Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in RC Core (Division 863)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for RC Core.


Most RC courses are open to LS&A students and may be used to meet distribution requirements. In most instances, RC students receive priority for RC course waitlists.

RC sections of LS&A Courses

These sections will be letter graded for all students Math 115 Section 110 Analytical Geometry & Calculus. See Math 115.

Intensive Language Courses

Intensive language courses meet in lecture and discussion twice a day four days a week. The language programs have language lunch tables, coffee hours, and other social events. There is a language laboratory in the College, and the language teachers are available for counseling and additional help. If a student begins a new language, proficiency is usually attained in one year through the Residential College program.

FLAIR: Foreign Language Applied to Independent Readings.

To provide more opportunities for the use of foreign language skills, one-hour Independent Studies can be arranged for the following purposes:

  1. Completion of supplementary readings in a foreign language for a class taught in English
  2. Completion of readings assigned in English in the original foreign language.

Students enrolling in FLAIR should discuss the proposed readings with the course instructor. The Independent Study proposal should then be presented to either Mireille Belloni (French), Janet Shier (German), or Eliana Moya-Raggio (Spanish) for further suggestions and approval. The course should then be elected through the RC Counseling Office and an Independent Study number (Core 205, 305, or 405) assigned. Upon completion of the project, the work will be evaluated and credit granted by the sponsoring foreign language coordinator.


RC Core 190. Intensive French I.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Merielle Belloni (mbelloni@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in French 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 191. Intensive German I.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet Hegman Shier (jshie@umich.edu), Karein Goertz (goertz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: http://www.rc.lsa.umich.edu/programs/german/

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 194. Intensive Spanish I.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cornejo-Krohn

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 100, 101, 102, or 103. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a basic but solid knowledge of grammatical structures and syntax, a functional vocabulary, familiarity with intonation patterns and native pronunciation, and practice in speaking and writing. Upon completion of Intensive I, the student can understand simplified written texts of short spoken passages without the aid of a dictionary, and can carry on a short, elementary conversation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 205. Independent Study.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students must submit a written proposal approved by a faculty sponsor outlining the proposed topic, the readings, and the final product of the project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 290. Intensive French II.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dominique Butler-Borruat (dborruat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Core 190. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in French 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency exam. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker, in spoken and written language. Students must be able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature, and of a general (non-literary) interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 291. Intensive German II.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karein Goertz

Prerequisites & Distribution: Core 191. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in German 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency exam. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker, in spoken and written language. Students must be able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature, and of a general (non-literary) interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 293/Russian 203. Intensive Second Year Russian.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alina Makin (resco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Core 193 or Russian 102. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Russian 201 or 202. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~resco/

See Russian 203.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 2, 3

RC Core 294. Intensive Spanish II.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria Rodriguez (mrodri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Core 194. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Spanish 230, 231, or 232. (8). (LR).

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to expand vocabulary and to master grammatical structures and syntax to the level of competency required to pass a proficiency exam. This entails developing the ability to communicate with some ease with a native speaker, in spoken and written language. Students must be able to understand the content of texts and lectures of a non-technical nature, and of a general (non-literary) interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 305. Independent Study.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students must submit a written proposal approved by a faculty sponsor outlining the proposed topic, the readings, and the final product of the project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 307. RC Practicum in College Team Teaching.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is for the student who wishes experience in college teaching. The student-teacher functions as a teaching intern in a course. Regular staff meetings and individual conferences with the person in charge ensures that the intern shares in the overall planning and management of the course. The student may receive credit only once for student-teaching in the same course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 310. Accelerated Review-French.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to bring students to the level of proficiency defined in the brochure "The French Program at the Residential College", in the four linguistic skills. Students who take 310 typically have not reached this level in two or more skills, but do not need the Intensive course 290 to do so. "Accelerated Review-310" is taught on a semi-tutorial mode with hours arranged to meet the particular needs of the students.

In this course, emphasis is placed on correctness and fluidity of expression in speaking and in writing. Speaking skills are developed though weekly conversation sessions on current topics; personalized pronunciation diagnoses are administered and exercises prescribed. Writing skills are refined through a review of deficient grammar points and composition assignments which give students the opportunity to improve the accuracy and expressiveness of their style.

In addition, exposure to primary source materials (current magazines or newspapers) and to texts of cultural and literary value develop reading ability and vocabulary. Listening skills are trained in informal conversational exchanges and in lectures with note-taking in French.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 314. Accelerated Review-Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Olga Lopez-Cotin (olcotin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for students with a fairly extensive background in Spanish, who are too advanced for second-year intensive, although communicative competency is deficient in one of the basic language areas which would prevent success in a readings course. Attention is given to the development of reading skills through exposure to primary source materials such as magazines and newspapers. Plays and short stories may also be included. The course includes periodic listening comprehension tests. Weekly written compositions are assigned and evaluated for accuracy of expression and style.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 320. Seminaire en français.

Foreign Language

Section 001 Existentialisme

Instructor(s): Dominique Butler-Borruat (dborruat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Core 320. Seminaire en français.

Foreign Language

Section 002 Le Role De La Nourriture Dans La Culture Francaise.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Anderson-Burack

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Core 321. Readings in German.

Foreign Language

Section 001 Multiculturalism in Germany

Instructor(s): Karein Goertz

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The last decade has seen a growing interest in and production of German-language literature by writers of Turkish, Jewish, Afro-German, Roma-Sinti, Asian, and Arab descent. Yet the question remains open whether Germany is a truly multicultural country and whether this apparent literary interest is matched by real gains in the lives of ethnic minorities. The German debate on multiculturalism is an ongoing and heated one, and students will be challenged to articulate their own positions, drawing points of comparison from the American context.

Through the reading of autobiographical essays, poems, short stories, and novels, we will discuss how contemporary writers of diverse ethnic backgrounds propose alternative histories, identities, and sensibilities to the German mainstream. What do their poems, short stories, and novels contribute to ongoing debates about citizenship, immigration, and German identity? How do they expose the blindspots, prejudices, and zones of social exclusion in dominant discourse? We will also examine how the German language and culture are enriched by the different traditions (oral and written, secular and religious, Western and non-Western) of each writer. Since each ethnic group has a particular status and history in Germany, we will examine both the shared experiences of these groups on the margins of German society and their specific experiences in terms of ethnicity, language, generation, and gender.

Prerequisite: Proficiency in German. All class discussions and primary readings will be in German. Background readings in history and literary criticism will be in English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 321. Readings in German.

Foreign Language

Section 002 German Theater

Instructor(s): Janet Hegman Shier (jshie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.rc.lsa.umich.edu/programs/german/

In this course students will become familiar with traditions in 20th-century German Theater. We will read German plays, explore a variety of ways to present an idea on stage, and do scenework in preparation for the staging of an RC Deutsches Theater production in April. Several sessions will be devoted to acting, improv, voice, movement, and tech workshops. Requirements include: active involvement and participation at all rehearsals and performances; attendance at a retreat at a time to be determined at the first class session; one 10-15 minute "Referat" on a topic relevant to the final performance. Students will be required to keep a portfolio containing production ideas and reactions to readings, scene work, and workshops. Any student who has already completed German Readings is welcome to enroll. Students who have not yet had German Readings will be admitted by permission of the instructor only. No previous experience in theater is required, but students who have been in Deutsches Theater are encouraged to participate. It is desirable for students to keep some time available for individual scene work on Tuesday and Thursday mornings. During the final two weeks before performances, students can expect to be called for at least two additional rehearsals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 001 The Family and Hispanic Drama

Instructor(s): Cornejo-Krohn

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will explore family systems (structure, dynamics, function/dysfunction, and communication) as they are presented in Spanish and Latin American dramas. We will consider traditional family structures, gender roles, and restrictive demands placed on each family member. The conflict between child and parent will be studied as an oppressive patriarchal structure for the child as well as a challenging and often unfulfilling responsibility for the parent. Likewise, we will look at the relationship between wife and husband as a source of frustration for both sexes confined by rigidly defined roles in the family unit. The family as a subsystem will also lead us to a discussion of the larger systems of class and culture. Students will keep a journal, write a brief dramatic piece based a short narrative, and write two comparative essays.

Tentative reading list includes: La casa de Bernarda Alba and Yerma by Federico García Lorca; El rastro by Elena Garro; El gesticulador and El niño y la niebla by Rodolfo Usigli; Y nos dijeron que éramos inmortales by Osvaldo Dragún; Historia de una escalera by Antonio Buero Vallejo; La mordaza by Alfonso Sastre; La noche de los asesinos by José Triana.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 002 Culture, Ideology, and Resistance: The Spanish Dictatorship (1939-1975).

Instructor(s): Olga Lopez-Cotin (olcotin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As increasing social unrest was taking place in Europe with the rise of fascism and the international movements of the left-socialism, communism, and anarchism Spain became the battlefield for a clash of ideologies in one of its most painful experiences in history: the Civil War (1936-39). Its aftermath left thousands of people displaced, towns divided, suspicion and resentment everywhere. The "losing side" was destined to exile, concentration camps, prison, or death. It also established a long-term military dictatorship under Francisco Franco which only ended after his death in 1975. How did this war involve and affect people's lives? How did this dictatorship establish itself, remain in power, and evolve for almost forty years? What were the mechanisms and cultural discourses shaped under franquismo that were imposed and pervaded a radically divided society? What became silenced? What became official?

This course addresses these questions by tackling the notions of ideology and propaganda through public visual art-posters, monuments, and other emblems as well as poetry. It also focuses on the modes in which dictatorships regulate collective behavior through repressive legislation punishment and censorship as well as indoctrination education, and explicit/implicit moral conduct codes: the ways to bring children into the system and, as men and women, into their roles. We will contrast laws on censure and education with the literary depiction of daily life in post-war Spain in several short stories and poetry. Finally, the course explores the mechanisms of resistance that posed challenges of different nature and at different times to the official system: the intellectuals' and artists' role and activism among university students; Catalan nationalism based on it distinctive language and identity and the use of political violence in the Basque region. Some documentaries/films will complement the written and visual art material.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 003 Bilingualism: Linguistic Competence vs. Linguistic Culture.

Instructor(s): Maria Rodriguez (mrodri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to provide a global understanding of bilingualism, one that is not limited to the acquisition of linguistic competence, but rather a view that recognizes bilingualism as a means for the development of linguistic culture. Initial exploration into the topic will focus on linguistic aspects of bilingualism, such as bilingual types, patterns of language acquisition, features of bilingual speech, among others. Afterwards, we will examine the sociocultural value associated to bilingualism. What is the relevance of bilingual education in our society? What myths and beliefs are associated with bilingual education? How do these beliefs reflect the relationship between the majority language and national identity? How do they affect language policy? How do they affect the education of linguistic-minority students? How do they affect the development of a linguistic cultural identity? The latter part of the course will analyze how bilingual programs address both the development of linguistic competence and linguistic culture and, more importantly, what is the linguistic competence and culture being promoted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 324. Readings in Spanish.

Foreign Language

Section 004 Raza/Etnicidad, clase, y género en el México del siglo XX

Prerequisites & Distribution: Proficiency test. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Core 334. Special Topics.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 001 Museums in U.S. Society: Culture, Nation, and Power. Meets with History of Art 394.001

Instructor(s): Diana Linden

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History of Art 394.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Core 334. Special Topics.

Written and Verbal Expression

Section 003 Zu Fuß im Kiez. Meets with Architecture 509.042

Instructor(s): Karein Goertz, Michael Kennedy

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Through unification, the city of Berlin is undergoing an intense period of reinvention and refiguration. The charged content of the city's political and symbolic history has often dominated an understanding of Berlin as a physical entity. Consequently, the city has been subject to severe cultural abstraction in both architectural design and cultural discourse that obscures the reality of the city as a collection of neighborhoods, Kiez, with distinct housing and social patterns, industrial enterprise, commercial and recreational centers. Architects such as Schinkel, Speer, and Libeskind and writers such as Doblin, Benjamin, and Schneider have left work that bears witness to a changing city's visions and aspirations. The symbolic content of such work poses a further challenge to any understanding of Berlin as "place." Just as history is more than an assemblage of "great men," so, too, a city is more than a collection of privileged "sites," whatever their historical or symbolic merit.

This seminar will provoke students to investigate the inherent disjunction between abstract, symbolic representations of the city and the physical, social fabric of the Kiez. Through the various lenses of maps, texts, films and images of and about Berlin (the city and its inhabitants) the course will seek to develop a critical understanding of the city based a linear, organic synthesis a virtual walking tour of the city. As the heroine of the film Run Lola Run moves through Berlin, a city she knows intimately, we will develop a fluid, ground-level understanding of the city, focusing on the interrelated themes of the domestic sphere, the workplace, and the social realm of arts and pleasure as they manifest themselves in architecture, literature, and the arts. This work will engage questions and set conditions to reshape "biases" that are inherent in any symbolic or abstracted apprehension of the city.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Core 405. Independent Study.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (1-8). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Credits: (1-8).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students must submit a written proposal approved by a faculty sponsor outlining the proposed topic, the readings, and the final product of the project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 410. Senior Project.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An individual project in the field of concentration.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Core 489. Honors Independent Research.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Section.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl).

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RC Core 490. Honors Thesis.

Independent Study, Fieldwork, and Tutorials

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An individual Honors project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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