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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in RC Interdivisional

This page was created at 9:43 AM on Wed, Nov 1, 2000.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in RC Interdivisional

Wolverine Access Subject listing for RCIDIV

Take me to the Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for RC Interdivisional.

To see what has been added to or changed in RC Interdivisional this week go to What's New This Week.

Search the LS&A Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

Most RC courses are open to LS&A students and may be used to meet distribution requirements. In most instances, RC students receive priority for RC course waitlists.

RC sections of LS&A Courses

These sections will be letter graded for all students Math 115 Section 110 Analytical Geometry & Calculus. See Math 115.


RCIDIV 350. Special Topics.

Section 001 Job Search Strategies for RC Students

Instructor(s): Sharon Vaughters

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Mini/Short course

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


RCIDIV 351. Special Topics.

Section 002 Advanced Readings in German.

Instructor(s): Erica Kuhra Paslick

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar is conducted entirely in German and is designed to further enhance the students' preparedness to either study or work abroad, pursue a major in German, or gear up for graduate studies. Students will select a topic they are particularly interested in and will do their reading, writing, and presentations in that area. They may choose a single author, a particular genre, or topic related, non-literary text of either a philosophical, scientific, or cultural nature. Class time will be devoted to individual project presentations, regular progress reports, writing workshops with peer critique and tutorial consultations with the instructor. Participants will write 5 smaller essays at certain stages of their studies and complete one comprehensive research report of 10 pages or more by the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCIDIV 351. Special Topics.

Section 003 Adv. Proficiency in French

Instructor(s): Dominique M Butler-Borruat

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is especially designed for, but not limited to, students who intend to spend their Junior Year in France. It will give students a set of basic references to navigate everyday life as foreign students in France. Topics will include:

  • Geography and the use of land
  • History
  • Political structure of the country
  • Economy
  • The European Union
  • Media

In addition, different types of academic writing and presentations style with which students are expected to be familiar in a French university will be introduced.

Assignments will test content as well as form. The final evaluation will take into account the student's preparation, active participation, and knowledge of cultural facts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCIDIV 450. Science and Social Responsibility.

Section 001 History and Politics of Chemical and Biological Warfare Disarmament. Meets with RC Social Science 460.001 and Political Science 498.003.

Instructor(s): Susan Presswood Wright (spwright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Problems of chemical and biological warfare and disarmament have achieved salience in the post cold war period for several reasons. The most spectacular have been the discoveries that both Iraq and the former Soviet Union developed large BW capabilities, both countries stockpiling daunting quantities of biological agents, and both largely eluding discovery until the revelations of the weapons programs provided by defectors. The Aum Shinrikio attack in the Tokyo subway underscored the dangers of terrorists acquiring and using, or threatening to use, chemical or biological weapons in cities. A more general reason for the prominence of biological and chemical warfare issues is that they have been portrayed by the U.S. and other western governments as examples of major security problems to be confronted by the western alliance in the 21st century.

On the disarmament side, the completion of the Chemical Weapons Convention in 1992 has been claimed as a major achievement, signifying the willingness of major states to cooperate in order to ban a major category of weapons. But efforts to develop a regime which would provide parallel inspection machinery for biological weaponry, already banned by the Biological Weapons Convention, confront thorny problems, especially how to provide sufficient transparency for credible assurance concerning disarmament in the face of strong military and industrial interests in maintaining secrecy.

The questions posed today by chemical and biological weaponry also illustrate more general security problems of the post cold war era:

  • approaches to achieving security by the remaining super power and its western allies
  • differing positions on security held in other regions
  • he regional specificity of security problems
  • linkages between chemical and biological weapons and nuclear weapons
  • chaos of post-cold war Russia and the problem of "loose weaponeers"./li>
  • the problem of verifying compliance given national interests in protecting commercial and military secrecy
  • the challenge of restraining military interest in "dual-purpose" technologies

The seminar will use case studies to bring out these general questions. There will be a strong emphasis on choices of theoretical framework (e.g., mainstream political realism vs. political economy, feminist theory, world order theories) and how these shape security positions. The seminar will also draw attention to the role of language in formulating problems and solutions. Finally, throughout, the seminar will emphasize development of skills in research techniques through pursuit of a research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

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