Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in Sociology (Division 482)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 – April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for Sociology.


Soc. 100. Principles of Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Larry Radine (radine@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in Soc. 400. Seniors must elect Soc. 400. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 195 or 400. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/winter/lsa/soc/100/001.nsf

Have you ever wondered why there's misery in the world? And whether the individual can really make a difference? Have you thought about what holds a society together and why some fall apart? Or, why are people so ethnocentric? Or another question: Why are people so unequal in society?

Or what does it mean to be human, and if we know so much about what causes human action, are human beings free or is personal freedom an illusion? How much of what we know and believe is illusion?

These are sociology's questions. In this course, you will also find out, through some of the original, path-breaking articles, why sociology has been such an inspiration for new intellectual fields like women's studies, legal realism, and cultural studies, as well as world-changing movements like the ways corporations have been rethinking everything.

This course uses three texts: Ten Questions, by Joel Charon, Sociology, Exploring the Architecture of Everyday Life by David M. Newman and The Image, by Daniel Boorstin. (The textbook costs are about $70 if bought new). Coursework includes two exams (20% and 25% of the grade) and two projects (20% and 25%) and participation in the weekly discussion section (10%). The course is echoed in a Coursetools website.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 100. Principles of Sociology.

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Karen Honeycutt (khoneyct@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in Soc. 400. Seniors must elect Soc. 400. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 195 or 400. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Sociology is the systematic study of human behavior, social relationships, and societies. This course will introduce the "sociological perspective" as a tool for understanding the connections between the individual's everyday life and larger-scale processes and structures within society. We will focus particularly on various explanations for social inequality in the U.S. and empirical research about such inequality. Specifically, we will examine how social class, race-ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, etc. shape our lives and our social institutions.

What you should expect to get out of this course is a critical perspective on social life. You should be prepared to grapple with some issues you've never thought about before (or at least have never thought about sociologically before); be prepared to deal with value judgments, slippery concepts, and some ambiguity. Course requirements include three exams (20% each), two "sociological projects" (20% total), and attendance and participation at the weekly discussion section (20%).

NOTE THAT THIS IS SECTION *012*. THE LINK BELOW WILL TAKE YOU TO SECTION 001, SO TO REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE, SCROLL DOWN TO SECTION 012.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 101. Person and Society: An Introduction to Sociology Through Social Psychology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Diane Sunar

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 400 or 401. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will be an introduction to the main approaches and subject matters of social psychology. Areas such as social influence, attitudes, persuasion, social perception and attribution, stereotypes, self, aggression, prosocial behavior, and relationships will be discussed, and approaches such as social exchange theory, cognitive dissonance, social identity theory, and others will be described and applied. GSIs will conduct discussion sections and assist with exams, written assignments, and record-keeping.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 102. Contemporary Social Issues: An Introduction to Sociology.

Section 001 – Images and Realities: An Introduction to Sociology through the Mass Media

Instructor(s): Karen Honeycutt (khoneyct@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 400 or 401. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS). Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do media portrayals – e.g., of women and racial minorities – reinforce stereotypes? Is everyone in the U.S. "middle class" or is that a media fiction? How "true" is the picture of welfare mothers that we get from the news media? Is there such a thing as a "gay lifestyle" or is that a media creation? In this course, we will use a sociological cultural studies approach to explore issues of inequality in the U.S., focusing on dominant ideologies and how they are perpetuated (or not) in the mass media.

In the first third of the course, we will look at the political economy of the mass media: who are the owners, producers, consumers, etc., and why this makes a difference. In the second third, we will examine mass media texts – e.g., excerpts from TV shows, clips from films, advertisements, etc., – for their representations of social class, race, gender, and sexual orientation. In the last third, we will discuss how different audiences – people of different sexes, races, sexual orientations, social classes, etc. – respond differently to the same media texts.

Videos will be a regular part of each week's class. Course requirements include three in-class exams (20% each), three short papers or one long one (20% total), and attendance/participation at your weekly discussion section (20%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 102. Contemporary Social Issues: An Introduction to Sociology.

Section 012 – Persistent Social Problems of Modern Society

Instructor(s): David Allison

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 400 or 401. No credit for seniors. (4). (SS). Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will introduce the student to sociological analysis by examining sociological research on persistent social problems of modern society. We will begin by reviewing different theoretical traditions, each of which shape both our view of human nature and human possibilities, as well as our understanding of how much inequality is ethical, just, or inevitable. We will then turn to the study of social problems. Examples of the problems we will confront include: class relations and the problem of economic inequality; poverty, unemployment, and underemployment; the problems of racial groups and racial inequality; the problems of gender roles and sex discrimination; and problems in modern education, health care, and law enforcement. Throughout this later section of the course, we will rely on a power-conflict perspective in addressing these problems, but we will draw on other theories when appropriate. Course requirements include doing the assigned readings, attending lecture, actively participating in discussion section, a midterm and final, and one seven-page paper.

NOTE THAT THIS IS SECTION *012*. THE LINK BELOW WILL TAKE YOU TO SECTION 001, SO TO REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE, SCROLL DOWN TO SECTION 012.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 105. First Year Seminar in Sociology.

Section 001 – Reshaping Metropolitan America: Economy, Race, and Suburbanization Since WWII

Instructor(s): Reynolds Farley (renf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In the last half of the 20th century, metropolitan America was greatly changed, and those changes, in turn, greatly altered the entire nation. First, there was a passive movement of the African-American population from the rural South to many of the nation's largest cities during and after World War II. Racial conflict occurred frequently. A second pervasive trend was the suburbanization of the white population. Federal programs encouraged the invasion and conquering of a crab-grass frontier. Third, fundamental shifts in employment occurred as the number of jobs in the traditional manufacturing industries declined while many new more highly skilled jobs opened up in the service sector, especially in health care, finance and the law. In many places, booming job growth characterized the prosperous suburban fringe, while low-income black ghettos developed within the older cities. More recently, another fundamental demographic change began to radically change some but not all of the largest cities – the arrival of millions of immigrants from Asia and Latin America.

This course will examine the causes and consequences of the forces that are changing metropolitan America, including the implications for our elections and political system. Five paperback books will be read, each of them focused upon some aspect of urban change. The course will pay particular attention to racial change in this nation with special attention given to the Detroit metropolitan area. Students will write a short 3-page paper every other week. Grades will depend primarily upon these short papers along with the ensuing discussions. There will be two or three tests. The total cost of the assigned books will be approximately $80.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 105. First Year Seminar in Sociology.

Section 002 – Democracy, Diversity, and Community

Instructor(s): David Schoem (dschoem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

R&E First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the possibilities for building community, giving particular attention to issues of race, ethnicity, gender, and class while acknowledging and addressing existing conflicts. How do we build community in our schools, neighborhoods, and cities comprised of people with perspectives, viewpoints, backgrounds that differ from our own? To what extent do this country's democratic principles continue to bind our society in the face of growing racial and class divisions? This seminar will explore a wide range of questions on inter group and community building, taking into account issues of power, conflict, and competing social interests. Students will be encouraged to bring in personal experience and perspective to enrich the discussion of theoretical readings. Active participation and considerable writing will be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 111/UC 111/AOSS 172/NR&E 111. Introduction to Global Change II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Timothy Killeen (tkilleen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.sprl.umich.edu/GCL/

See University Courses 111.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 122/Psych. 122. Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001 – Dialogues on Race, Gender, Sexual Orientation, Religion, or Ethnicity

Prerequisites & Distribution: Intended primarily for first- and second-year students. May not be used as a prerequisite for a concentration in psychology. (2). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration in psychology or sociology. May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/index3.html

See Psychology 122.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Soc. 202. Contemporary Social Issues I.

Section 001 – Sociology of Literature. (3 credits only).

Instructor(s): Dana Greene (dmgreene@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (2-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Literature may be seen as a tool with which authors express their viewpoints, perspectives, and thoughts, as well as those ideals that present themselves only in the imagination. Because literature is part and parcel of how the writer views both him/herself as well as the society in which s/he lives, we can see that we can use both classical and contemporary literature to understand sociopolitical occurrences that may influence both how a writer depicts his/ her story as well as how a reader interprets that very same story.

This course on the Sociology of Literature is designed to introduce the student to the politics of both reading and writing and looks to examine the theoretical and practical bounds of reading and writing. The course will be centered on the theme of identity and will seek to examine each work of literature from the perspective of identity politics. To this end, this course will examine different genres of writing (classical literature as well as more contemporary works by multi-ethnic authors) in an attempt to identify a writer's social location within society (as defined by culture, race, class, gender, national origin, religion, etc.).

This course takes both a classical and post-modern approach to the sociological examination of the theoretical bounds of writing and reading as well as addresses how authors and readers locate themselves in terms of their identities in literature. We will consider how different genres (poetry, fiction, science fiction, etc.) "inflect the representational practice of autobiography" in our examination of the role of history as a formative force in the sociological construction of everyday life experiences as depicted in literature.

Course requirements include class participation, two 4-6 page papers, a take-home midterm exam, and a final exam/paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 210. Elementary Statistics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sanjiv Gupta (sangupta@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sociology Honors students should elect this course prior to beginning the Honors Seminar sequence. Sociology concentrators should elect this course prior to their last term. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Stat. 100, 265, 311, 402, 405, or 412, or Econ. 404 or 405. (4). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Soc. 304/Amer. Cult. 304. American Immigration.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michelle Harris-Reid (hreid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Soc. 310. Introduction to Research Methods.

Sections 002-005 meet the Upper-Level Writing Requirement

Instructor(s): Karen Honeycutt (khoneyct@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology; or completion of one social science course in economics, anthropology, political science, psychology or other sociology course. Sociology Honors students should elect this course concurrently with Soc. 397. (4). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).

Upper-Level Writing Full QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will introduce you to a range of basic research methods used by sociologists, including surveys, experiments, qualitative interviews, observation, and archival methods, particularly comparative-historical research. The course also addresses the logic of reasoning in social science research and exposes students to some important methodological and epistemological debates in the field (don't worry if you're not sure what these words mean!).

Grades will be based on five in-class quizzes (can drop 1 and the others are worth 10% each = 40%), thirteen weekly homework assignments (can drop 3 and the others are worth 5% each = 50%), and overall effort including attendance, participation, an upward trend on grades on quizzes and homework assignments, etc. (10%). (Note: coursework requirements are slightly different for those students taking the class for Upper-Level Writing credit.) There is no midterm or final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 320/Psych. 310. Training in Processes of Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001 – Mandatory Retreat Jan 8 – Jan 10.

Instructor(s): Ruby Beale (rubeale@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. Open to juniors and seniors. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~igrc/index14.html

See Psychology 310.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 321/Psych. 311. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Charles Behling (cbehling@umich.edu), Pat Gurin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sociology 320 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). A combined total of 8 credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 311.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

Soc. 331. Population Trends in the United States: Their Economic and Social Consequences.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Reynolds Farley (renf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/winter/lsa/soc/331/001.nsf

In this course, the methods of modern social science and demography are used to analyze the causes and consequences of those large scale social and economic changes now occurring in the United States. There is an emphsis upon population trends as both the causes and consequences of social and economic change.

Aims of the Course:

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 383/Psych. 383. Introduction to Survey Research I.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Regula Herzog (rherzog@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Psych. 380. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 383.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity

Sociology 389 is know as "Project Community." Students combine four to six hours of weekly service in community settings, with weekly student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning, and problem-solving.

Over 40 sections offer settings that include working in school classrooms with "at-risk" children and youth in a variety of tutoring, chemical dependency, and mentoring situations; in the adult and juvenile criminal justice system; with adult literacy; with the homeless; and with elderly, the mentally ill, the disabled, and in hospitals. For descriptions of Project Community sections, go to: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity

Transportation to off-campus service sites is available through Project Community.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 009 – King/Chavez/Parks Program. (3 credits).

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 010 – Elementary Classrooms. (3 credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course10_PC.html

Students work with individual students or groups under the direction of the classroom teacher or reading program coordinator. Typical tasks include assisting with reading, helping with learning centers, special projects, or computer work or working one on one with children having difficulty.

Site Requirements: two three-hour blocks of time per week. Time blocks are: Monday through Friday, 8:15-11:45 or 8:30-12:15; or 12:30-3:45.

Seminar: T 5-7. Location: 1640 Chemistry.

Permission of instructor is not required for this section.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 012 – Middle School Tutors. (2 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course12_PC.html

Students in this section will work with 6th through 8th graders at an Ann Arbor Middle School. Each of the schools is racially and socioeconomically diverse. Students can choose between the following schools:

Scarlett Middle School, located on the south side of Ann Arbor, is the most racially and socioeconomically diverse. Students work one-on-one through the Mentor Center, which provides resources and caring staff who can help at-risk youngsters achieve academic goals, and also in classrooms.

There is usually a request for helping in a Spanish classroom. Site time: Approximately 4 hours per week, between 8:30 and 4. Clague Middle School is located on the north side of Ann Arbor. Clague has an after-school "Homework Club," which provides support to youth in completing assignments, particularly to those having difficulty keeping up with their work. Students may be working with an individual middle-schooler or with a group of students during any given day.

Site time: Mon and Wed 3:00-4:15, plus one (1) additional hour per week. Forsythe Middle School is located on the west side of Ann Arbor. Students will volunteer in an after-school "Homework Club," helping youth with a variety of subjects, under the direction of two teachers. Site Time: Mon,Tue and Thur 3:00-4:30.

Seminar: T 5-7. Location: 1640 Chemistry.

Permission of instructor is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 013 – Latino/a Youth Mentors. (3 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course13_PC.html

Since 1992, Project Community has been working with ALIANZA, the Latino/a Student Alliance, on a tutoring/mentoring service project in connection designed to reach Latino/a high school students. As of 1994, students in this project have been working in Detroit's Latino community. Spanish fluency is not required for this section, but may be helpful. As of now, students will be working at Cesar Chavez Middle School.

The Cesar Chavez Academy Middle School was opened in Fall 1997 and the student population is half Latino/a and half African-American. Students at Cesar Chavez will have the opportunity to work with limited or non-English speaking students in one-on-one tutoring during the last school period and after school. Help with "clubs" (ex. chess) is also possible. Site Times: Tues or Thurs, 12:15-5:00 (including travel time).

Seminar: T 5-7. Location: 1640 Chemistry.

Permission of the instructor is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 014 – America Reads. (3 Credits)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course14_PC.html

Participants in this section will have the opportunity to develop the reading and writing skills of lower elementary students (K-3) through one-on-one after-school tutoring sessions at two Detroit schools, Boynton and Twain.

To register for this section, you must be a work-study student. Through work-study, participants will be paid $9.50/hour for attending America Reads training, creating lesson plans, and attending biweekly meetings. Participants also earn academic credit for attending all class meetings, completing assigned coursework, and tutoring. As with many other off-campus sites, transportation is provided.

Seminar: T 5-7. Location: 1640 Chemistry. Site Times: options are M, W, or Th 3:30-6:30PM.

For more information, please contact Albert Wat (alwat@umich.edu)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 015 – Ann Arbor High School Tutors. (2 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course15_PC.html

Students will be assisting ninth through twelfth graders two to three times per week, depending on your schedule and the site, at one of the following: a large comprehensive high school, a 400-student non-traditional "open" school or two smaller programs/schools aimed at students at risk for dropping out or non-success in the more traditional system. Two schools do not require cars. Site Times: Three to four hours per week (depends on school schedules) between 8 am-3 pm. Seminar: T 5-7. Location: 1640 Chemistry. Tutors may be placed at one of the following high schools:

Community High School is an alternative public school of 300 students that builds on the open school philosophy. There is some structure, but more flexibility than in traditional high schools. The school appeals to creative and independent students whose needs aren't well met in more traditional structure, as well as average students who want a smaller, more intimate school.

Pioneer High School is a traditional, large, comprehensive schools of over 2000 students. Students will tutor primarily ninth through twelfth graders during the school day who are having academic difficulty at Pioneer.

Huron High School is also a traditional large high school. Tutors at Huron will work mainly with 9th graders.

New School, like Community High, is also a non-traditional high school. In its third year, New School is a small alternative school aimed at providing integrated, themed cross-discipline units of study. An additional goal is student involvement in decision-making about school processes.

Project Education is a program established six years ago as an option for persons 15-19 not succeeding in traditional high schools and are not eligible for adult education programs. These could be students who are just now leaving school, or have been dropped out for a year or two and need a way to complete their education. Many of the 125 students are living independently and some are supporting infants or young children. The Project is a supportive, "behaviorally structured" program of 90-minute classes.

Permission of instructor is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 016 – Urban Classrooms-Detroit. (3 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course16_PC.html

Students, working with teachers, will collaborate to recognize and develop highly talented youth at Vetal Elementary in northwest Detroit. Vetal is K-8 and the children are predominantly African-American. Site Times: once per week, 8:15 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. Mon to Fri. Seminar: T 5-7. Location: 1640 Chemistry.

Permission of instructor is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 019 – Advocacy in Education. (3 Credits)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course19_PC.html

In order to enroll in this section, students must have previously taken at least one (1) academic term of Project Community (Sociology 389). Students in this section will have the option of working either at the Student Advocacy Center (for 2 credits) or Ozone House (for 4 credits).

The Student Advocacy Center is a social change, equity-orientated organization which serves non-legal advocacy needs of students and parents. The Center works for educational rights for students and parents and researches and monitors a variety of relevant issues (suspension statistics, education reform and policy, corporal punishment, gender and race discrimination, etc.).

Ozone House is an agency dedicated to improving situations for runaway youth. Students in this section will receive 40 hours of intensive training to answer calls on the hotline, process information for youth residing at Ozone House, and working with youth to develop life skills.

Permission of instructor is required. Contact Amy Knife Gould at 763-3548 or akgould@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 020 – Media Awareness Campaign. (3 Credits)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course20_PC.html

Students will be placed with University Health Service to construct a systematic, intensive media campaign designed to reduce binge drinking at the University.

Permission of instructor is required. Contact Amy Knife Gould at 763-3548 or akgould@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 021 – Feminist Mentors. (3 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course21_PC.html

Raising Strong and Confident Daughters is a grass roots organization dedicated to helping young girls develop a strong sense of self-esteem in a society where girls are at risk for sexual harassment and sexual abuse, drug and alcohol abuse, eating disorders, depression and suicide. This organization will train UM undergraduate women as mentors to middle school girls in an after-school discussion format.

In addition, the program will take issues identified by these young people and turn them into theatrical performances. This term femtors will work with girls from West Middle School in Ypsilanti.

Students wishing to enroll in this section must set up an interview with Carole (carolelap@aol.com). Priority will be given to students with relevant work and/or volunteer experiences.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 022 – UM Hospital: Mott/Women's. (3 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course22_PC.html

Students in this section will spend time at Mott Children's Hospital and the Women's Hospital, both part of the University Hospitals Complex. Children with whom students work may be in the units for a range of health issues, and are usually separated by age rather than by illness.

Possible placement options include recreational/O.T. activities rooms, physical therapy, adolescent hematology or bedside visitation and comfort. No medical experience is necessary. Ease and warmth with children and an ability to initiate interaction or provide comfort are appreciated. In addition, students should be prepared to observe and think critically about the experiences of women and children within this health care system.

Permission of instructor is not required. Students will not assist with or be apt to observe medical procedures, and should expect that tasks may be routine and interactions with patients may need to be self-initiated. In order to be placed at the hospitals you MUST contact the Volunteer Services Office at the hospital as soon as you arrive on campus. You may also contact them in January before returning to Winter Term 2000.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 023 – UM Hospital: Adult Services. (3 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course23_PC.html

Students in this section will work in Adult Services at UM Hospital. Medical experience not needed, but students will need to be comfortable initiating interactions with patients. Students will assist patients and hospital staff as appropriate.

On nursing floors, tasks include visiting with patients, transporting patients, answering call lights, joining families in waiting areas, responding to floor staff or patient needs. In special units such as the Emergency area, Rehab, Burn, and others, volunteer tasks vary according to need. Students will be placed as much as possible in areas relevant to women's health.

Permission of instructor is not required. Students will not assist with or be apt to observe medical procedures and students should expect that tasks may be routine and interaction with patients may need to be self-initiated. In order to be placed at the hospitals you MUST contact the Volunteer Services Office at the hospital as soon as you arrive on campus. You may also contact them in January before returning for Winter Term 2000.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 024 – SAFE–House: Women. (4 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course24_PC.html

SAFE–House is a shelter for battered women and their children operated by the Domestic Violence Project. Volunteers in this section have the opportunity to work with the women of the shelter, or to be on call. Students working with women may staff the 24-hour crisis line, provide transportation, attention, and support; provide on-call services or serve as overnight shelter staff. Experience with domestic violence issues is not necessary.

Interested students must arrange an interview (973-0242 or 995-5444). Be persistent and do not delay – you must complete the interview and participate in 40 hours of training (Fri 6-10; Sat 9-6; Sun 9-6) during consecutive weekends in the beginning of the term.

Permission of instructor is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 025 – SAFE-House: Children. (4 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course25_PC.html

Students working with the children at SAFE-House (see description for section 024) will plan and engage in recreational and educational activities. Again, interested students must arrange an interview (973-0242 or 995-5444). The interview and 40 hours of training must be completed during consecutive weekends in the beginning of the term.

Permission of instructor is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 027 – Social Change with Special Populations. (4 Credits)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course27_PC.html

In order to enroll in this section, students must have previously completed at least one (1) section of Project Community (Sociology 389).

Permission of instructor is required. Contact Amy Knife Gould at 763-3548 or akgould@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 028 – Advocacy for Economic Justice. (4 Credits)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course28_PC.html

In order to enroll for this section, students must have previously taken at least one (1) academic term of Project Community (Sociology 389). Students will work with the Center for Empowerment and Economic Development (CEED).

CEED is a nonprofit organization dedicated to building economic independence particularly for historically underprivileged and discriminated peoples. Much of the work they do involves helping people start their own businesses and become economically stable and independent. In 1998, students helped publish a Black business directory. In Fall 1998 and Winter 1999, they worked to organize a Women's Business Summit in Michigan to address the concerns of women business owners and provide a venue for their voices to be heard, create a networking and support system for women in business, and create a statewide women's business organization.

Students will be expected to volunteer in two weekly two-hour shifts: One shift will include a group meeting with the CEED director and will be coordinated with student schedules at the beginning of the term; the other students may arrange according to their availability.

Permission of instructor is required. Contact Amy Knife Gould at 763-3548 or akgould@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 030 – Wayne Youth Mentors. (4 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course30_PC.html

This is an interactive program that works with children between the ages of 6 and 18 (Youth are divided into three groups, based on grade: Elementary, Jr. High, and High School) who have been referred by the juvenile justice system. This site consists of an hour-and-a-half discussion over different themes that are presented at the beginning of each session. Students work to establish relationships with individual children and try to be positive role models.

The mentor will work with his or her mentees on goals that are established at the beginning of the term. Most of the children have behavior problems, learning disabilities, or personal problems with which the mentors may be able to help the youth cope.

Permission of instructor is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 031 – Detention Center Writing Tutors. (3 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course31_PC.html

In this section, students will work as a team to lead weekly creative writing workshops. The Detention Center is a temporary facility for juvenile boys and girls who are awaiting placement or release. Students will work with the English teacher to develop communication skills through creative writing or one-to-one/small group tutoring. No prior experience is necessary.

Permission of instructor is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 032 – Detention Center: Recreation. (3 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course32_PC.html

The Detention Center is a temporary facility for boys and girls who are awaiting placement or release. At the Detention center students will provide structured leisure time in both educational and recreational activities and may incorporate theater activities, as well as music, dance, and/or art. Students in this section provide positive models and interactions for these youth, much like a Big Brother or Big Sister. In the past we have held debates, health and nutrition seminars, and seminars on skills for job seeking.

Permission of instructor is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 033 – Adrian/Western Wayne Prison: Creative Writing. (3 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course33_PC.html

Students in this section will work in teams to lead creative writing workshops at either of Western Wayne or Adrian Prisons on a weekly basis (see description for section 034). At the prison students will help inmates enhance their writing skills and communicate their ideas. Students will be required to submit weekly creative writing assignments as well as fulfilling other course requirements. No previous teaching experience is necessary.

Permission of instructor is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 034 – Adrian/Western Wayne Prison: Debate. (3 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course34_PC.html

Students in this section will work in teams to lead debate at either of Adrian or Western Wayne Prisons. Western Wayne is a medium security prison for adult males and Adrian is a minimum security facility that houses adult male prisoners who are serving short sentences, or will be eligible for parole within the next 18 months. Students will organize a weekly debate about a current topic, the goal of which is to strengthen communication and argumentative skills of both students and inmates.

Students will be required to submit weekly journals and complete other identified course requirements. No previous debate experience is necessary.

Permission of instructor is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 035 – County Jail: Women's Writing and Debate. (3 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course35_PC.html

Students, working as a team, will act as leaders of creative writing and debate workshops at the Washtenaw County Jail on a weekly basis. For this section, students will be working with female prisoners who are awaiting trial, sentencing, or transfer to prison. The inmates at this facility have varying levels of ability with which students will work; however, no previous experience is necessary.

Permission of instructor is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 036 – Maxey Training School. (3 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course36_PC.html

This State-operated facility is located in Whitmore Lake, approximately 20 minutes from campus. At this long-term residential placement for juvenile offenders, usually ages 12-18, students provide structured educational and recreational activities in a small group setting.

Permission of instructor is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 037 – American Friends Service Committee: Prison Advocacy. (3 credits).

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course37_PC.html

To enroll in this section, students must have previously completed at least one (1) academic term of Project Community (Sociology 389).

American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) is a prisoner advocacy agency where students may have the opportunity to attend political rallies, give presentations to community groups about AFSC efforts, help draft correspondence to legislators, and participate in other activities designed to ensure fair treatment of Michigan inmates.

Permission of instructor is required. Contact Amy Knife Gould at 763-3548 or akgould@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 038 – HIV/AIDS. (3 Credits)

Instructor(s): Nadja Hogg (nadjah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML

Students in this section will receive training from the Midwest AIDS Prevention Project (MAPP) to be HIV/AIDS peer educators. The training is in three parts, where students not only learn about the transmission of HIV, prevention, and barriers that people face when trying to protect themselves, but also about alternatives to intercourse as well as basic safer sex techniques.

The students are encouraged to take their knowledge to different communities and educate them about HIV and AIDS. At least one presentation will be required.

Permission of instructor is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Soc. 393/REES 396/Hist. 333/Poli. Sci. 396/Slavic 396. Survey of East Central Europe.

Section 001 – Eastern Europe Since 1900. Meets with History 439.001

Instructor(s): Brian Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397. (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~baporter/syl43900.html

See History 439.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 395. Directed Reading or Research.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit in the same or different terms.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For undergraduate students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Student should contact faculty member with whom they want to work to arrange topic and workload.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 397. Junior Honors in Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alfred Young, Jr.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Soc. 210; prior or concurrent enrollment in Soc. 310 or 512; and Honors standing in sociology. (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Soc. 399. Senior Honors in Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Pamela Smock (pjsmock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors standing in sociology. Soc. 210 and 310, and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Soc. 420. Complex Organizations.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Allison

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Formal organizations, or complex organizations, are ubiquitous in modern society. Our economy is composed of complex organizations; many of our political institutions are also complex organizations. Formal organizations also play a significant role in other spheres of our life-religion, education, social services, sports, performing arts, etc. How are these organizations defined? Who are their members? How are they structured internally? How do they relate to other organizations, and the wider society? How do organizations and their members make decisions and carry them out as actions? These are some of the questions that this course will try to answer.

This course provides an introduction to temporary theory and research on complex organizations, such as business enterprises, schools, government, and voluntary associations. We will consider the internal structure of organizations, the relationship of the organization to its environment, and organizational strategies and decision-making.

The first part of the course covers the internal structure of organizations and introduces three perspectives on organizational structure: organizations as rational systems, as natural systems, and as open systems. The second part of the course places the organization in a wider context and examines the organization's relationship to the various elements of its environment. We will learn how different theories conceptualize the organization's environment, and how organizations manage their relationship to the environment. In the third part of the course we will discuss a number of different questions and issues regarding organizational structure and behavior, such as the relationship between technology and structure, strategy and organizational structure, power and authority in organizations, organizational culture, conflict in organizations, and organizational learning.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 423/Am. Cult. 421. Social Stratification.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sandra Smith (sandrass@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/W00/SC423/index.html

This course offers a survey of traditional paradigms and recent conceptual and empirical work in the field of sociology, focusing in particular on the study of stratification as it has developed in the United States. We begin with discussions of classical theories of social inequality before considering contemporary paradigms of social stratification, such as the status attainment tradition of research and dual labor market theories. After a critical examination of these works, we then consider more recent alternatives to these approaches, including cultural and social capital and new theories of race and gender inequality.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 430. Introduction to Population Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbara Anderson (barba@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Soc. 430 does not meet core requirements for graduate students in sociology. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 530. (3). (Excl). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the major population processes: mortality, fertility, and migration. It is an introduction to the technical and substantive aspects of demography.

If you look at the size of the population of a geographic area at two points in time, people are added to that population through births and migrants into the area; people are removed from that population through deaths and migrants out of the area. The study of the determinants of the basic population processes of mortality, fertility, and migration is, thus, actually the study of the determinants of population growth and decline.

There are large differences throughout the world in the rate of population growth and in the level of fertility and mortality of the population. The way fertility, mortality, and migration interrelate to result in population growth is important as a background for understanding many social, economic, and political issues. This course concentrates on the causes of population processes rather than on the effects of population processes. Sociology

Population Problems concentrates on the effects of population processes. You will be introduced to basic demographic measures of each of these processes and methods of analyzing them. No formal background in statistics is required, but much of the material is quantitative. The ability to read and understand tables is essential, as well as willingness to try to understand explanations of the results of statistical analyses.

This course does not aim to produce expert population analysts who can do complicated computations. Rather, it aims that students will understand methodological approaches and how to interpret demographic measures and will understand many of the major theoretical perspectives that are important in population research and the evidence that supports or does not support various theoretical perspectives. After taking the course, a student should be able to read an article in a newspaper or magazine that deals with population issues and understand what the issue is about and possess the knowledge and critical perspective to be able to assess the likely validity of the article and what possible problems or additional considerations might be.

There are several in-class exams and one project assignment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 450. Political Sociology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeff Paige (jpaige@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to political sociology with a particular emphasis on the relationship between economics and politics. Basic concepts such as power, state, nation, and class will be introduced and applied to the analysis of the development and change of political systems in historical and comparative perspective. The course examines (a) the historical origins of democracy, fascism, and communism as political systems, (b) imperialism, development, and revolution in the Third World, and (c) class, class coalitions, and the state in post New-Deal U.S. politics. Introductory courses in sociology or political science desirable but not required. Lecture/discussion; midterm and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 454. Law and Social Organization.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dan Sharphorn (dsharphn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to examine the organization of law in society and the relationships between law and society. The approach will be primarily from a sociological perspective; however, we will also explore the views of legal scholars, anthropologists, political scientists, philosophers, and others. While the course will be a survey of "law and social organization" in general, we will focus on current topics of special interest as a device for our study: the death penalty, rape laws, affirmative action and anti-discrimination laws, university rules and regulations, and others.

Students will be expected to gain an understanding of the extent of the study of law and social organization and the leading theories and ideas about it, and will be asked to think critically and independently about legal systems and the role of law in society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 455/Rel. 455. Religion and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Terrence Mcginn

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Religion 455.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 460. Social Change.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ian Robinson (eian@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~eian/Soc460syllabus.pdf

One of the most significant social changes of the late 20th century is the process known as globalization, which promises to transform ways of life worldwide. This course explores the character and consequences of the economic dimension of this process. The first half of the course considers what is new about economic globalization, relative to several baselines. We then examine its current character and consider whether this or any other form of globalization is inevitable. The second half of the course focuses on the consequences of the current model of economic globalization for (a) levels of poverty and economic inequality within and among countries, (b) the scope and quality of democracy, and (c) environmental sustainability. Authors examined include Marx, Polanyi, Wallerstein, Reich, Krugman, Spero, Lipietz, Piore & Sabel, Heilleiner, Cox, Hirst & Thompson, Gowan, Rodrik, and Castells. We also read analyses by the World Bank, International Monetary Fund, and World Trade Organization, as well as critiques of these organizations produced by labor and other social movement organizations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 463/Comm. Studies 485. Mass Communication and Public Opinion.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret Howard (meghow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Communication Studies 463.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Soc. 468. Criminology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeff Morenoff (morenoff@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the sociological study of crime and social control. After reviewing the definition and nature of crime in both classic and contemporary theories, we explore the major theoretical perspectives on the causes of crime and compare their ability to explain criminal activity by considering case studies drawn from books, film, and current events. Some of the specific topics we will explore include historical trends in violent crime; America's comparatively high crime rate; family and cultural influences on crime; crime and policing in local communities; the contours of criminal careers; and urban poverty, racial segregation, and gender as they relate to crime in America.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 472/Psych. 381. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology.

Section 001, 002.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Stat. 402 and Psych. 380. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~psycours/381/

See Psychology 381.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Soc. 495. Special Course.

Section 003 – Research on Ethnic Identity. Prev Crswrk On Immig-Race-Ethncty. Permis. Instrctr.

Instructor(s): Silvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this class, the students will engage in doing research, together with the instructor, on ethnic identity. First, students will become familiar with the literature in Sociology on ethnic identity, where it comes from and how it changes over time. Then the class as a whole will engage in constructing a survey questionnaire on the topic. We will pretest the questionnaire by giving it in introductory Sociology classes. In this semester, the aim of the course will be to survey the incoming Freshpersons class on their identity and their social and demographic characteristics (age, country of birth, social class of parents, generations in the U. S., age at the time of immigration, and the like), as we seek to find out how those characteristics are related to how they identify with respect to their ethnicity – race, nationality, ethnicity, religion. In a few years time we will also want to survey that same class when they become Seniors, so that we can see how the college years actually changed their identities and their participation in ethnic student organizations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 495. Special Course.

Section 004 – Social Psychology in Cross-Cultural Perspective

Instructor(s): Diane Sunar

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Soc. 495. Special Course.

Section 006 – Social Psychology of Genocide

Instructor(s): Dana Greene (dmgreene@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The primary aim of this course on the Social Psychology of Genocide is to understand the precursors to and the conditions under which genocide occurs. The course will be structured around the following orienting questions: What is genocide? In what ways has the term, "holocaust," been adopted to address many of the atrocities committed against humans in modern society? What is the role of hatred, race, gender, religion, and, most importantly, POLITICS in the commission of genocide? What makes some nations quiet while others try to help those in imminent danger? In what ways does the media perpetuate stereotypes that inhibit aid? This course will seek to identify the sociological relationship between politics and aggression and will delve deeply into the definition of genocide in several international realms (East Timor, Rwanda, Cambodia, the Nazi Holocaust, among many others). Moreover, we will consider the roles of race, religion, culture, and gender in the instigation and perpetuation of genocidal activities. Lastly, we will consider the nomenclature associated with genocide and will pay particular attention to the roles of perpetrators, victims, and bystanders in the social psychological politics of memory and remembrance.

Course requirements include class attendance and participation, two 6-8 page papers, a take-home midterm examination, and a final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 521/CAAS 521. African American Intellectual Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alford Young, Jr. (ayoun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 521.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

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