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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Comparative Literature

This page was created at 9:27 AM on Wed, Nov 1, 2000.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Comparative Literature

Wolverine Access Subject listing for COMPLIT

Take me to the Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Comparative Literature.

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COMPLIT 140. First-Year Literary Seminar.

Section 001 Classicism

Instructor(s): James I Porter

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will pose the following problem about the study of ancient Greece and Rome. Given that the ancients had no clearly marked category for "classical" or "classicism," is their past rightly labeled "classical"? Subsequent attempts to grasp the meaning of "classicism" down to this day rarely agree with one another. The course will set out to trace the emergence and history of this fascinating problem through a wide sampling of literature, readings, and visual art.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 241. Topics in Comparative Literature.

Section 001 Desire.

Instructor(s): Mary Gloria Lauri

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comp. Lit. 240 recommended. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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COMPLIT 350. The Text and Its Cultural Context.

Section 001 Post Modernism Revisited.

Instructor(s): Christopher David Luebbe

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What comes after Postmodernism? Post-postmodernism? Neo-primitivism? The No-Place, No-Time, No-Culture of a Future never arrived yet without End? Although the furor over Postmodernism has largely come and gone, we're still steeped in its effects (and affects). And whether we choose the path of relentless forgetting, the channel-surfing option, or the nostalgic longing for times gone by, the "remember when SNL used to be good?" option, our choice is conditioned by the Postmodernism that we've never fully left behind. In this course, we will, in postmodern fashion, revisit Postmodernism through a series of interrelated topics: history, subjectivity, and representation. Through an examination of a range of novelistic examples of Postmodern fiction and film, we will attempt to arrive at an understanding of the central problems posed by this complicated cultural moment, one that, arguably, we still inhabit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 350. The Text and Its Cultural Context.

Section 002 Fact/Fiction in Serial Novels

Instructor(s): Margaret Wheeler

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The news. It offers stories of murders, faraway places, outrageous characters and sometimes even more outrageous politics. It often reads like the stuff of novels. We could even say it is the stuff of novels...from the very first, after all, novels have appeared in newspapers. Often, serialized novels mirror the concerns of the day, intervene in political debates, or retell recent events. At other times, serialized novels copy the style of the theater reviews, travelogues, or gossip columns that appear in the newspaper. In short, serialized novels often exist in ongoing tension with the news stories amongst which they appear. This tension helps to blur the borders of fact and fiction.

In this class, we will read a selection of newspaper novels, some now considered sensational adventure tales, some considered classics. We will look at the way in which newspaper novels engage with questions of modernity, the rise of the nation-state, the tensions between urban and rural cultures and between the metropole and the periphery. Throughout, we will try to understand the way in which serialized novels problematize the truth claims so central to the news of narrative depictions of reality.

Possible texts include Aphra Behn's Oroonoko, Alexandre Dumas' The Count of Monte-Cristo, George Sand's The Miller of Angibault, Fyodor Dostoevsky's Demons, Jules Verne's Around the World in 80 Days, Karel Capek's War with the Newts, and Tomás Eloy Martínez' The Perón Novel. We will end by reading Caleb Carr's Killing Time, serialized this past year in Time magazine. Course requirements include three papers and one class presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 410. Major Authors.

Section 001 Early Modern Literature of Travel. Meets with English 417.002

Instructor(s): David L Porter

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 417.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 424. Literature and Other Disciplines.

Section 001 Literature for Psychologists. Meets with Psychology 401.007.

Instructor(s): Silke-Maria Weineck

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing and one course in literary studies. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Literature may well be the most complex expression of human conditions we have, as an eloquent record of interior states, as a richly detailed observation of behavior, motivation, and interpersonal relations, or as sustained self-reflection on the nature of language in construing our images of self and the world. The goal of this course is to acquaint future psychologists (and all others who might be interested) with ways of reading works of literature both as psychological records and as critical reflections on psychology. Its rationale is that much of therapeutic dialogue is in nature hermeneutic, and that the study of literature aids us in analyzing and understanding human utterance in general and important elements of self-representation (like narrative structure, metaphor, symbol) in particular. In addition, this course will look at the literary elements in seminal psychological texts (e.g., Freud, Winnicott). Readings may include: Sophocles: Oedipus Rex, Shakespeare: Hamlet, Flaubert: Mme Bovary, Dostoyevsky: Notes from Underground, Kafka: Letter to His Father , Eliot: Four Quartets, Morrison: Beloved, Menaker: The Treatment , Palahniuk: Fight Club. We will also watch two films, Suddenly Last Summer , and The Three Faces of Eve. Requirements: attendance, participation, two 8-pp papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 438. Comparative Studies in Film.

Section 001 Filming Literature.

Instructor(s): Mary Gloria Lauri

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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COMPLIT 490. Comparative Cultural Studies.

Section 001 Colonial Critiques of Modernity. Meets with AAPTIS 491.001

Instructor(s): Yaseen Noorani

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 491.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 492. Comparative Literary Theory.

Section 001 Space, Vision, Literary Representation

Instructor(s): Yaseen Noorani

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

One of the fundamental things that literary works do is to offer us ways of perceiving and orienting ourselves in the spaces in which we live. Literary genres and forms have characteristic ways of representing the spatial and visual which seem to have their own particular logic. Nevertheless, we find that literary forms with new ways of representing space emerge in the context of transformations in social life. The Realist novel and Surrealist poetry are good examples. The same may be said of painting and cinema, which take the visual as their primary realm of representation. How then should we understand the relationship between artistic visualizations of space and those of everyday lived experience? Are some types of representation closer to "real" life and perception than others? Have the various forms of spatial and visual representation that have appeared in the past had any connection with how people actually perceived their environments in those historical periods? Do artistic representations have any influence over us as we alter the spaces in which we live? In this course, we consider these and related questions by looking at different approaches to the linkages between the visual, spatial and literary. Bakhtin's conception of the literary chronotope will help to frame discussion of the spatial features and motifs of literary genres. We will consider the concept of the "scopic regime," forwarded by a number of theorists as a means to associate particular ways of seeing with historical periods. We will think about the connections between the social experience of space and literature by reading from such works as The Production of Space by Henri Lefebvre, The Practice of Everyday Life by Michel de Certeau, and the work of some contemporary geographers, such as David Harvey. Finally, we will look at work which attempts to theorize the relationship between literary and lived space, including that of Frederic Jameson and Gaston Bachelard.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMPLIT 496. Honors Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comp. Lit. 495 and Honors concentration in comparative literature. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In the Honors Thesis course the Honors student typically develops the seminar work done in Comparative Literature 495 (Senior Seminar) into a longer, more thorough study under the auspices of a faculty thesis director. Students who need help in arranging for a thesis director should contact the Comparative Literature office, 2015 Tisch Hall, 763-2361

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

COMPLIT 498. Directed Reading.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended for Comparative Literature concentrators. It offers a student the opportunity to work closely with a faculty member associated with Comparative Literature on a comparative topic chosen by the student in consultation with the professor. Together they will develop a reading list; establish goals, meeting times, and credit hours (within the range); and plan papers and projects which the student will execute with the tutorial assistance of the instructor. The student will be required to submit a written proposal of his or her course to the Program office. For further information, contact the Program in Comparative Literature, 2015 Tisch.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

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