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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Political Science

This page was created at 9:36 AM on Wed, Nov 1, 2000.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 – April 26)

Open courses in Political Science

Wolverine Access Subject listing for POLSCI

Take me to the Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Political Science.

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POLSCI 101. Introduction to Political Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Arlene W Saxonhouse (awsaxon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Through a study of classic texts in political theory by such as Plato, Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Tocqueville we will consider the questions that have been raised and the answers posed over the centuries in the search for the best political regime. Consideration of the meaning of familiar concepts such as justice, equality, liberty, community, democracy are part of this investigation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 111. Introduction to American Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel P Carpenter (dancarp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a broad survey of government and politics in the United States which explores a wide range of topics including public opinion, elections, interest groups, the presidency, Congress, and the courts. We will examine the basic structure of American government and politics, namely, what are the rules that govern this system? How have these rules changed over time, and to what ends? Some specific questions covered in the course are: What makes one set of interests more successful in the public sphere? Are political parties meaningful anymore? What accounts for swings in voting behavior and election outcomes from one time to another? What influences a member of Congress' voting decision? In what ways do presidents and bureaucrats affect public policies? This is not a comprehensive list but suggests the kinds of issues that are discussed in this course. There are two lectures and two discussion section meetings each week. Coursework involves readings and several written assignments; there will also be an in-class midterm and a written final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 140. Introduction to Comparative Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ronald F Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/polsci/140/001.nsf

This course examines how democracy evolves and functions in different settings around the world. We start with the emergence of democracy in Western Europe, examining the factors that give rise to it and help it survive. We then examine the origins of fascism in Germany and Japan; and the rise of communism in Russia and China, attempting to understand why these alternatives to democracy flourished in those settings – and why they later collapsed. This leads to an analysis of the current struggle between reformers and hardliners over the move to market economies and liberal democracy in Russia, China, and Eastern Europe, and an assessment of the prospects for democracy in Mexico and Nigeria. Finally, we examine the probable evolution of democracy in advanced industrial societies. In addition to two lectures, there are two meetings a week in relatively small discussion sections, designed to encourage active discussion of these topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 160. Introduction to World Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): James D Morrow (jdmorrow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course analyzes world politics from a broad and general perspective, explaining and exploring the principles involved in the functioning of the global political system and illustrating these principles with contemporary material. The course begins by setting standards for judging theories of international politics and reviews well-known theories such as realism and liberalism. A strategic approach based on the combination of power, preferences, and perceptions will be explained. That approach is then used to understand a variety of issues in world politics, including war, alliances, domestic politics and foreign policy, and international political economy. These issues will be presented both in general terms and applied to understand specific key events.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 353. The Arab-Israeli Conflict.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Aharon Klieman (aklieman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Knowledge about Arab-Israeli conflicts is the focus of the course. Although there are lectures on the origins of the conflicts, they do not lay blame on any of the parties: The course is not about who is right or wrong but why there are conflicts in the Arab-Israeli zone, and what are the scenarios of their futures. Lectures address the history of the conflicts from the perspective of general social science theory. Discussion sections give students a forum for assessing the relationship between events and ideas. Core theoretical concepts include bargaining and negotiation; crisis as an opportunity for diplomacy; how global, regional, and domestic factors explain conflict and cooperation; the relation of force to diplomacy; the effect of threat on deterrence, coercion, and escalation; as well as incremental versus comprehensive approaches to the peace process. The course discusses the Arab/Persian Gulf as it bears on Arab-Israeli zone. There are no prerequisites. There are a midterm exam and a final. There is extensive use of conferencing on the web, COW, in order to make use of the Internet to explore war and peace scenarios in the Arab-Israeli and Gulf zones.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 390. Practicum for the "Michigan Journal of Political Science."

Instructor(s): Daniel H Levine (dhldylan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission of the chair.

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course allows students to gain experience working on the journal under the direction of the chair or other appropriate faculty member. This experience involves editing the Michigan Journal of Political Science. In addition to taking part in working on the year's issue, students wishing credit for working on the journal would do readings and write book reviews and research notes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

POLSCI 396/REES 396/Hist. 333/Slavic 396/Soc. 393. Survey of East Central Europe.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Herbert J Eagle (hjeagle@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in REES 397. (4). (SS). Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Russian and East European Studies (REES) 396.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 402. Selected Topics in Political Theory.

Section 001 – American Political Thought, 1860 – 2000.

Instructor(s): Anne Manuel (amanuel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 101 or 400 or 401. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

President John F. Kennedy once said, "The United States has to move very fast to even stand still." This quotation provides a good sense of the struggles facing American political thinkers since the Civil War. America confronts significant challenges in the post-Civil War era. These challenges include reconstruction, race-based discrimination, industrialization, immigration, labor militancy, the women's suffrage movement, the progressive movement, the call for the welfare state, the civil rights movement, second wave feminism, and the emergence of global capitalism. These challenges force American thinkers to look back to the American founding and to develop radically new modes of political thought. We will see American political thought shift between projects of maintenance and nostalgia on the one hand and projects of revision and reinvention on the other. The thinkers we will consider reveal a sustained commitment to America's founding political principles as well as the innovative political imagination necessary to meet new challenges and to expand the promise of the freedom and equality to previously excluded groups. To deepen our understanding of the political thought of this era, we will work with writings by W.E.B. DuBois, Henry Adams, William James, Jane Addams, Upton Sinclair, William Graham Sumner, John Dewey, Herbert Crowly, Martin Luther King, Malcolm X, John Rawls, among others, as well as several key supreme court decisions such as Plessy vs. Ferguson. Course requirements include class participation, a group project, a take-home midterm essay, and a take-home final essay.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 409. Twentieth Century Political Thought.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Claudia M Ritter (ritterc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 101 or 401. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar is intended as a comprehensive overview of 20th-century political thought. Readings will include Marxist and liberal thought, theory of action, as well as feminist and postmodern thought. We will analyze the slow but profound change of the central topic over the century. While questions of power and domination prevailed in the first half of the century, theories on democracy and cultural differences shaped the basic discussion during the second half of the century. Authors of the syllabus will be, among others: Weber, Gramsci, Heidegger, Arendt, Rawls, Habermas, Young, Lyotard, Castoriadis.

There will be an oral midterm and a written final exam. Requirements include several short written assignments, regular attendance, reading of the texts, and active discussion participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 410. American Policy Processes.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret Marie Howard (meghow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will study the institutions of American federal government: Congress, the Presidency, the bureaucracy and the courts. We will consider how ordinary citizens' concerns are addressed and represented in each institution. This class does not require that you have ever taken any political science course before, but a rudimentary knowledge of American history is helpful, although not mandatory.

If you took PS 411 in the Fall 2000 academic term, you will find PS 410 an extension of our study of how people relate to government and government relates to people. You do not have to take 411 if you took 410, but if you do, you will get the chance to apply what you have learned in 411 about political parties, interest groups, the media, voting and elections, and public opinion to how the institutions of government do or do not respond to these forces.

We will use Lowi & Ginsberg's, American Government 6th edition by W.W. Norton as our core text, then consider several short books on specific topics about American institutions that fit into Lowi and Ginsberg's overall discussion.

We will have three or four exams and a 10-15 page research paper. You may opt to take 410 for Upper-Level Writing Requirement credit, in which case your research paper will be 30 pages long.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 412. Courts, Politics and Society.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Noga Morag-Levine (noga@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Courts, what they share with and what distinguishes them from other political institutions, are at the center of this course. The term will be divided into four sections. Part I will examine the structures, practices and organizing principles of central actors and institutions within the judicial process (court structure, judicial selection, juries and the legal profession). Part II will follow the evolution of primary legal theories regarding the impact of political constraints and choices upon judicial reasoning. Particular emphasis will be put on the relationship between political controversies and attendant legal theoretical debates during the New Deal and Warren Court era. Part III will provide an introduction to interdisciplinary studies of courts and society and will draw upon contributions from Political Science, Anthropology, Sociology, Economics, and Literature. Finally, Part IV will incorporate diverse methodological and disciplinary perspectives in the context of two important contemporary legal theoretical debates. The first pertains to the relationship between state law and alternative mechanisms of dispute resolution. The second concerns the viability of law as an instrument of social and political change.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 414. The Politics of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Francene M Engel (fengel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (4). (Excl). May be repeated twice, for a total of six credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course is concerned with civil rights and civil liberties in the American constitutional system. It will focus on decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court, but will also draw on literature from other sources. The primary substantive aim of the course is to help students develop a theoretically informed understanding of civil liberties and of the institutional devices for enforcing them. Additional aims include helping students to read and criticize political texts, to assess constitutional arguments, and to think and write more rigorously. Some of the topics that will be discussed include racial discrimination, rights to privacy, free speech, religious freedom, rights of the accused as well as others. Students are expected to have read assignments before class and to be prepared to discuss them. Students also will be expected to participate in a moot court exercise. Methods of instruction: lecture (3 hours) and discussion section (1 hour); you must register for both the lecture and discussion section. Prerequisite: A basic understanding of American institutional politics and American history. Some exposure to political theory is helpful, but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 419/AAS 418. Black Americans and the Political System.

Section 001 – Black Am & Political System.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. AAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses upon the evolution, nature, and role of African American politics within the American Political System. The concern is with African Americans as actors and creators and initiators in the political process. And the course will focus upon the inputs, the responses of the decision makers, and the outputs in terms the political process. And the course will focus upon the inputs, the responses of the decision makers, and the outputs in terms of public policies. And finally the various controversies will be explored and analyzed in regard to African American politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 420/Comm. 484. Mass Media and Political Behavior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Margaret Mary Young (mmyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Communication Studies 484.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

POLSCI 423. Politics of the Metropolis.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Gregory B Markus (gmarkus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the political life of American cities and the metropolitan regions in which they are embedded. Relevant institutions include city government, public authorities, the business sector, nonprofit agencies and organizations, neighborhood groups, and more. Issues include city and regional governance, economic development, urban sprawl, the provision of public services, and the ways that race, ethnicity, and social class are implicated in these and other issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 428/Asian Studies 428/Phil. 428/Soc. 426. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Mary Gallagher (metg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course seeks to convey an overall understanding of the evolution of China during the tumultuous twentieth century, with a strong focus on the current period. While concerned primarily with domestic developments, the course also considers the impact of the global arena on China and the issues China poses in international politics. The course presumes no prior knowledge of China. Three hours of lecture and one of discussion per week. Term paper and two exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 439/Econ. 325. Inequality in the United States.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank W Thompson (fthom@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 and 102. (3). (SS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Economics 325.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 441. Comparative Politics of Advanced Industrial Democracies.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Madeleine Hosli (mhosli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is concerned with the politics, institutional structures, and electoral systems of European states. It provides an overview of theoretical approaches to study electoral procedures and coalition-formation in multiparty systems and illustrates how governments are elected and operate in several European states. The focus is on both large European states, such as Germany, France, and the United Kingdom, and smaller ones, including the Benelux countries. It indicates the relationship of these states with the institutions of the European Union (EU) and with European states that are not (yet) EU members. Analysis of multiparty government in the past decades will be compared with recent data on elections, governments, and policy outcomes in Europe. Grades are determined on the basis of two short (six to ten page) papers, class participation (which may include a short presentation), a midterm and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 454. Governments and Politics of Southeast Asia.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael Ross (mlross@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Southeast Asia is one of the world's most dynamic and complex regions, and is of growing importance on the global stage. This course offers an introduction to the region for advanced undergraduates; it is also an introduction to some of the broader political, economic, and environmental issues in the developing world. The course has three parts. The first is an introduction to the history and politics of the region; the second is a country-by-country study of nine of Southeast Asia's states: Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, the Philippines, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, and Burma. The final section looks at the five central problems facing the region – economic development, environmental protection, international security, human rights, and democratization. Grading will be based on two midterms, a final exam, and in-class discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 456. Government and Politics of Japan.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven Benfell

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 140, 440, or 450. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


POLSCI 460. Problems in World Politics.

Section 001 – The Politics of Global Trade and Finance.

Instructor(s): Jude Collin Hays (jchays@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice with permission of the instructor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine the political underpinnings of the global economy. The major analytical approaches to studying international political economy will be covered and used to understand a wide range of topics. We will focus on both the international and domestic politics tied to international trade and finance and discuss whether the institutions that currently govern international economic activity are robust enough to survive important political and economic changes that are currently taking place in the world. For example, we will consider whether the domestic political coalitions that have traditionally supported free trade are breaking up as a result of increased international capital mobility and whether the international cooperation necessary to manage the global economy can survive major changes in the international distribution of power. Classes will be mainly lecture with some discussion. There will be three in-class exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 468. Cooperation and Conflict in the International System.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Douglas W Lemke (dlemke@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We begin by discussing what the international system is, consider the possibility of multiple international systems, and describe some of the history of the modern international system(s). We then turn to consideration of patterns of cooperation and of conflict within the system. We will seek to understand why it is that some members of the system can cooperate in rather remarkable ways, while at other times overt conflict erupts. When discussing cooperation we will pay close attention to arguments about why international cooperation should be especially hard to achieve, and will speculate on ways to overcome these difficulties. Students will be awarded grades based on their performance in two exams and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 470. Comparative Foreign Policy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): William Zimmerman IV (wzim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce the student to the advantages and disadvantages of alternative approaches to foreign policy analysis. Particular attention is given to assessing approaches that attempt to explain behavior, such as spending in alliances, without reference to the states' domestic political systems; to those that emphasize the key role of internal political processes in explaining how states behave internationally, and to those that suggest that for many states similarities across issue area may be more crucial in defining the policy process than the nature of the states themselves. There is a midterm, a paper, and the final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 472. International Security Affairs.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Francis W Wayman Jr (fwayman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course concerns the changing nature of East-West and North-South relations, examines the process by which American national security decisions are made, and treats alternative explanations of national security affairs. A special focus will be on the causes of modern wars, including the Arab-Israeli Conflict and the Persian Gulf War. Students should have taken an introductory course in international politics, such as PS 160. There will be three exams. Methods of instruction include lecture and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 481. Junior Honors Proseminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Martha Feldman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to Honors concentrators with junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a seminar that is designed to introduce students to the Honors program in political science and the process of research design leading to the defense of a thesis prospectus. Students must be admitted to the program before enrolling in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 482/Econ. 483. Positive Political Economy.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yan Chen (yanchen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 401. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.econ.lsa.umich.edu/~yanchen/econ483/econ483.html

See Economics 483.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 483. American Political Parties and Electoral Problems.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Hanes Walton Jr

Prerequisites & Distribution: Poli. Sci. 111, 140, 410, or 411. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this class we seek a broad understanding of what the American political parties are, how they operate and how they evolved, and how they compare to parties in other countries. We will study them mainly in the context of presidential and congressional elections, although we will also consider local parties, party organization, and parties in legislatures. Students will be expected to read assigned books and articles and be prepared to discuss the material. Lecture and discussion will be the format.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 486. Public Opinion, Political Participation, and Pressure Groups.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sharon D Wright (sdwright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will analyze the ways in which organized interest groups have mobilized their members, increased their voter participation, elected their preferred candidates, and changed American policies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 487. Psychological Perspectives on Politics.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Cara Wong (cjwong@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Explanations of political phenomena often rest on psychological assumptions. Studies of leadership, decision-making, socialization, public opinion and voting, violence and revolution, propaganda and persuasion all have a psychological base. The purpose of this lecture course is to survey major currents of theoretical and empirical work in the psychological analysis of politics. Extensive background in political science and psychology courses is NOT required, nor is the course part of a departmental sequence. Grades will be based on examinations and at least one paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 001 – Political Elites and Leadership.

Instructor(s): Judith S Kullberg (kullberg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In all nations, a very small percentage of the population dominates politics and the policy process, making decisions that directly or indirectly affect the lives of all citizens. This sub-population of officials and the politically influential may be conceived of as a more or less coherent group, as the "political elite." Because of their access to power and resources, the interests, motivations, behavior, and values of political elites and individual leaders are significant variables in the determination of political outcomes.

This course will survey theories of political elites and leadership and address questions central to the study of politics: Why do leaders and elites emerge in most social groups and in all societies? What are the origins of power and authority? What is the relationship between political actors and the state? Are certain types of individuals more likely to seek power and to succeed in politics? What role do leaders and elites play in shaping events and history? By exploring the research conducted on leaders and elites around the globe, the course will also examine how historical, cultural, and institutional factors shape and constrain elite behavior.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 002 – Political Economy.

Instructor(s): Robert Franzese, Jr. (franzese@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course explores the impact of politics on the economy and of the economy on politics. Our approach to this broad subject matter will be positive as opposed to normative. I.e., we are interested in understanding, i.e., theoretically explicating, a set systematic relationships which may exist between features of the socio-politico-economic environment, not in commenting on the justness of those relationships. E.g., does the periodicity of elections induce cycles in economic policy and perhaps thereby outcomes, and, if so, how?

The course proceeds via an in-depth reading of six great books spanning the substantive realm of political economy: first a broad theoretical overview (Olson), then studies of (2) electoral politics and economic policy in the U.S. (Tufte), (3) partisan politics and economic policy in the U.S. (Hibbs), (4) politics and economics in developed democracies (Hall) and in (5) developing countries (Bates), and (6) the international economy and domestic politics (Rogowski).

Class meetings: partly lecture, partly discussion; Reading: 110 pp./wk. +/-; Writing: three short papers, one intermediate-length paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 003 – Environmental Politics. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): David P Stuligross (dstuligr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

People around the world have never been more aware that human development has a variety of negative environmental effects, yet such development continues. What are the policies in various countries that challenge (or reinforce) that developmental path; and what are the sources of political access available to individuals and political communities that seek to change (or retain) the status quo?

This upper division course will provide students with analytical tools to address these questions in a broadly comparative perspective. First, we will use a variety of political-economic methods to evaluate the politics of environment in general way. These methods will be supplemented with detailed country studies that will show how, where, when, and why political action yields particular policy outcomes. Next, we will use the tools developed in a single-country context to evaluate variations in environmental policy and environmental politics across countries in several issue areas. Finally, we will probe the ways in which politics in one country influences policies elsewhere: international linkages among communities, interest groups, and national governments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 489. Advanced Topics in Contemporary Political Science.

Section 004 – The Politics of Fascism and Right-Wing Movements. (3 credits.) Meets with German 499.001 and Sociology 495.007

Instructor(s): Andrei S Markovits (andymark@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two 400-level courses in political science. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See German 499.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 492. Directed Studies.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A directed study course on an individual research topic that is developed between an individual student and a faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

POLSCI 494. Senior Honors Proseminar.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Daniel Levine (dhldylan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to senior Honors concentrators. (4). (Excl). No more than four Honors credits may be elected as part of a concentration plan in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a seminar for seniors who are working an on Honors thesis. Students must be admitted to the Honors program before enrolling.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 495. Undergraduate Seminar in Political Theory.

Section 001 – Theorizing the Political Subject.

Instructor(s): Anne Manuel (amanuel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will explore writings on political subjectivity by 19th- and 20th-century political theorists. We will focus specifically on the tradition of thought that celebrates political freedom as a subjective experience. This tradition privileges the subjective experience of freedom over freedom understood as a phenomenon dependent on particular social and political conditions. Some questions we will consider are: how do theorists sustain and justify their focus on the inner experience of the individual? What are the merits and weaknesses of this theoretical tradition within political theory? What is the relationship between the inner experiences of freedom and the particular social and political conditions in which freedom emerges?

We will address these questions by analyzing the appeal and the limits of freedom as defined by the philosophers we read. In addition, we will carefully consider the role of social conditions and political institutions in generating the type of political freedom various thinkers value. Texts by Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Frederick Nietzsche, and Julia Kristeva among others will be used as a basis for our inquiry. We will also view two films by the French feminist Nouvelle Vague director Agnes Varda. Students in this class must be willing to engage in the close reading of sometimes obscure and difficult texts. Dedication, as well as an open and inquisitive mind, will be essential. Participation in seminar discussion is mandatory. Students will write three short reader-response papers and one long final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

Section 001 – Constitutional Theory.

Instructor(s): Francene M Engel (fengel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine important debates about the nature of constitutional government and the question of whether there is an appropriate way to interpret the Constitution. The course will begin by looking at what the purpose and function is of a constitution in a political system. Why do we have a Constitution? Does the United States Constitution have a theme? If so, is it constraining or empowering? Moreover, a commitment to constitutionalism raises questions about how the document should be interpreted. Students will be asked to think about if it is possible to construct theories of constitutional interpretation, which can constrain the personal policy preferences of judges. Can the Constitution become easier to understand if judges simply adopted the "appropriate" method of constitutional interpretation? Would the Constitution have a more consistent meaning and be less ideologically tainted if theories of interpretation were adopted with an eye towards the application of neutral principles, the "literal" language of the text and/ or the "original intentions" of the framers? Or, in reality, do these theories have no consequences? Furthermore, since a constitution must permit change, we also will explore the amendment process. What is the purpose of amendment and how do we recognize it? How do we distinguish between amendment and interpretation? Students will be asked to apply many of the theories studied in this seminar to contemporary debates over constitutional meaning.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

Section 002 – Political Knowledge and News Attention

Instructor(s): Margaret Marie Howard (meghow@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How much ordinary people know about government and politics and how much influence they should have on policy are eternal questions in political science. This course will investigate what some of the answers to these two fundamental questions are. Although the class will limit itself primarily to Americans and American government, we will sometimes compare the U.S. to other countries and their citizens' levels of knowledge and engagement in the political system. Although many of our readings will be about empirical research, we will begin with normative questions discussed by the ancient Greeks – questions that are just as pressing today as they were when Plato was alive.

The reading load will be substantial; the tests will be difficult; the research paper will be challenging; but, if you want to argue whether ignorance is bliss or a danger, take this class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

Section 003 – Theories of Diversity.

Instructor(s): Scott E Page (spage@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will study the impact of diversity in political, economic, social, and physical environments. We will try to understand how and why homogeneous and heterogeneous systems differ. For example, we will analyze why the most stable and the least stable systems tend to be diverse. We will cast a wide net touching on subjects as varied as racial segregation, comparative advantage, political competition, and measurements of intelligence. Students should have an interest in politics and public policy and be willing to learn some straightforward mathematical models such as The Game of Life, The Prisoner's Dilemma, and Schelling's tipping model.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

Section 004 – Politics & Social Identities.

Instructor(s): Cara Wong (cjwong@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar is designed to provide students with an introduction to the concept of identity in the context of American politics. We begin by examining the definition of identity, its sources, and its measurement. After these issues have been addressed, we turn to an exploration of the effects of identities on public opinion, behavior, and politics. Written assignments include several short papers and a seminar paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 496. Undergraduate Seminar in American Government and Politics.

Section 005 – Election Dynamics.

Instructor(s): Christopher H Achen (achen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a junior-senior seminar designed for those who have had several prior political science courses. We will read some recent books on contemporary democratic theory: What do the voters know? How do they vote? How are votes translated into government policy? What do parties do to shape electoral outcomes? Some of the reading is quantitative, but a good grasp of high school algebra will suffice as background. Grades will be based on several short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Section 001 – Comparative Constitutions.

Instructor(s): Jennifer L Bednar (jbednar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Constitutions define the rules by which we are governed. When we write our constitution, we make a contract with one another and with our future selves; we define possibilities and we close doors. This course takes an interest-based approach to the study of constitution-building: through comparisons of nearly a dozen cases we will consider how founders balance short-term (adoption) and long-term (stability) goals. We will examine how different institutional structures create winners and losers in society, and how well founders understand the effect of their designs at the time of adoption. We will study compromises made, evaluating them in terms of both short-term and long-term goals (United States, Israel). We will study constitutional change, thinking about the advantages of meeting the changing needs of society, but also its drawback; the importance of consistency, reliability, legitimacy (Canada, France) We will look at cases where a constitution was imposed upon a society (Japan, Weimar Germany) and where a society borrowed another country's institutional design (Mexico, Argentina), to better understand how local interpretations affect the meaning of the constitution. We will consider the growth of legitimacy as a constitution evolves slowly, and is sometimes not even written (Great Britain, European Union). Many of our cases are federal: one knotty issue is asymmetrical arrangements between the center and the regions (Russia, Canada, European Union). Throughout the course, we will consider the role of courts, of legislatures, and of peoples as interpreters of the constitutional document.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Section 002 – Longterm Trends.

Instructor(s): Ronald F Inglehart (rfi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/polsci/497/002.nsf

This undergraduate seminar will examine the impact of a wide variety of factors on the evolution of life, and the evolution of societies. The underlying goal is to understand how the societies we live in are changing and are likely to change in the long term. We start with the distinctive and unusual factors that made this planet suitable for complex life. We then examine the impact of factors ranging from technological change to epidemics, genetic evolution, and variations in agriculture and climate. Each participant will write three short papers, each of which counts for 25 percent of the final grade. Your oral contributions in the seminar will count for 25 percent of the final grade.

Required reading:

  • Peter Ward and Donald Brownlee, Rare Earth, Copernicus/Springer, 2000.
  • William McNeill, Plagues and Peoples, Anchor, 1976.
  • William McNeill, The Pursuit of Power, University of Chicago Press,1982.
  • Jared Diamond, Guns, Germs and Steel, Norton, 1997.
  • R. Dawkins, The Selfish Gene, Oxford, 1978.
  • Ronald Inglehart, Modernization and Postmodernization: Cultural, Economic and Political Change in 43 Societies. Princeton University Press, 1997.
  • John Mickelthwait and Adrian Wooldridge, A Future Perfect, Crown, 2000.

This is an expensive list. It is recommended that you buy them, but the above books have been placed on reserve.

Course pack, on sale at Accu-Copy, 518 East William St. Course pack selections:

  • Bonner, The Evolution of Culture in Animals
  • Inglehart and Baker, Modernization, Cultural Change and the Persistence of Tradition, ASR 2000.
  • Dawkins, Unweaving the Rainbow, "The Balloon of the Mind."
  • Economist, Why did Growth Take Place?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Section 003 – Religion and Politics : Explanations and Experiences.

Instructor(s): Daniel H Levine (dhldylan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar examines a range of historical and contemporary experiences of religion and politics.

Cases include movements, events, and national or cultural experiences of conflict or change in the relations of religion and politics. Case materials will be drawn from The United States, Latin America, Europe, Africa, and the Islamic world.

Explanations for these experiences will be drawn from a range of theories and discussions in the social sciences with particular emphasis on theories of secularization, social capital, social movements, and discussions of ideology and conflict.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 497. Undergraduate Seminar in Comparative and Foreign Government.

Section 004 – Gov't & Politics of South Asia.

Instructor(s): David P Stuligross (dstuligr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar, which focuses mostly on the 'domestic' politics of India, has multiple aims. In addition to providing an overview of political developments in India since independence, the seminar assesses the various perspectives used to understand Indian politics, south Asian politics, and comparative politics more generally. It will also attempt to develop an alternative way of approaching the study of Indian politics by stressing the role played by political parties in Indian political developments and examine the limits of such an approach.

The seminar will begin with a discussion of some of the characteristic features of Indian politics, such as: How to build genuinely representative political institutions in an extremely diverse nation with multiply cross-cutting cleavages? and, Why do democracy and collective violence seem to accompany each other? The next segment will focus on the formal institutional structures of the Indian state, which were developed in the decade following independence: the role of the state in economic development; federalism generally; linguistic states in particular; the bureaucracy; the judiciary. This institutional framework will be used as the foundation of a theoretical framework for understanding party politics in general, the organization and subsequent decline of the Congress Party, and the rise of the Bharatiya Janata Party. This background in party politics will be used to address contemporary issues such as the rise of fundamentalism, separatism, and ethnic conflict. After examining the politics of social policy and economic reform, the course will conclude with a brief discussion of the "nuclearization" of India.

While the readings have India as their sole focus, seminar participants are encouraged to think comparatively. A comparative focus can allow us to better understand the nature of Indian politics as well as assess the validity of various theories developed to understand Indian politics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

Section 001 – Global Environmental Change and State.

Instructor(s): Harold K Jacobson (hkj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, loss of biodiversity, and other aspects of global change could threaten the earth's habitability. Dealing with these problems, which originate in fundamental demographic and economic changes, requires unprecedented global cooperation. This course addresses the issue of whether these global challenges can be met within the existing nation-state system or whether managing global environmental change will force modifications in this system. The course examines: the current global political system and its characteristics and origins; the classic debate between those who posit limits to growth and those who argue that with appropriate economic, social and political arrangements, continued growth is possible; the nature of global environmental change and responses to it, such as the 1992 Framework Convention on Climate Change; and the adequacy of these steps. Three books and several articles. Students prepare a research paper and write a final examination. Lectures, discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

Section 002 – The Politics of Israeli Foreign Relations.

Instructor(s): Aharon Klieman (aklieman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Israeli external affairs are addressed within a comparative foreign policy framework. Its international behavior and diplomacy are traced to a combination of factors, beginning with four constants: Jewish history and the legacy of pre-state Zionist statecraft, geopolitical determinants, the perceived ongoing national security dilemma and, not least, domestic politics.

Specific attention will be given to the following sub-themes: Israeli perceptions and core worldviews; the national interest-national power calculus; the decision making process as well as the influence of political elites, institutions and bureaucrats. A final section of the course is then devoted to Israel's strategic map, the U.S. connection and a range of bilateral relationships.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 498. Undergraduate Seminar in International Politics.

Section 003 – History and Politics of Chemical and Biological Warfare Disarmament. Meets with RC Interdivisional 450.001 and RC Social Science 460.001.

Instructor(s): Susan Presswood Wright (spwright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing, primarily for seniors concentrating in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Interdivisional 450.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 529/Public Policy 529. Statistics.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior coursework in calculus or concurrent enrollment in Math 413, and permission of instructor. Previous coursework in statistics is not required. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Public Policy Studies 529.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 592. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Instructor(s): Helen Graves (hmgraves@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400 level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Political Science Department sponsors an upper division, juniors and seniors, Political Internship Program, Political Science 592, worth 3 credit hours. Students are placed with Legislators (Republicans and Democrats in Lansing), with Federal election officials in the Senate and Congress from Michigan, the Michigan Executive, the Courts (at all levels, local and Federal), the bureaucracy (at all levels), legal profession, interest groups, private sector (such as Governmental Affairs of the Major Auto companies) and international placements such a Canadian Consulate, as well as the Media.

Students are in placements for 16 hours a week. They write a Political Journal encompassing a daily log of activities, two questions from the newspaper relating to the placement, new language and a quote of the week. In addition, they do 3 interviews…one with a staff member, one with the head of their agency/office, and one with a political actor. Additional assignments include their goals for the internship, their resume, and acknowledgment letters at the end of the internship. The interns attend 5 Seminars with the Director. Lansing interns attend 6 brown bag luncheon Seminars and Detroit interns attend two brown bag luncheon Seminars. Readings include, Keeley and Brown's "Asking the Right Question" and Turow's "One L" for those going to Law School. On average, each intern will write approximately 80 to 100 pages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

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