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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Cultural Anthropology

This page was created at 7:07 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Cultural Anthropology
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ANTHRCUL

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology.


ANTHRCUL 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Thomas E Fricke (tomf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/anthrcul/101/001.nsf

This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture; human genetics, evolution and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex-gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change, and the emergence of a world system. Required readings come from one introductory text and additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion-recitation. Two objective exams (multiple choice and true or false questions) cover the two halves of the course. The second exam is given on the last day of class. There is no final exam and no term paper. Section leaders require quizzes and, perhaps a short paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1, 3, 4

ANTHRCUL 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 026.

Instructor(s): Conrad P Kottak (ckottak@umich.edu), Kelly M Askew (kaskew@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/anthrcul/101/026.nsf

This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture and ethnicity; human genetics, evolution, and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex and gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change, and globalization. Required readings come from one introductory text and additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion. Two objective exams (multiple choice and true or false questions) cover the two halves of the course. The second exam is given on the last day of class. There is no final exam and no term paper. Section leaders require quizzes and perhaps a short paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 158. First Year Seminar in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001 The Changing Family in the U.S.

Instructor(s): Janet Stouffer Dunn (dunnb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS). May not be included in an anthropology concentration.

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar for freshman will examine the notion of family and family life in the United States. Using both a historical perspective and a comparative cross-cultural approach, we will look at the place of family in society, the changing structure and composition of families and households, and the role of parents, children, and other kin in American families. Students will engage in active learning through the discussion of assigned readings, through individual presentations, and through written assignments. The small seminar format is designed to draw students into rigorous scholarly discussions of contemporary issues while exposing them to broad intellectual perspectives on the given topic.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 222. The Comparative Study of Cultures.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Janet Leigh Finn (jlfinn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS). Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores non-Western and Western societies as well as the methods, politics, and ethics entailed in the representation of cultural difference and historical change. We will be centrally concerned with the formation and transformation of cultures in the context of colonizing and globalizing processes in the modern period. Our goal is to develop a historical anthropological perspective that enables us to appreciate the richness of human diversity, the historical and political conditions under which cultures develop, and the human potential for transformation. Our work will center on the intensive examination of a group of five or six path-breaking monographs, complemented by articles and movies. These texts will allow us to study with some depth not only a wide range of cultural formations in different societies, but also differing methods and theoretical perspectives used to interpret them. We will pay special attention to the role of fieldwork and archives in the formation of anthropological and historical interpretations, to the procedures and theories that serve to establish scientific claims, and the effects of power in the formation of knowledge. Classes will be organized around the discussion of texts, and will include student presentations. Students will be required to write short papers about the central texts.

Textbooks:
"Mirror for Humanity," by Conrad Kottak.
"The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down," by Anne Fadiman.
"All Our Kin," by Carol Stack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 258. Honors Seminar in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 001 Mexico: History and Identity

Instructor(s): David L Frye (dfrye@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Admission to the College Honors Program. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar will introduce students to the history of the people of Mexico through the prism of the question of identity. Within the context of Mexico's colonial and post-colonial history, what does it mean to identify, for example, as Indian or as non-Indian? How does gender identity inflect ethnic, regional, or class identity? How does life 'on the border' affect discussions of what it means to be Mexican?

Classes will be discussion based. Assignments will include weekly discussion papers (1 p), one short research paper (5-7 pp) due in the 6th week of class, and one longer research paper (10-15 pp), due in the last week of class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 272/Ling. 272. Language in Society.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Ann Dickinson (jdcknson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/anthrcul/272/001.nsf

What place does language have in everyday life? Do people really communicate when they speak to each other? How is language used to reinforce relationships of power, especially along racial, gender, and class lines? How do languages change, and how does change reflect the structure of society?

This course is about the nature of language and the ways in which it reflects and informs social life. Topics covered include:

  1. How and why languages change;
  2. the relationships between speech and social class, race, and gender;
  3. the politics of language use in society, including language policy in third-world societies (especially in South America) and the "English-only" movement in the United States;
  4. the ways in which language is used to construct social, cultural, and political "realities" and the ways these realities are contested as, for example, in the abortion debate.

We will try to answer some of these questions in this course, which is about the nature of language and social life. The course has no prerequisites except curiosity about the interrelationships between language and society. There is a required text, Nancy Bonvillain, Language culture and communication, and a supplementary course pack.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 285. Cult Archaeology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Lisa C Young (lcyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Cult archaeology examines popular and fantastic interpretations of archaeological remains presented in the press and on television. We focus particularly on claims that cultural achievements by indigenous peoples are a consequence of contact with superior beings, such as aliens from outer space or other "more advanced" cultures. We will examine the logical flaws in these pseudoscientific explanations and the racist assumptions that underlie them. The goal of this course is for students to learn critical thinking skills that will enable them to assess popular interpretations of archaeological remains in the future, to understand professional ethics, and to appreciate cultural racism and the harm that it does. The course format is lecture and discussion sections. Evaluations are based on section exercises, participation, and three exams. The textbook is Kenneth L. Feder's Frauds, Myths, and Mysteries. A course pack and readings from web sites supplement the text.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001 Outside the Lines: Explorations in Interdisciplinarity Introducing Historical Anthropology. Meets with RC Social Science 360.004 and History 302.001.

Instructor(s): David W Cohen (dwcohen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/rcssci/360/004.nsf

See RC Social Science 360.004.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 315. Native American Peoples of North America.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Instructor(s): Christopher S Beekman

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Native American communities, often deeply rooted in traditional places and voices despite relocations and losses of native languages all involve strong family ties and histories of local and regional power struggles. In this course, we look at cross cultural dynamics and tribal identities in political encounters between Native American peoples and various others: developers, environmentalists, educators, other governmental authorities, poets, and social scientists, to name a few. Key issues include land rights, family relations, alcoholism, and freedom of religion. We also look at contemporary Native American fiction, non-fiction, and film documentaries as cultural forces which challenge others; constructions of who Native American peoples are. A recurrent question: what are the limits and possibilities of self-definition for Native American peoples, in what circumstances?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 323. Pacific Islands Anthropology.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Stuart A Kirsch (skirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How well have anthropologists prepared us to understand contemporary Pacific societies? To what degree have relations between Europeans and Pacific Islanders, ranging from 'first contact' to colonialism, and from cargo cults to Christianity, shaped Pacific societies today? Finally, what happens when 'history' and even 'custom' become the subjects of political debate? This course will attempt to answer these questions while providing an introduction to the peoples and cultures of Micronesia, Polynesia, Australia and Melanesia. Among other topics, the course will examine shifting identities in the context of emerging national traditions; response to the environmental impact of logging, mining and nuclear testing; the effects of tourism, video and other global culture flows; and the impact of increased participation in the global economy on local systems of exchange. The course will combine lecture and discussion, with ethnographic film forming and integral part of class material. Required readings: several monographs, an edited volume and a course pack. Final evaluation: based on participation, presentations, a midterm exam, a short research paper and a take-home final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 357. Undergraduate Seminar in Ethnology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Anthropology of Europe.

Instructor(s): Janet Carol Hart (janeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in cultural anthropology and junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The class will examine studies, issues, and debates in the vast field of European ethnology. Key concerns will be: what are the boundaries of European anthropology and a concept called "Europe"? How have anthropologists made intellectual decisions in the midst of global and local transformations, and given the explosion of cross-cultural interactions in and around the continent? Can we talk about a tradition of European anthropology and any kind of common identity among its practitioners? [Witness the active existence of such organizations as the European Association of Social Anthropologists]. Are European anthropologists necessarily European? Does the region studied have to be formally designated as Europe? What kinds of regional hierarchies exist within the discipline of anthropology? Finally, how do recent shifting identities, outbreaks of hate-mongering in parts of Europe, and so-called postmodern and postcolonial problems affect anthropological practices in the region? These points will be discussed in this seminar. Grades will be based on class attendance and participation, successful completion of readings, a term paper, and several shorter exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 373. Articulating Gender: Women, Men, Speech.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Alaina M Lemon (amlemon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: At least one course in Anthropology (Ethnology or Linguistic Anthropology), Linguistics, Women's Studies, or the Social Sciences. (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In the wake of popular therapeutic writing about sex differences and language in the United States, especially about miscommunication between men and women, certain assumptions about language and gender have become entrenched. In this course, we will challenge those assumptions by exploring ways men and women speak in many societies around the world, and by asking how those ways of speaking intersect broader patterns and practices of social hierarchy and difference. Do men and women use language differently? Or do different expectations about who should speak how create our understandings of gender in the first place? We will read recent essays in the linguistic anthropology of gender, popular and therapeutic writing on men, women, and language, and occasionally analyze filmed dialog in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 386. Early Civilizations.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey R Parsons (jpar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (4). (SS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/anthrcul/386/001.nsf

This course examines the long-term development of pre-Columbian Latin American civilizations, including the Aztec, Maya, and Inca. The geographic coverage extends northward from northwest Argentina and northern Chile, through the Andean and Amazonian regions of Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, and Columbia, and into Central America and Mexico. After a discussion of the general principles of cultural evolution, we consider a series of specific archaeological case studies that reveal prehistoric cultural change. We reflect on how these ancient societies may provide useful perspectives on some contemporary problems such as population pressure, ecological degradation, and ethnic conflict. No special background is assumed. There are three lectures and one discussion section per week. Students are evaluated on the basis of three take-home essay exams. Those taking the course ULWR will also submit rewritten versions of their take-home exam essays. Textbook: Patterns in Prehistory, 3rd edition, by Robert J. Wneke, Oxford University Press. 1999.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 388. Gender and Archaeology.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Carla M Sinopoli (sinopoli@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101 or 282. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Gender provides a basic organizing principle in all human societies. Through cultural constructions of gender, biological differences between males and females become associated with cultural values. These values then condition and determine individuals' occupations, social status, economic rights, and belief systems and understandings of their world. Thus while biology is given, gender is both constructed by human actions and decisions and influences subsequent human behaviors. In this course, we will explore the role of gender in human prehistory. Our time span will be broad, spanning nearly three million years. Among the topics to be addressed are models of early tool use and the relevance of gender to human evolution, gender in prehistoric art and symbolic representation, the origins of agriculture, emergence of gender inequalities, and transformations of gender relations with the emergence of political stratification and the state. Case studies will be drawn from both New and Old World archaeology and ethnography. We will also explore archaeological methods and challenges to a study of gender in prehistoric contexts, and will examine the history of the archaeology of gender in the context of the history and practice of North American archaeology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 399. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 001 Honors Ethnology

Instructor(s): Erik A Mueggler (mueggler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This Honors course sequence in cultural anthropology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in cultural anthropology and have applied for senior Honors in the Department of Anthropology. This course is divided into two parts. In the Fall Term, the students will meet once a week in seminar to read and discuss a selection of significant monographs and papers in ethnology, and a selection of writings on fieldwork methods and research strategies in ethnology. This seminar provides background for the students to define their own senior Honors thesis project. By the end of the term, the students will have decided on a project, and begun preliminary work on it. In consultation with the Honors advisor the student may request any member of the Anthropology Department to serve as a main thesis advisor or second reader. In the Winter Term, the students will convene periodically in seminar with the Honors advisor to discuss their research projects and get feedback from the group, as well as staying in contact with the Honors advisor and second reader. By the end of the term, each student should have completed the research and write-up for their thesis so that they can make a formal summary presentation of it for the group. Original field research or library work may be used for Honors projects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 399. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 002 Honors Archaeology

Instructor(s): Lisa C Young (lcyoung@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is the second half of the Honors sequence in archaeology. Honors students will periodically meet as a group with the instructor to discuss the progress of their thesis, read each others work, and give constructive suggestions to each other. The majority of the academic term will be spent finishing data analysis and writing. Oral presentations of thesis conclusions will be presented to a general audience at the end of the academic term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 403. Japanese Society and Culture.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer E Robertson (jennyrob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a multi-media course designed to introduce and explore the salient patterns in and of (mostly post-WW2) Japanese society and culture. Our overall aim is to appreciate the ways in which Japanese women and men, girls and boys from punks and theatre fans to police officers and office workers construe, construct, communicate, reproduce, and resist everyday practices and realities. We will also challenge and transcend parochial stereotypes of Japan (of Japanese and Euro-American invention alike). Japan warrants closer attention by Americans and for more reasons than the wild success of animation (anime'), Nintendo, and Pokemon in their everyday lives. Long characterized in the popular and scholarly media as the "cultural opposite" of the United States for example, "the Japanese" are homogeneous, more polite, less litigious, less violent (but more suicidal), and more tuned to nature than "the Americans" people are understandably surprised to learn that Japan was a powerful empire in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; that it has a long history of social unrest and feminist activism; that it is a multi-ethnic society; that its mass media thrive on gratuitous sex and violence; and that its environment is one of the most polluted in the capitalist world. Rather than casting Japan and the U.S. as opposites, it is more productive to understand the various forces and circumstances out of which institutions such as the constitution, educational system, racism, consumerism, health care, popular entertainment, the police, etc. emerged and were shaped in each society. This then, is our mission: to look carefully and closely at those Japanese social structures, institutions and practices that either closely resemble or greatly deviate from those of mainstream America so that we can simultaneously learn how to understand better the complexities of American culture and society which is far more than just the "opposite" of everything Japan represents. Ditto Japan.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 409. Peoples and Cultures of the Near East and North Africa.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrew J Shryock (ashryock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a survey of anthropological approaches to the cultures of what is now called "the Middle East," a region extending from Morocco to Iran. Primary attention is given to Arabic-speaking, Muslim societies. We will examine enduring topics of interest, such as tribalism, kinship, gender, and Islam. We will also explore new problems (and styles of analysis) that call older interest into question. These include (trans)nationalism, mass culture, the political consequences of popular literacy, globalization, diasporas, and novel forms of ethnographic engagement with these topics. Finally, the course addresses the growing number of Middle Eastern communities that now live outside the region, with a special focus on Arabs in Detroit. Classes will include a mix of lecture and discussion, and readings will be drawn mostly from recent monographs. Grades will be based on two essays, with an additional short paper for graduate students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 411/AAS 422. African Culture.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu (omk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing or permission of the instructor. AAS 200 recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to and familiarize them with the nature and dynamics of the unity and diversity of pre-colonial sub-Saharan African cultures and societies. The focus is on INSTITUTIONAL characteristics. Topics covered include: ecology and environment; the distribution of races and peoples; economic institutions; kinship and marriage; political legal institutions; religious, magical, and witchcraft beliefs and practices; music/dance and the arts. Grades are based on four take-home papers and contributions to class discussions. Films and videos.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 417. Indians of Mexico and Guatemala.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Joyce Marcus (joymar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101, 222, or junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This lecture course provides an overview of Indian groups occupying Mexico and Guatemala. Groups include the Maya, Nahuatl (Aztec), Zapotec, Mixtec, Huichol, Mixe, Tarascans, etc. Course will focus on social and political organization, world view and religion, subsistence, settlement patterns, etc. Comparisons and contrasts between groups will be made in an effort to determine shared ancestry, the borrowing of various practices, the domination of one group over another, and independent developments. Two required papers (midterm and final) constitute course grade. No prerequisite. Text: Indians of Middle America, by Robert B. Taylor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 422. Ethnography in America.

Ethnology-Regional Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Rebecca L Upton (rupton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing, and one course in anthropology or American Culture at the 200 level or above. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores American society and culture through ethnographic studies, that is, studies based primarily on long-term participant observation. It also uses other commentaries on American society to frame questions. Central concerns of the course include the workings of class, history, and identity in American everyday life and moral discourse. These are explored in the domains of gender and ethnicity; schools and families; small communities and urban neighborhoods; and workplaces. American culture in the context of rapid social transformation includes a series of tensions that may be expressed in such oppositions as class versus equality, individual versus community, stability versus mobility. These tensions are expressed, either explicitly or unintentionally, in various kinds of cultural productions: films, novels, mass media. And they may be explored in ethnographies. While the general approach of exploring cultural tensions through the ethnography of everyday life will remain constant, the ethnographic focus (schools, families, work, communities, regions of the country) may vary from term to term. Seminar format; one brief midterm essay and one final paper.

Textbooks:

  • Weaving Work and Motherhood, by Anita Garey. Temple University Press, 1999.
  • Shadowed Lives, by Leo Chavez. Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1992.
  • No Place Like Home, by Chris Carrington. University of Chichago Press, 1999.
  • Racial Situations, by John Hartigen. Princeton, 1999.
  • Jocks and Burnouts, by Penelope Eckert. Columbia Teachers College, 1989.
  • Surrogate Motherhood, by Helena Ragone. Westview Press, 1994.
  • No Shame in my Game, by Katherine Newman. Vintage Books, 1999.
  • Exotics at Home, by Micaela Di Leonardo. University of Chicago Press, 1998.
  • Hermes' Dilemma and Hamlet's Desire, by Vincent Crapanzano. Harvard Univ. Press, 1992.
  • The Predicament of Culture: Twentieth Century Ethnography, Literature and Art, by J. Clifford. Harvard University Press, 1988.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 426. Principles of Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Ann Dickinson (jdcknson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 101 or 222. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in anthropology.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An overall view of the field of anthropology, stressing basic concepts and objectives, designed for students specializing in other disciplines who are interested in the nature and scope of anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 439. Economic Anthropology and Development.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Maxwell K Owusu (omk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to economic anthropology and development in rural, village-based, tribal, peasant, urbanizing and industrializing societies and cultures of the Third World: Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Middle East. The FIRST PART reviews the nature of economic anthropology, its scope, objectives, basic concepts, theories and methods of investigation. It discusses economic anthropology as it relates to conventional/development economics. The SECOND PART examines anthropological (social science) perspectives on development and underdevelopment: progress, modernization, acculturation, socioeconomic growth. The THIRD PART is concerned with specific case studies of problems of Third World development and underdevelopment: rural/urban poverty and inequality; women and development; international migration and globalization; etc. The course CONCLUDES with an overview of global issues in Third World development and underdevelopment in a post-cold war environment. The course is recommended for anthropology concentrators and all students with serious interest in comparative cultures and Third World development and underdevelopment. Lecture/discussion format. Films and videos shown in class when available. Final grades based on three take-home papers and contributions to class discussion.

Basic texts: Lucy Mair, Anthropology and Development; and Polly Hill, Development Economics on Trial.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 444. Medical Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Holly Peters-Golden (hollypet@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101 or 222. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/anthrcul/444/001.nsf

The concepts of "health" and "illness" are culturally constructed. This class will examine beliefs about these states of being, and the ways in which they are both products and illustrations of the larger social system in which they are found. Ideas about the history of disease, social construction of the body, illness causation, therapies and therapists, healing symbols and rituals, and the social roles of patients and healers will be explored. In addition to examining these beliefs and processes cross-culturally, we will also draw upon examples from Western biomedicine among them cancer, AIDS, eating disorders, schizophrenia to illustrate the powerful ways in which illness and culture are bound together.

Textbooks:
The Spirit Catches You and You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors, and the Collision of Two Cultures, by Anne Fadiman, 1997. (paperback)
An Anthropologist on Mars, by Oliver Sacks, 1995. (paperback)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 447. Culture, Racism, and Human Nature.

Ethnology-Theory/Method

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in the social sciences. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the possible origins of culture to understand the unique behavior and historical development of Homo sapiens and traces the salient features of human history and contemporary modernity to discuss and explain the nature of humans. The understanding of the nature of humans and their development will enable the students to comprehend, explain and resolve racism, part of a pan-human phenomenon. Is racism fundamental to the character of human culture? The course will suggest that many of our modern social problems have a common generation the nature of human culture. That would suggest that the solutions will require a social transformation in the character of human culture. These examinations of human culture will require us to return to the discussions of Leslie White (culture is autonomous) and Alfred Kroeber (culture is superorganic) to determine the possibilities of social transformations that contemporary society may require.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 453/AAS 454. African-American Culture.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Melvin D Williams (mddoublu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in the social sciences. AAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the Afro-American as one example of how humans live. It places distinctive Black behavior within its social context and its history. It reminds of middle-class Jews in Nazi Germany who believed that success would make you full citizens. It ponders that great (although restricted) contributions that African Americans have made to white identity, the U.S. Nation and economy, fashion, youth rebellion, gay and women rights and entertainment. An understanding of African Americans enlightens the nature of systemic oppression and explains the anomalies of Native America, Jack Johnson, Paul Robeson, Joe Louis, Jackie Robinson, Tiger Woods, Michael Jordan, Venus Williams, W. Arthur Lewis, Toni Morrison, Ralph Bunche, E. Franklin Frazier and many others. This course looks at the future of African-Americans in a millennium in which the memory of their oppressions and reparations seem lost.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 457. The Film and Other Visual Media in Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Ruth Behar (rbehar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in cultural anthropology, American culture, women's studies, or film and video studies. (4). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

New approaches to the study of film which focus on how cultural issues are represented, negotiated and contested in a wide range of documentary, ethnographic, and narrative films showing students how the construction of "otherness" and modern "selfhood" are played out in films. Moving from the "voyage out" to the "voyage in," the course parallels the way anthropology as a discipline has moved from an emphasis on differences to a desire to map points of contact and identification, and understand the otherness in our own midst.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001 Indigenous Political Movements

Instructor(s): Stuart A Kirsch (skirsch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the prospects and limits of contemporary indigenous political movements. In Winter 2001, the course will be held in conjunction with a speaker series on indigenous political movements supported by the Ford Foundation (Crossing Borders Project, "Social Movements and Negotiated Revolutions") and the International Institute. Students will attend the public lectures and the class may also meet separately with the speakers.

The emergence of the 'indigenous' as a political category and social movement has opened up new politics and debates about alternative forms of sovereignty and resource use in many parts of the world. This course examines the efforts of indigenous peoples to ensure their own physical and cultural survival, as well as to protect their environment. The paradox of their position, however, is that in order to protect their rights, they often must become global activists: the maintenance of difference in the political economy of contemporary culture requires movement and translation across cultural, political and geographic boundaries. Working with these activities is a range of actors, each with their own agendas and resulting compromises for the communities that accept their support. These social movements have the capacity to introduce new ideas into the public domain in a compelling fashion, presenting alternatives to the universalizing discourses of science and capital. Topics may include, but are not limited to: definitions and histories of the indigenous; the politics of culture and representation; debates about sovereignty and special rights; social movements and civil society; alternative notions of space, place and time; the intersection of indigenous politics and global environmentalism; and indigenous knowledge and debate about cultural and intellectual property rights. Examples will be drawn primarily from the Pacific, Southeast Asia and the Americas, with special emphasis on Melanesia and Amazonia. Readings: several monographs, edited volumes and a course pack. Requirements: short discussion papers, term paper, participation and presentation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 002 Language, Ethnicity, and Nationalism

Instructor(s): Judith T Irvine (jti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Many Americans and Europeans assume that communities normally are, or ought to be, monolingual that language differences divide people from one another, while a common language unites them. Yet, much of the world is multilingual. What do language differences mean for their speakers' social identities and relationships? In this course we will consider the relationship between communication and community particularly as these have been conceptualized (and ideologized) under the rubrics of "tribe," "ethnic group," and "nation." We will explore what kinds of social groupings those terms might (or might not) label, and how they might (or might not) connect with languages and with communication networks. Our approach will be cross-culturally comparative and, where relevant, historical. Through a discussion of selected theoretical works and case studies, we will consider topics such as language use in small-scale societies; the functions of multilingualism; the politics of language standardization and print media; language and the idea of "nation" in nineteenth-century Europe; the European colonial expansion and its influence on indigenous peoples and languages; and the role of language in nationalistic movements. In addition to the class discussions and readings that involve the whole class, each student will explore and report on a particular case study. Evaluation will be based on class participation (including discussion-leading and a class presentation), some short writing assignments, as in-class test, and a term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 003 Art and the Anthropological Imagination.

Instructor(s): Stephen L Pastner (spastner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Taught by an anthropologist/sculptor, this course focuses on the analysis and production of narrative visual art that derives from, and itself informs, more traditional anthropological and historical scholarship an art genre commonly marginalized by both anthropologists and art-historians. The format of the course will combine lectures, group discussions, formal student presentations and art practicum elements. Evaluation criteria will, for most students, include production of a work of art based on scholarly research, and a paper and presentation describing its genesis and development. However, for the resolutely "left brained" who may wish to forego the art project, additional writing assignments will be possible. There will also be participation in one of several collaborative class presentations and the possibility of one or more exams/quizzes.

Textbooks:

  • The West of the Imagination. by W. Goetzmann and W. Goetzmann.
  • Erect Men/Undulating Women. by M. Wiber.
  • Eaters of the Dead. by M. Crichton.
  • Blackrobe. by B. Moore.
  • Keepers of the Game. by C. Martin.
  • Dance of the Tiger. by B. Kurten.
  • The Cultural Life of Images. by B. Molyneaux.
  • And course pack.

In addition to the required texts and "course pack," students electing to do an art project should anticipate some art-materials expenses.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

ANTHRCUL 458. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 004 Violence & Social Order: Making Sense of Force, Terror, Torture & Politics.

Instructor(s): Daniel M Rothenberg (dmrothen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). May be repeated once for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will investigate the relationship between violence and social order. Is violence an necessary element of society? What is violence? How is it regulated, understood, and experienced? The course will consider different theoretical perspectives on the definition and meaning of violence as understood through both institutional and non-institutional mechanisms of regulating behavior. The course grounds interdisciplinary theoretical discussions with a series of case studies focusing on: violent crime, domestic violence, religious violence, imaginary violence and state violence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 473/Ling. 473. Ethnopoetics: Cross-Cultural Approaches to Verbal Art.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Mannheim (mannheim@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in anthropology, linguistics, or literature. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do we understand the verbal art of non-western peoples without imposing our pre-conceived folk ideas about form, performance, authorship, and textuality? And if we do manage to hear and study these arts in their own "terms," can we translate and represent them without making a caricature of these sources? This course will consider efforts by anthropologists, linguists, poets, folklorists, and literary theorists to address these questions at several levels: (1) working our methodologies which allows us to see the poetics in others' arts; (2) critically assessing the methodologies; and (3) exploring theories about differences between oral literatures and written traditions as well as the cultural shaping of literatures. We will also consider what ways this work contributes to reshaping anthropology itself.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 488. Prehistory of Mexico.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Kent V Flannery (kflanner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101, 282, or junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course covers the Prehispanic culture sequence for Mesoamerica outside the Maya region. It begins with the first evidence for humans in late Pleistocene Mexico, and proceeds to a discussion of Archaic hunting-and-gathering period of 8000-2000 B.C. The origins of agriculture during this preceramic period are documented, as well as the rise of sedentary agricultural villages by 1500 B.C. The course then considers the evolution of ranked societies during the Formative Period (1500 B.C.-A.D. 100) and of urban stratified societies during the Classic Period (A.D. 100-800). The evolution of Mexico's ethnohistorically documented Postclassic societies the Toltec, Aztec, Mixtec, Zapotec, Huastec, and Tarascans is then traced up to the Spanish Conquest of A.D. 1519. There will be two lectures a week, accompanied by reading of a course pack of relevant journal articles and book chapters.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 491. Prehistory of the Central Andes.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey R Parsons (jpar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101, 282, or junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~jpar/ant491/

This course examines the development of pre-Columbian Andean civilizations from the terminal Pleistocene (ca. 13,000 years ago) through the European contact period (16th century A.D.). Major emphasis is on the archaeological study of increasingly complex society after ca. 3000 B.C. in the region between central Chile and Colombia. One previous course in basic anthropology is desirable. Students will be evaluated on the basis of a take-home midterm exam (25%), a take-home final exam (50%), and a 10-15 page term paper (25%). Textbook: Indigenous South Americans of the Past and Present: An Ecological Perspective, by David J. Wilson, Westview Press. 1999.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

ANTHRCUL 492. Prehistory of Oceania.

Archaeology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Henry T Wright (hwright@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 101, 282, or junior standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course explores the spread of people into the islands of the Pacific Ocean, beginning with the colonization of Australia about 50,000 years ago and continuing up to the spread of the Polynesians to the most distant isles. Ecological, Human Biological, Linguistic, and Archaeological data will be brought to bear on both specific historical problems and some of the broad anthropological concerns that have made Oceania a source of new ideas for anthropologists for almost a century. The basis of student evaluation includes an in-class essay midterm and final, or original independent research paper.

Textbooks:

Required: On the Road of the Winds... by Patrick V. Kirch. 2000. University of California Press. ISBN 0-5202-23457-0.

Recommended: Evolution of Polynesian Chiefdoms. by Patrick V. Kirch. 1989. Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-5212-7316-1 (paperback).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

ANTHRCUL 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ANTHRCUL 503. Non-Western Colonialisms.

Ethnology-Topical Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Jennifer E Robertson (jennyrob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: 400-level coursework in Anthropology, History, and/or permission of instructor. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This seminar foregounds imperialist regimes and colonialist states operating outside of Western Europe and the United States in the 19th and 20th centuries, focusing in particular on Japan. The absence of the Japanese Empire in the (mostly Eurocentric if also anti-orientalist) anthropological literature on colonialism and imperialism is puzzling. Perhaps the fact that Japan was not colonized by Euro-American powers coupled with its ambivalent status in Asia as an anit-colonial colonizer complicates and confounds the East-West binarism informing the critique of Orientalism? It was in the late 19th century that the Japanese state initiated an imperialist project of its own, beginning with the colonization of Hokkaido in 1869, the annexation of Okinawa in 1879, the acquisition of peninsular Manchuria and Taiwan in 1895, the annexation of Korea in 1905, the acquisition of Micronesia in 1919, and eventually, by the end of 1942, dominion over a vast area stretching from the Solomon Islands to Burma's border with India, and from the rain forests of New Guinea to the icy shores of the Aleutian Islands. Japanese colonial ideologues pursued a program of Japanization cloaked in the rhetoric of Pan-Asianis a program whose ramifications are evident today in the conception and structure of nation-ness in Southeast Asia particularly.

This multi-media seminar explores the making and unmaking of the Japanese Empire, focusing on social organizations, assimilation policies, and such cultural strategies as art, film and theater, advertising, education, religion, youth groups, internment camps, sexual slavery, etc... It offers as important corrective to the more Eurocentric literature on colonialism and imperialism. Assignments include reading and discussing the required texts, writing and presenting several short papers (2-5 pages, depending on the assignment), and a final paper (10-15 pages) on a relevant subject of your choice (and my approval).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

ANTHRCUL 556. Fieldwork, Research Methods, and Cultural Anthropology as a Profession.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Andrew J Shryock (ashryock@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course, conducted as a seminar, examines the expectations of cultural anthropology (academic and applied) as a profession, including the relation between theory and practice in several contexts: choosing a research area and problem; grant application strategies; various kinds of fieldwork; old and new frames of analysis (local, transitional, diasporic, interpersonal); research design; data analysis and interpretation; and forms of anthropological writing. Special attention will be given throughout to qualitative research methods and analytical styles.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 577. Language as Social Action.

Linguistic Anthropology

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Mannheim (mannheim@umich.edu), Judith T Irvine (jti@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Anthro. 576. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Develops a framework for viewing languages as a social, cultural, and political matrix, a form of action through which social relations, cultural forms, ideology, and consciousness are constituted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

Graduate Course Listings for ANTHRCUL.


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