Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in Spanish (Division 484)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for Spanish.


Registration and Waitlist Policies: French & Spanish Elementary Courses (101-232)

On the first day of classes, instructors will receive a class list for each section of a class showing the names of students currently registered. They will also receive a list of students registered for the waitlist for the section, if applicable.

Instructors should take attendance at the first two class meetings, using the class list, the waitlist, and writing down the names and Social Security Numbers of any students attending class whose names are not on either list. Instructors should ask LSA seniors who wish to add the class to identify themselves, and to produce proof of their class standing.

After the first two meetings of the class, the instructors will meet with the course coordinators, and fill any openings in the class sections. Any student who has not attended the first two class meetings may be dropped from the registration list or from the waitlist, at the course coordinator's discretion.

Openings will be filled, in order of priority, by:

  1. LSA seniors who are registered on the waitlist and have attended the first two class meetings.
  2. LSA seniors who have attended the first two class meetings, but are not registered on the waitlist. If the number of eligible students in this group exceeds the remaining number of spaces, the course coordinator will make the selection by a random method.
  3. Others registered on the waitlist, in the order in which they are listed on the waitlist, provided they have attended the first two class meetings.
  4. Others not registered on the waitlist, but who have attended the first two class meetings. If the number of eligible students in this group exceeds the remaining number of spaces, the course coordinator will make the selection by a random method.
  5. Coordinators will provide a list of students (and their Social Security Numbers) who are to be issued overrides, to the department office staff. Staff will provide confirmation of overrides issued to coordinators or instructors on request.

Elementary Language Courses

Students who intend to continue a language begun in high school must take the Placement Test to determine the language course in which they should enroll. Spanish 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction in high school. It is strongly recommended that students who began Spanish at another college or university also take the placement test. Students must check with the Course Coordinator for any exceptions to the Placement Test level.

Placement Exams

Tue., Nov. 16, 4:00-5:30 p.m.

Spanish 2440 Mason Hall
French 3410 Mason Hall
Italian 3447 Mason Hall

Wed., Nov. 17, 4:00-5:30 p.m.

Spanish 3442 Mason Hall
French 3410 Mason Hall
Italian 3415 Mason Hall

The following are additional Placement Exam dates:

Tue., Dec. 14, Wed., Dec. 15, Thur., Dec. 16, Fri., Dec. 17 - *10:00AM 11:30AM

Spanish Angell Hall Aud. C
French 3439 Mason Hall
Italian 3435 Mason Hall

Monday, December 20*10:00AM 11:30AM

Spanish Angell Hall Aud. D
French 3439 Mason Hall
Italian 3435 Mason Hall

Tuesday, January 4*10:00AM 11:30AM

Spanish Angell Hall Aud. C
French Angell Hall Aud. D
Italian 3402 Mason Hall

Additionally, we will have 2 make up exams. One will be January 6th and the other January 10. Time and place still to be determined.


Spanish 101. Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For students with little or no previous study of Spanish.

Course Objectives: the first part of an introduction to the Spanish language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing Spanish 101 understand about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak, using memorized phrases and some original language; read short texts of familiar or simple structure for detailed comprehension, less familiar materials for gist and main ideas; write familiar material with considerable accuracy.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, three exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 102. Elementary Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. Spanish 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. Open only to students who have completed 101 at the University of Michigan. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in Spanish 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Continuation of Spanish 101.

Course Objectives: Introduction to Hispanic language and culture; task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Videos, audio cassette and computer materials incorporated.

Goals: Students completing Spanish 102 will speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communications like radio and television; read for practical information; writer simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a Final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

Spanish 102. Elementary Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 013, 014 Section 013 and Section 014 Are Reserved For Csp Students. Inquire In G155 Angell Hall For Further Information.

Instructor(s): Karen Primorac (kjprim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. Spanish 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. Open only to students who have completed 101 at the University of Michigan. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in Spanish 103. (4). (LR).

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Spanish 103. Review of Elementary Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test or permission of department. Transfer students elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Accelerated refresher course for students with two or three years of high school Spanish whose previous study did not occur within the preceding two years. Equivalent to 101 and 102 condensed into one term. Transfer students elect Spanish 103 if they have completed the equivalent of Spanish 101 elsewhere.

Course Objectives: Introduction to the Spanish language and culture task- and content-based approach integrates grammar in a functional use through listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Language use encouraged through communicative activities rather than a sequence of linguistic units. Video, audio cassette, and computer material incorporated.

Goals: Student completing Spanish 103 will hear about different sociocultural norms, can act with awareness of such differences; speak in short spontaneous conversations involving everyday topics, observing basic courtesy requirements; understand gist of one-way communication like radio and television; read for practical information; write simple correspondence and short compositions on familiar topics, with good control of basic sentence structure.

Work requirements/Evaluation criteria: Regular attendance essential. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, four exams, and a Final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

Spanish 231. Second-Year Spanish.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~span231/

This course is designed to improve the speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills of students and to provide some insight into the literature and culture of Spanish-speaking people. Course grade is based on a series of quizzes and exams (written and oral) designed to assess ability to read, write, and understand spoken Spanish plus periodic written work and oral class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

Spanish 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The principal aim of this course is to acquire a more profound understanding of the history, politics, society, culture, customs, and literature of the Hispanic world through listening, writing, reading, and speaking activities in Spanish. At the same time, students develop the language tools, both grammatical functions and vocabulary, necessary to discuss issues of relevance to Hispanic culture and to analyze these situations while expressing their own personal opinions, reactions, conclusions, and possible outcomes to hypothetical situations. Therefore, the practice and application of grammatical features and vocabulary is integrated into the content of the course and students are expected to formally study and practice these structures individually through the explanations provided in the textbook and the practice activities assigned as homework. Materials include newspaper articles, cultural readings, videos, short lectures, audio cassette, and computer materials. Work requirements/evaluation criteria: Regular attendance crucial. Participation in class includes asking and answering questions, initiating discussion, role playing and other situational activities. Grade based on oral participation, homework assignments, in-class work, compositions, exams, and a final written and oral exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

Spanish 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 006 Honors

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Spanish 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 007 Introduction to Hispanic Cultures

Instructor(s): Olga Gallego (ogallego@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to introduce participants to the cultural reality of the Hispanic world by studying various aspects of its history, social issues/problems, current and past customs. The most important aim of the course is to provide participants with an experience with Hispanic culture that will give them a true sense of cultural understanding. At the same time students will be exposed to the mayor communicative functions that characterize the intermediate mid/high levels of proficiency. That is, participants will

a. narrate and describe in the present, past and future.

b. express and support opinions; express feelings and emotions about present, past and future events.

c. hypothesize about the future and the present.

The course is conducted entirely in Spanish. Various writing assignments are required, three exams, quizzes, oral examination, oral presentations, final paper, final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 008 Literatura fantástica

Instructor(s): Kimberly Boys (ksboys@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: Http://www-personal.umich.edu/~ksboys/

This course will focus on the discussion and examination of fantastic literature and magical realism in contemporary Latin American literature. The principle objectives will be to develop an understanding of the origins, themes, methods, and purposes of fantastic literature through selected readings of literature and criticism. Texts will include short stories and a short novel by Carlos Fuentes, Julio Cortázar, Jorge Luis Borges, and others. Students will be required to purchase a course pack, a grammar reference text, and a reader. In addition to the focus on the development of fluency in understanding, speaking, reading, and writing Spanish, important functional aspects of language will also be addressed. Evaluations will be based on class participation, course exams, an oral exam, homework, in-class activities, and a final course portfolio. Special emphasis will be placed on writing and the writing process through reaction papers as well as analytic and creative compositions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 020 La Cultura Hispana a Traves de la Musica

Instructor(s): Melody Nixon (nixonm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

So you love Ricky Martin and Jennifer López, but what do you know about Latinos in the U. S.? You know how to salsa, but do you know where it came from? This course will provide answers to these questions and more, as it will use music as a starting point for the exploration of Hispanic cultures in Spain, Latin America, and the U. S. Beginning with an introduction to a particular type of music the focus will expand outward to look at the history, society, politics, and racial and cultural issues surrounding that music. We will examine musical forms like flamenco, tango, Andean music, political protest songs, Afro-Cuban forms, salsa, merengue, Tex-Mex, and the recent boom of "Latin pop" in the U. S. Students will learn the necessary vocabulary and grammar structures to be able to discuss these issues and their reactions to them. Grades will be based on class participation, homework, a journal, exams, and a final research project consisting of oral and written parts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 232. Second-Year Spanish, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 026, 030, 034 Latino Culture Through Community Service

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 230 or 112. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will be a query into the nature of the Hispanic community through the topic of culture. Not only will we be discussing Hispanic in a seminar setting, but we will be providing two hours a week of community service in after-school tutoring to the Hispanic community in southwest Detroit. The goals of this course, then, are two-fold, and encompass the objectives of both a service-learning course and a fourth-term Spanish language course. You will be exploring and "testing" different cultural understandings of service, including, and especially, your own. This course in not just about providing a service in terms of logging hours, but to go beyond, through analysis, reflection and evaluation to address the variety of needs of the Hispanic culture in our community.

Note: See Time Schedule for days and times of the above listed sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

Spanish 270(358). Spanish Conversation for Non-Concentrators.

Other Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 275 or 276. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in Spanish.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Spanish 270 is a practical Spanish course for non-concentrators interested in the Spanish language and in contemporary Hispanic culture. Texts include journalistic prose as well as journal formatted videos aimed at increasing students' knowledge of current affairs in Spain and Latin America. Audio tapes will be employed to improve pronunciation, vocabulary, and listening skills. Class format includes group discussions, debates, oral presentations, and role-playing. Attendance and participation will be mandatory and will constitute a large part of the course grade. Grades will also be determined by examination of students' listening and expressive skills. Finally, students will practice writing in various practical formats such as letters, book or movie reviews, etc. These written exercises will form the final component of the course grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 275(361). Grammar and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~dennisdp/Spanish.275.html

Spanish 275 is intended to increase the accuracy of students' Spanish and to increase vocabulary and cultural knowledge through readings. The course is centered on a grammar-review text. Students do readings in Spanish, prepare compositions and other exercises, and expand vocabulary. Time is allotted to class discussion of readings and especially to the treatment of recurrent problems of grammar. Classes are taught in Spanish. The final grade is based on weekly translations, tests, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

Spanish 276(362). Reading and Composition.

Other Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 232. A maximum of six credits of Spanish 270, 275, and 276 may be counted toward graduation. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Spanish 276 is intended to improve students' ability to read Spanish prose, as well as their skills in conversational and written Spanish. To this end, students will be presented with a variety of written, visual, and audio materials designed to stimulate discussion, both written and oral. Compositions are assigned regularly and oral presentations by students are required. Classes are conducted exclusively in Spanish. The final grade is based on compositions, exams, and participation in class discussions or presentations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1, Section 099. See Romance Language Override Statement for Important Information.

Spanish 290(307)/Amer. Cult. 224. Spanish for Heritage Language Learners.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Heredia

Prerequisites & Distribution: Basic knowledge of Spanish language. (4). (Excl). This course does not satisfy the language requirement.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course addresses the particular linguistic needs and interests of students of Hispanic descent and heritage born and/or educated in the United States interested in acquiring a formal and structural knowledge of Spanish, in further expanding vocabulary at the abstract and professional levels, and in developing their skills in formal and professional writing. Sociolinguistic aspects of Spanish in the United States code-switching, linguistic attitudes, bilingualism also will be explored in relation to the politics of cultural identity. Short weekly assignments and exercises emphasizing the differences between oral and written modes of communication and between formal and informal Spanish will be required, along with a midterm and final exam. Readings will include cultural essays, literatures, and scholarly articles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 305. Spanish for Business and the Professions.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria Dorantes (lourdes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Business 305 is intended to increase the student's vocabulary and knowledge about the Spanish-speaking business world. Since the class is conducted in Spanish, students must have an understanding of the fundamentals of Spanish Grammar. The course will use authentic material, rely on group discussion, various readings, and exercises. The final grade will be based on class participation, written assignments, a project, a midterm exam, and a final exam. This course will allow students to develop their Spanish business knowledge to be more effective in the business world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 305. Spanish for Business and the Professions.

Other Language Courses

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Maria Dorantes (lourdes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Business 305 is intended to increase the student's vocabulary and knowledge about the Spanish-speaking business world. Since the class is conducted in Spanish, students must have an understanding of the fundamentals of Spanish Grammar. The course will use authentic material, rely on group discussion, various readings, and exercises. The final grade will be based on class participation, written assignments, a project, a midterm exam, and a final exam. This course will allow students to develop their Spanish business knowledge to be more effective in the business world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank Casa (fcasa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to narrative fiction, poetry, drama, argumentative essays, and critical literature. It emphasizes the formal aspects of each genre, including appropriate terminology and analytical/ interpretive approaches.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literature

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Dennis Pollard (dennisdp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this introduction to the study of literature, specifically literature written in Spanish, we will consider topics of literary study and methods of analysis. We shall examine three of the most commonly-taught literary genres prose fiction, lyric poetry, and drama. In addition, we will study the essay. The discussion of each reading will focus on one or more specific aspects of literary style appropriate to the genre under consideration. The principal text for the course, Aproximaciones al estudio de la literatura hispánica, will be supplemented by other readings from the four literary modes. The basic class format is discussion, with very few lectures, so regular attendance and participation will be critical. Students will make presentations on readings during the term. Each student will complete written projects of approximately five pages on each of the genres. Each paper will be read and commented on by fellow students as well as the instructor. There will be two exams on material covered.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literature

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Sanchez

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Spanish 320. Introduction to the Study of Literature.

Literature

Section 004.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to narrative fiction, poetry, drama, argumentative essays, and critical literature. It emphasizes the formal aspects of each genre, including appropriate terminology and analytical/ interpretive approaches.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 340(375). Introduction to Iberian Cultures.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enrique Garcia (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course seeks to give an overview of Spanish culture by focusing on some of the major points of its history. The course will have unit readings on a variety of topics that go from the Moorish conquest, to the end of the Inquisition, the American encounters as well as the more problematic modern period that includes the Civil War, the dictatorship, and the return to democracy. We will supplement the readings with movies, TV clips, and music presentations. Class conducted in Spanish only.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 341(376). Introduction to Latin American Cultures.

Literature

Section 001 Dialogues between Latin American Cultures Introduction to Latin American Studies

Instructor(s): Jossianna Arroyo (jarroyo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course presents a panoramic view of Latin American cultural representations, dialogues and experiences. It comprises a corpus of reading, visual images, and music with emphasis in Caribbean, Brazilian, and U.S. Latino cultures. One oral presentation is required. Course will be taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 350. Independent Studies.

Literature

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once with permission.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Interested students should contact the concentration advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 373. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literature

Section 001 Spanish Meta-Theatre

Instructor(s): Andrew Anderson (andander@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

All literary texts refer, to a greater or lesser extent, explicitly or implicitly, to other texts; metaliterary texts do this more overtly and self-consciously than others. They emphasize (and often inquire into) their own literariness, in a variety of different ways. Metatheatrical texts can depict a playwright composing a play, a director producing a play, the "real" lives and "stage" lives of actors and actresses, the experiences of audience members, or a combination of these features. Perhaps the most characteristic manifestation is of the "play-within-the-play." This course will focus on examples of metatheater drawn from all periods of Peninsular Spanish literature, and will be further illustrated by reference to texts from other literatures and to films. Teaching, conducted in Spanish, will be by lecture and class discussion. Active participation is expected. Evaluation will be by attendance and three medium-length papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 373. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literature

Section 002 Hispanic Caribbean Culture

Instructor(s): Suarez (rosarios@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Spanish 373. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literature

Section 003 Latin American Popular Culture: Between the Local and the Global

Instructor(s): Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and one additional 300-level course. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Globalization has brought some changes to Latin American culture. Hollywood, MTV and the transnational record companies have been selling, successfully, their products in the Third World in general and in Latin America in particular in the last few years. As a consequence, there is now a series of products that incorporate some foreign elements to the traditional, local artistic forms. These are usually considered as hybrid cultural phenomena. We are going to study some musical examples of hybridization, such as Latin jazz, rock en español and hip-hop latino. By studying groups such as Molotov, Peyote Asesino, Platano Macho, Ilya Kuryaki and the Valderramas, Soda Stereo, Cafe Tacuba, Irakere and solo artists like Fito Paez, Charly Garcia, Chucho Valdes, Danilo Pérez, Caetano Veloso and Milton Nascimento, we will try to make sense of the cultural hybridity that characterizes much of Latin American current cultural production. We will also study some cinematographic examples that show a complex interaction between high- and low-brow cultural registers. In the case of Rodrigo D, we will see an "author" or "art" film that deals with popular culture issues, while in cases like Death and the Maiden and Kiss of the Spiderwoman we will be confronted with "serious literature" works that have been appropriated by Hollywood. We will also deal with movies such as Like Water for Chocolate which allow us to study in detail the fate of Magical Realism, one of the most popular aesthetic trends in 1960's and 1970's Latin America.

We will also study some critics who have tried to make sense of globalization, cultural hybridity and popular culture in general, such as Néstor García Canclini, Renato Ortiz, and Jesús Martín Barbero.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 392. Junior Honors Course.

Literature

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Readings of selected works from the literatures of Spain and Spanish America. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 405. Introduction to Spanish Linguistics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Teresa Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. Taught in Spanish(3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Linguistics is the scientific study of human language; that is, it looks for answers to the questions "what are human languages like?" and "why are human languages the way they are?" This course is an introduction to the main concepts and methods of analysis of linguistics, focusing on Spanish and taught in Spanish.

The main part of the course will present concepts and techniques of the analysis of word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), meaning (semantics) and sounds (phonetics-phonology). The last part of the course will examine subfields of linguistics such as psycholinguistics (the study of language acquisition), dialectology and sociolinguistics (the study of language variation), and diachronic linguistics (the study of language change).

Undergraduate Spanish concentrators, linguistics concentrators, and graduate students in Spanish. 3 hours lecture, taught in Spanish. Examinations and term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 410/Rom. Ling. 410. Spanish Phonetics and Phonology.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga Gallego (ogallego@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276. Spanish 405 is strongly recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will offer participants a theoretical foundation in Spanish phonetics and phonology. It includes the study of articulatory phonetics, phonological theory, distinctive feature analysis, practice in transcription, lab practice, contrastive analysis of English and Spanish sounds, with special attention to those sounds of Spanish that are most difficult for English speakers to acquire. The grade will be based on a midterm and a final exam, four quizzes, various homework assignments and a final paper. Course is conducted in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 435. Independent Study.

Literature

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Interested students should contact the concentration advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 440. Literatures and Cultures of the Borderlands: The Politics of Language.

Literature

Section 001 Puerto Rico and Puerto Ricans 1898-1998

Instructor(s): Jossianna Arroyo (jarroyo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level course. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course analyzes the political, literary and cultural discourses that have shaped Puerto Rican history throughout one hundred years of colonial experience. Puerto Ricans are one of the poorest and largest minorities in the United States,and their cultural reality has been influenced by two imperial powers (Spain, United States).

In this course we will discuss the changes, continuities, and negotiations of Puerto Rican subjectivities from 1898-1998. Relationships between colonial subjectivities will be analyzed through diverse topics such as: migration, identity politics (i.e. race, gender, sexuality), national discourses and visual representations (i.e., documentary, film, performance). A necessary dialogue between the political and cultural imaginaries of the island and the diaspora its inclusions and exclusions will organize the context of the course and will help us to theorize the differences and similarities between Puerto Rican's "border"/migrant experiences and those from other groups. The course will be taught in Spanish. One oral presentation and a final paper is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Spanish 448. Hispanic Culture Through Community Service Learning.

Literature

Section 001 Latino Culture through Community Service

Instructor(s): Frances Aparicio (franapar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 300 level Spanish course. (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Spanish 450. Middle Ages.

Literature

Section 001 Love and Prostitution in Medieval Spain

Instructor(s): George Greenia

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Epic adventures and clashing armies are fine, but what about the intimate history in early Spain? Next to gunpowder, romantic love is said to be the most dangerous invention of the Middle Ages. This course will focus on the notion of love, and how its representation in literature was sometimes at odds with law and the commerce of flesh. We will read selections from Alfonso's law books and his chaste love songs to the Virgin Mary (and her protection of sinners, including wayward lovers); the Life of St. Mary of Egypt and her struggle to abandon sexual wantonness; Juan Ruiz's rollicking Libro de buen amor, a medieval manual for lovers; the Archpriest of Talavera's Little Sermons on Sin, a mean-spirited condemnation of the wiles of women; and Celestina, a dramatic novel about an old bawd and her misguided clients. Readings will be in modern Spanish with occasional forays into the original texts; taught in Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 458. The Spanish Picaresque Novel.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Enrique Garcia (enriqueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

El género de la picaresca es considerado como uno de los fenómenos más significativos de la literatura áurea Se aproxima a la sociedad coetánea desde perspectivas únicas, tratando algunas de las preocupaciones y obsesiones del momento a veces de manera burlona, a veces trágica. Al tiempo que abre nuevas vías de reflexión sobre una España en continuo cambio, impulsa la creación de una nueva forma de representación: la novela. Algunos de los arquetipos más singulares del género (ladrones, prostitutas, estudiantes, gitanos, moriscos, etc.) serán analizados en las lecturas de clase: Lazarillo de Tormes, El Buscón de Francisco de Quevedo, Rinconete y Cortadillo de Miguel de Cervantes, La pícara Justina (selecciones) de Francisco López de Ubeda y el Guzmán de Alfarache (selecciones) de Mateo Alemán. La clase será en español.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 460. The Spanish Comedia.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank Casa (fcasa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Spanish Comedia: The theater of the Golden Age, known as the Comedia, is both a literary artifact and a mirror, if not of the reality of the period, at least of its aspirations. The dream of love, courage, honor is the foundation of this theater but it is never completely separated from the subtle but nevertheless present questioning of the dramatists. Students will read about six plays, view some of these on videos and write about various aspects of these plays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 473. Colonial/Postcolonial Studies in Latin-American Cultures.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gustavo Verdesio (verdesio@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

One of the goals of this course is to explore the limitations of Postcolonial theory as a tool to understand or make sense of Latin American culture and society. We will read authors like Edward Said, Homi Bhabha, Ngugi Wa Thiongo, Aimee Cesaire and many other Postcolonial critics. Most of these authors elaborated their theoretical apparatuses from the perspective of subjects who had broken the colonial ties to empires such as the British and French ones. At the same time, we will read some canonical Latin American literary works and will watch some Latin American films in order to test the explanatory power of the aforementioned Postcolonial critics. Parallel to these readings we will study some Latin American critics such as Hugo Achugar, Beatriz Sarlo and Néstor García Canclini, whose theoretical frameworks are originated in the framework of decolonization that Latin American independent republics have been developing for the last 175 years, in order to see how their approaches differ from the ones practiced by Postcolonial authors. Through the comparison of these different types of texts we will be able to assess the explanatory power of Postcolonial theory as well as its limitations for the study of Latin America. We will also be able to evaluate the methods and theories generated by Latin Americanists, not only from Latin America, but also from the US academic world (for example, John Beverley, Alberto Moreiras, Julio Ramos and Walter Mignolo).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 475. Latin American Narrative of the Twentieth Century.

Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Javier Sanjinés (sanjines@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be elected for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

By reading key political and literary essays on XIXth and XXth century Latin America, this course will discuss the development of political thought through techniques of literary analysis.

We will study some of Latin America's most interesting (sometimes very funny) political speeches through the notions of epics, drama, comedy, etc. The course is built on two opposing sets of political doctrines. On the one hand, we will contrast liberalism (particularly the Chilean Jose Victorino Lastarria's XIXth century key political and literary speeches, as well as XXth century newspaper editorials advocating open market Latin American economies) to dependency theories which study Latin America's backwardness as a consequence of imperialism and free-tradism (particularly the Uruguayan Eduardo Galeano's widely read Open Veins of Latin America).

On the other hand, the course will oppose neoliberal authoritarian doctrines such as the Argentine and Chilean Military Junta speeches on politics, economics, and sports (particularly Augusto Pinochet's 1973 and 1974 speeches, and Jorge Rafael Videla's speech accepting for Argentina the 1978 Soccer World Cup) to the doctrine of human rights developed by the recently deceased Brazilian activist Catholic bishop Dom Helder Camara, and the Peruvian theologian Gustavo Gutierrez (A Theology of Liberation).

A course pack will be distributed. There will be a midterm exam and a final take-home. Active participation of students is essential to the development of this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literature

Section 001 The Don Juan Figure in Spanish Literature

Instructor(s): Andrew Anderson (andander@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Of the several legendary or archetypal figures bequeathed to us by Spanish literature among them the Cid, La Celestina, Don Quijote and Sancho Panza Don Juan holds a position of prominence. In this upper-level course we will investigate the emergence and development of this figure by reading key Spanish texts in which he is the protagonist. Adopting a broadly historical approach, we will start with Tirso de Molina's El burlador de Sevilla (seventeenth century), in which Don Juan appears for the first time. Next, we will read José Zorrilla's Don Juan Tenorio and José de Espronceda's El estudiante de Salamanca (nineteenth century), while in the latter half of the academic term we will move on to more modern texts, plays, short stories and novels, by Jacinto Grau and Ramón del Valle-Inclán, among others, which offer a diverse range of treatments of this enduring figure.

Attention will be paid both to the constants and variables in Don Juan's character and behaviour, and individual authors' treatments of the figure and his actions will be studied in the light of the historical circumstances in which they lived and wrote, showing how different ages essentially produced different Don Juans.

Teaching is by a mixture of lecture, class discussion, and some informal oral presentations. Evaluation is by attendance, class participation, and several medium-length papers. The class will be conducted exclusively in Spanish. Regular attendance and active participation are essential to the successful completion of the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 488. Topics in Hispanic Literatures and Cultures.

Literature

Section 002 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics

Instructor(s): Teresa Satterfield (tsatter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 275 and 276, and three additional 300-level courses. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Linguistics is the scientific study of human language; that is, it looks for answers to the questions "what are human languages like?" and "why are human languages the way they are?" This course is an introduction to the main concepts and methods of analysis of linguistics, focusing on Spanish and taught in Spanish.

The main part of the course will present concepts and techniques of the analysis of word formation (morphology), sentence structure (syntax), meaning (semantics) and sounds (phonetics-phonology). The last part of the course will examine subfields of linguistics such as psycholinguistics (the study of language acquisition), dialectology and sociolinguistics (the study of language variation), and diachronic linguistics (the study of language change).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 490. Spanish Honors: Introduction to Literary Studies and Criticism.

Literature

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: One 400-level Spanish literature course, and permission of Honors advisor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Introduces the student to the fundamental principles of literary studies as a discipline.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spanish 491. Senior Honors Course.

Literature

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Supervised independent studies and a program of selected readings including conferences, term papers or reports, and written examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Page


LSA logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1999-2000 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.

This page was created at 5:59 PM on Thu, Jan 27, 2000.