Winter '00 Course Guide

Courses in RC Humanities (Division 865)

Winter Term, 2000 (January 5 – April 26, 2000)

Take me to the Winter Term '00 Time Schedule for RC Humanities.


Most RC courses are open to LS&A students and may be used to meet distribution requirements. In most instances, RC students receive priority for RC course waitlists.

RC sections of LS&A Courses

These sections will be letter graded for all students Math 115 Section 110 Analytical Geometry & Calculus. See Math 115.


RC Hum. 214. Fundamentals of Narrative Fiction.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Goodenough

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How have human beings in our civilization chosen to present themselves and the stories of their lives? What motivates a person to tell his or her story? This course examines a variety of short narratives and novels – from acknowledged classics of historical fiction and the bildungsroman to such popular forms as Westerns and mysteries, romances and children's fables – to look at story-telling as a reflection of social values and as a mode of seeing, thinking, being, and becoming. What stage of development or type of experience is formative and which provide the most useful lens from which to view the whole? What is the impact of gender, nationality, and race on the cultural construction of selfhood? How do writers invent the impossible? Why must they lie to tell the truth, write beyond the ending, and make up stories about stories within stories? How do we decide what these stories mean? Required Texts: James Barrie, Peter Pan in Kensington Garden; A. Conan Doyle, The Hound of the Baskervilles; Samuel Johnson, Rasselas; Louis L'Amour, The Ferguson Rifle; George MacDonald, The Golden Key; Susan Minot, Monkeys; Toni Morrison, Beloved; Tim O'Brien, If I Die In A Combat Zone and The Things They Carried; Tillie Olsen, Tell Me A Riddle; and Mary Shelley, Frankenstein.

Evaluation will be based on participation in discussion and four short papers.

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RC Hum. 220. Narration.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Suggested assignment: 1250 words of prose fiction every two weeks. Rewriting is emphasized. The class meets as a group up to two hours per week. Collections of short fiction by established writers are read. Every student meets privately with the instructor each week.

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RC Hum. 221. The Writing of Poetry.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The amount of poetry each student is required to submit is determined by the instructor. The class meets three hours per week as a group. In addition, each student receives private criticism from the instructor every week. Contemporary poetry is read and discussed in class for style. Students are organized into small groups that meet weekly.

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RC Hum. 235. Topics in World Dance.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will survey a diversity of dance traditions throughout the world. The students will gain insight into the functions, aesthetics, history, and cultural context of dances within specific societies. Theatrical, religious, popular, and social dance traditions will be examined in a variety of cultures including groups in Africa, Japan, India, South America, Aboriginal Australia, Indonesia (Bali, Java), the Mideast, and others. A variety of broad comparative issues will be explored:

In addition to lectures and readings, the class will feature several guest artist/speaker presentations, viewings of films and videos, and observations of dance rehearsals, classes and performances.

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RC Hum. 242. Creative Adaptation: Fact Into Fantasy.

Creative Writing

Section 001 – Creative Non-Fiction.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~balducci/creative_adaptation.html

Creative non-fiction is information-based writing for general audiences. Free-lance writers, journalists, and technical writers are assigned to write, translate, interpret, or edit texts which explain or describe specialized subjects in ordinary language that non-specialists can understand. These assignments can range from advertisements and news reports to articles aimed at more sophisticated readers in periodicals such as The New Yorker. Even semi-specialized publications such as Scientific American, Car and Driver, and the New England Journal of Medicine use non-technical language which informed amateurs as well as professionals can comprehend. In classical literature, works such as The Odyssey, MacBeth, The Aeneid, and The Divine Comedy were inspired by historical events and figures. Gettysburg, Joy Luck Club, and Age of Innocence are recent films which were adapted from historical or literary sources. Aladdin and Beauty and the Beast and many other Disney animated feature films are adaptations from literary sources. TV docu-dramas have been created about figures in the news, such as Amy Fisher and Jessica DeBoer. Biographies, autobiographies, translations, and musical adaptations as well as many non-fiction children's books are, in fact, blendings of fact and fantasy.

All professions reward good communication skills. One's ability to understand, synthesize, and communicate facts to others is as necessary to a doctor as it is to a writer. With this in mind, students should find "Creative Non-Fiction," with its combination of the challenge of research and the pleasure of self-expression, to be a valuable elective.

Projects students will pursue will include adaptations from one medium to another; translations from one language to another or bilingual texts; science/math/history for children; personal essays/interviews/oral history; autobiographical fiction, poetry, or drama; folklore/oral traditions into fiction, picture books, animation. Students will complete either one long (25-30 page) project or three short papers (10-15 pages each) on a related theme. Two drafts will be required. NOTE: This class can be useful to Juniors in anticipation of Honors Thesis work.

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RC Hum. 250. Chamber Music.

Music

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maria Barna (barkar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-2). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of 16 credits.

Credits: (1-2; 1 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No audition required. All students who are interested in participating in instrumental ensembles may enroll for one or two credits. The second credit is at the discretion of the instructor. Every student must elect section 001 for one hour; those students who will fulfill the requirements for two credits MUST also elect Section 002 (with an override from the instructor) for the additional hour of credit.

For one credit, students must participate in two ensembles; for two credits, students must participate in the large ensemble and two smaller ones. Responsibilities include three to four hours of rehearsal time per week per credit (6-8 hours of practice and rehearsal for two credits) and participation in one or more concerts per term, if appropriate. Course may be used to satisfy the Residential College's Arts Practicum Requirement. Ensembles have included: mixed ensembles of strings and winds; brass quintet; intermediate recorders; string quartet; woodwind quintet; and some other duos and trios, including piano and harpsichord.

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RC Hum. 251. Topics in Music.

Music

Section 001 – Music of Ireland

Instructor(s): Camino

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Music of Ireland will provide both a general history of Irish music as well as a more in-depth exploration of specific genres that have emerged in Ireland and among the Irish Diaspora in North America. Much of the course is devoted to traditional vocal and instrumental styles and the ways in which these traditions continue to challenge and to exert profound influence on the music-making of other traditions in Ireland, especially popular music and art music. The course will include in-class lecture/demonstrations by local musicians, as well as some experience performing traditional tunes on instruments such as the tin whistle and frame drum. No previous musical experience is necessary. Traditional music will also figure prominently in our examination of the definition and continuing transformation of an Irish national musical identity.

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RC Hum. 253. Choral Ensemble.

Music

Section 001 – (Drop/Add deadline=January 25).

Instructor(s): Katherine Fitzgibbon

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (CE). Offered mandatory credit/no credit.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Group rehearses twice weekly and prepares a thematic concert of music. Vocal skills, sight singing, and basic musicianship are stressed. No prerequisites, but a commitment to the group and a dedication to musical growth within the term are required. No audition necessary.

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RC Hum. 255. Film Experience.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 – The Film Experience: Self-Reflexive Cinema

Instructor(s): Matthew Biro

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will introduce students to central concepts of film analysis-form, narrative, shot, editing, mise-en-scéne, spectatorship, visual pleasure, and the classical Hollywood style through close readings of the film theory of Laura Mulvey, David Bordwell, Kristin Thompson, and Janet Staiger. These concepts will then be tested against approximately 7-10 American and European films, all of which focus on cinema as a highly complex and specific set of signifying practices. Through films such as Fritz Lang's M (1931), Michelangelo Antonioni's Blow Up (1966), and Francis Ford Coppola's The Conversation (1974), we will examine how filmmakers have made the experience of viewing and listening central to the meaning of their works. In this way, the seminar will explore how filmmakers have probed issues having to do with the ways in which the experience of movies has changed how people perceive and understand their world. Students will be responsible for a 15-page research paper on a particular film.

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RC Hum. 257. Visual Sources.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Beth Genné (genne@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to develop and sharpen the students' skills of visual analysis by examining the world of images in which we live and discussing the process of perception. In order to better understand the "language" of images, we will analyze selected examples of painting, sculpture, the graphic arts, architecture, film, and dance. The works studied will not necessarily be considered in chronological order and we will not restrict ourselves to those works that are labeled "great" by art historians and critics. We will include images of popular and commercial art both from the past and the present.

The unique methods and materials used in creating a work of art will be discussed. (In the case of painting, for example, we will consider the difference between oil, tempera, and water color.) But we will not be concerned with form and materials alone. Images will be studied not only in terms of form, but content, and the relationship between art and audience. How does the visual artist (or advertiser) convey certain moods and/or messages through the arrangement and juxtaposition of forms? What is the impact and effect of the visual environment on our psychological state? How do visual artists convey certain cultural beliefs and attitudes in their arrangement and presentation of images?

In the final section of the course we will consider the display of art in public spaces – including museums and galleries – and the sometimes controversial issues that have surrounded the showing and funding of art in the United States. In conjunction with this and other aspects of the course, museum and gallery visits are planned, involving the study of objects at close hand and discussions with museum and gallery personnel.

There will be several short papers, and students will be asked to keep a journal of their ideas about the visual arts that they encounter in their day-to-day experiences or in which they are especially interested. Readings may include works by John Berger, Rudolph Arnheim, Joshua Taylor, Kendall Walton, T.J. Clark, Erwin Panofsky, Linda Nochlin, Tamar Garb, and Carol Duncan.

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RC Hum. 275. The Western Mind in Revolution: Six Interpretations of the Human Condition.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Fred Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will treat six major reinterpretations of the human condition from the 16th to the 20th centuries generated by intellectual revolutions in astronomy (Copernicus: the heliocentric theory) theology (Luther: the Reformation), biology (Darwin: evolution of the species), sociology (Marx: Communism), psychology (Freud: psychoanalysis), and physics (Einstein: the theory of relativity).

All six reinterpretations initiated a profound revaluation of Western concept of the self as well as a reassessment of the nature and function of his/her political and social institutions. Since each of these revolutions arose in direct opposition to some of the most central and firmly accepted doctrines of their respective ages, we will study:

  1. how each thinker perceived the particular "truth" he sought to communicate;
  2. the problems entailed in expressing and communicating these truths; and
  3. the traumatic nature of the psychological upheaval caused by these cataclysmic transitions from the past to the future – both on the personal and cultural level.

If the function of humanistic education is to enable the individual to see where he/she stands in today's maelstrom of conflicting intellectual and cultural currents, it is first necessary to see where others have stood and what positions were abandoned. The emphasis of this course will not be upon truths finally revealed or upon problems forever abandoned, but rather upon certain quite definite perspectives that, arising out of specific historical contexts, at once solved a few often technical problems within a specialized discipline while unexpectedly creating many new ones for Western culture as a whole.

Texts:

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RC Hum. 280/English 245/Theatre 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Drama

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert Knopf (robknopf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 281. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

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RC Hum. 280/English 245/Theatre 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Drama

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Mbala Nkanga (mbalank@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 281. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 280.005.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 282. Drama Interpretation I: Actor and Text.

Drama

Section 001 – Henrik Ibsen and Anton Chekhov

Instructor(s): Kate Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

During this term, we will be studying two dramatists of early modern drama: Henrik Ibsen and Anton Chekhov. By working on their plays as actors we will be learning much about the development of naturalism as a literary style and an acting theory. Ibsen had a profound influence on Victorian society and was a proponent of "realistic acting" and Chekhov's contemporary, Constantine Stanislavsky, a co-founder of the Moscow Art Theatre, was the pioneer of "method acting." Our approach will be to take one major play by each playwright and explore it through scenework, then to look at two or three other plays by the same writer, as well as doing dramaturgical reports on the period and place of the drama. We will start with Ibsen's Hedda Gabler, then move on to scenes from A Doll House and The Master Builder. Our work on Chekhov will focus first on Uncle Vanya, then move to larger sections from The Seagull and Three Sisters which will constitute our end of term production.

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RC Hum. 312/Slavic Film 312. Central European Cinema.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 – Race, Ethnicity and Gender Issues

Instructor(s): Herbert Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Upper-Level Writing R&E Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Slavic Film312.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 314. The Figure of Rome in Shakespeare and 16th Century Painting.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cynthia Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will read a selection of Shakespeare's roman plays, Titus Andronicus, Julius Caesar, Anthony and Cleopatra, and Cymbeline, in the light of their ancient sources, especially Ovid, Livy, Plutarch, and Caesar. We will ask what the figure of "Rome" means in the context of each play, and how that historical reference point is used to frame problems of contemporary import in Shakespeare's own time. As comparison and contrast, we will also examine the reclamation of Rome by artists of the Renaissance and the Counter-reformation, especially Mantegna, Titian, and Caravaggio, in order to make arguments concerning antiquity and memory; martyrdom and authority; and the status of the image. We will complete our study by inquiring how (and why) renaissance artists, historians, and antiquarians began to construct a pre-Roman paganism. What sources did they use? Was there a political or cultural motive behind this construction?

This course will focus on Shakespeare's plays as texts to be read, studied, and interpreted. From time to time, however, we will consult with members of the Residential College Drama Program on questions of actual staging and performance.

  1. I. Blood Cries out: Martyrdom and Authority Shakespeare Titus Andronicus; Ovid selections from the Metamorphoses; Livy selections from the Early History of Rome; Caravaggio paintings
  2. II. The Lion and the Fox: Strategies of Power Plutarch Lives of Julius Caesar and Brutus; Shakespeare Julius Caesar; Niccolo Machiavelli The Prince; Mantegna paintings (The Figure of Rome cont.)
  3. III. The Snare of Love Plutarch Life of Anthony; Shakespeare Anthony and Cleopatra; Titian paintings
  4. IV. Inventing British Paganism Julius Caesar Commentaries on the Gallic War; (Selections) Shakespeare Cymbeline
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RC Hum. 318. Critical Approaches to Literature.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 – Psychoanalytic Interpretation of Literature and the Visual Arts: Freud and Lacan

Instructor(s): Cynthia Sowers (cindysrs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Freudian psychoanalytic theory has in recent years undergone withering criticism. It no longer enjoys the prestige it once assumed; few retain full confidence in its explanatory capability. Some would argue that it is defunct, a relic of the 19th century, a construct of the "self" now in ruins. Is there anything in Freudian psychoanalytic theory that can be salvaged?

This course will take a critical, but respectful view of the Freudian text. We will address in particular the problem of psychoanalytic interpretation of literature and the visual arts. We will base our study on selected works by Sigmund Freud and his most controversial recent interpreter, Jacques Lacan. Beginning with two important case histories, The Wolf Man and Dora, we will derive a method of interpreting literary texts and visual images from Freud's method of dream analysis. We will go on to explore the way in which psychic space opens onto an historical, even archeological landscape, as this is described in Freud's theory of the death instinct and its relation to sexuality. Finally, we will address the contribution of Freudian psychoanalysis to contemporary critical theory, especially in the work of Jacques Lacan. In what way is the human subject constituted by language? What is the relation between language and the unconscious? Does a text or image have an unconscious? How do we know? If it does, can we disclose its presence, discover the direction of its warp? Can psychoanalytic theory enable us to find a common ground between literature and the visual arts? Can we discover in the halting voice and the marked hand a link between the vision and the word?

D.H. Lawrence, The Prussian Officer; Sigmund Freud, The Wolf Man; Ivan Turgenev, First Love; Freud, Leonardo da Vinci and a Memory of His Childhood; Freud, Dora: An Analysis of a Case of Hysteria; Edvard Munch paintings; Freud, Beyond the Pleasure Principle; Emily Brontë, Wuthering Heights; Giorgio de Chirico, paintings; Jacques Lacan, Speech and Writing in Psychoanalysis; Mary Kelly, The Post-partum Document.

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RC Hum. 322. Advanced Creative Writing for Children and Young Adults.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (CE).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~balducci/advanced.html

This informal Seminar is designed to build upon skills and themes developed in RC Humanities 222 "Creative Writing for Children and Young Adults." The casual setting of the seminar is intended to encourage interaction and collaboration among students. Weekly paper swaps allow students to become familiar with the writing styles and interests of others in the course. Support and suggestions, as well as collaborations (when feasible) are encouraged. Students are expected to support their theories with articles, books, scripts, and other material.

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RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

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RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Keith Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 325. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Laura Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 220, 221, 222 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tutorials provide an opportunity for students who want to write, no matter how sophisticated their work, to have their efforts recognized with constructive criticism and academic credit. Reading may or may not be assigned, depending upon the background needs of the individual student. Tutorial students meet privately with the instructor each week. Permission of instructor is required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

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RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

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RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 326.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Keith Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

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RC Hum. 326. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Laura Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 325 and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

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RC Hum. 333. Art and Culture.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001 – Arts and Ideas of South and Southeast Asia.

Instructor(s): Pratt-Walton

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

South and Southeast Asia historically have produced some of the world's most highly evolved, diverse, and richly complex civilizations. In this century the countries of this region have been exposed to the ideas, technology, and political power of the West. How have these countries transformed themselves as a result of that contact? How have they re-conceptualized their cultures, accommodating to or rejecting Western views? This course focuses on the aesthetic responses of 20th-century artists, film-makers, musicians, writers, and dancers as they come into contact with Western ideas. Some ancient artistic forms that have been transformed in this century will also be investigated. This is an interdisciplinary course with several of the lectures provided by faculty specialists in South and Southeast Asian history, literature, and film. It is not a survey course. The emphasis is on an intensive engagement with significant and representative texts, images, or musical sounds that have been produced by South and Southeast Asian artists as they have struggled to re-evaluate and re-create their cultures. Although many of the themes we will be presenting are valid for most of South and Southeast Asia, this course will focus primarily on India, Thailand, and Indonesia.

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RC Hum. 350. Creative Musicianship.

Music

Section 001 – Creative Musicianship.

Instructor(s): S. Eddins

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (CE).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This music theory-composition course is designed to give students the skills necessary to understand and to create music as a form of personal expression. Nothing is assumed in the way of musical background, and those who are apprehensive about composition will be welcomed and guided through a process that enables them to create music of their own. Many students in the class will have had instrumental or vocal performance experience; others may have taken music theory or history classes; and some of them will already be composers. All are welcome. 20 students will be accepted. Each student works at his/her own level on the musical element under consideration (rhythm, melody, harmony). The course meets for 4 class hours, and students should plan to spend a minimum of 10-12 hours per week preparing materials for the Hums 350 class. There will be a programmed theory text required, to be selected according to your own level of experience. The accompanying lab (RC Humanities 351) is required unless excused by the instructor.

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RC Hum. 351. Creative Musicianship Lab.

Music

Section 001.

Instructor(s): S. Eddins

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 350. (1-2). (CE).

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a required lab course to be taken with Humanities 350; however, it can be taken by itself. It will deal with the three basic elements of music (rhythm, melody, harmony) through music reading, notation, singing, use of ear-training tapes, and computer lab programs. The class will be divided into three or four sections according to ability and experience levels. Each section meets together as a group, and students will also work individually and with a lab partner. It may be elected for either one or two credits, depending on the amount of work one chooses to do. Attendance at both Tuesday and Thursday class sessions is necessary whether you are taking the lab for one or two credits. Advanced students may be exempted from taking this lab on permission of the instructor.

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RC Hum. 357. What Television Means: Research, Analysis, and Interpretation.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Barbra Morris (barbra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Social critic Raymond Williams reminds us that public forms of discourse/communication have evolved through a series of forms: repertory companies, commercial theatres, motion pictures, and television, for example. In each of these cases, he observes: "There has been a new sharing and integration of languages, at least of gesture and systems of signs. Moreover, these fresh inter-relationships are not merely available; in the course of their use and development, they are themselves transformative, and means of communication are transformed as they are employed."

How does television shape our thinking? In this class, we will be researching and critiquing various genres of television discourse to apply relevant analytic tools to the content and to examine our own responses to the content in light of the cultural climate we inhabit. Much of what is said about television is inaccurate and superficial; we will examine what is on the screen and what experience, background, and point-of-view we bring to the text. Four papers on differing genres of text are required, as well as presentations to the class on individual's research findings. Class discussion and screenings are regular required parts of the course each week. A long final paper is written on a topic agreed upon in individual conferences.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 360. The Existential Quest in the Modern Novel.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Fred Peters (fgpeters@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior/senior standing. (4). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"God is dead. God remains dead. And we have killed him."
(Nietzsche)

"If there is not God, then everything is permitted."
(Dostoevsky)

"Everything that exists is born without reason, Continues to live out of weakness, And dies by chance."
(Sartre)

Existentialism combines the investigation of major issues in the history of Western philosophy with daily problems of intense personal concern. In this course, existentialism will be viewed as a literary as well as philosophical movement united by a number of recurrent and loosely related themes: (1) Theological: the disappearance of God; the condition of being "thrown" into an indifferent and ultimately absurd universe; man's encounter with nothingness beneath the floor of everyday reality revealed when familiar objects and language drop away. (2) Psychological: man's imperfection, fragility, and loneliness; the feeling of anxiety and despair over the emptiness of life and the terror of death; arguments for and against suicide; human nature as fundamentally ambiguous and hence not explicable in scientific thought or in any metaphysical system; the absence of a universally valid morality; and human nature as undetermined and free. (3) Social: man's rebellion against the inhumanity of social institutions that suffocate the "authentic self"; the escape from individual responsibility into the "untruth of the crowd." (4) Finally, man's various attempts to transform nihilistic despair into a creative affirmation of life.

Philosophic texts by Pascal, Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, and Buber; fiction by Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Camus, Sartre, and Kafka. Two examinations and one term paper required. Permission of the instructor is NOT required for this course.

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RC Hum. 389. The Modern Theatre.

Drama

Section 001 – Gender and Sexuality in Contemporary American Drama

Instructor(s): Kate Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 280. (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore plays from contemporary American drama which examine gender and sexuality. A great deal of emphasis will fall on drama written by women, by writers of color, and by artists in the gay and lesbian community. The reading list may include established works such as Ntosake Shange's For Colored Girls... and Tony Kushner's Angels in America, but will include a range of contemporary writers and performance artists.

Coursework will demand close reading of the plays and ongoing personal response to the material through a journal. Written work will also include critiques and creating original pieces. The emphasis in the course is on understanding the texts by performing them, so scene and monologue rehearsal is a central part of the process. Students with an interest in directing are encouraged to enroll, as our end-of-term project will be a mini-festival of these plays in workshop production.

The course will deal with work which may challenge traditional attitudes about gender, sexuality, and race. Students should be aware of this and should also have some previous experience with acting, either through "Actor and Text I" or a comparable course. First time actors and directors should schedule an interview with the instructor before enrolling.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 390. Special Period and Place Drama.

Drama

Section 001 – Modern Irish Drama

Instructor(s): Martin Walsh (narenlob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hums. 280. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A survey of 20th-century Irish Drama beginning with the pioneering works of the "Irish Dramatic Movement" (Yeats, Synge, and Lady Gregory) in the first years of the century, through the works of O'Casey in the 20s and beyond, to the second flourishing of Irish Drama from the 60s onward with such figures as Brendan Behan, Brian Friel, Tom Murphy, Sebastian Barry, and Martin McDonagh. The course will be equally divided between lecture/discussion (with attention paid to Irish mythology, folklore, history, politics) and practical work on scenes (with workshops in verse-speaking, grotesque comedy, Irish accents, etc.). Midterm exam, individual research into playwright not covered in syllabus, and an end-of-term presentation of two to three one-acts (Synge, O'Casey, et al).

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RC Hum. 410. Upperclass Literature Seminar.

Comparative Literature

Section 001 – Fathers and Sons.

Instructor(s): Hugh Cohen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Be it the relationship between Odysseus and his son Telemachus in The Odyssey or Creon and his son Haemon in Antigone or Noah and his sons in The Old Testament, from the beginning of literature relationships between fathers and sons have often involved complex and passionate emotions, the source and meaning of which elude the pair's understanding. Fathers may have narcissistic expectations for their sons, and certainly expect, indeed need, fathers to be models of behavior, attitudes, and beliefs. It is satisfying, even inspiring, when a father fulfills these expectations – and in our study we shall encounter a number who do – but not all fathers can, or do, fulfill them. This often results in torturous confrontations and long standing conflicts.

We will examine a variety of narratives that tell of both harmonious and troubled relationships: novels such as Chain Potok's The Chosen, Saul Bellow's Seize the Day, Richard Russo's The Risk Pool, short stories such as Ernest Hemingway's Indian Camp, The Doctor and the Doctor's Wife, "comic" books such as Art Spiegelman's Maus: A Survivor's Tale, I and II, plays such as Arthur Miller's The Death of a Salesman or Eugene O'Neills A Long Days Journey into Night or Athol Fugard's Master Harold…and the boys, poems such as Ken Mikolowski's Michael/Alternatives, autobiographies such as Philip Roth's Patrimony, and films such as Pat Conroy's The Great Santini or Elia Kazan's East of Eden. For purposes of comparison, we will read one work that deals with a mother-daughter relationship. Students will write at least two papers plus a midterm and final exam. Films will be viewed at night.

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RC Hum. 410. Upperclass Literature Seminar.

Comparative Literature

Section 002 – The Forbidden Memory of Chile. Students need a good reading knowledge of Spanish. FIRST COURSE MEETING IS JANUARY 18.

Instructor(s): Eliana Moya-Raggio (elmoras@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for credit.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In September of 1998 the people of Chile marked the 25th anniversary of the military coup. A month later General Augusto Pinochet was arrested in London. These events have contributed to bring the issue of Chile back into discussion and, especially, the unprecedented act of arresting an ex-dictator in a foreign country under charges of genocide and crimes against humanity.

The purpose of this class is twofold: First, it will provide information and general background on the events within Chile that were caused by the arrest of General Pinochet; Second, it will focus on the narrative, poetry, film and video, visual art, and music produced under the difficult circumstances of repression and censorship or exile.

The military coup of September 1973 profoundly altered Chile's institutions and cultural life by the introduction of repression as a means of maintaining a self-imposed government in power, with the consequent erosion of fundamental principles always guaranteed before: respect for life and for the unrestricted expression of ideas. As for the artists, as the writer Antonio Skarmeta says,

The precipitous loss of liberty, means much more to a creator than mere deprivation of a certain dimension of civic life, this loss is essentially a metaphysical crisis. It demands of the poet a respiratory adjustment to a new climate, a response to the problems of trying to understand it and of trying to survive in it.

Both class objectives are connected by the common tension between memory/remembrance and the official tendency to forget. Exploration of how the past "speaks" to and for the present and the insistence – on the part of several artists – that history's lessons need to be recounted for each generation, will appear in the works considered in this class. The notion that without memory there is no identity, that Chileans have been lost to their own history has been an important thrust of the work of several artists.

The actions of the Spanish judge and the English courts revealed the failure to understand that the emphasis on memory, for many, was a path to the acknowledgment of the truth about human rights violations, always before denied or glossed over. The country came to a halt: the issues of torture, disappearances, and assassinations were no longer a well kept secret, but a fact proclaimed all over the world. Chile had to look at itself in a mirror placed in front of it by the world, challenging its well-cultivated and polished image. Within the country the discussion was open, the wounds became visible and a very public conversation began. Among the authors included in this class are: Raul Zurita, Hernán Valdés, Constanza Lira, Pia Barros, Omar Lara, Gonzalo Millan, and Ariel Dorfman among others. In visual arts the class will present works by Roser Bru, Lotty Rosenfeld, Claudio Bertoni and José Balmes. Films and videos by Ricardo Larrain, Patricio Guzmán, Pablo Perelman, and others. Students will have the opportunity to listen to the musical piece "Cantata de los Derechos Humanos" in connection with the work of the human rights organization Vicaría de la Solidaridad. A series of arpilleras will also be presented, also within the context of the activities of the same Catholic Church organization. The class will be conducted in English. Students need a good reading knowledge of Spanish.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Keith Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Laura Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 425. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Kate Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

No Description Provided

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RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Warren Hecht (whecht@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Ken Mikolowski (mikolows@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Carolyn Balducci (balducci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.003.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Keith Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 426. Creative Writing Tutorial.

Creative Writing

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Laura Thomas

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Humanities 325.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 452/Russian 452. Survey of Russian Literature.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Halimur Khan (hrkhan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Russian is not required. (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Russian 452.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

RC Hum. 475/Chinese 475/Phil. 475/Asian Studies 475/Hist. of Art 487. The Arts and Letters of China.

Arts and Ideas

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Chinese 475.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 476/Chinese 476/Asian Studies 476. Writer and Society in Modern China.

Comparative Literature

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alexander DesForges

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Chinese is required. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Chinese 476.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RC Hum. 485. Special Drama Topics.

Drama

Section 001 – Emerging Voices: Coming of Age in Detroit

Instructor(s): Kate Mendeloff (mendelof@umich.edu), Charlie Bright (cbright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a collaboration between the RC Drama and Social Science programs, other units at the UM, and teachers, students, and creative artists in Detroit. It involves an unusual structure and will provide creative opportunities and learning experiences unlike any other course at the UM. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors are welcome.

The Project: The goal is to build an oral history-based archive and to develop theatrical performances around the theme: coming of age in Detroit. College and high school students will work together in Detroit interviewing people across generations, races, and neighborhoods about their experiences growing up in the city. These oral histories will then be used in two ways: they will become the basis of a Detroit history web-page that will include transcripts, historical documents, and photographs in a format which is friendly and usable for high school students; and they will form the foundation for a series of performance projects involving drama and poetry. Some of this material will be published, some performed in high schools, and some developed by Detroit's Mosaic Youth Theater for their contribution to the tri-centennial celebration of the city.

The Format: One of the aims of this project is to put students with different backgrounds, skills, and interests into interaction. Everyone enrolled will be expected to participate in all aspects of this project, including the collection of oral histories and other archival material, the development of performance material based on the oral histories, and the construction of a website for Detroit history. But different students, with different interests and resources, will take a lead in different aspects of this work. Therefore, we ask you to hold Friday afternoons (2-5) open for this class and assume that there will be other times during the week when you will do independent work with others.

The Credit: this will be "project based" credit, given when the work is complete. Much work will be done during winter term 2000, but we also want to have a series of organizational meetings in November and December of this year; and we expect the collaborative aspects of the project, especially the creation of theatrical pieces (we hope to hold an intensive workshop over several days at East Quad in June) and work on the website, will continue through the high school Winter Term into June of next year. You can earn up to 8 credit hours for this work. Everyone should enroll in either RC Drama 485.001 or RC Social Science 460.001 in Winter term. We will arrange for you to get the balance of your credit through an RC Field Studies course or an LS&A Independent Studies course taken during either the Winter or Spring Terms, 2000.

Admission is by permission of instructor. If interested (or if you want additional information) please contact: Kate Mendeloff, 114 Tyler (647-4354), mendelof@umich.edu, or Charles Bright, 128 Tyler (662-6024), cbright@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

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