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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in English

This page was created at 9:45 AM on Wed, Nov 1, 2000.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in English

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ENGLISH

Take me to the Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for English.

To see what has been added to or changed in English this week go to What's New This Week.

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For all English classes, registered students must be present at each of the first two meetings to claim their places. Any student who does not meet this requirement may be dropped from the course. NOTE: If you must miss a class due to religious observances, contact the instructor or leave a message for the instructor with the department (764-6330).

WRITING COURSES:

After taking or placing out of Introductory Composition, students may elect either English 224 or 225 for further practice in the fundamentals of expository and argumentative prose. English 325 offers the opportunity for work in argumentative and expository prose at a more advanced level.

Several sections of English 223, the beginning course in creative writing, are available each term. The work is multi-generic, and two of the following will be covered in each section: fiction, poetry, and drama, or you may take English 227 (Introductory Playwriting). A more advanced course for creative writers is English 323 (Fiction or Poetry), which is available after completion of the prerequisite, English 223. More experienced writers may apply for admission to specialized sections of English 327 (Playwriting), English 423 (Fiction), English 427 (Advanced Playwriting), and English 429 (Poetry). Admission to these advanced courses is by permission of the instructor, who may require writing samples.

INDEPENDENT STUDY:

Independent study in English must be elected under one of the following numbers: 226 (Directed Writing, 1-3 hours), 299 (Directed Reading, 1-3 hours), 426 (Directed Writing, 1-4 hours), 499 (Directed Reading, 1-4 hours). There is a limit to the total hours that may be taken under any one number. Students interested in independent study should obtain an application from the English Department office on the third floor of Angell Hall. Independent study proposals must be approved by a supervising professor and by the Undergraduate Chair of the department. The deadline for Independent Study in the Winter Term 2001 is January 12, 2001.

English 350 & 351

This two-term sequence is designed to give students a principled sense of the range of literary works written in English; the first term will characteristically deal with works produced before the later seventeenth century to the time of Milton, that is; the second term will begin at that point and proceed to the present. These courses will be open to English concentrators and to non-concentrators alike.

English 370, 371, & 372

Each of these courses will range over the materials of the periods indicated below in one or more of a variety of ways. Some may be multi-generic surveys; some may focus on the development during the period of specific genres; some may be topical, others formal in their principle of organization. All sections will emphasize the development of student skill in writing essays analyzing the materials and evaluating the approaches in question.


ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

By connecting the two terms of its title, Writing and Literature aims to help prepare the student to produce the range and quality of expository prose expected in college courses. Works of literature will be considered for their effective use of language and argument. They will serve as reference points for thinking and writing strategies. Characteristically, sections of English 124 will involve the writing of 20-30 pages of revised prose, with considerable attention given to the preparation of drafts and to revision. The literary works which will serve as points of reference will vary from section to section and from term to term.

Course descriptions will be posted to the English Department web site (http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/courses/w01/w01courses/124cds.htm ) as they have been approved. For a variety of reasons it may be necessary for instructors to change courses or sections prior to the first day of class, although we try to keep this to a minimum. Revised course descriptions will be posted to this web site as they occur.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No one ever finishes learning to write, so this course focuses on helping students further develop their unique potentials as writers, readers, and thinkers. By analyzing texts from a variety of academic disciplines, students will come to understand the conventions writers follow to present their ideas effectively to their chosen audiences. What rhetorical strategies are common in different disciplines and why? How and when might we use those strategies in our own writing? For instance, what writing strategies would we call upon for a lab report, and would we use any of those strategies for a philosophical speculation, a history exam, a love letter? Throughout the term, students will work to identify the writing skills they most need to develop, and they'll invent and refine a personal style of expression that can be adapted to different audiences and purposes. Course requirements include at least 40 pages of writing, including at least 20 pages of revised, polished prose.

Course descriptions will be posted to the English Department web site (http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/courses/w01/w01courses/125cds.htm) as they have been approved. For a variety of reasons it may be necessary for instructors to change courses or sections prior to the first day of class, although we try to keep this to a minimum. Revised course descriptions will be posted to this web site as they occur.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

All sections of 223 teach the writing of two of the following three genres: fiction (including personal narrative), drama, and poetry. Different sections will emphasize the individual genres to varying degrees. Class work involves the discussion of the process of writing and the work of a few published authors. Students will do exercises meant to develop a sensitivity to language and a facility with evocative detail, voice, form, and so forth. Most classroom time, however, is devoted to reading and discussion of student writing. A final portfolio of revised finished work of 35-50 manuscript pages may be required.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course furthers the aims of English 124 and 125 in helping to analyze the various claims of a given issue and to develop ways of exploring and defending positions, ideas, and beliefs in writing. Careful attention will be paid to the process of reasoning, the testing of assumptions and claims, the questioning of beliefs, and the discovery of ideas and evidence through analysis and rigorous articulation in written discourse. The course will also focus on considerations of style, formal strategy techniques, and revision as integral to precision in making points and developing argumentative ideas both for purposes of individual reflection as well as for the purpose of persuading an audience.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 020, 021.

Instructor(s): Randall L Tessier

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 024, 033 RACE, CLASS AND GENDER IN TWENTIETH-CENTURY AMERICA.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 031.

Instructor(s): Amit Ray

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 226. Directed Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

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ENGLISH 227/Theatre 227. Introductory Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Oyamo (oyamo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (CE).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 227.001.

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ENGLISH 229/LHSP 229. Technical Writing.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Scott Melanson (melanson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the introductory composition requirement. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~skassner/Eng229.html

In this course, students analyze and practice the types of writing done by technical and professional writers in particular, manuals, reports, correpondence, and proposals. Like all effective writing, technical and professional writing emerges from an understanding of purpose and audience, from an understanding of "the rhetorical context." It is the specifics of its rhetorical context not any implied intellectual difference that distinguishes technical and professional writing from other forms of writing. Thus, a major goal of this course will be to help students develop the analytical skills they will need to navigate the rhetorical contexts technical and professional writers encounter in a variety of fields. Since most technical and professional writing is the result of collaborative activity, students should expect to work in teams in the course, but the course will also address more personal issues, such as the writing of resumes and letters of self-promotion.

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ENGLISH 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What does it mean to be an author, to create a story? To figure that out, we'll be authors ourselves a little and ask about our own responses as readers. We'll read texts closely, attempting to understand their less accessible meanings, the effect of the social and economic context in which they are written and read, and what's at stake for us, if anything, in the content. We'll be interested in the social purposes of literature and in questions of authors' responsibilities. We'll read or view The Official Story, Interviews with My Lai Veterans; Wiesenthal's The Sunflower; Coetzee's Age of Iron; Thomas' The White Hotel; Kingsolver's Pigs In Heaven; Washington's Iron House; Cervantes' Emplumada; and Shange's "spell #7." Class participation will be important, and you'll write 25 pages worth of essays and literature, the nature of which we'll determine together. No exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 002 Telling Stories: The Art of Narration

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this class we will want to think about the power and the connectedness that the act of telling stories might provide. For example, a character in Ursula Hegi's Stones from the River thinks: Every time I take a story and let it stream through my mind from beginning to end, it grows fuller, richer, feeding on my visions of those people the story belonged to until it leaves its bed like the river I love. And then I have to tell the story to someone. As we discuss various 20th century literature (mostly), we find ourselves grappling with issues as basic as how and why do these created characters "tell us" stories? How do those stories provoke our own life stores? All along, our discussions will focus on the process of interpretation and understanding of these wonderful tales. Two essays and two hourly exams required.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 003 Ain't I A Woman?: Ethnic Women Writers

Instructor(s): Betty L Bell (blbell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will study the ways in which ethnic women writers attempt to build and speak to communities of women in their works. Although attention will be given to ethnic communities, the course will emphasize gender in an inter-ethnic conversation between women writers. Required texts will include autobiographical essays and texts by contemporary ethnic women writers. Course requirements will include two ten-page papers.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Sara B Blair (sbblair@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended to introduce students to the study of literature, and its changing claims and value in varied social contexts. We'll encounter a wide variety of genres, including the lyric, the novel, short fiction, autobiography, and drama, in writers ranging from Shakespeare and Emily Dickinson to Charles Dickens, Toni Morrison, Derek Walcott, and Sylvia Plath. Some key questions for our work: how do literary forms and ways of meaning shape the experiences of readers? What's the relation between literature and other kinds of writing or expression (popular fiction, journalism, film)? How do literary texts represent, negotiate, or challenge reigning conventions or ideals? Requirements will most likely include a midterm and final, three essays, and a reading journal.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 005 Honors

Instructor(s): Anne C Herrmann (anneh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will address the question of why and how we read literature, not by providing an answer to "what is literature?" but by considering the strategies we use as readers to make meaning of literary texts. The focus will be less on what, than on how we read. The first half of the course will consider Edith Wharton's House of Mirth (1905) in light of five literary critical approaches: cultural, feminist, deconsructive, psychoanalytic, and marxist. How does the literary text change depending on our assumptions about what to read for? The second half will examine Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe (1719) in relation to various contemporary rewritings, by J.M. Coetzee in Foe, by Elizabeth Bishop in "Crusoe in England" and by Jamaica Kincaid in A Small Place. Why are certain stories told again and again? Assignments include a literary critical essay, a group presentation, and a take-home final.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 006 What Is Literature in the Americas?

Instructor(s): Lemuel A Johnson (eljay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do perceptions of "The Americas" differ, or converge, in the United States and Cuba, in Trinidad and Argentina, in Haiti and Brazil? What accounts for the ways in which "America" is thereafter translated into "Literature"? And how is this clarified by the narratives and plays and poetry that we get in, say, Nash Candelaria's Memories of the Alhambra and Jo Sinclair's The Changelings; in Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman, Earl Lovelace's Jobell and America and Philip Roth's Portnoy's Complaint ? We'll explore similar issues when we read Rosario Ferre's When Women Love Men and Hisaye Yamamoto's Seventeen Syllables. So too when we turn to Alejo Carpentier's Concierto Baroque, Derek Walcott's O Babylon!, and Jonathan Edwards' Sinners in the Hand of an Angry God."

These apparently similar and yet opposed stories about "America": what do they teach us about how "Literature" is defined in different places? And by whom? How does a Flannery O'Connor A Good Man Is Hard to Find get to be important, or forgotten, in one context, an Austin Clarke Growing Up Stupid Under the Union Jack in another, and a Herman Melville Bartleby, the Scrivener in yet another part of the New World?

Note: preceded by short informal reports (1-2 pages) on each reading, the "Final" for this course will be a comparative essay on any two of the regions that we'll cover during the academic term.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 007 What is literature? Examining the Body

Instructor(s): Rosemary Ann Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The generic title of this course, What is literature?, poses an intriguing question, one that has no simple or definitive answer. Nevertheless, we will discuss it and try to discern what literature IS and, perhaps, more importantly, what literature DOES. Can we define it? or do we just know it when we see it? Does it entertain? Does it instruct? And, if it instructs, just what kind of information does it convey? Aesthetic? Cultural? Social? Psychological? Historical? Like good detectives, we will be examining some small portion of the body of literature and drawing some theoretical conclusions about literature itself.

The course will focus on novels and short stories, primarily. However, we will also be looking at a few films and a play as other forms of literature. These various narrative forms or ways of telling stories have evolved over time to reflect changes in society and in men's and women's thinking and world views as well as changes in technology. This course is designed to trace those changes. Our readings may include some classic writers such as William Shakespeare, Jane Austen, Feodor Dostoevsky, and more modern or contemporary writers such as William Faulkner and Charles Baxter. (Specific titles are yet to be determined.) Requirements will include two short papers, a final exam, a reading journal, as well as enthusiastic and frequent participation in class discussions.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Joyce A Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course addresses how our expectations of literature are shaped by our assumptions about gender, ethnicity, and class. Who is literature for? What purpose does it serve? What makes a "good" story or novel, and how do we know this? How do specific literary periods and even technological developments (such as the invention of the computer) change our ideas of literature? How might each of us read a literary work differently, and why? This course also explores questions of literary genre, such as the thin line between autobiography and fiction, or between short stories and novels: for instance, is the difference just one of length? Can a series of short stories be a novel? Course books will be chosen from a list that may include but is not limited to: James Weldon Johnson's Autobiography of an Ex-Colored Man, William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon, Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart, Leslie Marmon Silko's Ceremony ,and Sandra Cisneros' The House on Mango Street. Students will write a number of informal responses as well as a midterm and three formal papers. Class participation and discussion are essential components of this course.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What a story means has a lot to do with how it's told. In this section of "What is Literature," we will explore some essential questions of contemporary literary discourse through the consideration of narrative and the delights and implications of the story-telling. Using as our main source what D.H.Lawrence called "the great book of life," the novel, we will look at the varied strategies authors employ to present their stories to their readers and how those strategies reflect the writers' ideology and culture. Writers speak to their culture and out of their culture, and thus we will situate our texts within the culture that produced them to examine the specifics of this interaction. I have chosen stories by some of my favorite authors including possibly Faulkner, Woolf, Hemingway, Brontë, Dickens, James, O'Brien, Morrison, Alexie, Banks and other, less-known contemporary writers. Requirements: two essays, a midterm, and a final; contributions to the discussion of class texts on the computer conference (COW); regular attendance, and active class participation in discussion.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 010 Narratives of Law and Literature.

Instructor(s): Julie Early (earlyj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines narrative to consider how two fundamental categories of human endeavor, the legal and literary, act and interact. In oral cultures, myths and stories often educated individuals and communities in important codes moral, social, medical, etc. and those functions did not cease entirely with the establishment of writing, or even the rise of institutions whose job it was to "give" law to the people. In classical literature and the development of Judeo-Christian thought what we now think of as literature was once a primary vehicle for promulgating and disseminating various forms of law. Modern artists (and philosophers, historians, and revolutionaries) continue to write texts that explore questions of justice, the nature of order, the sources of human conflict all problems often seen as the province of law. Conversely, legal discourse adopts narrative, particularly in the adversarial model of legal process where divergent narratives of truth compete, and where one may be found more believable, 'compelling', 'dramatic', even probable when it is inflected by aesthetic or structural standards derived from art and literature. This course will use Classical, Biblical, Renaissance, and nineteenth- and twentieth-century texts to examine these domains and their actions and interactions to consider the functions and properties of narrative. Major texts (whole or selections) may include Aeschylus, The Eumenides; Shakespeare, Measure for Measure; Robert Browning, The Ring and the Book; M. E. Braddon, Lady Audley's Secret; materials related to the Oscar Wilde trial; Hannah Arendt, Eichmann in Jerusalem; and assorted short pieces ranging from Bible passages to selections from trial transcripts and popular detective fiction. In addition to short response papers, written work will include three papers and two exams.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 011 The Family

Instructor(s): Brenda K Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What we call "family" is often based on our own experience. In this class we will explore various concepts of "family" through reading novels and short stories. We will begin setting the terms of our discussion with Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, and then move to 20th-century American literature. As we read Toni Morrison's Sula, Marilynne Robinson's Housekeeping, Michael Cunningham's Flesh and Blood, Edwidge Danticat's The Farming of Bones, and short stories by, among others, James Baldwin and Alice Walker, we will look at how notions of "family" are affected by gender, sexuality, race, and class. There will be three in-class essays and one term paper required. Class participation is essential.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 012.

Instructor(s): Lawrence K Beaston

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Our investigation of the nature of literature will pay particular attention to the role of the reader. How do authors engage their readers in the literary enterprise? How do authors prompt readers to assume certain attitudes or adopt certain positions? To what extent is the reader absolutely essential to the production of the literary work of art? To answer these questions, we shall study a variety of literary texts including Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, King Lear, Wilkie Collins' The Moonstone, and Toni Morrison's Beloved as well as short fiction by Herman Melville and Ambrose Bierce and poetry by John Donne and Robert Frost. In addition to four quizzes, you will be required to keep "field notes" and write a report on your reading experiences. Other requirements are two short papers (2 pages each), and one longer paper (7-10 pages).

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The first part of this course will concentrate on prosody the techniques of verse, how poems are put together, how they work. The second part will undertake a mini-history of English poetry, concentrating on some of the major poems from the Renaissance through the Modernists. There will be two exams, short daily writing assignments (a paragraph or so), and two five page analytical papers. The text will be the Norton Anthology of Poetry.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the art of poetry so that you can read and discuss any poem with understanding and delight. During the term, we will move from a general survey of poetic techniques and forms to a more detailed study of the work of a selection of authors from the Renaissance to the present. For the former, we will use Western Wind by John Frederick Nims. For the latter, we will use a course pack of selected poems. Formal writing will include three (ungraded) exercises in poetic analysis and four (graded) papers (3-5 pages) on individual authors and poems.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we shall study closely a variety of poems written in English from about 1600 to the present. The task of the course is a pleasurable and progressive understanding of how poems work, that is, what techniques poets use to articulate their visions of experience. We shall pay close attention to the language, forms, figures, and themes of verse, to literary-historical conditions that influence poetic craft, and to the intertextual connections that create constellations of poems across the centuries. The textbook, Norton Introduction to Poetry (seventh edition) by J. Paul Hunter, will be our chief reading, in addition to handouts. Because this is a discussion class, regular attendance and participation are required. Other requirements include a series of short papers, supplemented by a reading journal, a midterm, and a final examination.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Ejner J Jensen (ejjensen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course, a prerequisite for concentrators in English, is an introduction to English and American poetry. In this section, students will read a wide variety of poems drawn from WESTERN WIND, ed. J.F. Nims. I shall be organizing the course according to poetic kinds or themes, working chronologically within each category. Occasional brief lectures will serve to direct and focus discussion, which will be the primary method of instruction. Student responsibilities in the course include the following: three or four in-class writing exercises, one or two oral reports, a long end-of-term essay, and a final examination. Regular class attendance is required, and each student's contribution to class discussion will be a factor in the assignment of grades.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Marjorie Levinson (cecily@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to acquaint you with writers, works, poetic forms, styles, and themes that until quite recently defined the "tradition" of British Romantic (1780's-1830's) poetry. In order to appreciate the specificity of the nontraditional literatures studied in many courses today, one must know the literature against or in relation to which those maverick or marginal forms defined themselves. I plan to highlight the self-critical effects in the mainstream poetries we'll be studying that is, their way of actively destabilizing many of the values and positions they undertake to endorse. In the end, you will see that the difference between canonical and non-canonical texts can often be a function of how we read and position them what work we ask them to do and not a result of internal features, either ideological or formal. Selections will be taken from Romanticism, An Anthology, Duncan, Wu ed.; requirements to consist of weekly critical questions and comments, two short essays, and one research paper.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 006.

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A course in ways to understand, feel, enjoy, evaluate, and interpret poems. Poetry differs from ordinary language and from prose in certain fairly conventional and (for poetry) advantageous ways, and we shall try to understand how it does so. As we look at and hear poems, we shall consider such things as sound, diction, rhythm, figures of speech, the line, form, genre, authorship, audience, and context. Our readings will come from various cultures, old and now; most readings will be British and American, most of these recent or contemporary. We'll pay some attention to the histories of poetry, and try to get a feel for the contemporary poetry scene. Texts: an Introduction to Poetry book and an anthology, both in course pack form. Everyone will write three essays on increasingly challenging topics. There will be a test on "technical terms," another on the course readings, and a final exam asking for the interpretation and evaluation of some new poetry.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 007.

Instructor(s): James Boyd White (jbwhite@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to learn to read poetry by doing it together. We shall give close attention to a series of poems drawn from different periods. Our focus will be on what makes each poem work as a poem: its formal and metric structure, its imagery, the tension between its rhythms and those of ordinary speech, its tones of voice and imagined speakers, its ironies, ambiguities, allusions, and surprises. Our central questions will be what kind of meaning each poem has and how that meaning is made. During the course you will be exposed to many different forms of poetry and many different authors. This is a discussion class and accordingly your attendance and participation are strictly required. There will be three short papers, a midterm, a final, and a series of short exercises. The text is the Norton Anthology of English Poetry.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Jennifer L Shelton (sheltonj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This discussion-based class will aim to increase both your love of poetry and your ability to understand and explain how poems work, both orally and in writing. We won't attempt a universal history of poetry but instead will focus on a few forms, movements, and poets in order to develop points of comparison. You will write frequently in a number of genres: brief essays explicating individual short poems, at least one longer analytical/argumentative essay, and an informal web-based discussion group. As a likely final project, you will construct your own anthology with introduction, annotations, and footnotes.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 009.

Instructor(s): Xavier Nicholas (xas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this section of English 240, we will approach poetry as a "pleasurable" activity which exercises our intelligence and imagination in a dynamic and disciplined way. We will explore the richness and diversity of poetry written in English, focusing on the form as well as the content of specific poems. During the term, we will move from a general survey of poets in The Norton Anthology of Poetry to a brief but detailed study of the works of two African-American poets, Gwendolyn Brooks and Robert Hayden. We will also examine how the study of poetry can liberate and broaden our experience of ourselves and the world we inhabit. Requirements include regular attendance and active participation in class, four short papers, and a final exam.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 010.

Instructor(s): Lyall H Powers (lhpowers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Poetry at its best is a mode of human communication, both vocal and scriptural, the aim of which is not the imparting of information per se like "Directions" on a soup can or "Instructions" for an erector set but rather intellectual and emotional engagement with some important human concern like love, folly, death, fun, etc. We will begin by looking at kinds of poems and how they work like learning the rules and techniques of basketball or chess or dancing (and other pleasurable activities); then we will look at the range of treatment given those "human concerns" in poems written over the centuries. We will consider particularly how poems communicate what they want to engage us in and entertain us with. We will discuss these matters in class, write about them in a few short exercises (2 pp. each) and a couple of little essays (5 pp. each), and commit some good poetic example (say 50 lines) to memory. The course has little practical use: it just helps you understand human creatures (including yourself) and how they interact with each other merely educational. Text: The Norton Anthology of Poetry, shorter ed.

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ENGLISH 245/RC Hums. 280/Theatre 211. Introduction to Drama and Theatre.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert J Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in RC Hums. 281. (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 211.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 270. Introduction to American Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will undertake an intensive study of four of the major American novels of the 19th century: Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, Melville's Moby Dick, Twain's Huckleberry Finn and Henry James' Portrait of a Lady. We will read some other works (important in themselves), but primarily to help illuminate the "big four": e.g., some of Hawthorne's tales of the Puritans, Twain's Tom Sawyer, James' Daisy Miller. There will be frequent short written reading responses, some in-class, some take-home; two 4-5 page papers; and two exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 299. Directed Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 308. History of the English Language.

Section 001 Satisfies the Pre-1600 English concentration requirement.

Instructor(s): Richard W Bailey (rwbailey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How did English, which began as a dialect of German, become the distinct and very different language now spoken around the world among an unprecedently multicultural diversity of people? You might be surprised to learn that "girl" could once refer to a boy or that a "nice" person was just plain picky and maybe not very nice at all. English is full of such surprises. Far from a stable and unchanging language, English has altered drastically since the fifth century when we can first discern its beginnings. Our course will explore the history of English from those beginnings to the present, including changes in sounds, vocabulary, grammar, and meaning. We will use C.M. Millward's Biography of the English Language with an exercise book and a course pack. Requirements include: participation in class, weekly exercises, two short papers, and a midterm and final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 313. Topics in Literary Studies.

Section 001 Science Fiction.

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an elective course for upperclasspersons. We will examine both the history and the diversity of science fiction prose by reading a representative international sampling of some of the best examples written since the beginning of the nineteenth century. Generally, we will approach each primary text in three ways: through a consideration of its backgrounds (scientific, mythic, and so forth), through specific questions the text raises (moral questions, questions of plausibility, and so forth), and through the traditional discipline of criticism (what is science fiction? what is the relationship of character to theme? and so forth). The written work for the course will revolve around weekly, short papers, and two longer papers. There are no exams. Authors studied include Mary Shelley, Poe, Hawthorne, Wells, Zamiatin, Capek, Stapledon, Bradbury, Clarke, Miller, Dick, LeGuin, Lem, and Gibson.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 315/WS 315. Women and Literature.

Section 001 20th-Century Women's Literature. Satisfies the New Traditions and American Literature requirement for the English concentration.

Instructor(s): Sara B Blair (sbblair@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended as a survey of the developing traditions of women's writing in the U.S. and beyond throughout the last century. We'll spend time not only with the major literary genres (novels, poems, drama, short fiction, autobiography) and some popular ones (romance, film, hypertext), but also with different ways of thinking historically, critically, textually about women and the writing they produce and read. Some of our key questions: What counts as literature? How does it differ from popular or mass fiction? What strategies do women writers adopt to address particular aspects of their shared or their nationally or ethnically particular experience? Do women readers have distinctive strategies or interests; why and how do they read? Authors will most likely include Edith Wharton, Zora Neale Hurston, Sylvia Plath, Grace Paley, and Gish Jen; requirements, a midterm and final, readings journals, and short and long formal essays.

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ENGLISH 315/WS 315. Women and Literature.

Section 002 Women Poets & Feminist Critics. Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for the English concentration.

Instructor(s): Johanna H Prins (yprins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Over the past three decades, feminist critics have turned to women poets to explore questions about female subjectivity, to construct alternative literary traditions, and to imagine the possibilities for a feminist poetics.

In this course, we will read women's poetry from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries alongside recent critical essays, in order to analyze and historicize different ideas about "the woman poet." We will consider how and why particular women poets (such as Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Emily Dickinson, H.D., Sylvia Plath, Adrienne Rich, Eavan Boland, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Rita Dove) have become significant figures within feminist literary criticism.

Our goal throughout the academic term will be to develop critical skills and appreciation for the complexity of writing in (and on) poetry by women. Course requirements will include two 7-8 page papers, several informal writing assignments, participation in a student panel, and regular attendance. No final exam.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 001 Modern Jewish Literature. Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for the English concentration.

Instructor(s): Judith Nysenholc (jnysenho@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will study selected texts written by Jews from the mid-nineteenth century until the eve of World War II, a period marked by the breakdown of traditional Jewish culture and by the construction and questioning of modern Jewish identities. To explore this cultural landscape that transcends linguistic and national boundaries, we will ask such questions as: how can we define Jewish literature? How is Jewish modernity understood and configured in these texts? How do writers from the Diaspora relate to a Jewish homeland, to Jewish tradition and history, to other national literatures, to the various languages in which they write? Possible authors will include: Sholem Aleykhem, I.L. Peretz, Franz Kafka, Isaac Babel, Bruno Schulz, Marcel Proust, H.N. Bialik, S.Y. Agnon, I.B. Singer, Else Lasker-Schuler, Gertrud Kolmar, Anzia Yezierska, Kadya Molodovsky. When appropriate, we will also draw on examples from film, music, and the visual arts. Requirements: participation, one group-led discussion (if class size permits), frequent short response papers, one longer paper, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2-3 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 002 Readings in Irish Literature

Instructor(s): Richard W Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How is it that this island nation with a population, north and south, of less than five million, has produced some of the most beautiful and powerful writing the world has seen? In this class we will get a sense of the history of Irish literature by reading a selection of fiction from the 19th century and before. Then we will take on the 20th century, when most of Ireland's literary masterpieces have been written. Among the books we will read are the novel Amongst Women by John McGahern, a novel and short stories by two Anglo-Irish cousins who collaborated under the name Somerville & Ross, a selection of poetry, and short stories by William Trevor. There will be brief weekly quizzes, one short paper, a midterm, and a final exam. Irish traditional music will be played every day before class begins, and one or two films will be shown. The class is taught in a multimedia format.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 003 Women, Autobiography & the Medical Body. Meets with Women's Studies 483.001.

Instructor(s): Sidonie A Smith (sidsmith@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Women's Studies 483.001.

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ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 004 Gothic Myth in Literature and Film

Instructor(s): Alan B Howes (ahowes@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Each age has its own myths, reflecting its aspiration and its fears. We will examine some Gothic myths, mainly from the 19th and 20th centuries, which are embodied in horror literature and films and represent changing cultural attitudes. Readings will include, but not be limited to these key texts: Dante's Inferno, Frankenstein, Dracula, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Heart of Darkness. In addition to film versions of these books, we will view some of these other films: Cocteau's Beauty and the Beast, The Company of Wolves, An American Werewolf in London, King Kong, Freaks, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, Apocalypse Now. Six hours a week are scheduled to accommodate a few longer films, but most meetings will be shorter. The format of the class will combine mini-lectures with class discussion. There will be several short papers and a final examination.

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ENGLISH 318. Literary Types.

Section 001 The Art of the Tale

Instructor(s): Reginald McKnight (regmc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores and analyses the shorter forms of prose fiction, including anecdotes, parables, short stories, frame-stories, urban legends and long-form jokes. The majority of the works we shall discuss are those written between 1920 and today. The writers we will read and discuss are Margaret Atwood, John Cheever, Richard Wright, Ilse Aichenger, Joyce Carol Oates, E.L. Doctorow, Raymond Carver, Chinua Achebe, James Baldwin, Alice Walker, Milan Kundera, Luisa Valenzuela, and many others.

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ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 001 Theater and Social Change

Instructor(s): William R Alexander (alexi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course teaches students how to use their creative skills and social commitments to facilitate the powerful expressiveness of high school youth and of incarcerated youth and adults. In-class exercises, improvisations, and discussion of theater and pedagogical texts prepare us to assist workshop participants in imagining and shaping their own plays. Students will work an average of two to three hours a week in one of a number of state correctional facilities located in Adrian, Coldwater, Detroit, Jackson, Ionia, Ypsilanti, Saginaw, and Plymouth, or at Henry Ford High School in Detroit, or at one of four juvenile training schools or centers. An additional two hours is spent in class meetings, and a further hour is devoted to meetings between each site team and the instructor. No exams. Admission to the class is by permission of instructor. Check 3275 Angell for specially posted hours for interviews for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 319. Literature and Social Change.

Section 002 Life Stories. Satisfies the New Traditions and American Literature requirement for the English concentration.

Instructor(s): Joyce A Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As a course that engages students in the process of collecting and writing life-stories, including their own, this class is tied to the Liz Lerman "Hallelujah Project" and current residency; Lerman is a nationally known choreographer who specializes in community dance. Lerman's work (and this course) is based on the premise that community-shared art can change lives. As part of the Lerman project, students in this course will make several visits to a designated Detroit site such as an elderly home, an after-school program, or a community center, in order to do oral histories and help facilitate writing workshops with Detroit city residents. Students will also have the opportunity to observe and dance with Lerman and her troupe in that same Detroit setting; then the students will help document through writing the Lerman experience. In the classroom itself, students will begin to write their own life-stories, as they read and comment on the autobiographically-based work of such writers as Maya Angelou, Sandra Cisneros, N. Scott Momaday, and Mary Karr. We will focus on how differences in race, ethnicity, gender, and physical ability inform life-stories. We will address such questions as: how is life-story linked to body, place, and tradition? How do people sort and make sense of their lives? What do they choose to remember and to tell? What is left out of their stories, and why? How do communal and individual stories differ, and what do they share? No prior dance experience is needed for this course (indeed, many of our Detroit partners have none, and your instructor has very little). Students will be assessed on the quality of their participation (both in and out of class) and especially, on their written contributions. The writing will include a number of smaller (1-page) responses that form the basis for the student's individual, larger (@ 8-page) life-story, as well as a communal, documentary work (such as an exhibit, film, or performance), that will involve our Detroit partners and Lerman's troupe as well.

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 001 Fiction

Instructor(s): Brenda K Marshall (bkmarsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this workshop we will focus on writing fiction, studying short stories selected from an anthology titled You've Got to Read This, and critiquing one another's works with thoughtfulness and intelligence. Evaluation will be based on workshop participation, written critiques, and a final fiction portfolio of approximately forty pages.

In order to enroll in this course, students need

  1. Waitlist on Wolverine Access
  2. Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 AH by noon on Thursday, January 4th, 2001 which is the first day of class for the Winter Term
  3. When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form.

You will be notified by the Department of acceptance or non-acceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 002, 003 Fiction

Instructor(s): Patricia T O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required.

In order to enroll in this course, students need

  1. Waitlist on Wolverine Access
  2. Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 AH, by noon on Thursday, January 4, 2001.
  3. When you bring in your portfolio, please complete the 323 registration form.

You will be notified by the Department of acceptance or non-aceptance into the course, shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 004 Fiction

Instructor(s): Peter Ho Davies (phdavies@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an intermediate course in the writing (and reading) of short fiction. The primary focus of the class will be on original student work, but we'll also study a variety of published contemporary stories. Students will be required to write 2-3 complete stories for the workshop, and revise them by the end of the academic term. Brief weekly critiques of stories to be discussed and regular short writing exercises will also be assigned. Reading will consist of three to four stories each week. Required Text: Vintage Book of Contemporary American Short Stories ed. Tobias Woolf.

In order to enroll in this course, students need to:

  1. Waitlist on Wolverine Access
  2. Submit a 10-15 page portfolio of poetry or prose to the Main Office, room 3187 AH by noon the first day of the term, Thursday, January 4, 2001.

You will be notified by the Department of acceptance or non-acceptance into the course shortly after.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 005 Poetry

Instructor(s): Ian Stuart Twiss (reedtwis@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (3). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The commitment of this course is that you will learn to write powerful, courageous poetry that conveys what matters deeply to you in a way that moves your reader. The focus, therefore, is primarily on work generated by you and other class participants. You can expect to write roughly one poem per week throughout the term and to participate in numerous written and oral "workshops" of your own and other students' work during the academic term. These workshops are designed to provide constructive, respectful, inspiring feedback to encourage strengths and strengthen weaknesses in your work. In addition, I will provide individual feedback on your work. Poetry assignments will allow you the freedom to write what moves you, while sometimes bringing your focus to bear on certain aspects of poetry (sound, imagery, form, etc.) All this work will culminate in a final portfolio of 25-30 pages of revised poetry on which your grade will be primarily based. (Class participation and preparedness will play an important role as well.)

In addition to student work, we will read and discuss a number of published poems, mostly from the 20th-21st Century, dissecting them from a practical point-of-view: to learn what they can teach us about craft, emotion, and honesty as well as to get moved and inspired by them. Other class work will likely include small-group presentations, writing assignments and exercises, and other activities designed to release inhibitions and teach certain concepts experientially. You will also attend and write brief evaluations of at least 3 poetry readings during the academic term.

Students in this course are particularly encouraged to take emotional risks in their work: to learn to recognize and write about material that they find compelling, and maybe even a little scary, to explore. The class operates on the premise that this is ultimately the most fulfilling kind of work to do, for you and for your reader. Bring your enthusiasm and your sense of humor.

This course is a permission of Instructor only course. In order to be considered for admittance into the course, please bring a 10-15 page portfolio to room 3187 Angell Hall, the main office of the English Department, by noon on January 4, 2001. You will be informed of admittance or non-admittance into the class shortly after via e-mail.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 001 The Mask

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Our understanding of the many "faces" we wear in our lives will be the subject of our discussions. If our discussions prove fruitful-and they will-our writing class will explore some of the strategies enacted by our favorite, most effective, writers. I hope we will come to see "the mask" as less a manipulative and negative feature in our lives and our writing and more as a creative and artful agency of the freedom to imagine. But whatever the outcome, we want to make the analysis of the concept of the mask an enlightening journey. Each student will be responding to that journey by writing exploratory essays; the student will determine the nature of the subject of those essays. Five essays and a weekly response will be required. Readings will consist of mostly 20th century prose: fiction, essays, memoirs-and of course our own writing. (Back)

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 002 About Writing

Instructor(s): Rosemary Ann Kowalski (rkowalsk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The links between writing and literature are many, and, in this course, we will be examining and emulating the various ways people write about literature or write literature itself. English concentrators are the presumed constituency for this course, but the course is not limited to them. Anyone who wants to improve his or her writing is encouraged to enroll. Students will be able to choose from the following possible assignments: a literary analysis, a literature review, a personal essay, a (small) literary research project, a piece on composition, a short story, a collaborative piece of writing. We will be focusing on grammar and mechanics, on polishing the style and the gracefulness of our sentences, as well as larger rhetorical and pedagogical issues. Students will write about 30 pages of prose that has been revised several times and a number of short, two-page peer critiques. Readings will include essays, a few short stories, a novel, and some journal articles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 003.

Instructor(s): Edith K Livesay (jlivesay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to provide opportunities for students to learn to write with increased insight, power, and assurance. Given that goal, I've tried to create a course (1) that gives students much writing practice (though not always as formal papers), (2) that allows students to work independently on topics of their own choosing, (3) that offers examples and inspiration from some of the finest prose stylists, and (4) that keeps the whole class sharing ideas and helping each other with writing throughout the term. Readings, discussion, in-class writings, and workshopping of one another's papers will be the primary focus in the classroom. Attendance and participation are essential, given the collaborative nature of the work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 004, 005, 006.

Instructor(s): John W Rubadeau (jwr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Much like the English 225 courses I have taught over the last dozen years, this course in Persuasive Writing will focus on (1) improving your vocabulary, (2) strengthening your grammatical, mechanical, semantical, and syntactical skills, and (3) helping you find your voice. I insist that you make the private public (ideally, to illustrate a universal truth or a general principle) in order that you establish your authority to comment on the topic of your essay, that you pen an essay which is not generic, and, most importantly, that you write with a human voice (not dead, wooden prose written by an obscurantist majoring in philosophy [mea culpa to any philosophy major reading this course description]). Although this course is not difficult, it is perhaps the most labor-intensive course you will take. Quid pro quo be prepared to bust ass for me, and, in the process, you'll learn much about writing. The reading material for this course is your peers' writing. This will be a fun, interesting, profitable, and practical course.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 007 A Nation of Immigrants. Satisfies the New Traditions requirement for the English concentration

Instructor(s): Merla Wolk (merla@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Central to the myth of the American Dream is the construct of the immigrant, those "tired" and "poor," welcomed to our shores, expecting to find "streets paved with gold," and "life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness" limited only by their own energy and desire. Not surprisingly, some of America's most compelling literature is about and by immigrants who write of the promise and disappointment of that dream and of the inevitable conflicts between old world ethics and new. This composition class will make their writings and the essays you compose in response to their ideas its focus. We will read texts by Alvaraz, Rodriguez, Doctorow, Morrison, Alexie, Hong Kingston, Chang-Rae Lee and other professional writers and by the writers in this class. Requirements include three 6-8 page essays, responses to each others' essays, active participation in class discussion, and regular attendance.

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ENGLISH 327/Theatre 327. Playwriting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Wendy Hammond (wham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Engl. 227. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 327.001.

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ENGLISH 351. Literature in English after 1660.

Section 001 Originality and Modernity

Instructor(s): David W Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Here we examine British literary texts from the late 17th century to the present. As a survey, the course takes up traditional period designations such as Restoration, Romanticism, and Modernism, and follows developments in literary genres, especially the rise of the novel during this time. The lectures develop a specific thematic claim as well namely, that our ideas of originality are linked to some problematic issues of modern selfhood. How can we strike a balance between self-assertion and community-based identity? Do we lose ourselves in traditions or find ourselves there? What is at stake in our interest in originality? And how does modern literature take up these issues? Texts in several genres drama, poetry, the novel, film with authors including Etherege, Defoe, Dickens, Wilde, and Woolf. Two exams; two papers.

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ENGLISH 368. Shakespeare and his Contemporaries.

Section 001 Histories Great and Small. Satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement of the English concentration.

Instructor(s): Steven Mullaney (mullaney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A study of major dramatic works by contemporaries of Shakespeare, along with a few Shakespearean plays selected to highlight the energetic dialogue between very different playwrights. This course can be taken either as a sequel or as an alternative to 367. Although we will be reading the plays intensively as literary works, we will also be considering social and political issues in Elizabethan and Jacobean England in order to clarify the complex engagement of the stage with cultural controversies of the period. For W2001, the course will be tied into the RSC production of Shakespeare's Henry VI plays and Richard III, along with other plays based on actual events or persons such as Edward II, Arden of Faversham, The Changeling, The Duchess of Malfi, and The Roaring Girl (available at Shaman Drum Bookshop). There will be a midterm and a final exam, as well as two relatively short essays.

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ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 001 History of Early English Poetry. Satisfies the Pre-1600 English concentration requirement

Instructor(s): Macklin Smith (macklins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

After a brief survey of English prose from the 14th to the 18th Century, we shall study the following forms from the same period: alliterative verse, rhymed couplets, various stanza forms, sonnets, and blank verse (narratives and plays). The emphasis will be on shifts of style through time, on trying to define and explain these shifts in terms of cultural forces and authorial talents. Poets will include Langland, Chaucer, Sidney, Spenser, Shakespeare, Donne, Milton, Swift, and Pope. Everyone will need to learn to read Middle English, to scan verse, and to gain familiarity with various terms for characterizing poetic style. Everyone will be asked to engage in detailed textual analysis as well as to write on broader issues. Required texts: The Norton Anthology of Literature, Vol. I, and a course pack. (Smith, M.)

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ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 002 New Literary Histories. (Honors). Satisfies the Pre-1600 and New Traditions requirements for the English concentration.

Instructor(s): Theresa L Tinkle (tinkle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an English Honors course; you will need the permission of the Instructor in order to register.

What did women write before 1660? How did that compare with men's writing? How were minorities defined? What did books look like before the invention of the printing press? How did the printing press change the way we read? This course explores the new literary histories that attempt to answer these questions. We will read several kinds of literary history, seeking to understand the value and limitations of each. At the same time, we will engage the literary texts emphasized by particular histories. Finally, we will examine early manuscript and print versions of some works in order to determine how material forms shaped early readers' interpretations and how those forms can help us to appreciate literary works' historical potential for meaning. Course requirements: active participation in discussions, reading response papers, peer critiques, and two short essays.

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ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 003 THE COURAGE TO BE: HEROES AND HEROINES IN MEDIEVAL AND EARLY MODERN ENGLISH LITERATURE. Satisfies the Pre-1600 requirement for the English concentration.

Instructor(s): Lawrence K Beaston (beaston@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is courage? How has it been portrayed in literary works, including but not limited to stories of warrior heroes? What circumstances call forth courageous action? Do narratives featuring courageous protagonists reinforce or undermine the socio-cultural status quo? Our search for answers to these questions will be the occasion for our study of several medieval and early modern literary texts. The reading list will include such works as Beowulf (in translation), Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Chaucer's Book of the Duchess, and The Book of Margery Kempe as well as Shakespeare's Richard II and Henry V. Besides becoming proficient in reading Middle English, you will write two short essays (2 pages), one longer paper (7-10 pages), and two examinations. You should also be prepared for lively class discussion and several short writing assignments.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 001 Literature of Eighteenth-Century Britain. (Honors). Satisfies the Pre-1830 English concentration requirement

Instructor(s): David L Porter (dporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an English Honors course; you will need the permission of the Instructor in order to register.

The eighteenth century was a period of profound cultural change, witnessing the emergence of a consumer society, the rise of the middle class, the consolidation of empire, and transformative debates over questions of taste, luxury, gender roles, and religion. These historical phenomena were closely tied to equally significant developments in the literary landscape. While most commonly associated with the rise of the English novel, the long eighteenth century also encompasses the Restoration's revival of the English stage, the emergence of the periodical essay as a powerful cultural force, the poetic triumphs of the Augustans, the first successful comic opera in English, the invention of gothic fiction, and the first stirrings of romanticism. This course will offer an in-depth exploration of representative works from a variety of genres in the period with the aim of understanding their structure and content, their relationship to their historical context, and their importance in the evolution of literary forms. The class will be conducted as a seminar with an emphasis on discussion. Coursework will include essays, an oral presentation, and the option of a collaborative web-based final research project.

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ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 002.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 001 Victorian Children's Literature and Modernist Experiments

Instructor(s): Jennifer L Shelton (sheltonj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"The question is," said Alice, "whether you can make words mean so many things." "The question is," replied Humpty Dumpty, "which is to be master that's all." New readers of modern texts those written in the period 1890 to 1940, roughly may find themselves seconding the question Alice so sensibly posits in Through the Looking Glass. They may also, though, discover a certain affinity with Humpty Dumpty's reading strategy. Is reading a contest, as Humpty Dumpty implies? If so, who are the contestants, and how does one determine a winner? And if it's a contest, is it playful, or deadly earnest?

Somewhere between a traditional survey course and a theme course, this class will sample literature in a number of genres from the period. Included in the preliminary reading list are such texts as Alice in Wonderland, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, To the Lighthouse, The Importance of Being Earnest, and Travesties. We'll also read a selection of poetry. (The texts are drawn from the period 1865-last week, but expect emphasis on the modern period and on British and Irish writers.) Writing requirements include two formal papers, one short (5-6 pages) and the other longer (10-12 pages), participation in a web-based discussion, ad hoc informal writing, and an essay exam.

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ENGLISH 387/Amer. Cult. 327. Latino/Latina Literature of the U.S.

Section 001 Chicano/a Narrative. Satisfies the New Traditions and American Literature English requirements

Instructor(s): John Moran Gonzalez (jmgonzal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will consider the relationship between Chicana/o literary productions and the social conditions and possibilities of its production since the early '60s. Topics will include: cultural nationalism as a response to structural racism, the articulations of literary form and cultural nationalism during the Chicano Renaissance and after, the fate of both texts and their producers within various institutions, the gendered division of literary labor and the feminist critique of nationalist aesthetics, and queer transformations of the Chicano/a literary landscape.

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ENGLISH 401/Rel. 481. The English Bible: Its Literary Aspects and Influences, I.

Section 001 This course no longer fulfills the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Bible is a book, a text: it is also a collection of texts of the most astonishing variety and range. Our first task will be to try to understand these works in terms both of form and content and then of the circumstances which occasioned and shaped them. We will also study how the Bible came to have its present form(s), and consider its transmission as text and as cultural influence. Students will be encouraged to study especially the literary influences of the Bible in authors of interest to them. The particular readings will be influenced by class needs: we shall surely include Genesis, Exodus, Job, the Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, Isiah, Hosea, Mark, The Acts of the Apostles, Romans, and the Apocalypse. Writing Requirements: three essays of moderate length, a midterm and a final. Class attendance and participation essential. This course no longer meets the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 414. Multimedia Explorations in the Humanities.

Section 001 Multimedia Explorations

Instructor(s): Eric S Rabkin (esrabkin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of Instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

MULTIMEDIA EXPLORATIONS is a three credit hour course that offers students the opportunity to work in groups creating and/or augmenting web-based resources for the study of a humanities topic of their choice. Students may register in groups with the mentorship of any collaborating faculty member or register singly and form partnering and, if needed, mentoring relationships. All students will study in the field of their chosen group, learn modern information technology, and use that technology to produce materials that become part of on-going resources for use by themselves and others. Reading, writing, and production requirements will be adjusted to the backgrounds of each student and the needs of each group. A typical minimum requirement is the equivalent of reading five books in the field of choice (e.g., 18th century satire or The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood), mastering at least three substantial programs (e.g., Flash or Photoshop), and producing the multimedia equivalent of 30 pages of revised, researched prose.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 001 Literature and the Law.

Instructor(s): Peter M Bauland (pbauland@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

From antiquity to the present, artists have been irresistibly drawn to the law as an institution and justice as an ethical concept as thematic material for their story telling. Based on intensive reading of works by or from Aeschylus, Sophocles, the Apocrypha, Shakespeare, Melville, Schnitzler, Kafka, Koestler, Camus, R. Shaw, and P. Roth, our discussions will examine how these selections treat the legal process as an object of analytical interest in itself, as an example of procedurally and ethically complex social phenomena, and as a testing ground for propositions of morality. We will also study two films. Limited class size should allow each student a chance to lead discussion. Requirements: one short paper, a longer critical/analytical essay, and your actively, intelligently participating presence. We will study how some artists' fascination with the law helps us come to terms with themes of ethical content within a social context.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 002 Early Modern Literature of Travel. Meets with Comparative Literature 410.001. Satisfies the Pre-1830 English concentration requirement

Instructor(s): David L Porter (dporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Ideas of the foreign exerted a profound influence on the literary imagination of early modern Europe. In this course we will explore the development of this fascination with travel, cultural difference, and the related tropes of the journey and exile. We will consider a wide range of fictional, dramatic, and descriptive works by major British and French writers of the period, possibly including Shakespeare, Bunyan, Defoe, Graffigny, Swift, Montesquieu, Johnson, Diderot, Montagu, and Voltaire. We will consider topics including the use of travel narrative as a form of social commentary, the role of travel accounts in the development of Enlightenment thought, the aesthetics of the exotic, and relations of power and mastery in encounters with the cultural "other." The class will be conducted as a seminar with an emphasis on discussion. Coursework includes short essays, an oral presentation, and the option of a collaborative, web-based final research project. No previous background in the period is required.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 003 The Language of Poetry

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the use of language in poetry and the relationship between this language and more general concerns biology, psychology, culture, history, and art. Readings will be drawn from various sources linguistics, poetics, stylistics, literary theory, criticism, aesthetics, and cultural and literary history. Early in the academic term, class discussion will focus on these readings. Class time at the end of the academic term will be devoted to presentations of seminar projects. The major requirement for the course will be an extended research paper on some aspect of the language of poetry.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 004 Jewish Culture in America:1945 to the Present. Satisfies the New Traditions and American Literaure requirements for the concentration in English.

Instructor(s): Julian A Levinson (jlevinso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Beginning with the rise of the "New York intellectuals" and concluding with the Klezmer revival, this senior seminar traces the development of Jewish culture in America during the last half century. We will examine a wide range of cultural forms including literary works, essays, plays, films, stand-up comedy, and musical recordings. Among the themes to be discussed are the tensions between "high" and popular culture, American assimilation and its discontents, classical Jewish themes in modern forms, and the problem of representing the Holocaust. Among the figures we will consider are Alfred Kazin, Micky Katz, Grace Paley, Saul Bellow, Lenny Bruce, Philip Roth, Allen Ginsberg, Cynthia Ozick, Art Spiegelman, Irene Klepfitz, and Tony Kushner. Students will write a number of short response papers and one 8-12 page paper.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 005 Imitation & Inspiration: The History of the Short Story.

Instructor(s): Peter Ho Davies (phdavies@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This survey of the history of short fiction will consider work by Gogol, Turgenev, Poe, Kafka, Borges, Chekhov, Maupassant, Babel, Anderson, Mansfield, Colette, Joyce, Hemingway, Mishima, and O'Connor. We'll trace the historical development of the short story form with particular attention to the issue of influence: how some of these writers influenced each other, and how they might continue to influence writers today. Students will write regular brief exercises imitating the style/technique of the writers discussed as well as 2-3 essays or stories responding to/inspired by the works considered. Required Text: Course pack

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 006 Literature in the USA and in Africa. Satisfies the New Traditions and the American Literature requirement for the concentration in English.

Instructor(s): Lemuel A Johnson (eljay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As though in response to the now famous Los Angeles Rebellion question, "Can We All Get Along?", we'll compare and contrast the ways in which writers in the United States and writers in Africa have engaged problems of ethnicity and sexual identity, of class and race. Accordingly, we will work in fiction, drama, and poetry to link up a Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby with a Cheikh Hamidou Kane Ambiguous Adventure; a Nawal Saadawi The Fall of the Imam & an Ama Ata Aidoo, Our Sister Killjoy with a Kate Chopin, The Awakening. Or else an Emily Dickinson and a Toni Morrison, The Bluest Eye with a Mariama Ba, So Long A Letter. Elsewhere, we'll see if we can, or should, relate the Southern USA that we get in William Faulkner, Light in August and Dorothy Allison, Bastard Out of Carolina with the South Africa of J.M. Coetzee, Waiting for the Barbarians, and Athol Fugard, Statements Following an Arrest Under the Immorality Acts.

In addition, what insights would we get from pairing up Walt Whitman's Americanism with Leopold Sedar Senghor's Negritude? Also relevant and via Leslie Silko and Chinua Achebe, or through Yambo Ouologuem, Bound to Violence and Gerald Vizenor, Heirs of Columbus,: How do native cultures in America and Africa recall being discovered, colonized, and converted by Judaeo-Christianity and by Islam?

Note: Final Project for this course will be a 15-page comparative essay. This will be preceded by short (1-2-page) informal reports on assigned readings, and by a 5-page midterm essay.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 007 REIMAGINING PLACE

Instructor(s): John R Knott Jr (jknott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Recollecting that we once lived in places is part of our contemporary self-discovery. It grounds what it means to be 'human'" (Gary Snyder).

What gives places identity and meaning for us? How do we reimagine them in different times and circumstances? How does memory affect our sense of place? We will address these and related questions through readings in poetry, fiction, and non-fiction prose, using a course pack, a special issue of the MICHIGAN QUARTERLY REVIEW on place, and texts representative of the best in contemporary nature writing, by writers including Edward Abbey, Wendell Berry, Gary Snyder, N. Scott Momaday, Linda Hogan, Barry Lopez, and Terry Tempest Williams. The work of the course will include a sense of place map (an exercise in recreating childhood places), weekly journal entries, and a final paper.

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ENGLISH 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Nicholas F Delbanco (delbanco@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A workshop course in the nature and technique of prose fiction. Classroom discussion will focus on student work with an average expectation of 10,000 words to be submitted during the term. Revision, written critiques of the work of other seminar participants; attendance at the Visiting Writer Series of readings will also be expected. Permission of Instructor required. Students who wish to enroll in the course should get on the Wait List on Wolverine Access, then bring a manuscript for review to the first class session. A list of admittees will be posted soon thereafter.

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ENGLISH 423. The Writing of Fiction.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Patricia T O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to seniors and graduate students; written permission of the instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students are expected to maintain journals throughout the term, to comment thoughtfully and intelligently on one another's work and on short stories selected from the text, and, to come up with forty pages of reasonably polished fiction. Attendance at the 4-5 readings sponsored by the English Department is also required. Students who want to enroll in the course should get on the waitlist on Wolverine Access and bring a manuscript to class the first evening. A list of those admitted will be posted shortly thereafter. (O'Dowd)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 425. Advanced Essay Writing.

Section 001 My Life/Our World: The Arc of Narration in Essay Writing

Instructor(s): Lillian L Back (lillianb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors and graduate students. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Why you're only a sort of thing in his dream" says Tweedledum to Alice in Through The Looking Glass. "If that King was to wake you'd go out -BANG-just like a candle!"

In out discussions, we want to see how we create and recreate ourselves. The relationship between imagination and reality will be at the center of our exploration. We want, for example to see how we "write" our own "characters," our own worlds. Moreover, in the process of analysis, we want to uncover the connections between MY private life and OUR shared world. Although our writing may begin with our own experience we hope to find ways in which we can create a rhetorical "I" who tells our tales with a convincing voice, a voice that finds a home in our reader's heart. Five essays and a weekly response will be required. Our readings will consist of contemporary authors: fiction and non-fiction writers and of course our own writing.

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ENGLISH 426. Directed Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 428. Senior Writing Tutorial.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): G Keith Taylor

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223, 323, and 423/429. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 429. The Writing of Poetry.

Section 001 Turning Points: Poetic Collaborations with Music & Art. Meets with Art and Design 454.001 and Music Theory 504.001.

Instructor(s): Richard W Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Written permission of instructor is required. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course's purpose is to bring together creative-writing students with art and musical compostion students for the purpose of creating original, collaborative works of art. While this course is primarily designed for undergraduates, we also hope to have room for two or three writers from the Master of Fine Arts program. Students in this course will attempt to work in what are essentially new, hybrid art forms performace art pieces in which each of the three art forms contributes something. The advantage for poets is that these collaborations offer the chance to attempt more multi-faceted and "edgy" collaborative work than one is likely to do when working within media that are more easily categorizable in conventional terms.

Admission is by permission of the instructor.

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ENGLISH 431. The Victorian Novel.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Julie Early (earlyj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In Victorian England, 1837-1901, the novel for the first time becomes a dominant, indeed, the dominant literary genre, both articulating and shaping middle class concerns. We can, in fact, see something of ourselves in the Victorians as they addressed issues of private life in an industrial and commercial culture undergoing rapid technological change. Novels served as social and moral guides for private and public relations to explore issues of 'right conduct' in relation especially to class, race, gender, and sexuality. We will read five novels and two novellas in groupings illuminating 'the economy of culture,' 'gendered stories of progress,' 'the new epic of domestic life,' and 'exploring identity through the Gothic'. Authors include Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Bram Stoker. The course requires four papers, 4-5 pages each.

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ENGLISH 441. Contemporary Poetry.

Section 001 Satisfies the American Literature requirement of the English concentration.

Instructor(s): Laurence A Goldstein (lgoldste@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on poetry written in English from 1945 to the present. Some experience of "modern" poetry written in the first decades of this century would be very useful, but is not essential. We shall examine one full career, that of C.K. Williams (the Hopwood Reader in January) as well as key volumes of the contemporary period such as Robert Lowell's For the Union Dead, Sylvia Plath's Ariel (with Ted Hughes' responsive volume Birthday Letters), Seamus Heaney's Field Work, Rita Dove's Thomas and Beulah, and two or more volumes from the 1990s. A course pack of prose and poetry by other figures will also be included. Two papers, a midterm and a final examination, as well as a reading journal, constitute the course requirements.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 444/Theatre 322. History of Theatre II.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Claire Conceison

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 322.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 444/Theatre 322. History of Theatre II.

Section 002.

Instructor(s): Leigh A Woods (lawoods@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 322.002.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 449/Theatre 423. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert J Cardullo (cardullo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 423.001.

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ENGLISH 449/Theatre 423. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 002 Satisfies the American Literature requirement for the concentration in English

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This survey course will examine the origin and development of U.S. Drama in the twentieth century. Beginning with playwrights like O'Neill, Glaspell, Rice, Odets, and Treadwell, the class will focus on the interrelationship of U.S. culture in American Drama and American Drama in U.S. culture, especially as it manifests itself in the mid-century plays, of Miller, Williams, and Hellman. Topics of class discussion will include: the emergence of a nativist theater tradition, the role of ethnicity, the situation of the female playwright, the conflict between commercial and artistic values, and the move to a more pluralistic and inclusive theater, one in which previously marginalized voices move to center stage. Additional playwrights on the reading list include Hansberry, Albee, Mamet, Shaped, Forbes, Lanyard Wilson, Kushner, Wang, and August Wilson.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 001 Three Modern American Poets: Pound, Eliot, and Stevens. Satisfies the American Literature requirement for the English concentration.

Instructor(s): George J Bornstein (georgeb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will examine what three major writers Ezra Pound, T.S. Eliot, and Wallace Stevens have to teach us about the kinds of relations possible among art, society, and individual experience. We will consider their chief works both in themselves and as responses to personal, political, and literary problems such as the construction of modernism, the impact of two world wars and the psychological problems of twentieth-century life. The readings are primarily poetry, both lyrics and longer works like Pound's Mauberley sequence, Eliot's Waste Land, and Stevens' Notes Toward a Supreme Fiction with some critical prose by the authors themselves. We proceed by a mixture of lecture and discussion. There are two papers (about six pages each) and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 002 U.S. Culture of the 1950s. Satisfies the American Literature requirement for the concentration in English.

Instructor(s): Julian Levinson (jlevinso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines diverse currents of American literature, film, music, and cultural criticism from the 1950s a decade that witnessed America's emergence as a global "superpower." The works under discussion will be examined in relation to key social and historical phenomena, such as the rise of the Cold War, the expansion of the middle class, the "re-domestication" of women after the war, and the beginning stages of the Civil Rights movement. The writers we will consider include Mary McCarthy, Norman Mailer, Richard Wright, Irving Howe, Vladimir Nabokov, James Baldwin, Robert Lowell, Sylvia Plath, Elizabeth Bishop, and Jack Kerouac. We will also listen to selected Jazz recordings and view representative anti-Communist and "liberal conscience" films. Students will write one short paper (2-3) and one long paper (8-10); there will also be a midterm and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 479/AAS 489. Topics in Afro-American Literature.

Section 001 African American Writers and the Politics of Travel. Satisfies the New Traditions and American Literature requirements for the English concentration.

Instructor(s): Sandra R Gunning (sgunning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 274 and AAS 201 and/or 320 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Looking at autobiographers, poets, travel writers, novelists and essayists such as Olaudah Equiano, Martin Delany, Marcus Garvey, Matthew Henson, Jean Toomer, and Terri McMillan, this course will address the following: (1) What constitutes an "African American" identity and how have black writers defined themselves in relation to the peoples/nationalities they have encountered in (for example) Africa, the Caribbean or Asia, from the 18th C. to the present? (2) How do we analyze the different literary genres of travel writing they utilize? (3) How have they confronted the political challenge of being colonizers, when they themselves face(d) oppression at home? (4) What roles do gender, class, and ethnicity play in shaping the way black writers address the politics of mobility? Though there are certain courses students are recommended to have taken prior to this course, the professor will allow students to enroll who have not had these prior courses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 479/AAS 489. Topics in Afro-American Literature.

Section 002 Topic?

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 274 and AAS 201 and/or 320 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 482. Studies in Individual Authors.

Section 001 Jane Austen in Context. Satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for the English concentration.

Instructor(s): Adela N Pinch

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will do a careful reading of Austen's six major novels along with (a) some of the novels by women of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century that she herself read; (b) other kinds of writings about women from Austen's era, such as feminist and anti-feminist tracts, conduct books, and letters; (c) selected essays in social and cultural history. We will also view and discuss one or two of the recent film versions of her novels, in order to explore what Jane Austen means in our context as well as her own. Texts will be Northanger Abbey, Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park, Emma and Persuasion; Burney, Evelina, Wollstonecraft, Maria and/or A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Radcliffe, The Romance of the Forest; plus a course pack. The class will combine lively lectures and livelier discussion; students will write one paper, an annotated bibliography, and a take-home final. NOTE: the reading for this course will be heavy; students might want to read Frances Burney's Evelina (Oxford UP) over winter break.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 483. Great Works of Literature.

Section 001 Staging History: Shakespeare on Legitimacy and Rebellion.

Instructor(s): Ralph G Williams (fiesole@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The special occasion of this course is the residency at the University of Michigan during March of 2001 of the Royal Shakespeare Company, arguably the world's premier classical company. During that residency, the RSC will present, as a unit, for the first time in the Company's history, Shakespeare's first history tetralogy: Henry VI, Parts 1,2,3, and Richard III. These plays explore patterns of meaning which might be elicited from a hugely violent and nearly chaotic period of English history, and embody Shakespeare's progress as a dramatist, poet, and delineator of human character from his earliest work to the astonishing achievements of Richard III.

The course will help prepare those who wish to see the plays. It will give a chance to learn from a range of experts at Michigan and from the RSC. Professor Williams' own lectures will be partner to presentations by (among others) Professors Eriksen, Mullaney, Potter, Schoenfeldt, Traub and Walsh and by personnel from the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Reading: Henry VI 1,2,3, and Richard III Writing: One essay (8-l0 pp.); perhaps a final examination

Note: given the special occasion of the RSC residency, this course will especially be open to visitors from the University and the community.

(Williams, R)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 484. Issues in Criticism.

Section 001 Doing Things with Theory

Instructor(s): David Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course asks about theory as a form of action. Is theory, as naysayers have argued, an entertaining but inconsequential meddling in cultural habits and values? Or does theory clarify who we are and how we might do well to act? Many who ask such questions hope to establish whether politicized theoretical approaches from Marxism and feminism to queer theory and multiculturalism constitute forms of activism. But a still more fundamental question lies in our way: can theory alter ways of thinking and, if so, can it guide our ways of acting? This course spotlights desires and assumptions that underwrite key modern theoretical arguments in order to illuminate our own motives in theorizing about literature. We read a few authors from the 1800s (e.g., Coleridge, Mill) but emphasize theory statements of the last few decades. Probable assignments: response papers and short critical papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 496. Honors Colloquium: Completing the Thesis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David W Thomas, Adela N Pinch

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 492, admission to the English Honors Program, and permission of instructor. (1). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 498. Directed Teaching.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ENGLISH 499. Directed Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

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