Information for Prospective Students Information for First-Year Students Information for Transfer Students Information for International Students Learning Communities, Study Abroad, Theme Semester Calendars Quick Reference Forms Listings Table of Contents SAA Search Feature Academic Advising, Concentration Advising, How-tos, and Degree Requirements Academic Standards Board, Academic Discipline, Petitions, and Appeals SAA Advisors and Support Staff

Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in RC Social Science

This page was created at 9:43 AM on Wed, Nov 1, 2000.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in RC Social Science

Wolverine Access Subject listing for RCSSCI

Take me to the Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for RC Social Science.

To see what has been added to or changed in RC Social Science this week go to What's New This Week.

Search the LS&A Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

Most RC courses are open to LS&A students and may be used to meet distribution requirements. In most instances, RC students receive priority for RC course waitlists.

RC sections of LS&A Courses

These sections will be letter graded for all students Math 115 Section 110 Analytical Geometry & Calculus. See Math 115.


RCSSCI 280. Moral Choice in Context: Social-Psychological and Historical Perspectives.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry Greenspan, Ian Robinson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the contexts in which, and the processes by which, profound moral choices are made. It does so through a series of case studies that include both psychological experiments especially Milgram's famous experiments on "obedience" and selected historical situations. Examples also come from weekly films and, on occasion, from literature and drama.

Major topics include:

  • The process of moral choice within extreme situations; in particular, the ways some people became killers and others became resisters during the Holocaust and at the My Lai massacre in Vietnam. We will look at the ways our analysis of moral choice in such extreme circumstances may both inform and distort the ways moral decisions take place in everyday life.
  • The evolution of discrete acts of moral resistance into large-scale social movements; more specifically, the process of organizing sustained commitment within the civil rights movement in Mississippi during the 1960s. Here, we consider the role that social networks, shared participation, and a shared history play in the process and impact of moral choice. More generally, we explore "activism" as a context of moral choice.
  • In the final segment of the course, we consider contemporary America as a context for moral choice. We will assess the ongoing debates about a crisis of "moral character" in contemporary American culture and politics. Individualism, capitalism, secularism, psychologism, globalization, consumerism, and more have all been blamed. How do we assess what faciliates and what erodes ethical commitment in contemporary America the contexts of our own moral choosing?

Primary texts include Milgram's Obedience to Authority along with later commentary on Milgram's work; Browning's and Goldhagen's studies of Holocaust perpetrators; Bilton and Sim's Four Hours in My Lai; Payne's and McAdam's studies of the civil rights movement in Mississippi; and commentators on American culture from DeToqueville to Falwell to Lasch and Sennett. There will be films both features and documentaries every Monday evening from 7-9 p.m., so no student should enroll for this course who will not be free during those hours.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCSSCI 290. Social Science Basic Seminar.

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar is designed for students at the sophomore level or above who are seriously considering a Social Science major in the Residential College. The seminar is a requirement in the Social Science Program; its purpose is to prepare students to pursue a concentration program in Social Science in the RC. Seminar sessions will introduce students to the RC Social Science faculty and upper-level Social Science majors, and discussion will center on how to turn general interests into problems that can be investigated systematically. Early on, students will begin working on their own with guidance from faculty and upper-level students whose interests complement theirs in order to complete the principal goal of the seminar: designing a coherent, individualized program of study for the Social Science major.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCSSCI 302. Contemporary Social and Cultural Theory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Frank W Thompson (fthom@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Social Science 301 or equivalent (as determined by the instructor). (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar-format course will intensively examine primary texts selected from writings of some of the most influential contributors to recent and contemporary social theory, ranging from Gramsci, Keynes, and Hayek, through Rawls, Habermas, and Foucault, to Rorty, Sen, and Putnam (among others). Competing accounts of variations in social institutions and dynamics will be compared and related normative considerations will be examined. Regular (very) short papers on aspects of the readings will be required during the term to ground class discussions. A substantial paper on an agreed topic will be due at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCSSCI 345. Community Strategies Against Poverty in the United States.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Weisskopf

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Developed as a collaboration of the Residential College and the Center for Community Service and Learning, this 4-credit-hour course analyzes the changing context of poverty and anti-poverty strategy in the United States, with an emphasis on community-level initiatives to improve standards of living. The first half of the course (up to the Spring Break) focuses on the nature and sources of poverty in the U.S. and on the historical evolution of efforts to combat poverty. The second half of the course addresses a variety of community-based initiatives in recent decades to overcome urban poverty. Throughout the course attention will be devoted to the complex inter-relationships between race, class, and gender in urban America, as they affect poverty and efforts to overcome it with examples drawn frequently from the experience of the Detroit metropolitan area.

The course will meet twice a week, sometimes with all students together and sometimes in three separate discussion groups of roughly 15 students each. Before the Spring Break there will generally be presentations (and occasionally videos) during the first hour of each 2-hour session and discussion group meetings during the second hour. After the Spring Break the first weekly session (on Tuesday) will usually be devoted to a presentation by a guest lecturer with special expertise in the subject to be addressed. Guest lecturers will include faculty from various UM units, such as the College of LS&A, the School of Social Work, and the School of Public Health, as well as outside experts on community-based approaches to social and economic change. For the second weekly session (on Thursday) the class will usually meet in discussion groups; but at times a relevant video will be shown to the full class in the first hour.

Students are expected to send weekly e-mail messages on the assigned readings to their discussion group leader and to play an active role in classroom discussion. Students will also write one short paper and take an in-class exam (at the end of the first half of the course), and they will write one term paper (during the second half of the course). There are no prerequisites for this course, but a previous course in the social sciences is highly desirable.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCSSCI 360. Social Science Junior Seminar.

Section 001 Steam Engines and Computers: From Industrial Proletarians to Information Workers. Meets with RC Natural Science 415.001.

Instructor(s): O'Donnell

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Natural Science 415.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCSSCI 360. Social Science Junior Seminar.

Section 002 Excellence, Equity, and the Politics of Education.

Instructor(s): David Thomas Burkam

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on the broad issue of educational equity, explored within the context of the many goals of American schooling. In particular, readings and discussions will assess: (1) the social distribution of educational resources, opportunities, and outcomes; (2) the role of schooling in reproducing and reinforcing prevailing economic, political, and social relationships; and (3) the potential contradictions between the societal functions of schooling and the professed goals of educators. Class time will follow a seminar format with student requirements, including (a) extensive readings and active participation/leadership in class discussions, (b) four short essays, and (c) a final research project with in-class presentation.

Readings will be drawn from a course pack and such texts as: Bowles & Gintis (1976). Schooling in Capitalist America. Bowen & Bok (1998). The Shape of the River: Long Term Consequences of Considering Race in College and University Admissions. Kozol (1991). Savage Inequalities. Oakes (1985). Keeping Track: How Schools Structure Inequality. Powel, Farrar, & Cohen (1985). The Shopping Mall High School.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCSSCI 360. Social Science Junior Seminar.

Section 003 Nature and Sources of the Creative Process

Instructor(s): Jeffrey E Evans (jeevans@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Is the creative process fundamentally mysterious? Does it come from some place "deep within". and within what? The mind? The brain? What occurs in a flash of insight or intuition? Where do ideas come from? What is the role of emotion and motivation in developing ideas? Of the artistic medium, society, culture, other people, chance?

In this course we will first treat creativity as an autonomous, often unconscious process that gives birth to ideas. We will examine models of imagination, fantasy, and mental imagery. Do those models help us understand our own subjective states? Do they ring true to our understanding of the structure and functioning of the brain? Might there be a gene for creativity?

Or is it true, as Thomas Edison claimed, that genius is only 10% inspiration, but 90% perspiration? What is the role of conscious, hard work and the "prepared mind" in the creative process, and is that work part of or separable from a mysterious creative "moment"? Or was Edison, in coming from a world of science and engineering, speaking of a fundamentally different process than creating in the fine arts and literature? Further, what is the influence of the specific medium clay, charcoal, fiber on the creative process? Are there, in fact, many creative processes? This course will address different fields of creative endeavor and ask in what ways the mind, the brain, and the whole person act differently if one is, for example, composing a dance, writing a story, or imagining a mathematical space.

This course will also treat creativity as a process of life which, like life itself, is permeated with the influences of society, culture, and other people. How does creative work fit into real lives? How do real people balance the necessities of life with the need or desire to create? How can creating help people achieve balance in their lives? Finally, we will also explore how the creative process is affected by mental, emotional or neurological illness. Why is manic-depressive illness, for example, so often associated with creativity? To help us integrate these various perspectives and thus achieve more realism in our study of creativity, we will read biographical and autobiographical material and invite guest speakers to share insights on their own creative work.

This course is meant for students who (a) are primarily interested in psychology or neuropsychology and want to broaden their studies to include the creative process, or (b) are primarily interested in the arts or creative thinking and want to deepen their understanding of their own creative processes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCSSCI 360. Social Science Junior Seminar.

Section 004 Outside the Lines: Explorations in Interdisciplinarity Introducing Historical Anthropology. Meets with Anthropology 298.001 and History 302.001.

Instructor(s): David W Cohen

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/rcssci/360/004.nsf

Over the past four decades, scholars in the fields of Anthropology and History have actively explored, and tapped into, the methods and orientations of the other discipline. Some of this work reflects a sense of deep crisis in the disciplines, some of the work reflects a heady optimism regarding the possibility of comprehending little understood realms of the past and more fully comprehending the social, cultural, and economic forces affecting the world over the past millennium. Through experimentation outside their own disciplinary formation, scholars in Anthropology and History have altered the shapes of their home disciplines while making what has become a most influential case for interdisciplinarity across the academy. Out of this work, and out of the conversations and debates concerning interdisciplinarity, a distinctive literature, a fresh critical voice, a scholarly field, and a movement have emerged: Historical Anthropology.

Historical Anthropology has found its métier in the destabilization of the confident methodologies and certain epistemologies of the academic disciplines...beautiful work made possible through unsettling the given terms of debate, reshaping the languages of analysis, undefining the rules of the disciplinary crafts...original, creative multi-layered work joining disparate strands of scholarship...getting beyond the privileging powers of large events to get at basic conditions of life...enlarging the grounds of critique and self-critique through introducing the scholar into the text...opening the doors between the academy and the wider world...rethinking the nature and work of archives...subtly linking emotion, interest, and scholarly inquiry...reconsidering the modes of telling stories and recognizing the prior and potential powers of stories as they are told and written in diverse genre and in different settings.

This course, organized as a workshop, will take up the several dimensions of historical anthropology. We will read five remarkable monographs that give expression to the possibilities of interdisciplinary scholarship and to the extraordinary developments in the borderlands of the disciplines of anthropology and history over the past several decades. We will look at several collections of significant papers on the subject as well as key arguments that gave historical anthropology some of its form and direction. We will screen, and discuss, several films that further define the ethic and values of historical anthropology. And members of the workshop, the course, will develop several critical pieces that explore, through practice, some key issues in historical anthropology.

Meeting hours: a three-hour workshop meeting per week plus five film screening sessions and one special half-day conference meeting during the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCSSCI 381. Unteaching Racism.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helen Fox (hfox@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl). (R&E).

Upper-Level Writing R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do children learn to accept a certain level of racism as "normal," even in the most progressive communities? How can we convince skeptics that racism continues to flourish on campus, in schools, and in the media? How can we develop new materials, methods, and forms of education that include more cultural styles and perspectives than the dominant Eurocentric model? How can white students and students of color become allies by un-teaching racism in our schools and communities?

This is a community service learning course with a twist. Instead of linking readings and discussion with work in impoverished communities of color, students of all backgrounds and cultures will work in predominantly white, middle class communities to educate themselves and others about "normal," everyday racist practices. Students can intern in community organizations devoted to multiculturalism and anti-racist teaching, they can learn to be intergroup relations facilitators, or conduct research on campus of "normal, ordinary" racist practices in classrooms, dormitories, campus police services, and so on. They might make a video to play on community access television, get involved in Peacekeeper Training for future KKK rallies in Ann Arbor, or create training materials for other community service learning courses or Alternative Spring Break activities.

Readings and discussion will cover such topics as definitions of racism and prejudice, white privilege, institutional racism, teaching and learning styles encouraged by different cultures, John Ogbu's concept of voluntary and involuntary minorities, the psychology of stigma and its effect on children, racial identity development theory, and how race consciousness and its associated taboos are taught, sometimes unwittingly, in U.S. society. Students will be encouraged to develop their own ideas and understandings about this perplexing and sensitive topic rather than adopting a particular political stance toward it. All that is required is a willingness to see from the various points of view of those most affected by the problem, and a desire for greater justice and equality.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCSSCI 388. Transitions to Capitalism.

Section 001 This course meets the Social Science Theory Requirement.

Instructor(s): Frederick Cooper

Prerequisites & Distribution: A 200-level Social Science course. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course examines one of the most basic transformations in economic and social history first by a close reading of a social theoretical work Marx's Capital and then by comparison of two cases: England from the late seventeenth century through the early phases of the industrial revolution, and southern Africa in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The first is the classic case of the development of capitalism, the second an instance of change in the context of an already developed and expansionist European economy. Yet in both instances, cultivators who had complex rights in land and varied obligations to landlord lost many of those rights and ties to individual landowners, and wage labor became the central feature of agricultural organization. In both areas, changes in agriculture were closely related to industrialization. Yet the social structure and economic context out of which both transitions arose were vastly different, and the meaning of race and class in the economies that emerged from the transition periods were equally distinct. Those differences will form a way of getting at the most basic questions of what the concept of capitalism signifies, and how theory can be both used and critically examined. There will be some lecturing in the course, but the emphasis will be on reading and discussion. Students will write a short essay on the readings plus a longer one on a topic of their choosing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

RCSSCI 460. Social Science Senior Seminar.

Section 001 History and Politics of Chemical and Biological Warfare Disarmament. Meets with RC Interdivisional 450.001 and Political Science 498.003.

Instructor(s): Susan Presswood Wright

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See RC Interdivisional 450.001.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

RCSSCI 460. Social Science Senior Seminar.

Section 002 Detroit Oral History Project. Meets with RC Humanities 484.003.

Instructor(s): Charles C Bright (cbright@umich.edu), Katherine Mendeloff

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing. (4). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a collaboration between the RC Drama and Social Science programs, other units of the university, and community groups in Detroit. It involves an unusual structure and will provide creative opportunities and learning experiences unlike any at the UM. Sophomores, juniors, and seniors are welcome.

The Project: The goal is to collect oral histories and develop theater from them. We are going to be working in the southwest section of Detroit a densely settled and uniquely mixed (Mexican, Latin American, African American, east European, and Arabic populations) community that has long-standing links to the auto industry, and especially to the huge River Rouge plant at its western border. We will be interviewing people about the history of this community and about their working lives, and we will be doing theater and writing workshops, both at the UM and in the community, to develop the oral histories into material for the stage. We will be working in close collaboration with theater people and playwrights, as well as residents, in the community and with other folks at the UM who have been doing archival work on Southwest Detroit this fall, in preparation for the oral history/theater project in the winter academic term. We hope to build an archive of historical material that can be posted on a Detroit history web-site and we will be exploring these possibilities as we go along.

The Format: One of the aims of this project is to put students with different backgrounds, skills, and interests into interaction. Accordingly, everyone enrolled will be expected to participate in all aspects of the work, studying the history, conducting interviews, assembling the material, and transforming it into theater. We will be doing interviews and theatrical improvisations, historical work and playwriting, interactively, all academic term. We are especially interested in having some students with Spanish proficiency, as several of our interviewees will not be entirely comfortable in English, and we may want to develop some bilingual theater from their oral histories. The class will meet regularly at the UM on Friday afternoons (2-5) and will also make regular trips to Detroit, mainly on weekends but, as schedules permit, on other occasions as well. We will probably run a play-writing workshop at an elder's home one evening during the week, and other collaborative ventures are likely to emerge as we go along. Although this is a winter term course, there will undoubtedly be continuing work on this project going through spring academic term, and students who are interested can enroll for extra credit.

For more details, please contact Charlie Bright, 201 Greene (615-6301), cbright@umich.edu or Kate Mendeloff, 114 Tyler (647-4354), mendelof@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Page


This page was created at 9:43 AM on Wed, Nov 1, 2000.


LSA logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2000 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.