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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Japanese

This page was created at 9:32 AM on Wed, Nov 1, 2000.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Japanese

Wolverine Access Subject listing for JAPANESE

Take me to the Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Japanese.

To see what has been added to or changed in Japanese this week go to What's New This Week.

Search the LS&A Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

Waitlist policy for all courses is 1 get on the waitlist and go to the first day of class and talk to the instructor.

Students wanting to begin language study in Chinese, Japanese, or Korean, at a level other than first year, must take a placement exam to be held on Tuesday, January 4, 1-3pm. Test locations will be posted outside of the Department office in 3070 FB.


JAPANESE 102. Beginning Japanese.

Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 101. (5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($9) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($9) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed for students who have less than the equivalent of one year's study of Japanese at the University of Michigan. The goal of the course is the simultaneous progression of four skills (speaking, listening, writing, and reading) as well as becoming familiar with aspects of Japanese culture which are necessary for language competency. Recitation sessions are conducted in Japanese emphasizing speaking/reading in Japanese contexts at normal speeds. Analyses, explanations, and discussions involving the use of English are specifically reserved for lectures with a linguist. Students are required to do assignments with audio tapes a minimum of two hours for each class hour (10 hours per week). It is expected that, by the end of the year, students will have basic speaking and listening comprehension skills, a solid grasp of basic grammar, reading and writing skills in Hiragana and Katakana, and will be able to recognize and produce approximately 140 Kanji in context. Texts: Situational Functional Japanese, Vol. 1-2.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

JAPANESE 120/Asian Studies 120. Understanding Japan: A Multidisciplinary Introduction.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ken K Ito (kenkito@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This team-taught course is an introduction to the study of Japan. It aims to introduce key terms and concepts used in Japanese studies, but to do so critically by reflecting on the history and the utility of these concepts. It will also expose students to the various disciplines represented in Japanese studies at Michigan, exploring some of the approaches and methodologies used in the humanities and the social sciences. The course will begin by covering basic factual information about geography and history. The core of the course will consist of lectures by faculty from various disciplines, who specialize in the study of Japan. Each faculty member will introduce a concept (or perhaps a group of concepts) that has played an important role in his or her field. A literature specialist might talk about the issues of "tradition" or of the "subject" as they have developed in Japanese literary studies; a historian might address "modernity" or "gender"; a political scientist or an economist might address issues of the "nation-state" or "development." A student should emerge from the course familiar with some fundamental issues in the study of Japan and better equipped to make choices about furthering their interests.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

JAPANESE 202. Second-Year Japanese.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Mayumi Y Johnson (yukijohn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 201. (5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($9) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($9) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/japanese/J20x/20x.html

Further training is given in all the language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) for students who have acquired a basic language proficiency. The aim of the oral component is to provide the student with the speaking and comprehension skills necessary to function effectively in more advanced practical situations in a Japanese-speaking environment. In the reading and writing component, the emphasis is on reading elementary texts, developing an expository style, and writing short answers/essays in response to questions about these texts. Approximately 400 of the essential characters are covered. Discussions on the social and cultural use of language are provided. Students are required to attend five hours of class per week: two hours of lecture and three hours of recitation. Students are also required to practice a minimum of two hours for each class hour (12 hours per week). Recitation sessions are conducted entirely in Japanese. Recitation sessions emphasize speaking/reading in Japanese contexts at normal speed with near-native pronunciation, accent, intonation, rhythm, and appropriate body language. Analyses, explanations, and discussions involving the use of English are specifically reserved for lectures. Texts: Situational Functional Japanese, Vol. 2-3.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

JAPANESE 222/Great Books 222/Asian Studies 222. Great Books of Japan.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): E Ramirez-Christensen

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Great Books 222.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

JAPANESE 225. Calligraphy.

Language Courses

Instructor(s): Masae Suzuki

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 101. (1). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/asian/japanese/JPN225/index.html

The goals of the course are to help you learn how to practice Japanese calligraphy and cultivate your mind through the practice. Six subjects, including Kanji and Hiragana, will be introduced with the focus on basic skills such as the manner of using brushes, balancing characters, etc. Throughout the course, students will work on clarity of thought throughout the writing of characters in a tranquil setting, concentrating on maintaining correct posture and behavior throughout the writing process.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

JAPANESE 392. Honors Course in Japanese.

Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the department. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Directed readings aimed at the writing of analytical papers and/or the Honors thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

JAPANESE 394. Honors Course in Japanese.

Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the department. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Directed readings aimed at the writing of analytical papers and/or the Honors thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

JAPANESE 399. Directed Reading.

Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the department. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Individual work and directed reading for undergraduate concentrators. Must be arranged with an instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

JAPANESE 402/Asian Studies 402. Rewriting Identities in Modern Japan.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ken K Ito (kenkito@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This introductory course to modern Japanese fiction examines how novels and short stories written after 1868 engage the issue of national, cultural, and social identities. The inquiry in the course will simultaneously move in two directions: We will examine how fiction written in an age of national print-capitalism participates in the work of building a common understanding of a nation and its people. But we will also see how the same fiction can spotlight divisions of gender, sexual orientation, class, generation, and region. Using the fiction written by some of the best known of Japanese writers Mori Ogai, Natsume Soseki, Kawabata Yasunari, Mishima Yukio, and Oe Kenzaburo the course will pursue its inquiries on both formal and thematic levels. Attention will be paid to how different narrative genres and techniques either erase or emphasize social differences.

  • How do Japanese novels help to construct what Benedict Anderson would call the "imagined community" of the nation?
  • By what process does Japanese become a "national print language" appropriate for fictional writing?
  • How is the Japanese "self" narrated into being?
  • How are competing visions of what is "modern" and "traditional" addressed in the search for identity?
  • How does fiction, written by male and female writers, address the selfhood of Japanese men and women?

These are the questions that we will ask as we traverse the contested terrain of Japanese identities. No prior knowledge of Japanese language or literature is required. All readings will be in English translation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

JAPANESE 406. Third-Year Japanese.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 405. (5). (Excl).

Credits: (5).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Advanced training is given in all the language skills. Practice in the use of spoken Japanese is contextualized within simulated Japanese social settings. A variety of selected modern texts (essays, fiction, and newspapers) are read with emphasis on expository style. The goal is to produce self-sufficient readers who can read and discuss most texts with the aid of a dictionary. Students are required to practice with audio/visual tapes a minimum of two hours for each class hour (10 hours per week). Recitation sessions emphasize speaking/reading in Japanese contexts at normal speed with near-native pronunciation, accent, intonation, rhythm, and appropriate body language. Analyses, explanations, and discussions involving the use of English are specifically reserved for lectures. Texts: An Integrated Approach to Intermediate Japanese.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

JAPANESE 417. Communicative Competence for Japan-Oriented Careers II.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kaori K Ohara (kohara@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 406, 411. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course stresses the effective use of the Japanese spoken language in contexts likely to be encountered by a career-oriented professional in Japan.

Winter Term topics include: Banking, Import and Export, The Japanese Market, Annual Reports, Business Ritual and Socializing. In addition, the course will include practice in rapid reading and transcription/dictation of moderately difficult texts, newspaper articles, and news broadcasts. Students are expected to practice with audio tapes for a minimum of two hours for each class hour.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

JAPANESE 452. Fourth-Year Japanese II.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 451. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of the course is the acquisition of linguistic, pragmatic, and sociocultural competence in all four skills at an advanced level. A TV drama is used as the main textbook with the focus on the improvement of speaking and listening competence, and variety of reading materials on Japanese sociocultural issues that are related to the content of the TV drama are used to further develop reading and writing skills. The two hour class period is devoted to the verification and discussion of the drama content, use of new vocabulary and expressions as well as the acquisition of more complex, advanced grammar pattern usages. The techniques of improving reading skills is taught during the class period, and the actual reading of the materials and writing of the reaction papers will be assigned as homework.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

JAPANESE 475. Japanese Cinema.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001 Meets with Film & Video 455.002

Instructor(s): Mark H Nornes

Prerequisites & Distribution: A knowledge of Japanese is not required. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will survey the history of Japanese cinema with the aim of understanding a vital aspect of twentieth century Japanese culture. While structured chronologically, students will develop sophisticated approaches to understand what a national cinema is, how it relates to national identity, and how it fits into the global film scene. All aspects and genres of Japanese film come under consideration, including both the art film and more popular forms. We will start with the early cinema, and proceed through the silent era sword films, the classics of the 1950s, documentary, the avant-garde, ending with the recent explosion in animation art. Course requirements include outside screenings, papers, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

JAPANESE 493. Theory and Practice of Second Language Teaching.

Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mayumi Y Johnson (yukijohn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Japanese 406. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of the course is to provide an overview of theories and issues in teaching Japanese. The class discussion includes the history and theory of teaching methods, although the focus mainly is placed on the most current teaching approaches and their theoretical implications. Acquisition of such aspects of language teaching will further be confirmed through the practice of actual teaching in real classroom settings, as well as by observation and review of regular language classes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

JAPANESE 556. Japanese Drama and Narrative Performance.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 001 Japan's "Epic" Tale: The Heike in Music and Drama. Meets with Musicology 728.001.

Instructor(s): Hugh B Z De Ferranti (hbd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated three times for a total of nine credits. May not be elected more than once in the same term.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Musical narrative was at the core of Japanese performance culture until the post-war era. Fired by the artistry of itinerant blind singers, the oral and musical virtuosity of popular chanters, and the spectacle of the no, kyogen, kabuki and puppet theaters, public enthusiasm for historical tales in performance was strong at all levels of society from the medieval period until the mid-20th century. The body of stories most often drawn upon was that which concerned the downfall of the Heike clan and related events of the 1180s, as compiled in the Tale of Heike. As such, the corpus of Heike stories has been as significant a formative agent in Japanese culture as have the epic tales of the Mahabarata and Ramayana in south and south-east Asian cultures, the Romance of the Three Kingdoms in Imperial China, and the Sunjata tales in Manding West Africa.

As a seminar for students of Japanese culture and musicology, respectively, this course will combine essential perspectives for study of the performing arts in context. In examining the presentation of Heike stories in performance media characteristic of various eras from the 14th to the early 20th centuries, we will consider the creative practices of both musicians and authors of written texts, and the cultural practice of performance itself as a social institution in which "the Heike" has been re-cast under changing historical circumstances.

Weekly coursework will involve core readings in English, as well as viewing or listening preparation, for which translations and transliterations will be provided. Extra readings and listening assignments will be presented in each session and will be tailored to the profiles of seminar participants, so that Japanese sources can be assigned to those students with reading ability and materials requiring musicological skills to those from the Music program. It will also be possible for students from both sides of the divide to collaborate in production of term papers that incorporate the tools of both disciplines in application to specific repertory items.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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This page was created at 9:32 AM on Wed, Nov 1, 2000.


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