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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in American Culture

This page was created at 9:21 AM on Wed, Nov 1, 2000.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in American Culture

Wolverine Access Subject listing for AMCULT

Take me to the Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for American Culture.

To see what has been added to or changed in American Culture this week go to What's New This Week.

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Unless otherwise stated, the permission required for the repetition for credit of specifically designated courses is that of the student's concentration or BGS advisor.

Courses in Ojibwa

A full sequence of Ojibwa cannot be guaranteed. Students must consult with the American Culture Program Office before undertaking Ojibwa to satisfy the College language requirement.


AMCULT 100. What is an American?

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Richard Meisler

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The search for answers to the question in the course title will take us through inquiries in several disciplines, studying scholarship and works of art and of the imagination. There will be some field work in nearby communities. Investigation of our own national identity will be connected with the cultures and experiences, past and present, of those who share the Americas with us.

The central question of the course leads to difficult questions of social justice issues of values as well as of facts. These inquiries will be guided by the principles of academic freedom without regard to transient concepts of political correctness or incorrectness. The course involves an honest search for both truth and justice.

The methods of teaching and learning in this course will include discussions, lectures, projects, short and long written assignments, films, guest speakers, and conferences. They will also include extensive use of computer-based communications. Students must be proficient, or willing to become proficient, in Web browsing, email, word-processing, and computer-based discussion. A course Web site will be a gateway to important materials and class communications. Students must have computers with Internet access or be willing to use public computer terminals on a daily basis.

For grading purposes, learning will be judged with reference to participation and attendance, written work, class presentations, and the completion of assignments. The actual grading system will be defined at the beginning of the academic term in consultation with class members. Once deadlines are established for the academic term, there will be very little flexibility concerning when work must be completed.

The costs for texts and course packs will be minimal, probably less than $50. Some field work may involve occasional travel costs as well as admission fees to films and performances.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 103. First Year Seminar in American Studies.

Section 001 America and the Movies

Instructor(s): Jonathan E Freedman (zoid@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this class, we'll be looking at the ways in which certain Hollywood and post-studio films intersect with larger patterns of cultural meaning in the U.S. Some of the topics we'll study will include: the myth of "the West"; the myth of the nuclear family; the myth of race. Much attention will be given to thinking about how film, as an integral element is visual culture, works to create its effects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 204. Themes in American Culture.

Section 001 History of Childbirth in America: Early Republic to the Present. Meets with Women's Studies 253.007

Instructor(s): Christine Kae Bass (cbass@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the history of childbirth in the U.S. from two different perspectives: the mother; and the person assisting with the birth. By exploring these two very different perspectives we will learn a great deal about the issues that have been, and continue to be, important to women giving birth. We will also focus on the factors that have influenced who has assisted birthing women over the past two hundred years. In addition, we will look at the medical, social, and cultural aspects of childbirth and how they intersect and influence one another. We will also explore gender and power dynamics in the birthing room and how socioeconomic factors and race influence childbirth practices and experiences. The class format will focus primarily on discussion of weekly reading assignments. There will be weekly journals and two papers (3-5pp. in length). Students will also have a group project followed by a group presentation. There will also be a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 002 AIDS in America

Instructor(s): Richard Meisler

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The American response to the AIDS epidemic is a window into important aspects of our values and culture. These involve the place in our social world of gender and sexual orientation, scientific and medical knowledge, poverty, homelessness, privacy rights, racial and cultural diversity, the law, and public health efforts. This course will be an interdisciplinary exploration of all of these phenomena as they bear on the AIDS crisis. Some field work will be involved in parts of the community where the impacts of the epidemics may be observed and engaged.

Scientific knowledge of HIV/AIDS presented for a nonscientific audience will be a required part of the course curriculum.

Other parts of the course will involve studying research results in the social sciences and engaging with artistic work memoirs, fiction, film, poetry, fine arts, music concerning AIDS.

Although the focus of the course is on AIDS and America, the global context of the AIDS epidemic will be studied to provide a context for the American experience.

In addition to presenting factual materials about AIDS, the course will examine policies about and responses to the epidemic that raise ethical and political issues. In this part of the course, we will be guided by the principles of academic freedom without regard to transient concepts of political correctness or incorrectness. The course involves an honest search for both truth and justice.

The methods of teaching and learning in this course will include discussions, a few lectures, projects, short and long written assignments, films, presentations by guest speakers, and conferences. They will also include extensive use of computer-based communications. Students must be proficient, or willing to become proficient, in Web browsing, email, word-processing, and computer-based discussion. A course Web site will be a gateway to important materials and class communications. Students must have computers with Internet access or be willing to use public computer terminals on a daily basis.

For grading purposes, learning will be judged with reference to participation and attendance, written work, class presentations, and the completion of assignments. The actual grading system will be defined at the beginning of the academic term in consultation with class members. Once deadlines are established for the academic term, there will be very little flexibility concerning when work must be completed.

The costs for texts and course packs will be minimal, probably less than $50. Some field work may involve occasional travel costs as well as admission fees to films and performances.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 213. Introduction to Latino Studies Humanities.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E). Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


AMCULT 215. Introduction to Asian American Studies Humanities.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Emily G Lawsin (elawsin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E). Laboratory fee required.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introductory survey of the experiences of Asian American and Pacific Islanders in the U.S. through the study of autobiographical narratives, art, poetry, plays, and fiction. We will examine fascinating literature by Americans of Asian/Pacific Islander descent, including (but not limited to) Chinese, Filipina/o, Hawaiian, Japanese, Korean, South Asian, and Southeast Asians, focusing on nineteenth and twentieth-century America. By placing the texts in a social, economic, personal, historical, cultural, and ideological context, we will compare diverse perspectives and generations of American life. As an introduction to Asian Pacific American literature, part of the course objective is to look critically at how fiction can intersect with autobiography and how cultural literacy can inform our understanding of texts and community. We will also examine some forms of literary and cultural productions, through films, dance, and/or music. Texts range from works by early Asian American immigrants to contemporary authors, emerging writers, as well as musical, visual, and spoken word artists. Assignments include facilitating and participating in class discussions, exams, as well as a final project, such as analyzing and/or producing an Asian/Pacific American creative text.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 222. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Non-LS&A students must have permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


AMCULT 223. Elementary Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 222 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


AMCULT 231. Visual & Material Culture Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kristin Ann Hass (kah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We are living in a material and, an increasingly, visual world. Every image you see and every object you touch is shot-through with powerful cultural ideologies ideas about power and gender and race and class and place and nation shape our visual and material world. In this class we will dive into the work of thinking about the images and objects in our daily lives as puzzles full of meanings for us to explore and unpack.

In this course students will be asked to think about how photographs, maps, paintings, graffiti, architecture, fashions, monuments, billboards, museums, movies and more as fundamental elements of our visual and material world construct and convey meaning. Students will be asked to think about ubiquitous visual and material signs as sites of essential forms of cultural knowledge. They will be asked to develop analytic tools for understanding these signs and to create, in response, some signs of their own.

Drawing on scholarship in Visual Culture, Material Culture, Architecture, American Studies, Anthropology, Contemporary Art Criticism, Feminist Criticism, and more course readings will include Nicholas Mirzoeff's Visual Culture Reader, Lucy Lippard's The Lure of the Local: sense of Place in a Multi-Centered Society, bell hooks' Black Looks: Race and Representation, Andrew Ross' The Celebration Chronicles, Paul Groth's Understanding Ordinary Landscapes, and Witlod Rybczynski's Looking Around: A Journey Through Architecture.

Course Requirements: Students will be asked to write two papers and to produce, regardless of skill or background, two visual responses to the course material. These visual responses might include a photo essay, a short video, a series of drawings, a collection of blueprints, etc. Course grades will be based on papers, visual responses, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 240/WS 240. Introduction to Women's Studies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dena Goodman (goodmand@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Women's Studies 240.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 001 Oral History and Autobiography of Asian Pacific American Women. (3 credits). Meets with Womens Studies 342.002

Instructor(s): Emily G Lawsin (elawsin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on the theory and practice of collecting oral histories of women. We will examine various theories and methods of conducting interviews, with a concentration on the feminist perspective. We will also explore issues to consider, such as "insider-outsider" perspectives, relationships between the interviewer and interviewee, our role as "narrator", legal and ethical issues, the reliability of memory, and how the complex intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality are reflected in women's life stories. Students will learn different strategies of how to prepare for, conduct and process an oral history interview; how to develop an interview guide, how to do background research, how to phrase questions to get the most out of an interview, and what type of equipment choices one has. Towards the latter half of the course, we will cover post-interview processing, including: transcribing, editing, indexing, and presentation options. Students are expected to facilitate and participate in class discussions, and complete assignments that lead to a final project (i.e., conducting, transcribing, reading, workshopping, processing, documenting, and presenting an oral history of a woman). By doing so, we will attempt to uncover "new" historical findings within our local community, adding to the oral history research available on women.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 002 Asian Pacific Americans & the Law. (1 Credit). Runs 2/13 3/20.

Instructor(s): Roland Hwang

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an overview of how federal and state laws have affected the Asian Pacific American (APA) experience and presence in the U.S. The course will cover the APA historical timeline, exclusion laws, alien land laws, World War II internment of Japanese Americans, affirmative action as it applies to APAs, civil rights and racial hate crime violence, bilingual issues in education and the workplace, and the drive for native Hawaiian recognition and separation, among other topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 003 American Masculinities. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Magdalena J Zaborowska (mzaborow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores literary, visual, and theoretical representations of American masculinity in the twentieth century: from Henry Adams' the "last Puritan" vision of America and Abraham Cahan's depictions of immigrant "imported bridegrooms," through Ernest Hemingway's narratives about white men in Africa, Tennessee Williams' acclaimed play on desire located in New Orleans, and James Baldwin's gender-bending novel on American "innocents abroad," to Jerzy Kosinski's satire on pop culture/TV heroism, Henry Hwang's M. Butterfly, and Sherman Alexie's short stories.

The class will meet once a week for three hours. It will be based on a mix of background lectures, student-centered discussions, and individual and group presentations. Films, literary, and critical texts will provide springboards for these activities and inspiration for individual and collective research projects that will include a midterm and a final paper. Selections of criticism from the following sources will provide and challenge us with theoretical frameworks and a variety of analytical tools: Judith Butler, Gender Trouble, Bodies that Matter; Marjorie Garber, Vested Interests, Vice Versa; bell hooks, Outlaw Culture; John D'Emilio, Estelle B. Friedman, Intimate Matters; Kaja Silverman, Masculinity at the Margins; Susan Faludi, Stiffed. Films will include some or all of these titles: " Hester Street ," " Shane ," " The Maltese Falcon ," " The Betrayed ," " Boyz N the Hood ," " Being There ," " Smoke Signals ," " Hoop Dreams ," " Dr. Strangelove ," " To Wong Fu, with Love, Julie Newmar."

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 004 Culture and Politics During the Civil War and Reconstruction. (3 credits). Meets with Women's Studies 342.001 and History 393.001.

Instructor(s): Hannah R Rosen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated twice with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Women's Studies 342.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 001 LAB PRACTICUM ON COMMUNITY INTERVENTION. (4 CREDITS.) MEETS WITH PSYCH 317.001 AND 318.001

Instructor(s): Lorraine M Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 317.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 310. Topics in Ethnic Studies.

Section 001 Asian Pacific Americans: Social and Public Policy Issues.

Instructor(s): Paul Wong

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of advisor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

After the elimination of racially biased immigration policies in 1965, the Asian Pacific American population has grown significantly. It is estimated that the Asian Pacific American population will be about 20 million by the year 2020. Asian Pacific Americans share common concerns over a number of social and public policy issues. At the same time given the diversity of the Asian Pacific American population in terms of economic status, culture, gender, country of origin, the number of generations in the United States, and other factors, it is important to understand and address the issues that affect specific groups within this pan-ethnic category.

In this course, we will examine a number of social and public policy issues with regard to how they affect Asian Pacific Americans, including immigration, affirmative action, employment, access to health and mental health services, political participation, media representation, and civil rights. The research literature from a number of disciplines such as sociology, political science, psychology, education, economics, law, history, and media studies will be reviewed.

The course will provide a general survey of the historical background and current development of the major issues. In addition, we will deal in depth with specific cases in which Asian Pacific American individuals, organizations, and communities mobilized to address these issues on the national and local levels.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 310. Topics in Ethnic Studies.

Section 002 Filipino American Women. Meets with Women's Studies 342.003.

Instructor(s): Emily G Lawsin (elawsin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for credit with permission of advisor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an upper-division interdisciplinary course on the experience of Filipina women in America. We will examine the Pinay's Filipina American's role in historical events, contemporary issues, and how these affect community formation and life in America. By looking at the different waves of Filipina/o migration to the U.S., we will see the Pinay experience in various regions and sectors of American society: education, labor, family, politics, and communities, to name a few. We will also determine how Filipina/o American issues are reflected through historical, sociological, psychological, autobiographical, and literary texts, answering such questions as: Who/What is a Filipina American? What makes the Pinay's experience in America unique from that of other Asian Pacific Americans? What is "Pinayism"? How does the complex intersection of race, class, gender, and sexuality affect Filipina/os? How are Filipina Americans "positioned" in this society? What are some of the current issues facing Filipinas? Are Filipinas only "known for" queen contests, folk dances, and fried lumpia? Or, do these cultural spaces create strategies of resistance? What roles have Pinays played in civil rights and social activism? Overall, how have Filipina Americans strategized their changing places within this society? As we examine these issues, we will also attempt to uncover "new" historical findings within our local Filipina/o American community. This course is for those who want to learn more about Filipina/os women and men in America. Assignments include facilitating and participating in class discussions, exams, as well as a final project that adds to the field of Pinay Studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 314/Hist. 378. History of Asian Americans in the U.S.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott T Kurashige (kurashig@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides an overview of Asian/Pacific American history from the time of early migrations to the present. Groups to be examined include Korean, Filipino, South Asian, Southeast Asian, Pacific Islander, Chinese, and Japanese Americans. We will place these experiences into a national and international context of comparative race relations and U.S.-Asia relations. Our study will begin with the questions: What does it mean to study history from an Asian/Pacific American perspective? How and why has Asian/Pacific American history become a part of the curriculum? Readings and lectures will engage the following historical issues and themes: 1) pre-World War II immigration and efforts to build community in the face of racial exclusion; 2) the place of Asians and Pacific Islanders in the construction of the U.S. empire; 3) the changing demographics and community composition created by post-1965 immigration; 4) the impact of the Vietnam War and the resettlement of Southeast Asian refugees; 5) the construction of gender and the experience of women in Asian/Pacific American communities; 6) the shifting position of Asian/Pacific American labor in the capitalist economy; 7) the emergence of Asian/Pacific American activism in the fight for social justice.

Examples of required readings include Strangers From a Different Shore: A History of Asian Americans, Through Harsh Winters: The Life of a Japanese Immigrant Woman, Philip Vera Cruz: A Personal History of Filipino Immigrants and the Farmworkers Movement, The Karma of Brown Folk, and Resistance in Paradise: Rethinking 100 Years of U.S. Involvement in the Caribbean and the Pacific.

Course requirements: attendance/participation in lecture and discussion, a take-home midterm, research paper (10-15 pages), and in-class final. Some knowledge of U.S. history and/or Asian/Pacific American Studies is useful but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 315/History 377. History of Latinos in the U.S.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Amer. Cult. 312. (4). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course is an exploration of the history and culture of Latinos in the United States from the colonial era to the present. We will examine the diversity among groups that make up the Latino population of the United States, paying particular attention to the three largest subgroups of Mexican, Puerto Rican, and Cuban origin. Topics will include the varied experiences of colonialism and immigration; the role of race prejudice and discrimination in shaping social mobility; cultural transformation and regional variations in language, religion, and music; gender as a central variable in defining issues of identity and opportunity; and the birth of a Latino civil rights movement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 318/Mod. Greek 318. Greek-American Culture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Vassilios Lambropoulos (vlambrop@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Modern Greek 318.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

AMCULT 322. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 223 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


AMCULT 323. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 322 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 322.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

AMCULT 327/Engl. 387. Latino/Latina Literature of the U.S.

Section 001 Chicano/a Narrative.

Instructor(s): John Moran Gonzalez (jmgonzal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 387.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 350. Approaches to American Culture.

Instructor(s): Margarita De La Vega-Hurtado

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 201, junior standing, or concentration in American Culture. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar, designed for American Culture concentrators, explores the intellectual and institutional history and the current state of the American Studies movement, including its relationship to established academic disciplines (such as history, literary studies, anthropology) and to other transformation interdisciplines (such as ethnic studies, cultural studies, women's studies). Because this topic is so broad we will not so much cover American Studies as make forays into it, in order to make tentative maps and useful connections; because of the small class size, we should be able to adapt our course in order to pursue our individual and collective interests. We will look closely at some scholarly works and some other American texts, and we will ask ourselves about the uses of this sort of knowledge in contemporary America. The course will include opportunities for students to do substantial independent research, and a number of class meetings will be devoted to workshops on those projects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 367/Hist. 367. American Indian History.

U.S. History

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Liza Black

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will survey the major themes in American Indian history in the colonial, nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Students will read approximately five books and be tested on exams and section participation. Books include The Name of War, They Called It Prairie Light, and Termination and Relocation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 2

AMCULT 380/Spanish 380/Film-Video 380. Studies in Transnational Media.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Catherine L Benamou

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior coursework in Film and Video Studies, Communications (television studies) or Latino Studies. A knowledge of Spanish is not required. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Spanish 380.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and grade point average of at least 3.0. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Reading of selected works on American Culture. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

AMCULT 388. Field Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Field experience in organizations, institutions, and service agencies under such University of Michigan programs as the Washington and New York Internship Program and Project Community. Students must make individual arrangements with these programs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

AMCULT 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American Studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the student's area of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

AMCULT 398. Junior Honors Writing Workshop.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jonathan E Freedman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of a concentration advisor in American Culture. (1-3). (Excl).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


AMCULT 399. Race, Racism, and Ethnicity.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margarita De La Vega-Hurtado (delavega@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will use historical and theoretical approaches toward understanding racism and its dynamics of power, domination, subordination, and resistance. The syllabus and lectures will be interdisciplinary, building partly upon imaginative literature, personal narratives, and other texts in the voices of these various groups: Native Americans, African Americans, Latina/o peoples, Asian/Pacific Americans, and European Americans. Readings, lectures, and discussion will profile the groups and interpret histories of their interactions as well as analyze diversity within each. We will study how domination and resistance and their costs are experiences common to these groups but from different positions and through specific mechanisms varying from group to group. Two weekly hours in lecture plus one two-hour discussion section are required, as are two papers of 10-12 pages each and weekly responses to assigned readings.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 401. Race and Racialization in the Americas.

Section 001 Race & Racialization In The U.S. Meets with Sociology 495.005.

Instructor(s): Silvia Pedraza (spedraza@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 212 or 213, and 312. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The organization of this course on race and racialization in the United States comprises a dual focus: historical and comparative. The historical perspective is necessary to understand the difference that time and place make in shaping outcomes for particular ethnic groups. For example, Thomas Gossett's RACE: THE HISTORY OF AN IDEA shows that racism, the belief in racial superiority and inferiority, had a history and a career that it was not static, but changed over time. While the focus is on race relations in the United States, the comparative perspective serves to demonstrate that races are defined differently in different countries. For example, the children of mixed unions were always defined differently in the Caribbean than in the United States, as is shown in the work of Carl Degler, NEITHER BLACK NOR WHITE, that compares the different pattern of race relations in the U. S. and in Brazil. Those comparisons across time and across space show that races are socially constructed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 420/Spanish 420. Latin American & Latino/a Film Studies.

Courses in Spanish

Section 001 Latino/as in U.S. film and television.

Instructor(s): Catherine L Benamou (cbenamou@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Spanish 270 or 275. A previous course in Film & Video, or Latin American history, or Latino Studies. (4). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Spanish 420.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 421/Soc. 423. Social Stratification.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Sociology 423.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 422. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 323 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


AMCULT 423. Advanced Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 422 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See American Culture 422.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

AMCULT 490/Film-Video 451. American Film Genres.

Section 001 FILM SCREENINGS TUES 7-9 P.M.

Instructor(s): Kevin S Sandler (ksandler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (4). (HU). Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class focuses on two American film genres that still exist today: the horror film and the teenage sex comedy. Turning to the high school as a site where contemporary notions of race, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, family, and nation are played out, we will examine the representational strategies of these genres using a variety of methodological and and theoretical approaches: historiographical, formal, industrial, ideological, psychoanalytic, social, and cultural. Sessions will be devoted to the patterns, styles, and structures of these two genres and how they adapt over time to the changing cultural, social, and institutional norms in American society and Hollywood production praxis. Films may include: Carrie, Halloween, Prom Night, Last House on the Left, Nightmare on Elm Street, Scream, Disturbing Behavior, American Graffiti, Cooley High, Porky's, Fast Times at Ridgemont High, The Last American Virgin, American Pie, and 10 Things I Hate About You.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. A grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 AFRICAN AMERICAN SOCIAL MOVEMENTS. (4 credits). Meets with History 397.004.

Instructor(s): Matthew J Countryman (mcountry@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 397.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 496. Social Science Approaches to American Culture.

Section 002 American Music and Cultural Critique. (4 credits). Meets with History 397.005

Instructor(s): Paul A Anderson (paanders@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This interdisciplinary senior seminar offers two converging lines of inquiry. On the one hand, we will survey some key themes in American and European critical theory and ethnomusicology regarding music as a social text and the consequences for musical performance and reception of commodification and globalization. On the other hand, we will look to some case studies on music as a social text and a forum for cultural critique in U.S. cultural and intellectual history and American Studies writing. We will encounter writings on a number of music forms including selected instances of jazz, folk music, popular music, classical music, and avant-garde or experimental music. This is an upper-level undergraduate seminar on culture and ideas; therefore, prior musical expertise is not expected.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 498. Humanities Approaches to American Culture.

Section 001 Contemp Latino/a Pop Narrative. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): John Moran Gonzalez (jmgonzal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3-4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (3-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will center upon Latina/o literature, music, performance and visual media produced during the 1990s. With the fastest-growing demographics of any "ethnic" group, Latina/as made some advancements into the corporate world of mass consumption to reach a national and international audience. This course will examine the tensions and gains made by Latino/a communities in this process. Topics will include: the fate of cultural nationalism in the postmodern era, the fate of both cultural productions and their producers within various institutions, the feminist critique of nationalist aesthetics, queer transformations of the Latina/o landscape, cultural hybridity in the borderlands. We'll also examine the influence of mass culture upon the work of Latina/o intellectuals and performers such as Coco Fusco, Guillermo Gomez-Pena, Michael Nava, and Soldad Santiego. Some prior knowledge of Latina/o cultural issues helpful but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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