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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

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Courses in History of Art

This page was created at 9:31 AM on Wed, Nov 1, 2000.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 – April 26)

Open courses in History of Art

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTART

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History of Art 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from History of Art 101 to History of Art 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


HISTART 102. Western Art from the End of the Middle Ages to the Present.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Zurier

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed 104 and 105, or 150. Two credits granted to those who have completed one of 104 or 105. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a survey of topics in European and American Art from the late 14th century to the present, as well as an introduction to the techniques of art history. It will examine institutions such as patronage and the art market, the changing roles of artists in society, and the changing functions of art. Weekly discussion sections will be devoted to building skills in visual analysis and critical reading of art-historical literature. Requirements: informed participation in section meetings, regular reading assignments, two short papers, midterm, and a final examination. There are no prerequisites for this course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 103. Arts of Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martin J Powers

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will take a topical approach to the arts of India, China,, and Japan rather than attempt a broad survey. Lectures typically focus on one or two monuments as case studies so as to treat them in greater depth; images from these case studies will be available for inspection on the web. The course is divided into six topic areas: Paradise; Personal Conflict; Naturalism; Naturalness; Popular Art; and East/West interchange in the "modern" era. Across these topic areas we will consider a variety of different media, including painting, sculpture, bas relief, lacquer, ceramics, calligraphy, prints, garden design, and architecture. Case studies will highlight specific genres such as narrative painting, devotional sculpture, funerary art, landscape, and popular subjects. Because case studies from two or more traditions will be examined within each topic area, there will be ample opportunity for exploring the basics of comparative art history. Apart from section participation, course work will include two short papers, a midterm and a final examination. The course presumes no previous exposure to the arts of Asia. All are welcome.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 113/Art and Design 113. Introduction to the Visual Arts.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael R Kapetan (nbva@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: This course is for non-art majors only. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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HISTART 194. First Year Seminar.

Section 001 – In the Service of the Empire: Photography and Imperialism.

Instructor(s): Jasmine Amy Alinder (jalinder@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (HU). May be elected twice for credit.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The invention and popularization of photography corresponded with a flurry of expansionist projects by European powers and the United States in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This course will explore the uses of photography at different moments of colonial expansion in Asia, Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, and North America. We will examine how photography and visual culture more generally was used by imperialists to represent both themselves and the colonized to the people "at home." At the same time, the course will consider how colonized peoples adopted photography and put it to their own uses. During the second half of the course, we will focus on the Dean C. Worcester Photographic Collection housed here at the University of Michigan, which documents the Philippines from 1890-1913. We will have the opportunity to undertake original archival research on the Worcester collection in the rich holdings of the Bentley Historical Library and Special Collections at the Graduate Library. Through readings, writing assignments, an in-class midterm and a final project, students will learn how to critically analyze photographs, will gain an introduction to the process of original archival research and will have the opportunity to refine other critical skills necessary for success in college-level courses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 212/Architecture 212. Understanding Architecture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert L Fishman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Not open to students enrolled in Architecture. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This three-credit course is the principal introductory survey course in architecture. Using historical and contemporary examples, it examines the architect's role in society and the role of architecture and urban design in shaping the built environment. Upon completion of the course the student is expected to be able

  • to identify and distinguish buildings constructed in different times, places, and societies;
  • to discuss how architecture is and has been viewed and interpreted by various individuals and cultures;
  • to analyze urban forms and spaces in relation to the buildings which make them up and the people who use them; and
  • to develop and describe a personal attitude toward an understanding of the man-made environment.

The format consists of two one-hour lectures per week. Several design-related exercises requiring the student to experience, analyze, interpret, and report on aspects of the built environment will be required. The course is enhanced by weekly recitation sections, which are run by five graduate teaching assistants. Recitation sections focus on improving the student's ability to venture into and sustain architectural discourse.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 222/Class. Arch. 222. Introduction to Roman Archaeology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): David Leonard Stone

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 222.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 260. European Painting and Sculpture of the Seventeenth Century.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Celeste A Brusati

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the vital, many-faceted visual culture of seventeenth-century Europe with particular focus on the pictorial and plastic arts. Lectures will consider the extraordinary achievements of such well-known figures as Caravaggio, the Carracci, Artemisia Gentileschi, Bernini, Velázquez, Poussin, Rubens, Van Dyck, Rembrandt, and Vermeer, as well as a range of other visually interesting but less familiar works by their contemporaries. We will be looking not only at painting and sculpture, but also at drawings, prints, maps, and book illustrations, in order to glimpse the many ways in which the visual arts came to be used and valued in the seventeenth century. Lectures and weekly readings are designed to situate art within discussions of scientific inquiry, religious practices, politics, cultural encounter, social and economic life. Requirements include informed participation in discussion sections, a midterm quiz, a final examination, and a short paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 272. 20th-Century Art: Modernism, The Avant Garde, The Aftermath.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jasmine Amy Alinder (jalinder@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines major artists and artistic movements of twentieth-century Europe, the United States and Latin America with a focus on changes in the role of art in society. How has art been important for imagining the future and constructing the past? What role has visual culture of the last century played in the negotiation of gender, racial, class, and sexual difference? We will study art's relationship with politics and technology as well as the major critical debates surrounding modernism, the avant-garde, and postmodernism. In addition to painting, we will consider sculpture, photography, installation, performance, and video. Course requirements include attendance and participation at lectures and sections, two papers, and two exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 360/AAS 380. Special Topics in African Art.

Section 001 – Introduction to African Diaspora Arts in the Americas.

Instructor(s): Jacqueline R Francis (jrfranci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. Hist. of Art 108 or 214. AAS 200 recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Using interdisciplinary methods, we will investigate cultural production generally set outside the category of "the fine arts," such as "folk art," pre-Lenten Carnival costume design and performances, sacred spaces, and multi-media religious objects made in Brazil, Canada, Haiti, Jamaica, Trinidad, and the U.S. Objects and artistic practices will be our first concerns. In addition, we will scrutinize the status of African Diaspora art in the discipline of Art History and its influences on Modernist and post-Modernist artists in the West. Readings will be drawn from modern anthropology and ethnography, art histories and criticism, and history.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 393. Junior Proseminar.

Section 001 – Neo-Impressionism. (Honors).

Instructor(s): Howard G Lay (hglay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concentration in history of art and upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines in considerable detail the short life (roughly from 1884-1891) of Neo-Impressionist painting in Paris. The central figure of our study is George Seurat, whose invention-and promotion-of a presumably "scientific" form of painting will lead us to consider relations between modernism and mass culture, between the avant-garde and "official" culture, between "unique" works of art and the cult of technology, finally between the famous pronouncements of modernist criticism and various theories of style and narrative that modernist criticism may well have overlooked.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 002 – Buddhist Art in China.

Instructor(s): Qiang Ning (qning@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Buddhism has long been a popular religion in China and dominated the Chinese visual imagination for hundreds of years. Buddhism is also called xiangjiao or the "religion of images" which uses paintings, sculpture, and architecture to promote its religious ideas. This course introduces the iconography of Buddhist art and analyzes the social-political implications of the Buddhist images in their historical and ritual context. Special attention will be given to the role of patronage in making these images and to the impact of Buddhist art upon Chinese mass culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 003 – Contemporary Artists of Color in England. Meets with RC Core 334.001

Instructor(s): Jacqueline R Francis (jrfranci@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course tracks the burst of cultural production by contemporary African Diaspora artists trained and based in England from the mid-1950s to the present. The art under our scrutiny will be Modernist painting and sculpture, and post-Modernist installations, performances, and film. We will also examine the furor generated by controversial exhibitions in which Black British artists' work was prominently featured, namely, "The Other Story" (London, 1989) and "Sensation" (Brooklyn, 1999). The academic term's readings include art histories and criticism, as well as the social and intellectual texts that influenced these artists: cultural nationalism, post-colonial critiques, British cultural studies, anti-racist coalition politics, and post-identity hybridity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 004 – Whores, Lepers and the Ugly: Outcasts in Art.

Instructor(s): Robert A Maxwell (maxwell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Harlots and ogres, murderers and liars, randies and one-legged bumpkins, Moslems and Jews…. All of these outcast figures – Christendom's perpetual pariahs – played an important role in Western European art, appearing in all manner of public, private, secular, and religious art. Modern textbooks, though, have often pushed these figures to the margins of history, relegating them to footnotes or explaining them away with moralist arguments. This course examines both the nature of these outcasts and their role in art (primarily Medieval and Renaissance art, with some considerations for Baroque and early Modern art), as well as their marginal treatment by modern art history. For this last, we will delve into theories of marginality. Feminism, the folklore of Bahktin, the semiotics of Marin, the psychoanalysis of Freud, and the diverse romanticist and modernist influences of W. Benjamin, L. Aragon and V. Hugo will receive our special critical attention.

This course will be conducted as a seminar, with active student participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 396. Honors Thesis.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 393. Open to students admitted to Honors in History of Art. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Individual Honors research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

HISTART 399. Independent Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Supervision of each student's work is assigned to an appropriate member of the staff.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

HISTART 403/NR&E 403. History of Human Interaction with the Land.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth A Brabec (ebrabec@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The intent of this course is to survey the human management and design of open space throughout history. The discussions will focus on gardens, urban open spaces, and regional and environmental planning. Prototypes will be viewed and analyzed not only within the cultural context of their own time and place, but also in terms of the influence each has had in shaping 20th-century perceptions of the landscape. The course will also introduce students to specific areas of knowledge and expertise which currently comprise the practice of landscape architecture. The potential roles landscape architects will play in shaping and managing the environment in the future will be discussed. The course will consist of slide-illustrated lectures by the instructor and guest lecturers. There will be no regularly scheduled discussion section. Questions are welcome and encouraged during the lecture. In addition to taking a midterm and a final exam, there will be a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 434/Class. Arch. 434. Archaic Greek Art.

Section 001 – Image and Experience in the Pre-Classical Aegean.

Instructor(s): Nassos Papalexandrou (papalexa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Classical Archaeology 434.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 445/MEMS 445. Medieval Architecture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert A Maxwell (maxwell@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 101. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides an introduction to the built environment of the Middle Ages. From the fall of Rome to the dawn of the Renaissance, a range of architectural styles shaped medieval daily life, religious experience, and civic spectacle. We will become familiar with the architectural traditions of the great cathedrals, revered pilgrimage churches, and reclusive monasteries of western Europe, as well as castles, houses, and other civic structures. We will integrate the study of the architecture with the study of medieval culture, exploring the role of the pilgrimage, courts and civil authority, religious reform and radicalism, crusading and social violence, and rising urbanism. In this way we will explore the way in which the built environment profoundly affected contemporary audiences and shaped medieval life.

This course is in process of being changed to course 345.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 453. Venetian Painting.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): R Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 102. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Following introductory remarks on the history of Venice and on the character of that extraordinary city, renowned as La Serenissima and the Queen of the Adriatic, the course will survey North Italian and especially Venetian painting from the early 14th C. to the late 16th C. – that is, as it evolves from the first stirrings of a personal idiom, through the florid International Style to Early Renaissance realism and High Renaissance idealism, and finally to a Counter-Renaissance statement of great emotional fervor. The period 1450-1600, including such masters as Mantegna, Carpaccio, Giovanni Bellini, Giorgione, Titian, Tintoretto, and Veronese, will be featured. At once attempting to define the special qualities of the Venetian tradition, with its painterly and poetic sensitivities, and the creative uniqueness of some of its leading exponents, the lectures will approach the works of art both with respect to the sociocultural contexts in which they were born and to their relevance to us today. Students will be evaluated by way of midterm and final examinations of essay type.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 472. Nineteenth-Century Architecture.

Section 001 – Meets with Architecture 542.

Instructor(s): Anatole Senkevitch Jr (senkanat@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 102. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course traces the leading trends in nineteenth-century architecture, from the contending projects of Neoclassicism and the Gothic Revival to the innovative tendencies seeking variously to harness the impact of industrialization on architecture and urbanism. Elucidating the leading struggles for definition, meaning, and form in the architecture of the period, the course considers the link between theory and practice and the relationship between conceptual, aesthetic and technical factors and their cultural, socioeconomic, and political milieus. Special attention is given to the role of contending strategies in determining the place of tradition and innovation in architecture, in reassessing the concept of style in terms of its link both to its age and to society, and in dealing with the typological consequences of urban modernization and the emergence of a bourgeois architecture. Students will write two short papers and a term paper on a topic of their choice, focusing either on historical research or on a critique of contemporary design.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 487/Chinese 475/Asian Studies 475/RC Hums. 475/Phil. 475. The Arts and Letters of China.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Shuen-Fu Lin (lsf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (HU).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Chinese 475.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 493. Art of India.

Section 001 – Art and Architecture of the Indian subcontinent from the 1st through the 17th Centuries, C.E. Meets with Asian Studies 380.001.

Instructor(s): Alka A Patel (alkap@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 103. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the art and architecture of the Indian subcontinent from the 1st through the 17th centuries, C.E., with references to prehistoric periods as well. In addition to providing students with a general exposure to the Indic visual traditions, the course seeks to examine the simplistic modern understanding of Indian art: With the plethora of religio-cultural patterns thoroughly intertwined within what is broadly known as 'Indian culture', issues of religious and nationalist identification of the art of the subcontinent are foremost in the study of Indian art and architectural history. Surveying objects and buildings from the ancient through the Mughal periods, this course will explore the constantly shifting boundaries between what is Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, and Islamic in the context of the post-Partition subcontinent.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 565. Early Modern Architecture in Italy, Austria, and Germany.

Section 001 – Baroque Architecture. Meets with Architecture 528

Instructor(s): Lydia M Soo (lmsoo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course examines the architecture of the Baroque period in the buildings and cities of the late 16th to the mid-18th centuries in Italy, France, England, and Central Europe. They will be discussed in relationship to contemporary theoretical writings, addressing issues of function, structure, and beauty, as well as in relationship to the cultural context of the Baroque period, including philosophical, religious, political, economic, and environmental factors.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 581. Islamic Architecture to 1500.

Section 001 – A Millennium of Islamic Architecture: Continuity and Innovation.

Instructor(s): Alka A Patel (alkap@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Hist. of Art 285. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the architecture of the Islamic world from Spain to India, spanning the mid-seventh through eighteenth centuries, C.E. It will provide students with a brief background to the indigenous architectural traditions in regions as geographically diverse as South Asia and southern Europe. Subsequently, the course will explore the development of what is generally classified as Islamic architecture, a single category used in scholarship despite the variation of architectural traditions encompassed within it. The course seeks to deepen the simplistic modern understanding of what is 'Islamic': Students will be asked to identify the constituents of 'Islamic culture', necessary for the eventual identification of Islamic architecture. Essential to this process of identification will be the awareness of strong regional traditions, and the degrees of their confluence and interaction with what was a newly coalescing cultural complex during the first thousand years of its existence. The course will require participation in the weekly discussions, based on the lectures, readings and the issues raised therein. In addition to the midterm examination, a presentation, and a subsequent paper will also be required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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