Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in University Courses (Division 495)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for University Courses.


University Courses are sponsored by the College or University rather than by individual departments or programs and may be taught by members of the faculty in any academic unit on the Ann Arbor campus. The College offers as University Courses both full-term courses and mini-courses.

The University Courses Division sponsors a number of First-Year Seminars (UC 150, 151, 152, 153) that provide a unique small-class educational experience open to all first-year students. (A complete list of seminars offered this term by the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts can be found in the first section of this Course Guide.) These seminars are taught on a variety of topics by regular and emeritus faculty from many different departments. The small-class size (approximately 18-20 students) facilitates deeper learning through more active participation and increased opportunities for interaction between student and teacher as well as dialogue among students. First-Year Seminars provide a stimulating introduction to the intellectual life of the University by exposing new students to engaging subject matter; some may discover a subject to pursue in further courses. It is hoped that students who take a seminar will find in it a sense of intellectual and social community that will ease the transition to a large university.

All First-Year Seminars can be used to complete part of the College's general requirements. UC 153 meets the Introductory Composition requirement. Other seminars count toward satisfying the Area Distribution requirements: Humanities (UC 150); Social Sciences (UC 151); Natural Sciences (UC 152), Quantitative Reasoning or Race & Ethnicity.

The University Courses Division occasionally offers Collegiate Seminars, open to any student who has completed the Introductory Composition requirement. Intended especially for lower-division students and taught by regular professorial faculty members, Collegiate Seminars provide additional opportunities for first- and second-year students to personalize their education through a small-group course.

All Collegiate Seminars count toward satisfaction of the College's Area Distribution requirements in one of the three major divisions: Humanities (UC 250); Social Sciences (UC 251); Natural Sciences (UC 252). All emphasize critical thinking about important and central topics and feature further instruction in writing.

University mini-courses are one-credit, special interest offerings that center upon a conference, group of lectures, or special exhibit, appear on short notice in a term, and are usually of 2-to-8-weeks duration. Mini-courses are offered mandatory credit/no credit and are normally excluded from area distribution and concentration credits. Information about upcoming UC mini-courses is available by dialing POINT 10 (764-6810). No more than two University mini-courses may be elected in one term.


UCourses 111/Soc. 111/AOSS 172/NR&E 111. Introduction to Global Change II.

Section 001 Global Change II Human Impacts

Instructor(s): Timothy Killeen (tkilleen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit for seniors. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.sprl.umich.edu/GCL/

Global environmental change encompasses the rapid changes now occurring in the Earth as a system its climate, human population, natural resources, and ecosystems. Global Change II Human Impacts guides students in learning about the natural world and the role of human activities in shaping and changing the environment.

Global Change II is an interdisciplinary, team-taught and web-based introduction to the human dimensions of global change. You will study the recent, explosive growth of the human populations, our impacts on land, air, and water resources and on biological diversity, produced by recent human advances in technology and institutions. The course concludes by considering the political and policy considerations relevant to the transition to a more sustainable future.

Global Change II is appropriate for all students and assumes no prior background. Homework and laboratories make extensive use of computers to perform spatial analysis, develop quantitative reasoning, learn to write critically, and promote personal interaction with the faculty. Three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab/discussion per week. Grades will be based on weekly written lab exercises, midterms, and final exam.

In Global Change II you will learn about:

An expanded course description can be found at http://www.sprl.umich.edu/GCL.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gita Ragan

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

No Description Provided

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UCourses 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 002 Hopes and Fears of the Modern Self.

Instructor(s): Paul Sunstein (sunstein@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Is the modern individual one who is self-determining, self-aware, compassionate and freed from comforting myths, or rather a member of a "lonely crowd," self-involved, without grand passion, and disenchanted? We will consider this enigmatic self in its pronounced contrast to the two most significant traditions that have shaped it, the Judeo/Christian tradition and Greek antiquity.

This Great Books course aims to make classical understandings of freedom, happiness and misery come alive for today's students. The course begins by an examination of the Biblical background and a brief selection from St. Augustine's Confessions. We then consider a few classic statements from the works of Machiavelli, Hobbes, and Locke, thinkers who first conceived the hopes and desires of the modern self as an expression of secularized Christianity. Next comes Rousseau's anti-Augustinian Confessions, designed to lead readers to a new level of honesty and liberating self-knowledge. We will see how Rousseau constructs the paradigmatic life history of the creative and dynamic "modern individual."

We will next see how Dostoevsky's Notes from Underground deconstructs this individual, and displays the ambivalence and anguish of the modern anti-hero in an era in which, as Nietzsche declared, "God is dead." We will read classic statements of "the crisis of modernity" in Marx, Nietzsche, and T.S. Eliot. Finally, in order to stand outside of the entire Biblical/anti-Biblical configuration of modern thought and examine the Greek alternative, we will turn to Aristotle's Ethics. We will debate the merits of Aristotle's understanding of freedom, happiness, and misery against its modern counterparts. Selections from de Tocqueville's Democracy in America will help us to analyze modern democratic man and society as Aristotle might have done.

The overall aim of this seminar is to promote self-reflection by understanding ourselves in light of the above mentioned authors. With this goal in mind, students are encouraged to continue our discussions by meeting together outside of class. More practically, this course is designed to teach students to read closely and patiently, both critically and appreciatively. Paper topics are formulated with this purpose in mind, the goal being to produce two short gems. Students are expected to read and assimilate some lessons from The Elements of Style. and are also required to meet with the instructor to discuss their written work. Course requirements include two papers, midterm and final exams, and occasional quizzes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 003 The Arts Alive: An Introduction to the Arts in Ann Arbor.

Instructor(s): Susan Nisbett (snisbett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"The Arts Alive" is an introduction to art, architecture, and the performing arts in Ann Arbor for first-year students. Given the tools for appreciating the arts, students feel empowered to hold opinions about the arts and entitled to access. They no longer find going to a play, a dance concert, or an art exhibit scary because they no longer feel ignorant of what to look for. By making this a first-year class, the University can give students four years and then a lifetime of arts access. Through class discussion, attendance at performances, tours, visits with artists and critics, and post-performance debriefings, students sharpen their eyes, ears, and critical acumen as they think and write about the arts. As students prepare for each event of the term they read relevant critical works and discuss what to look and listen for. Then, through essays on what they have seen and heard, students put these critical principles to work themselves, as they ponder the issues aesthetic, ethical, economic affecting artist and audience. Through refining and revising these essays, students hone the writing and composition skills important to all intellectual endeavors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 150. First-Year Humanities Seminar.

Section 004 Exploring Photography in the Community.

Instructor(s): Victoria Veenstra (vicciv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce students to how they see and how the camera documents the community around them. Using oral narratives, written journals, interpretations and personal documentaries, we will explore ideas about this human experience through the photographic process. Students will document their environment by creating photo essays that convey their interpretations, observations, and commentaries. Basic 35 mm camera operations, black & white film, printing techniques, compositional strategies, and presentation methods will be covered. Classes will consist of lecturers, group discussions, hands-on demonstrations, and critiques. This course is intended for beginners as well as experienced photographers. Grades will be based on class participation, journals, the photographic essays, and the completion of 4 projects incorporating photographic images with the student's interpretation of community. (Enrollment limited to 15 due to space and equipment limitations. Priority given to participants of Michigan Community Scholars Program.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 001 Why Grandpa Went to War: The Psychology of Obedience & Drives Toward World War.

Instructor(s): Donald Brown (donrobro@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What were the social, economic, geopolitical, and personal psychological conditions in 1942 that would result in an 18-year-old freshman leaving college and going off to spend the next three years fighting with the U.S. Army in Europe and liberating Dachau? What led up to 1942 and how did these series of historical events become a part of the life of American youth and continue to affect that generation's (your grandparents) behavior after World War II and through today? What do we know from thirty years of research on the nature of obedience that resulted in both self-sacrifice and the Holocaust? These questions will be explored using the resources of historical works, novels, films, and personal documents. Each student will interview a member of that generation, preferably a grandparent or surrogate, with armed services experience during the war, and write a psycho-history of their subject's experiences and its consequences for their lives and times.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 002 Public Education for Blacks & Other Minorities 1863-1954 & Beyond: An Historical & Legal Perspective

Instructor(s): Warren Palmer (palmerwg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of the seminar will be to trace the development of elementary, secondary, and post-secondary education of Blacks and other minorities in the South from the Emancipation Proclamation to May 17, 1954. Particular emphasis will be focused on watershed judicial litigation, from the Supreme Court decision of Plessy vs. Ferguson, from which the doctrine of "separate but equal" evolved, to the historic Brown vs. Topeka, Kansas Board of Education in 1954 and beyond. Of special importance will be seminar discussions revealing how Blacks and other minorities were successful in achieving an education in spite of the barriers confronting them. Students will be expected to read a number of the classic writings by authors such as W.E.B. DuBois, E. Franklin Frazier, Booker T. Washington, and John Hope Franklin. The writings of contemporary Blacks and minorities will be explored as well as books such as Gunnar Myrdal's An American Dilemma. Students will be expected to prepare readings, participate in seminar discussions, and develop a research topic preferably centered upon one of the Southern states under investigation in the seminar.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 003 Medicine and the Media from Hippocrates Through ER.

Instructor(s): Raymond Hobbs (rhobbs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will study the development of medicine as a science and how its perception has changed through the media. Students will explore their own beliefs about medicine through literature such as The Citadel, Intern and The House of God, and movies and television series such as The Hospital, Marcus Welby M.D., Saint Elsewhere, and ER. Much of the course will focus on the discussion of ethical issues and the crystallization of the students' own beliefs about medicine in the 20th century.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 004 War, Nationalism, and Development In 20th-Century Asia

Instructor(s): Rhoads Murphey

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will survey the rise of nationalism in India, China, Southeast Asia, Japan, and Korea, from the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-95 to the ordeal in Vietnam. The course material also includes: the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05; the First and Second World Wars; the Chinese Revolution of 1911; the warlord years in China; the independence movement in India; the rise of the military in Japan; the triumph of Communism in China; independence and partition in India; and the Korean War. Most readings will be contained in a course pack, and class sessions will focus on discussion of the readings. Four short essays take the place of exams. Student presentations are encouraged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 005 Responding to Unprecedented Environmental Changes: The Hope for Sustainability

Instructor(s): Jim Crowfoot (crowfoot@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this seminar is to begin to understand at both the global and local levels emerging responses to major problems resulting from unprecedented environmental changes. Initiatives to achieve future sustainability will be the focus of the seminar.

We will begin with a multidisciplinary examination of global environmental and related social changes. Focus will be on the needs of humans and other life forms including the biophysical conditions on which life depends. Interconnections between the natural environment and social and cultural systems will be emphasized. To help develop a "global" perspective, we will identify implications of these changes for local communities, particularly in the U.S.A.

By critically examining the multiple meanings of "sustainable development" and "sustainability" and related practices, the seminar will learn about the emerging choices and actions for change. Emphasis will be on changes being pursued by communities, organizations, and individuals in response to growing perceptions of the unsustainability of established values and behaviors. Also, we will examine our own lifestyles in relation to achieving greater sustainability.

To understand initiatives to achieve greater sustainability in local geographical communities, we will study the topics of sustainable consumption, land use, food security and agriculture, materials use, and business and economy. Discussions of these topics will draw upon print and electronic resources, presentations by guest practitioners, and community based experiences of the seminar's members. Readings will come from a wide range of publications including core books of readings by different authors (e.g., People, Land and Community, Vital Signs 1999, and Eco-Pioneers) and articles from a variety of journals (e.g., The Futurist, Science, Resurgence, Harvard Business Review, and Co-op Quarterly).

Seminar members over the course of the academic term will select and complete a project of their choice. Each seminar member will be expected to involve herself/himself in relevant learning activities of their choice beyond the seminar and within the University as well as the surrounding community. If they choose to, students will have the opportunity to pursue and integrate into their seminar work service learning experiences related to the pursuit of sustainability. Information and other learning from these involvements will be incorporated in the seminar.

Writing assignments will include options for individual choice and utilize the forms of a journal and integrative essays expressed as op-ed articles, short research papers directed to different audiences, news articles, and book reviews. Essential parts of the seminar learning process will include thorough preparation for discussions and active participation in presenting and discussing ideas as well as in actively listening and responding to other seminar members. Assignments will be mostly individual but some will involve groups.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 006 Psychology of Interpersonal Relationships.

Instructor(s): Allen Menlo (almenlo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to assist members toward an understanding of the personal and situational forces that help and hinder persons in their relationships with each other and in their efforts to work and live together. It will also assist members to transform these social psychological understandings into constructive actions for handling the problems and difficulties that inevitably arise when people are together. There will be opportunity to refine one's competencies at reflective listening, giving and seeking feedback, interpersonal observation, and mindfulness in thinking about issues. The class sessions are interactive and informal with brief information-giving, focused discussions, interpersonal learning exercises, and videotapes. Reading assignments are mainly through course handouts and other suggested sources. To stimulate personal reflection on interpersonal issues, class members maintain an observation log and a reading log and do a term paper on a relevant, self-selected topic. This work is also used as the source of evaluation and grading in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 151. First-Year Social Science Seminar.

Section 008 Epidemics: Mass Disease In American History

Instructor(s): Martin Pernick (mpernick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of department.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/W00/UC151/index.html

From smallpox to AIDS, dramatic disease outbreaks both shaped and were shaped by American culture. This course explores how medicine and culture intersected to influence the causes, experiences of, and responses to epidemics in America; and it uses epidemics to illuminate the history of American society from colonization to the present. Lectures introduce new topics and summarize discussions. Discussions explore past perceptions and compare past and present; we will not discuss the present apart from the past. Readings (4-5 hours weekly) include modern histories, plus old newspapers, films, and medical journals. Readings available only for purchase cost about $30; other required readings available on reserve or for purchase cost about $125 more. Written assignments are two 5-page book review papers, a short weekly journal, and an individual research project with parts due throughout the term. They will introduce you to the medical, graduate, and undergraduate libraries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 210. Perspectives on Careers in Medicine and Health Care.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Fran Zorn

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is for students considering a career in the health profession. It is designed to help them acquire perspectives to facilitate their decision-making process. Health care professionals visit the class and share their educational and professional experiences. Students become acquainted with the prerequisites for professional and graduate schools and spend time with dental, medical, osteopathic, nursing, and public health students. We consider problems facing the health professions in the 90s: problems of health care delivery; the high cost of medicine and its effect on the uninsured and underinsured. We discuss issues relating to malpractice and death and dying. Students are expected to respond in writing and in class to visitors, to reading materials, and to films. Two course packs serve as the required texts. All students are responsible for taking definite steps toward the development of their own goals through a self-inventory of their values, skills, and interests, and through a term paper exploring a possible career direction. Evaluation is based on class attendance and participation in and completion of all assignments. Interested students must contact the instructor at CSP, 1017 Angell, and receive an override. The class meets on-campus Monday 3-5 and on Thursday 7-9:30 p.m. at 2130 Dorset Rd., about a mile from campus. A map showing the location of will be available at CSP. Students are responsible for their own transportation to the first Thursday evening session, when rides will be arranged for the remainder of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 270. University Courses Topics Mini-Course.

Section 001 The Psychiatric Patient, II. Prerequisite: Completion of UC 151.007 (The Psychiatric Patient) in Fall Term 1999 or permission of instructor. Course meets every other Monday beginning January 10. (Drop/Add deadline=January 25).

Instructor(s): Rob McCullumsmith (smithrob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl).

No Description Provided

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UCourses 280. Undergraduate Research-A (Grade).

Prerequisites & Distribution: First or second year standing, and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). A maximum of eight credits of UC 280 and 281 may be counted toward graduation.

No Description Provided

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UCourses 300. College Practicum.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students may petition the College Board of Study to receive academic credit for an activity not covered by one of the departmental experiential courses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 424/Urban Planning 424. Cities and International Development.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hemalata Dandekar (hema@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~hema/up424/

This course provides students with a conceptual understanding of the physical and socio-economic-cultural structure of cities. Students will learn to understand the history of city development; use city maps and architecture to read the impact of social, political, and demographic forces that influence city evolution; analyze the spatial evolution of cities in industrializing to post-industrial societies; and learn how cities of the future are currently imagined and shaped, in societies throughout the world. Cities such as Bombay, Shanghai, Sao Paulo, Lagos, London, Cairo, Mexico City, Los Angeles, Beijing, Delhi, Tokyo, Singapore, Hong Kong, Detroit, Johannesburg, Calcutta and Toronto have important parallels as well as differences in their historical evolution and in their emerging roles in a globalized world. These will be explored. Multi-media presentations and multidisciplinary guest lectures will communicate the sights, sounds, and textures of city fabrics and city life. Class grades are based on two mini assignments of data gathering (25% of the grade each) and a final term paper (30 pages, 50% of the grade). The two mini-assignments will be provide material for the final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

UCourses 490. Disciplinary Study in a Second Language.

Section 001 Latin America: The National Period

Prerequisites & Distribution: Fourth-term language proficiency, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl).

No Description Provided

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