypothesis, design and conduct experiments using common test methods, appropriately analyze and interpret data from experiments, and present results in reports following the standard format for psychology research.

The laboratory activities require working closely with groups of students using specialized software, so regular class attendance and participation is important. These activities also provide practice with more general critical thinking skills; for example, questioning what can be known from experiments vs. our experiences, deciding what conclusions are valid from observations, and evaluating scientific studies in other fields. Grading is based on written reports of research projects, exams, and in-class laboratory exercises. Psychology 340 is recommended as a prerequisite, along with Stats 402.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 345(434). Introduction to Human Neuropsychology.

Section 001 Meets with Psychology 634.001.

Instructor(s): Patricia Reuter-Lorenz (parl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Psych. 634. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/345/

This course surveys current knowledge of the human brain and its role in mental processes, such as perception, attention, thought, language and memory, and learned behavior skills. Case studies will be used to learn about the effects of brain surgery, head injury, stroke, and dementing illnesses. Evaluation based on three exams and a series of short assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 350. Introduction to Developmental Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Monique Ward (ward@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 255. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides an overview of the milestones of human development from conception to death. We examine the physical, cognitive, social, and emotional growth of children, adolescents, and adults, and the various factors (e.g. genetics, parenting, peer groups, schooling, and the media) that influence development. Our goal is to give you an initial introduction to the main issues, central theories, and dominant research methods in developmental psychology. We hope that students can integrate their knowledge of psychology and their observations of human development with the content of this course. We will also discuss the implications of course content for child-rearing, education, and social policy so that you can apply your knowledge to meaningful problems. Requirements include three multiple-choice exams, two papers, and section attendance and participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Psych. 351. Advanced Laboratory in Developmental Psychology.

Sections 002-004 ONLY meet the Upper-Level Writing Requirement

Instructor(s): Jennifer Myers (jeniferm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Stat. 402 and Psych. 350. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to provide students with training in the skills necessary for designing, conducting, evaluating, and communicating about research on human development. The class is a combination of lecture and discussion of research issues and methodology, activity-based laboratory sessions, and the implementation of individual and class research projects. Students are provided with "hands-on" research opportunities, interviewing school-age children and conducting observational studies. The class meets the Psychology Laboratory course requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 361. Advanced Laboratory in Organizational Psychology.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 360. (4). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a project-oriented advanced laboratory in organizational psychology. The lab is designed (1) to provide students with opportunities to gain practical organizational research experience, (2) to introduce students to selected general research methods in organizational psychology (e.g. field experiments, experimental simulations, survey research), and (3) to provide practical knowledge about research design, analysis, and scientific writing. Student research teams will engage in the design, data collection, analysis, and write-up of organizational research projects. The instructors have contributed their expertise to the architecture of the research. Student teams will contribute your effort and ingenuity to further refine the research designs and to conduct the research. Together, the class we will analyze and interpret the findings. Team members can support and learn from each other.

Instruction will be delivered by lecture, workshops, and discussions. Readings will focus on theories, research issues, and methods. Evaluation will be based on contributions to the research team (peer evaluations), on collaborative written reports, and on exams reflecting course readings. Energetic and thoughtful participation in research projects is an absolute requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 361. Advanced Laboratory in Organizational Psychology.

Section 002.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 360. (4). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a project-oriented advanced laboratory in organizational psychology. The lab is designed

  1. to provide students with opportunities to gain practical organizational research experience,
  2. to introduce students to selected general research methods in organizational psychology (e.g., field experiments, experimental simulations, survey research), and
  3. to provide practical knowledge about research design, analysis, and scientific writing.

Student research teams will engage in the design, data collection, analysis, and write-up of organizational research projects. The instructors have contributed their expertise to the architecture of the research. Student teams will contribute your effort and ingenuity to further refine the research designs and to conduct the research. Together, the class we will analyze and interpret the findings. Team members can support and learn from each other.

Instruction will be delivered by lecture, workshops, and discussions. Readings will focus on theories, research issues, and methods. Evaluation will be based on contributions to the research team (peer evaluations), on collaborative written reports, and on exams reflecting course readings. Energetic and thoughtful participation in research projects is an absolute requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 370. Introduction to Psychopathology.

Section 001 Do Not Register For a Discussion Section.

Instructor(s): Edward Chang (changec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Abnormal psychology entails the scientific study of aberrant behaviors, broadly defined. However, there is no universal consensus on the definition, classification, and treatment of psychological disorders. As we shall quickly see, what is deemed abnormal and how it develops or is treated will partly depend on the particular perspective taken. Hence, a key goal of this course is to guide students toward a broad and critical understanding of "abnormal behavior" from a number of different perspectives. We will accomplish this by exploring, evaluating, and discussing various strengths and weaknesses of different perspectives for understanding psychopathology based on the theoretical and empirical literature.

Films will be used to help reinforce ideas and issues presented in the lectures and in the readings. Grading will be based on exams, pop quizzes, and written assignments. This is a lecture class only (there are no discussion sections). Students are expected to attend all lectures and participate in class discussions. Required readings include textbook by Alloy, Acocella, & Bootzin, Abnormal Psychology (7th ed.), McGraw-Hill, and an Annual Editions reader.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 370. Introduction to Psychopathology.

Section 010 Section 010 must also Register for Discussion Section.

Instructor(s): James Hansell (jhansell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/370/

This course is an introduction to the clinical, theoretical, and research literature on psychopathology. We will explore the concept of "mental illness," existing systems of classifying behavior deemed to be dysfunctional (i.e., DSM-IV) and methods typically employed to treat forms of psychological suffering. The emphasis will be on understanding what psychopathology is at the level of the individual struggling with it as well as exploring what existing norms of illness and health tell us about human culture at the present time. Students are expected to attend lecture and discussion section regularly and will be evaluated on examinations, short papers, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

Psych. 372. Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Christine Trask (clswartz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 370. A basic statistics course (e.g., Stat 402) is recommended although not required. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to provide training on the skills necessary for critiquing and conducting research in psychopathology. Lectures will cover research issues, methods, ethics, and current studies in the field. Lab sessions will be writing-intensive, focusing on the design and analysis of clinically oriented research and on the communication of research findings. Grades will be determined based on two in-class exams and several written papers. One paper will include statistical analysis of a previously collected data set. Prior coursework in statistics is highly recommended.

Class format: A weekly lecture and a weekly lab meeting. This course is a research-based lab in the Psychology concentration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

Psych. 372. Advanced Laboratory in Psychopathology.

Section 010 Alcoholism and Other Behavior Disorders In Community Settings. Call 998-7952 For Registration Information. Do Not Register For the Lecture.

Instructor(s): Robert Zucker (zuckerra@umich.edu) , Fredric Blow (fredblow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 370. A basic statistics course (e.g., Stat 402) is recommended although not required. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The University of Michigan Alcohol Research Center (UMARC) provides a continuing opportunity for students to gain valuable research experience in community settings as part of the Center's ongoing program of field research studies. Current projects include; (a) a program for screening substance use problems and depression among pregnant women who come for general health care, which may involved the opportunity to conduct follow-up interviews with these women; (b) a project focused on the relationship between alcohol and injury in the Emergency Department which will involve conducting in-person and telephone interviews with patients; and (c) other developing field research studies being carried out by Center scientists. Projects provide students with the opportunity to obtain research experience in the social and health sciences.

A focused, collateral series of weekly seminars allows students to interact with Center scientists carrying out a variety of studies pertaining to the etiology, course, and remediation of substance abuse. Students administer brief questionnaires to persons in primary care offices, and conduct telephone follow-up interviews with participants in the Health and Pregnancy Study as well as the Emergency Department Study. Requirements include: interest in social sciences or health sciences; attendance at the weekly seminar, ability to travel to project sites (car preferred); excellent interpersonal skills; and experience interacting with the public. Furthermore, students will gain valuable research experience in the areas of alcohol problems, depression and behavioral health screening. This course is the first term of a two-term practicum sequence. In addition to 1.5 hours of class time each week, work involves participation in aspects of the data collection phases of the project(s), requiring approximately nine hours of time commitment per week. Ideally, students involved in this work should be able to enroll for a two-term sequence, taking Psychology 372 in Winter and Psychology 305 in Spring or Fall. Completion of both 372 and 305 will satisfy the lab requirement in the Psychology concentration. For further information, contact Dr. Zucker, Dr. Blow or Dr. Flynn (the course coordinator) at 998-7952.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5: Contact Instructors

Psych. 380. Introduction to Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Denise Sekaquaptewa (dsekaqua@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/380/

This course introduces students to the field of social psychology. It covers basic theoretical concepts such as social beliefs and social inference; conformity and power; altruism; aggression; interpersonal attraction and relations; and persuasion. The main goal of the course is to convey how social psychologists think about social phenomena, and the types of experimental evidence they consider persuasive. When possible, material from each unit is applied to contemporary social and psychological concerns. Students are evaluated by means of exams, essays, and classroom contributions. Instructional methods include assigned readings, lectures, films, demonstrations, and weekly discussion sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

Psych. 381/Soc. 472. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology.

Section 001, 002.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Stat. 402 and Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/381/

Students explore many aspects of social psychology research methods in this hands-on course. In the first half, issues around research methods are discussed in depth, utilizing survey data students collect to illustrate concepts. The second half of the course revolves around an original, experimental research project (topic varies) in which students design the study, collect and analyze the data, and write a written APA style report. SPSS is used throughout the course. Grades are based on write-ups of research projects, numerous homework assignments, quality of class participation and knowledge of research methodology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 383/Soc. 383. Introduction to Survey Research I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Regula Herzog (rherzog@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/winter/lsa/psych/383/001.nsf

This course is designed to acquaint students with the theory and practice of survey research methods, broadly defined as research methods that rely upon questionnaires or personal interviews as a primary means of data collection and upon multivariate techniques for data analysis in order to study properly sampled populations. Survey research methods have become an important tool for learning about society and social processes and should be of interest to students interested in basic social science fields as well as applied fields such as marketing, social work, or epidemiology. Familiarity with survey research methods should also be helpful to students expecting to interpret and utilize results from surveys in such fields as communication, advertising, or urban planning.

The course will provide a rigorous introduction into the major stages of a survey, including survey design, survey sampling, questionnaire development and index construction, pretesting, techniques of interviewing, code development and production coding, data cleaning and data management, data analysis, and report writing. The course involves lectures, discussions, exercises, and reading and practical assignments. Students will gain some experience in all stages by working with examples from real surveys. A textbook and a course pack will be used. Grading is based on homework assignments, exams, and class participation.

The course can be used for a research lab in the Psychology concentration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 390. Introduction to the Psychology of Personality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Winter (dgwinter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will survey the principal theories and current research on personality. It will focus especially on: (1) traits and temperament; (2) motives and defenses; (3) cognitive style, beliefs, and the sense of self; and (4) social context as the major components of personality. Case studies of historical persons will be used to illustrate and integrate these components.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

Psych. 391. Advanced Laboratory in Personality.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Stat. 402, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Psych. 390. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Personality research methods will be explored in detail in this course. Techniques involved in assessing personality will be introduced, including attention to social and ethical issues. These may include scale construction, content analysis, interviewing, and observation. Issues of experimental design will be discussed, and students will gain experience administering, coding, and evaluating personality measures. In addition, individually and in groups, students will plan and execute analyses of data drawn from one or more of ten different samples (of students, midlife adults, Presidents of the U.S., survivors of an earthquake, musicians, etc.) contained in the Personality Data Archive at the University of Michigan.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 391. Advanced Laboratory in Personality.

Section 002.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Stat. 402, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Psych. 390. (3). (Excl). Satisfies a Psychology research-based laboratory requirement.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Personality research methods will be explored in detail in this course. Techniques involved in assessing personality will be introduced, including attention to social and ethical issues. These may include scale construction, content analysis, interviewing, and observation. Issues of experimental design will be discussed, and students will gain experience administering, coding, and evaluating personality measures.

In addition, individually and in groups, students will plan and execute analyses of data drawn from one or more of ten different samples (of students, midlife adults, Presidents of the U.S., survivors of an earthquake, musicians, etc.) contained in the Personality Data Archive at the University of Michigan.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 001 Mind-Body Connections In Health. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Anne Murphy (jamurphy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will explore connections between mind and body that impact or determine states of health and the healing process. The core topics will include: empathy and the patient-physician relationship; psychoneuroimmunology (that is, the study of interactions between behavior, the brain, and the immune system); the placebo response; and mood disorders. Other topics will be determined by the interests of the students. Grades will be based on class participation, short written assignments on the core topics, and a self-designed project on the student's topic of interest. Each student will choose a class reading for their topic and be responsible for presenting and leading group discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 003 Seminar in Psychology of Underevelopment in Africa. (3 Credits). Meets With CAAS 458.005

Instructor(s): Denis Ugwuegbu (dcugwueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

When economists discuss development of Africa, they often forget the psychological component of social and economic development. This course is designed to lead students through lectures, discussions and demonstrations to explore the psychological causes of the contemporary underdevelopment of the nations of Africa. Emphasis will be placed on the behavioral aspect of development, and will cover topics such as colonial underdevelopment policies in Africa, neo-colonial theories of development, the new nations of Africa and their alternative plan for development, and psychological principles of development. Special considerations will be given to topics such as attitudes, motivation, and trust and development. Finally, the place of education and human resources planning as important aspects of development efforts will be examined.

Since this course will attract students with various educational backgrounds, students who are ready to make insightful and innovative contributions to the understanding of the causes and possible eradication of development problems of Africa are encouraged to register for it.

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Psych. 401. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 010 Mind, Culture, and the Environment. (3 credits). Meets with Anthro 458.005 and SNRE 306.005 and 501.005

Instructor(s): Scott Atran (satran@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. Only 6 credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 combined may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. (1-4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Cultural Anthropology 458.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 404. Field Practicum.

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: Psychology 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390; and permission of instructor. (1-12). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-12).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students may make arrangements to work in field settings where psychological principles may be observed and utilized. Information about procedures for electing Psychology 404, 405, and 409 is obtained at 1044 East Hall (764-2580).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 408. Field Practicum in Research Techniques/Natural Science.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psychology 330 or 340 or 350 or 360 or 370 or 380 or 390. (1-4). (Excl). (BS). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Credits do not count for the concentration, but the course may be used for an experiential lab if taken for three credits. (EXPERIENTIAL). Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of Psychology 404, 405, 408 and 409, and for a maximum of fifteen credits for Psychology 211, 404, 405, 408 and 409. This course may be taken for a maximum of two terms and/or four credits with the same instructor.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This field practicum course offers an opportunity to integrate experiential and academic work within the context of a field setting. Students make their own arrangements to work in a psychology research lab; meet regularly with a faculty sponsor and research group to discuss their experiences; read materials which are relevant to the research topic and techniques being used; and create some form of written product that discusses the research and the student's participation in the research process. Students may obtain a list of faculty sponsors offering research experience in the Undergraduate Office, 1044 East Hall. An override from a Psychology Department faculty member is required to register.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 409. Field Practicum in Research Techniques.

Prerequisites & Distribution: One of the following: Psychology 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390; and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. This course may be used as an experiential lab in the Psychology concentration but not the Biopsychology and Cognitive Science concentration. Credits may not be used toward either psychology concentration. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits. Credit is granted for a combined total of twelve credits of Psychology 404, 405, 408 and 409, and for a maximum of fifteen credits of Psychology 211, 404, 405, 408, and 409. May be elected for a maximum of two terms and/or four credits with the same instructor.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course provides experience and education in research techniques. The student works with the instructor on various aspects of psychological research, completes readings, keeps a journal and completes a paper which integrates the readings and experiences in the research setting.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 411/WS 419. Gender and Group Process in a Multicultural Context.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nancy Quay (nquay@umich.edu), Sarah Nickels

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in women's studies or psychology. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Women's Studies 419.001.

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Psych. 412. Peer Counseling.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lisa Damour (ldamour@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course, which is open to freshmen through seniors, is designed to explore the basic principles, techniques, and developmental issues involved in peer counseling. Appropriate readings and class discussion will address such issues as confidentiality, empathy, listening and communication skills. While there will be no examinations, there will be weekly writing assignments, a midterm role-play and critique, and a longer final paper. These written assignments and in-class exercises will give an opportunity to apply the theory and technique of peer counseling. Some of the readings and discussion will focus on issues of self-understanding in adolescence and adulthood, and on research issues in the field. It would be helpful for students taking this course to be curious about peer counseling and have a capacity for empathy and self-understanding.

This course will meet with guest speakers on campus whose programs offer opportunities to apply peer counseling skills and illustrations of how such skills are applied. Some of the class sessions may be videotaped for teaching purposes. Grades will be based on the quality of participation and written assignments. A course pack with readings and textbooks will be available, and additional materials will be distributed by the instructors during the course.

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Psych. 414(574). Clinical Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Donna Nagata (nagata@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 111 or 114. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to present a comprehensive overview of the spectrum of academic and clinical activities in the field of clinical psychology. Topics that will be addressed include the history of clinical psychology as a profession, issues in the diagnosis and classification of disorders, techniques used in the assessment of intellectual and personality functioning, various theoretical approaches to therapeutic interventions, and issues relating to ethics, training, research, and professionalism in clinical psychology. In addition, the roles of culture and gender within each of these areas will be explored, and specialty areas within the field, such as child clinical work, clinical neuropsychology, community psychology, and health psychology will also be addressed. Text and additional readings are required as well as in-class examinations and a paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 418/Religion 448. Psychology and Spiritual Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Mann (rdmann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~rdmann/

This course explores the stages of spiritual development, beginning with awakening and initiation, through the deepening of direct experience and the formulation of a coherent spiritual path, including the notion of an ultimate attainment. It explores the function of spiritual groups and teachers in facilitating this development. Of particular interest are: (1) the spiritual seeker's experience of "little death," the mode of apparent discontinuity when the "old life" is supplanted by a new identity and mode of living; (2) times of crisis, adaptation, and "the dark night". and (3) the experience of "physical death," as seen from the perspective of a lifetime of encountering both relative and absolute reality. By means of personal narratives and fictional accounts this course explores how diverse traditions create and value these moments of surrender and transformation. Lectures and readings by Hesse, Jung, Hillesum, Feild, Lessing, Soygal Rimpoche, Wilber, and others will form the basis of three short papers and one long final paper. There will be no final exam.

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Psych. 433. Biopsychology of Motivation.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kent Berridge (berridge@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 330. (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/W00/PY433/index.html

How do brain systems generate emotion and motivate behavior? How does motivation differ across species? How does learning influence basic motivations? What are the neural mechanisms of pleasure and pain? What are the mechanisms of sleep and dreaming, hunger, thirst, sex, and aggression? How does the brain translate motivation into goal-directed behavior? These questions are the focus of the course. Our emphasis will be upon the critical analysis of theory and evidence from opposing points of view: students are expected to construct and defend their own conclusions in essay exams, papers, and presentations. Format is a mixture of lecture and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 436. Drugs of Abuse, Brain and Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terry Robinson (ter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 330. Biol. 162 and chemistry are recommended. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/436/

This course provides an introduction to the neuropsychopharmacology of drug abuse and addiction. The acute and long-term effects of selected drugs of abuse on behavior, mood, cognition, and neuronal function are explored. Material from studies with humans is integrated with preclinical studies on the biopsychology of drug action and drug abuse including an introduction to pharmacological principles, behavioral pharmacology and detailed coverage of synaptic transmission and the distribution, regulation, and integration of brain neurotransmitter systems. The focus is on drugs of abuse, including opiates (heroin, morphine, opium), sedative-hypnotics (barbituates), anxiolytics (benzodiazepines), psychomotor stimulants (amphetamine, cocaine), hallucinogens (LSD, mescaline), hallucinogenic-stimulants (MDA, MDMA), dissociative anaesthetics (PCP), and alcohol. The course has a natural science orientation and is intended for students concentrating in biopsychology and cognitive sciences, biology, or the bio-behavioral sciences (e.g., pre-med). A lecture format is used, with required reading from a text. Grades are based on objective-type exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 442. Perception, Science, and Reality.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert Pachella (pachella@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (3). (NS). (BS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/442/

This course carries concentration credit for psychology concentrators and natural science credit for non-psychology concentrators. The course focuses on basic perceptual phenomena and theories. It also examines the general relationship between perception and scientific observation. Topics include: sensory transduction and psychophysics; Gestalt organization; constancy and contrast effects; expectation; selective attention; perceptual learning; and symbolic representation. While the course is oriented toward the natural sciences, it also considers social, philosophical, and aesthetic perspectives, since at its most general level, human perception concerns the questions of how and why human beings use sensory information to conceive of, and experience immediate reality the way they do. The instructor assumes no particular psychology background, and non-psychology concentrators are welcome. Grades will be determined on the basis of two short papers (each worth 30% of the grade) and one longer paper (worth 40% of the grade). Questions concerning this class can be e-mailed to Robert Pachella.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 5: Get on the WAITLIST. Be sure that your telephone number on the waitlist is correct and current. If space opens up, you will be called.

Psych. 453. Socialization of the Child.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Myers (jeniferm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 350. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on the social and emotional development of children with particular emphasis on the various influences on children's socialization such as family, peers, schools, and the society at large. A partial list of topics includes: biological influences on development; infant-caregiver attachments; the development of children's friendships; parental beliefs and behaviors; the role of fathers in child development; sex-role development; the development of prosocial behavior; the development of the self; the development of achievement motivation; schools as socialization agents; day care and maternal employment; and divorce and single-parenthood. The class will be a combination of lecture and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 459. Psychology of Aging.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Marion Perlmutter (perlmut@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 350. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/winter/lsa/psych/459/001.nsf

This undergraduate course is designed to familiarize students with current knowledge about the constancies and changes that occur in behavior and thought across adulthood. The degree of plasticity and likely causes of age differences and age change will provide the focus for our discussion. Understanding the implications for individuals, as well as for societies, will be our goal. By the end of the term, students should be able to characterize the range and variety of adult developmental trajectories. They should gain insights about the changes they can expect as they get older, and the things they can do to affect these changes. In addition, they should gain an understanding of the needs of older persons, as well as an appreciation of the tremendous potential resource they offer.

The course will cover theory, methods, data, and controversies relevant to age in adulthood. It will begin with an overview of the context of aging in the U.S. today, including discussions of attitudes about aging and its demographics. Then, theories about aging and methods of studying it will be considered. Adulthood age differences in biological, psychological, and social competencies will constitute the core of the course. Topics to be covered include changes in: physical capacities, health, sensation, memory, and intelligence, reasoning, creativity, wisdom, personality, relationships, and roles associated with family, work, and community. The final portion of the course will address societal issues, including services, policies, and careers relevant to the old, as well as gender, ethnic, cultural, and historical diversity in aging.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 464. Group Behavior in Organizations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Monique Fleming (moniquef@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 360. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The study of work teams is a thriving area of research for organizational psychologists. The course will utilize principles and concepts from organizational psychology to understand the nature of group behavior in organized work settings. A major goal is to discern fundamental determinants of group effectiveness by placing a greater emphasis on contextual influences than on intragroup factors. The course combines traditional learning methods (reading, lecture, discussion) with skill development through participation in structured exercises. Several videos are used to explain, amplify, or illustrate particular features of groups at work.

The course is structured so that learning can take place at three levels: through meetings of the class as a whole; in small teams carrying out course-related exercises or projects; and in individual reading, study, and analysis. Overall, what you learn from this course will be as much a product of peer interaction as it will be a product of other course activities. Evaluation will be based on three exams, on a group project, and on peer ratings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 470. Introduction to Community Psychology.

Section 001 Meets with Psychology 808.010.

Instructor(s): Laura Kohn (lpkohn@umich.edu), Tabbye Chavous (tchavous@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory psychology. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/winter/lsa/psych/470/001.nsf

This course is designed to introduce students to the science and practice of community psychology. We will use readings and case examples to understand how psychologists can investigate problems that whole communities may be having and draw on the resources of communities themselves to develop solutions. Community psychologists work on many of the social issues facing communities today such as juvenile violence, homelessness, child abuse, and welfare reform. We will use issues like these to explore key concepts in community psychology, understand what is involved in changing a community, and learn strategies that psychologists can use to work with communities on their problems. We will examine how research and science intersect with the practical aspects of working successfully with people in their own communities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 500. Special Problems in Psychology as a Natural Science.

Section 001 Language Disorders. (3 Credits). Meets with Psychology 808.008.

Instructor(s): James Hoeffner (jhoeff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory Psychology. (2-4). (Excl). (BS). Only six credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/winter/lsa/psych/500/001.nsf

This class will study recent research on disorders of language and reading. We will cover acquired language disorders affecting adults who have suffered brain damage, as well as developmental disorders affecting children's acquisition of language. The main questions we will try to address are: (1) what are the typical linguistic and behavioral changes in each disorder, and what capabilities are spared? (2) what can these disorders tell us about normal language development and processing? (3) what can these disorders tell us about the neural organization of language? and (4) what remediation techniques are used with each disorder, and how well do they work? Students will be graded on written assignments, classroom discussions, and a final paper.

Prerequisites: Psych 330, 340 or 350.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 501. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 001 The Psychology of Literary Experience. (3 credits). Meets With Comparative Literature 424.001.

Instructor(s): George Rosenwald (gcro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory Psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only six credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Since ancient times it has been thought that good literature improves the reader. In this seminar we explore whether and under what conditions the process of reading literature might facilitate human development. Approximately a third of the course will be occupied with two bodies of theory: (1) writings about the relation between reader and text, the nature of interpretation, the role of the reader's background in assigning meaning to literary texts, the specific literary devices that regulate the reader's response to the text, the interactional nature of the "bare" text and the reader's personal and cultural situation, and (2) perspectives on adult development, that is, ways of conceiving maturity, wisdom, competence, balance, and so forth.

The remaining two thirds of the course will be centered on pieces of fiction, including a number of short stories. Among the fiction authors to be sampled are Baldwin, Cheever, Chekhov, Faulkner, Hofmannsthal, Hurston, Joyce, Kafka, Flannery O'Connor, Salinger, and Welty. The seminar method of instruction is employed, based on reading, writing, and discussion. For every class period, students and instructor will produce written responses to the day's text that address the interplay of reader and text. Through these writings and their discussion in class we will be able to explore and document individually and socially mediated formative effects of literature. Evaluation of student work is based on the quality of written critical responses to the theoretical and literary readings due each class period, the longer analysis of a novel due at the end of the term, and contribution to class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 501. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 002 Research Conference On Adolescence. (3 credits). Students must Attend Conference In Chicago, IL March 30 April 2.

Instructor(s): John Hagen (jwhagen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory Psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only six credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class is designed to prepare students to attend the Biennial Meetings of the Society for Research in Adolescence (SRA) to be held March 30 April 2, 2000 in Chicago. The SRA is the major professional society in the field of adolescent development. More than 1,000 scholars and students attend this convention, which is held once every two years. Over 600 presentations will be made over a wide range of topics and issues by leading researchers, policy makers, and practitioners from the U.S. as well as a number of other countries.

Prior to attending the convention, students will learn about current research pertaining to adolescence through readings, lectures, and discussions. Students will choose topics of particular interest to explore in depth before the meetings and they will attend sessions specific to these interests. Students are encouraged to attend sessions on other topics as well. Requirements include logs, article and lecture summaries, and a term paper that, along with class participation, are used in determining the grade.

Students will be responsible for the cost of transportation, hotel, registration and food. The hotel should cost about $40-$45 per night with two to three people per room. Registration will be less expensive via a student membership to SRA, which students are encouraged to obtain. The cost for an undergraduate student affiliate membership is $35 per year.

For further information, please contact John Hagen jwhagen@umich.edu, 637-3717 or Brent Lignell blignell@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 501. Special Problems in Psychology as a Social Science.

Section 003 Cultural Psychology. (3 credits). Meets with Anthropology 558.001 and Psych. 808.006

Instructor(s): Ram Mahalingam (ramawasi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory Psychology. (1-4). (Excl). Only six credits of Psych. 400, 401, 402, 500, 501, and 502 may be counted toward a concentration plan in psychology. May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In addition to the Intro Psych prerequisite, one additional Psychology or Anthropology course is desirable. The section is offered for 3 credits.

This course deals with theory and current research on human development from a Cultural Psychology perspective. The aim of the course is to critically examine our psychological assumptions about human development in the light of the research findings from cross-cultural settings. The course explores the role of sociocultural setting in social, cognitive and personality development. Examples are drawn primarily from the cultures of Asia and United States. Issues involved in designing, conducting and interpreting research in cross-cultural settings will be discussed. The course is designed to emphasize student in-class participation including small group discussions. The final grade is based on class participation (25%), a midterm (35%) and a research paper (40%). There is a textbook and a course pack for the class. Attendance is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 505. Faculty Directed Advanced Research.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and one of the following: Psychology 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390. (1-6). (Excl). May be used as an experiential lab by faculty petition to the Committee on Undergraduate Studies. A combined total of six credits of Psych. 505 and 507 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual research of their own design under the direction of a member of the staff. The work of the course must include the collection and analysis of data and a written report, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for being properly registered for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 507. Faculty Directed Advanced Tutorial Reading.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor and approval of the Department of Psychology Committee on Undergraduate Studies; and one of the following: Psychology 330, 340, 350, 360, 370, 380, or 390. (1-6). (Excl). A combined total of six credits of Psych. 505 and 507 may be included in a concentration plan in psychology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to further explore a topic of interest in psychology under the direction of a member of the staff. The course requires a final paper, a copy of which must be given to the undergraduate office. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged. Students are responsible for properly registering for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Psych. 511. Senior Honors Research, II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Albert Cain

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 312 and permission of the Psychology Honors concentration advisor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The primary focus in Senior Honors is the implementation of your research design culminating in your final, acceptable thesis and poster preparation for our year-end poster session. (Previously summarized as Get thee to your tutor, Progress steadily, and Conclude well). The goal is a thesis that makes one justifiably proud, and enhanced, grounded understanding of research methods. Early on, each student will present the scholarly background and specific research design of their study to the class, and we will sporadically return to brief design and implementation presentations by each student. Drafts of segments of ongoing work that can later be incorporated into the final thesis are to be submitted periodically. Other class session topics will include: special current issues and models of research, e.g., meta-analyses, risk/resilience research, integration of quantitative and qualitative data, etc. Our primary focus, again, will be the conduct and successful completion of your thesis and the enrichment of your research competence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 530. Advanced Comparative Animal Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Holmes (wholmes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 335, 437, or 438. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course presents a critical examination of animal behavior from the perspective of evolutionary biology (or behavioral ecology). Students must have a clear understanding of modern Darwinian theory based on prior course work (e.g., Psych. 335, Psych. 437/Anthro. 368, Biol. 492, Biol. 494, BioAnthro 467, BioAnthro 562, BioAnthro 568, among other possibilities) and an interest in applying this theory to a rigorous analysis of various issues in animal behavior. Topics include: (1) theoretical issues in functional logic (e.g., the level of selection, the meaning of adaptation, inclusive-fitness logic); (2) altruism, cooperation, and reciprocity; (3) the evolution and ecology of social systems; (4) the evolution and ecology of mating systems; (5) sexual selection and (6) strategies of reproduction by males and females. A lecture format is used combined with frequent class discussion of course pack articles. Grades are based on take-home essay exams, written reactions to course pack readings and participation in class.

To insure well-informed discussions and classroom interactions, students MUST have a well-developed understanding of modern evolutionary theory, as it is applied in behavioral ecology, to enroll in the course (e.g., two prior courses or equivalent experience).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 558. Psychology of Adolescence.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Tabbye Chavous (tchavous@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 350. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to provide an overview of the current state of the art regarding research on adolescent development. Both theory and research as it pertains to normative processes will be considered from both a lifespan and an ecological perspective. Particular emphasis will be placed on the interaction between the individual and contexts which especially impact this developmental group (i.e., school, peer groups, neighborhood).

A survey of some of the specific problems and contemporary issues facing adolescents will be presented within these contexts (i.e., teenage childbearing, substance abuse, eating disorders, delinquency, school adjustment, and depression). In addition, the course will highlight issues of culture and ethnicity in adolescent social development. The class will meet twice a week for a total of three hours of lecture and discussion. There will be class presentations, a term paper and two exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 561. Advanced Topics in Organizational Psychology.

Section 001 Conflict and Negotiation. Meets With Psychology 581.001.

Instructor(s): Oscar Ybarra (oybarra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 360. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Conflict is a natural result of being social beings. People many times differ in their interests, beliefs, and goals, among other things. When people with divergent interests interact or have a relation with each other, conflict is a likely outcome. Conflicts can involve a variety of people, such as siblings, parents, romantic interests, employers, salespeople, colleagues, etc. To say the least, conflict is a ubiquitous social occurrence. Therefore, it is of great importance to understand what conflict is and the kinds of factors that give rise to it, the factors that are involved in it resolution, and the kinds of skills people can use to help resolve conflicts effectively. To this end, the goals of this course will include: (1) studying the nature of conflict; (2) studying the nature of negotiation in social conflict; and (3) performing exercises to start to develop students' skills in understanding and managing conflict.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 565. Organizational Systems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Saavedra (saavedra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 360. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Organizations are understood best when they are viewed as dynamic and open systems. We will study organizations by examining their specific characteristics, the nature and relationships among groups and departments that make up the organization, and the collection of organizations that make up the environment. Core topics include organizational environments, information technologies, organizational life cycles, and organization structure.

The course is structured so that learning can take place at three levels: through meetings of the class as a whole; in small teams carrying out course-related projects; and in individual reading, study, and analysis. Overall, what you learn from this course will be as much a product of peer interaction as it will be a product of other course activities. Instruction will be delivered by lecture and discussions. Evaluation will be based on group facilitation of cases, exams, a group project, and peer ratings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 570. The Psychological Study of Lives.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): George Rosenwald (gcro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 370 or 390, and junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course addresses the shaping of lives from two directions the psychodynamic and the cultural. On the one hand, a life story manifests a continuity of tendencies and themes that have the stamp of individuality. On the other hand, the progress of life is determined by the person's social and cultural situation (family, social class, subculture, gender role, economics). Students will learn to interpret biographical and autobiographical materials in cultural and psychological terms. Class discussion of theory, research, and case materials will be the medium of instruction. Students will be evaluated on the basis of one midterm and one final project, each involving the interpretation of a case history.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 573. Developmental Disturbances of Childhood.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Albert Cain

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 350 or 390, and Psych. 370. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on children's developmental disturbances. It includes basic points of view, selected syndromes, relevant research data, and etiological concepts. It suggests fruitful ways of analyzing and conceptualizing issues and data in the field, also alerting students to gaps in our knowledge. In addition, the instructor hopes to communicate an inner, affective feel for the phenomena of childhood disorders, to interest some students in this field as a possible profession, and to encourage others to incorporate certain knowledge, and ways of approaching issues into their own fields. Student work is evaluated on the basis of exams, plus written exercises and/or papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 581. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology.

Section 001 Conflict and Negotiation. Meets With Psychology 561.001.

Instructor(s): Oscar Ybarra (oybarra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 561.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 581. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology.

Section 002 Thinking About the Self and Relationships.

Instructor(s): Serena Chen (serena@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines social-psychological theory and research on the self and relationships. More specifically, the course focuses on how relationships at both the interpersonal and intergroup level shape how the self is defined, evaluated, and experienced. That is, how do our relationships and group memberships influence who we are? Emphasis is placed on social-cognitive approaches to the self and to interpersonal and intergroup relationships. Course topics include interpersonal and collective bases of self-definition and self-evaluation, attachment theory, social identity theory, and relational schemes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Psych. 581. Advanced Topics in Social Psychology.

Section 003 Social Cognition: Thinking, Judging and Communicating.

Instructor(s): Norbert Schwarz (nschwarz@umich.edu), Ian Skurnik (iskurnik@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course addresses how we form judgments about others, ourselves, or social problems. What determines which information we consider or ignore? How do we make sense of ambiguous or inconsistent information? Which heuristics do we employ in social judgment and when do they lead us astray? What is the role of moods and emotions in reasoning? How are our thought processes influenced by the social and communicative context in which we do much of our thinking? Each topic will be introduced with an overview lecture, followed by in-depth discussion of selected research articles. Students are expected to read 2 or 3 articles each week; to prepare for class discussion on the basis of questions that invite the application of what has been learned; and to write a term paper on a topic of their choice. The estimated work load per week, in addition to class participation, is about 5 hours. Grading is based on class participation and the term paper, with each counting one half.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

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