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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies

This page was created at 9:30 AM on Wed, Nov 1, 2000.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HJCS

Take me to the Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies.

To see what has been added to or changed in Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies this week go to What's New This Week.

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HJCS 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew, II.

Language Courses

Section 001, 002.

Instructor(s): Doron Lamm (dlamm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 101. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Continuation of the development of basic communication skills of reading, writing, and speaking modern standard Hebrew. Class drills, class discussions in Hebrew, language laboratory drills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 102. Elementary Modern Hebrew, II.

Language Courses

Section 003, 004.

Instructor(s): Milka Eliav

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 101. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Continuation of the development of basic communication skills of reading, writing, and speaking modern standard Hebrew. Class drills, class discussions in Hebrew, language laboratory drills.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 202. Intermediate Modern Hebrew, II.

Language Courses

Section 001, 002.

Instructor(s): Paula Weizman (pauliw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 201. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The focus of instruction will be on the four language skills with a continued emphasis on oral work and writing. In addition to continued study of morphology and syntax, some readings selections in fiction and non-fiction prose will be introduced.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 202. Intermediate Modern Hebrew, II.

Language Courses

Section 003, 004.

Instructor(s): Ilan Rosenberg (ilanr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 201. (5). (LR).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The focus of instruction will be on the four language skills with a continued emphasis on oral work and writing. In addition to continued study of morphology and syntax, some readings selections in fiction and non-fiction prose will be introduced.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 277/Judaic Studies 277/Rel. 277. "Land of Israel" through the Ages.

Jewish Literature and Culture in English

Section 001 Land of Israel Through the Ages.

Instructor(s): Yaron Eliav (yzeliav@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Events in the Land of Israel have played a unique role in both Western and Near Eastern civilizations. This course will examine the most significant developments in the history of this land. We will outline the historical process and analyze the various factors (political, economic, cultural, etc.) that shaped it; and we'll get acquainted with both the nations that ruled the land and the people who inhabited its cities and villages. Sometimes we will follow the route of bloody battles. At others, we will focus our attention on individuals and groups who produced some of the great masterpieces of our age. Our approach will be exclusively historical. That being so, we shall not settle for modern accounts alone on the various periods, but read samples of primary sources (which will be provided with English translation) as well.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 296/Judaic Studies 296/Rel. 296. Perspectives on the Holocaust.

Jewish Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elliot K Ginsburg (elgins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

R&E Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A study of the Holocaust as a historical event and its impact on Jewish thought and culture. We first survey the historical context: the European Jewish community on the eve of the destruction, and the events leading up to and culminating in that destruction. We will then focus on inner Jewish (and gentile) reactions to the Holocaust, and broader philosophical and ethical implications. We ask: What are the problems (moral, emotional, conceptual) in reading and writing about the Holocaust? What are its implications for those of us who come "after"? The course is also a meditation on visions of the Other, on ethnic-religious hatred, tolerance, and healing. Course materials include memoirs, poetry, fiction, psychological literature, as well as conversations with survivors. Take-home midterm; final exam; 5-8 page paper; journal.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 373/Judaic Studies 373. Israeli Culture and Society.

Jewish Literature and Culture in English

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Tsoffar (rtsoffar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Israel as a newborn nation-state offers us the opportunity to study a culture in formation, a culture formed from both indigenous Middle Eastern elements and the contributions of immigrants from Jewish communities from all over the world. Attention will be focused on the different bases of Israeli identity which give rise to a society defined by its cleavages, and the resultant tensions arising within such a society. The analysis will include a consideration of the ways in which the particular and peculiar history of the state of Israel are reflected in the national culture. The course will adopt a multidisciplinary approach encompassing historical, sociological, literary, and cultural studies. In addition to the reading of both primary and secondary sources, films (both documentary and belletristic) will be shown. Requirements for the course include compilation of dialectical journal and a paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 395. Directed Undergraduate Readings.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

HJCS 472. Introduction to Modern Hebrew Literature, II.

Jewish Literature and Culture in Hebrew

Section 001 Israeli Literature and Film: Narrative and Counter Narratives.

Instructor(s): Ruth Tsoffar (rtsoffar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: HJCS 302. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to contemporary Israeli literatures and films while at the same time to develop a theoretical framework that approach these as part of Israeli cultural production. So along with studying specific strategies to articulate Israeli diversity of gender, religion, history and nationhood, we will discuss relevant issues related to cultural studies such as colonialism, hybridity, Orientalism, and multiculturalism. The texts and films selected include a wide range of works by and about the Zionist pioneers, the second generation of immigrants to Israel, Holocaust survivors, women, Sephardic/Mizrahi Jews and Palestinians.

This course is open to undergraduates and graduate students. Graduate students have additional assignments and are expected to write a longer and more theoretically-oriented paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

HJCS 577/Judaic Studies 467/Rel. 471. Seminar: Topics in the Study of Judaism.

Jewish Literature and Culture in Hebrew

Section 001 Models of Jewish Renewal.

Instructor(s): Elliot K Ginsburg (elgins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In Jewish (mystical) tradition, the round of the year paces out a comprehensive devotional path, both a world-view and a spiritual practice. In this course, we will explore the yearly cycles of time as expressed in Hasidic mysticism: especially the Bnei Yissaschar, but also the Sefat Emet, the Icbiczer and Slonimer, and that latter day mystic, Zalman Schachter-Shalomi. These primary (Hebrew language) texts will be supplemented by English-language readings from the history and philosophy of religions, from Judaism (Schooem, Heschel, and Rosenzweig) and from the anthropology of time. This course will be conducted as a seminar: it calls for both intellectual rigor and engagement, to understand Judaism not only as an "argument" but as "deep song." Reading knowledge of Hebrew is required for this course. Short essays, term paper or project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HJCS 577/Judaic Studies 467/Rel. 471. Seminar: Topics in the Study of Judaism.

Jewish Literature and Culture in Hebrew

Section 002 Jewish Life in Late Antiquity.

Instructor(s): Yaron Eliav

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will examine some of the most significant aspects of Jewish life in the era ranging from after the destruction of the Second Temple until the beginning of the fifth century (70-429 CE). We will concentrate on reading, analyzing and discussing the primary sources (literary, archaeological, etc., on a given subject). The major body of source material for this epoch in Jewish history is the diversified corpus called rabbinic literature. We will not confine ourselves to these texts, but instead look at a more comprehensive sampling of sources (particularly Christian and archaeological material). There is no language requirement for this course at the 400 level, and all sources will be provided with English translation. Students who wish to take the course on the 500 level will be required to demonstrate reading abilities in one ancient language (Hebrew, Aramaic, Greek or Latin), and to prepare an additional paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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