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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Biology

This page was created at 7:09 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in Biology
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for BIOLOGY

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for Biology.


BIOLOGY 102. Practical Botany.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Michael Frohlich (mfroh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (4). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Biology 102 is an introductory course about plants and how they are used by people. Each week there are two one-hour lectures, one afternoon two-and-a-half hour lab at the Botanical Gardens, and one one-hour discussion on main campus. Lecture topics include: what plants look like; how plants work; how they make their living in nature; using this knowledge to landscape your house, caring for your house plants, and growing your gardens; medicinal plants; plant breeding; agriculture and food; environmental and psychological importance of plants.

In the lab, each student has his/her own personal space in a greenhouse to grow plants that can be taken home during the term. Lab activities may include: looking at plants; planting seeds; growing plants; rooting cuttings; making medicinal salve; testing soil; preserving garden produce; making hanging baskets; using plant dyes; making bonsai; grafting plants; making wine; and forcing bulbs to flower. The text, An Illustrated Guide to Gardening, will be useful throughout your life. The only prerequisite is your interest in plants. You MUST attend the first lecture and first lab for which you are registered to retain your place; your attendance throughout the term determines part of your grade.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 108. Introduction to Animal Diversity.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Philip Myers (pmyers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/biology/108/001.nsf

The goal of this course is to describe the diversity of animals. Students will learn about the diversity of animal life, accumulate information and experience that will enhance their appreciation of the natural world, and gain background to enable them to better understand current issues concerning biodiversity and conservation. Lectures will be presented by faculty who work with the animals being considered. Topics for each group of animals studied will include a description of diversity, evolutionary background, natural history, and issues concerning conservation or biodiversity. Students will attend three lectures and one discussion section per week. Grades for the course will be based on two midterms, a paper, participation in discussion section activities, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 109. Ecological Knowledge and Environmental Problem Solving.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): John T Lehman (jtlehman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (3). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/biology/109/001.nsf

The world presents us with many types of environmental problems. Everyone needs to have a basic understanding of the scientific knowledge and theories that are needed to solve these problems, so that they can make informed decisions as educated citizens. We will use a case study approach to learn how to apply knowledge and theory to the process of developing solutions.

Examples of the kinds of case studies that we will study include:

  1. Use and subsequent ban on use of DDT and PCB, including examples from Michigan
  2. Control of vampire bats in Central and South America
  3. Reservoir construction and mercury poisoning
  4. Role of wastewater treatment facilities in the water quality of lakes along the Huron River near Ann Arbor
  5. Acid Rain
  6. Biological species invasions
  7. Ecological effects of nuclear radiation
  8. Climate change and efforts to reverse current trends
  9. Landscape fragmentation, spotted owls and other examples
  10. Habitat restoration

Additional readings will include the nature of science, debates about science vs. "junk science". and even about the mindsets of typical scientists. This course can be elected by undergraduate students in any year of their degree program. There will be two lectures per week.

Grading is based on two in-class written examinations and graded evaluation of a final poster presentation. The exams will focus on the critical elements of different case studies. The poster presentation will give you the opportunity to identify an environmental problem, state elements of theory, report present understanding about the problem, and suggest ways to verify the facts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3, instructor is maintaining waitlist

BIOLOGY 118. AIDS and Other Health Crises.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Robert A Bender (rbender@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (4). (NS). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio118/index.htm

This course is designed for non-concentrators with a minimal background in the sciences. The course focuses on the concepts of health and disease and their impact on society. It also focuses on the impacts of the structures and attitudes of society on health and disease. We will examine a number of health crises, especially AIDS, from the multiple viewpoints of science, medicine, public health, law, social prejudices, mass media, high culture, and the historical effects of health and disease. Specific topics will include extensive discussions of the tragic story of Mary Mallon (Typhoid Mary) and Syphilis from 1880 to the present, as well as some discussion of cholera, tuberculosis, influenza, and the black death. About one third of the course will be devoted to AIDS. The course consists of two 90-minute lectures per week and a 1-hour discussion led by a graduate student instructor. Grades are based on five in-class exams and an optional final exam.

Required Reading: Deadly Feasts by Richard Rhodes; And the Band Played On by Randy Shilts

Useful reference: AIDS Update 2000 (or 2001) by G. J. Stine

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

BIOLOGY 120. First Year Seminar in Biology.

Section 001 Evolution of Life.

Instructor(s): David G Shappirio (dshap@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (3). (NS). (BS).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In science, theory is based on evidence, and theory evolves with new knowledge. This seminar focuses on some major questions in Biology, together with ideas and evidence that come from other sciences. What are the kinds of organisms? What evidence argues that they are related? How and why have they become different since life started? Is a billion years sufficient? Two? Three? Four? What do other sciences tell us about organization of recent and past organisms? What may we predict about our future? Students will be asked to participate in discussions based on readings, and to write two or three brief papers. There will be a short textbook; title will be at bookstores.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 162. Introductory Biology.

Section EXAMS WILL BE GIVEN JAN. 29, FEB. 19, MAR. 26, AND APR. 16, 6-8 PM.

Instructor(s): Marcus C Ammerlaan (mcammer@umich.edu) , Brian Hazlett (bhazlett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 130. Biology 162 is not open to students who have completed Biol. 152, 154 or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (5). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($68) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($68) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio162/bio162.html

Biology 162 is a one-term introductory course intended for concentrators in biology, other science programs, or preprofessional studies. Other suitably prepared students wishing detailed coverage of biology are also welcome. The aims of Biology 162 are:

  1. to provide factual and conceptual knowledge
  2. to give an integrated overview of the central tenets of modern biology
  3. to afford experience in obtaining and interpreting biological hypotheses
  4. to develop thinking and writing skills.

Topics in Biology 162 are divided among four areas:

  1. cellular and molecular biology
  2. genetics
  3. evolution
  4. ecology

Students MUST:

  1. attend 3 lectures, 1 one-and-a-half hour discussion, and 1 three hour lab section each week
  2. ATTEND THEIR ASSIGNED DISCUSSION AND LAB MEETINGS EACH WEEK STARTING WITH MONDAY MEETINGS IN THE SECOND WEEK OR THEIR SPACE MAY BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE ON THE WAITING LIST
  3. RESERVE the times and dates for the midterm and final exams (as specified in the Time Schedule) before enrolling.

Students usually purchase a textbook, lab manual, and course pack consisting of a syllabus and lecture notes. No other study guides or supplementary materials need be bought. For Honors credit, register for one of the Honors discussion/lab sections. For further information, contact the Introductory Biology office, 1039 Chemistry Building (764-1430).


Text: Campbell, Reece, Mitchell, Biology 5th Ed.

Lab Manual: available at bookstores

Coursepack: at Michigan Union Bookstore only

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 5 Go to 1039 Chemistry or call 764-1430 to put your name on the wait list.

BIOLOGY 200. Undergraduate Tutorial.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of faculty member in biology. (2). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended for sophomores learning research and laboratory techniques, working under close supervision of a faculty member. It may also be used for directed readings at an appropriate level. It includes reading on a significant topic and regular consultation with the faculty member chosen to supervise the work. The required paper could be on the scientific literature in a broad field, on biological issues on which the student may want to do continuing work, or on the detailed results of research in a biological specialty. Conferences, seminars, readings, and assigned writings are used to develop critical perspectives on modern biological problems and to provide breadth and sense of historical continuity in biological thought.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

BIOLOGY 201. Introduction to Research in the Life Sciences.

Instructor(s): Larry D Noodén (ldnum@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Grade of B+ or better in Biology 162. (1). (Excl).

Credits: (1).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~ldnum/bio201/201home.html

This course is designed to help students identify potential mentors for independent lab or field research. This course is particularly appropriate for students in Biology 162 or 305, 310, or 311 who hope to join the junior/senior Honors Program of the Biology Department. Membership in the LS&A freshman-sophomore Honors Program is not required.

This course will introduce students to the diversity of research opportunities and approaches to research in the biological sciences that are available on the Michigan campus, by having a variety of scientists who sponsor undergraduate research visit the class. Some of the scientists will be from the Department of Biology, while the rest will be from the Medical School and other schools at the University of Michigan. Students in the class will be evaluated based on two short papers, an oral presentation to the class, and on their participation in class discussion. Weekly reading assignments will form the basis of class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

BIOLOGY 222. From Message to Mind: An Introduction to Neurobiology.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Bruce Oakley (boakley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to molecular, cellular, and systems-level neurobiology. Topics include: (1) bioelectricity; (2) intercellular communication; (3) sensory transduction and processing; (4) motor function; (5) the neural basis of learning and selected regulatory behaviors; and (6) development of the brain and sensory systems. Students will be evaluated by exams and participation in discussion. There are three lecture hours and one discussion hour per week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 225(325). Principles of Animal Physiology: Lecture.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Karen A Ocorr (kocorr@umich.edu) , Paul W Webb (pwebb@umich.edu) , Gisela F Wilson (wilsongf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 and a year of chemistry. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio225Winter/

This course is an introduction to the physiological view of animals and emphasizes zoological rather than human aspects. The course uses evidence from different groups of organisms to identify the general principles of functional mechanisms. It also considers variations in these mechanisms as related to the requirements of the animals but does not attempt a phylogenetic survey. The course is intended for concentrators and pre-medical students in their sophomore, junior, or senior years. The subject matter includes metabolism and temperature regulation, nervous and endocrine system controls and integration, respiration and circulation, water and ion balance, excretion, digestion, reproduction, and immune system function. There are three one-hour lectures a week, three one-hour examinations, and a final exam. The web site for this course is located at http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio225/winter

TEXT: Biology, (5th ed.) by Campbell, Reece and Mitchell

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 226(326). Animal Physiology Laboratory.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Sushama Denver (spavgi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in Biol. 225 (or prior enrollment in 325, with permission). Students who intend at a later date to take Biol. 225 will not be admitted to Biol. 226 without special permission. (2). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Credits: (2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio226/

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIO 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation and other short assignments are required during the term.

  • Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, Biology 226, Winter 2001, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 255. Plant Diversity.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Michael J Wynne (mwynne@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (5). (NS). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($60) required.

    Credits: (5).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($60) required.

    Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio255/bio255.html

    An introductory botany course covering a broad spectrum of topics including principles of plant systematics, evolution, growth, and development. The lectures and laboratories concentrate on a group-by-group treatment of plant diversity, ranging from algae and fungi through primitive vascular plants and culminating in flowering plants. The approach is an evolutionary perspective, treating plants as organisms and emphasizing the innovations and structural adaptations of the various plant groups as well as life history strategies. Such topics as pollination biology, plant speciation, and vegetational biomes are included. The course also includes plant growth and structure. Two field trips are scheduled. Two one-hour lectures and two three-hour labs per week. A total of three lecture tests and three laboratory tests will be scheduled. Text: Raven et al., Biology of Plants, 6th edition.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

    BIOLOGY 281. General Ecology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): George F Estabrook (gfred@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 and a laboratory course in chemistry. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Biol. 381. (3). (NS). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Ecology is the science by which we study how organisms (animals, plants, and microbes) interact in and with the natural world. These interactions result in changes, over space and time, in the abundance of organisms of different kinds. Biology 281 is a survey of topics in the science of ecology including: physical properties of the environment and how organisms respond to them; how organisms interact with each other within species and between species; population dynamics; ecological communities; and indirect effects. There are two lectures and one 2-hour discussion per week. Students are expected to read the text. Grades will be based on attendance and participation in discussions, and on five in-class, short-essay exams. Biology 281 is intended for natural science concentrators. Students who have completed (or nearly so) the prerequisites for their natural science concentration will be better prepared to take Biology 281. If the course closes, students should go to room 2039 Nat. Sci. to put their names on a wait list.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

    BIOLOGY 300. Undergraduate Research.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Eight credits of biology and 3.0 grade point average in science; permission of faculty member in biology. (1-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Biology 300 intended primarily for juniors, including Honors students, who wish to pursue independent research or study at an intermediate level in an area of biological science. Students may ask an appropriate faculty member in the Department of Biology to direct the research project and supervise related readings. The project may take the form of an investigation of new problems in the field or laboratory, a detailed investigation of primary sources (a literature survey), development of new procedures or programs, design of a classroom experiment, etc. A final paper is required and must be approved by the research advisor.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    BIOLOGY 301. Writing for Biologists.

    Sections 002-011 satisfy the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

    Instructor(s): Robert B Helling (helling@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162, and completion of the introductory composition requirement. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Upper-Level Writing

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Biology 301 has been designed to help biology concentrators improve their writing AS BIOLOGISTS. Competence in writing in biology requires critical evaluation of one's work. In order to encourage the development of critical thinking, students critique published work as well as write essays, reviews, and research reports. The heart of the course lies in the weekly interaction between staff and student through discussion both in class sections and one-on-one. A weekly lecture provides structure and continuity and allows consideration of other topics such as interviewing and resume writing, ethics in biology, and the nature of science and creativity.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 302. Teaching Experience for Undergraduates.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). May not be included in any of the Biological Sciences concentration programs. (EXPERIENTIAL).

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Undergraduates participating in this course are responsible for (1) aiding regularly assigned Graduate Student Instructors; (2) providing tutorial help for undergraduates enrolled in the course; (3) meeting regularly with discussion and laboratory sessions; and (4) participating with Graduate Student Instructors in instructional activities.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    BIOLOGY 305. Genetics.

    Section 001 EXAMS WILL BE HELD MONDAYS, FEB.5, MAR. 12, AND APR. 2, 6:00-8:00 P.M.

    Instructor(s): Steven E Clark (clarks@umich.edu) , Ronald E Ellis (ronellis@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162, and prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 210. (4). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio305/bio305.html

    Open to students concentrating in the natural sciences or intending to apply for graduate or professional study in basic or applied biology. This introduction to genetics includes the following sections: DNA and chromosomes; gene transmission in Eukaryotes; linkage and recombination; genes and enzymes, the genetic code, and mutation; recombinant DNA, RFLP mapping, the Human Genome Project; gene regulation, transposons; population genetics; and quantitative genetics.

    There are three hours of lecture each week and one discussion section directed by GSIs. The discussion sections expand on and review lecture material, and discuss problem assignments. Grading is based on three term exams and a final covering lectures, discussions and reading assignments. Exams include new problems that test applications of basic concepts and genetic techniques. A practice problem set is available and is covered in discussion sections or the Genetics Study Center. The three term exams are given Monday nights.

    Texts:

  • Principles of Genetics (2nd edition) by Snustad and Simmons This text is intended to supplement the lectures. We will refer to some figures from the text in lectures, but much of the lecture material will be novel.

  • Coursepack Problems 1-270 Available at Dollar Bill Copying.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 306. Introductory Genetics Laboratory.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Santhadevi Jeyabalan (sjeyabal@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Biol. 305. (3). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Credits: (3).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course provides students with laboratory experience on basic genetic principles. Students will analyze patterns of inheritance, gene interaction, linkage relationship, and genetic mapping of unknown mutants of Drosophila through a series of genetic crosses. By using molecular techniques such as Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and gel electrophoresis, mutations in Caenorhabditis elegans will be mapped to chromosomal locations. The experiments in microbial genetics include mapping by conjugation in E. coli, recombination analysis by transduction using bacteria and phage, and complementation tests on "his" mutants of yeast. Experiments in Human Population Genetics include calculating allelic frequencies of PTC tasting in the class.

    Students will also be doing DNA fingerprinting of a VNTR locus using their own squamous epithelial cells. One hour lecture on Mondays 1-2 PM and one three-hour lab are scheduled each week; additional 3-4 hours of lab time per week is expected at irregular times. Students are expected to write one formal lab report and to keep a complete and accurate record of all results and analyses in a bound lab notebook. There are two tests given during the term.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 308. Developmental Biology Laboratory.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Santhadevi Jeyabalan (sjeyabal@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Biol. 307. (3). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($45) required.

    Credits: (3).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($45) required.

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Biology 208 or 307 are not required as prerequisites for this course during the Winter 2001 term.

    This course provides students with the opportunity to study first hand the development of a number of live vertebrate and invertebrate embryos, specifically sea urchin, amphibian, and chick embryos. In addition to observation of normal embryogenesis, students perform several of the experimental analyses which have contributed to a basic understanding of developmental processes.

    Exercises focus on fertilization, developmental morphology, induction, determination and differentiation of various tissues, metamorphosis, and regeneration. In addition to one hour lecture and one scheduled three-hour laboratory session each week, students are expected to spend about three additional hours in the laboratory each week. Grades are based on three laboratory tests, a term paper, and lab notebook evaluation. Maintenance of a lab notebook for a complete and accurate record of observations and experimental results is required. There is a required lab manual.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 310. Introductory Biochemistry.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Karen A Ocorr (kocorr@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162; and organic chemistry. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Biol. 311, Biol. Chem. 415, or Chemistry 451. (4). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio310/

    Introductory Biochemistry is designed to be a general introduction to the chemistry of biological systems. The biweekly lectures for this course present information on biomolecules and the chemical reactions that occur in cells. Students are also exposed to the strategies used by cells and multicellular organisms to coordinate the activity of various metabolic pathways. Topics covered include: protein structure and function; enzyme kinetics; molecular biology techniques, intermediary metabolism; photosynthesis; transcription; translation; and the hormonal regulation of metabolism.

    In addition to the lectures, there is a weekly discussion session which has a project-based format where students are provided with an opportunity to become more actively involved in their own learning experience. Students will have the chance to further explore the relationship between Biochemistry and the world around them through weekly mini-presentations. A variety of weekly projects are designed to help students master the material using the Internet, scientific literature, etc. Discussion sessions are informal, allowing students ample opportunity to discuss the lecture topics and ask questions. There is an extensive web site for this course providing students with numerous additional resources to help them master the material (http://biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio310/). Grades in this course are based on performance in the discussion session, two in-class exams, and a final exam.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 311. Introductory Biochemistry.

    Section 001 ORIENTATION MEETING THURS., JAN. 4, 6-7 PM., NS AUD. SELF-PACED, PERSONALIZED SYSTEM OF INSTRUCTION. MIDTERM EXAM WED., FEB. 21, 6-9 PM; FINAL EXAM THURS., APRIL 19, 6-9 PM.

    Instructor(s): Marcy P Osgood (mosgood@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162; and organic chemistry. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Biol. 310, Biol. Chem. 415, or Chem 451. (4). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio311/

    This course is taught by a self-paced, personalized system of instruction. Students interact, according to their own schedules, with undergraduate TAs. The student takes both a written and an oral quiz for each of 12 units which is graded and evaluated by the TA. If mastery is attained, the student may proceed to the next unit. Grades are assigned according to the number of units successfully completed and performance on the midterm and final examinations. This system is designed to take into consideration different rates of individual learning as well as to eliminate competition among students. TAs are available approximately 75-80 hours/week.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 321(209). Introductory Plant Physiology Lectures.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Jianming Li (jian@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162; college physics recommended. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is offered for students who are curious about how plants do the things they do in their everyday life. The main objective of the course is to provide students with an overview of plant molecular and physiological processes and how they are influenced by environmental factors. Major topics will include plant and cell architecture, plant water relations and mineral nutrition, photosynthesis and cellular respiration, plant growth and development, plant hormone and their signal transduction, plant defense and stress physiology. The course material will be presented in a lecture format, but discussion and questions are very much encouraged. There will be three one and one-half hour tests in the course. Students must purchase the assigned textbook.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 341. Parasitology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Barry M OConnor (bmoc@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162. (4). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($30) required.

    Credits: (4).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course concentrates on the biology of animal/animal interactions including parasitism, commensalism, and mutualism. The focus is primarily evolutionary and ecological, with emphasis on the origins and development of such associations. The organismal approach will be stressed in studies of Protozoa, various helminth groups and arthropods, with examples including parasites of medical and veterinary importance. Discussions of host-parasite interactions will include co-evolutionary perspectives as well as traditional approaches. No specific background other than introductory biology is required, although courses in ecology and evolutionary biology will be helpful. Students will be evaluated on the basis of two hour-exams, a lecture final, a term paper, laboratory quizzes, and a practical examination. This course consists of three lectures and one lab weekly.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 390. Evolution.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Priscilla K Tucker (ptuck@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162. (4). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (4; 5 in the half-term in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This lecture course covers the fundamentals of evolutionary biology with a focus on living organisms. It includes a historical survey of the development of evolutionary theory from ancient philosophers to the present, and critical examination of phylogenetic systematics, natural selection, population genetics, molecular evolution, microevolution, and macroevolution. Weekly discussions will focus on primary literature. Two midterm tests and one cumulative final exam will test students' knowledge of lecture material. Writing assignment(s) based on readings from the primary scientific literature will be required.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 400. Advanced Research.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: 12 credits of biology, 3.0 average in science, and permission of faculty member in biology. (1-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

    Credits: (1-3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Intended for those engaged in original research at an advanced level. This course number is most frequently elected by senior Honors students who have completed Biology 300 and who are completing their research and writing their thesis. A final paper is required. (Refer to the description of Biology 300 for more information.)

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    BIOLOGY 401. Advanced Topics in Biology.

    Section 101 MODEL SYSTEMS IN CELL AND DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY IN THE ERA OF ADVANCED MOLECULAR-GENETICS AND WHOLE GENOME SEQUENCES.

    Instructor(s): Rolf Andre Bodmer (rolf@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Intended for senior concentrators. The prerequisites will be set by the instructor as appropriate for each section. (3). (Excl). (BS). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is designed for graduate students and advanced undergraduates with a strong desire to learn about the state of the art principles and experimental approaches of a variety of model systems in developmental biology. Six internationally distinguished research scholars will spend four days in residence at the University and deliver two lectures, conducting one formal and two informal discussion sessions, and meeting individually with students. In alternate weeks, the students will hear an introductory lecture and discuss primary literature on the model system represented by the visiting scholar.

    This 3 credit course will meet Tuesday and Thursday at 12:00 in 2004 NS for lecture followed by an informal discussion section, and Wednesday at 12:00 for a discussion of primary research papers assigned by the visiting scholar.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 401. Advanced Topics in Biology.

    Section 201 VISUAL SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT. ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING ON MONDAY, JAN. 8, 10:00 AM IN 2111 NS.

    Instructor(s): Stephen S Easter Jr (sseaster@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Intended for senior concentrators. The prerequisites will be set by the instructor as appropriate for each section. (3). (Excl). (BS). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is intended for students who have had an introductory course in biology and an intermediate course in either developmental biology or neurobiology or both. Permission of the instructor is required for enrollment.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 5, permission of instructor

    BIOLOGY 412. Teaching Biochemistry by the Keller Plan.

    Instructor(s): Marcy P Osgood (mosgood@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 311 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). This is a graded course. May not be included in any of the Biological Sciences concentration programs. (EXPERIENTIAL).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio311/proctor.shtml

    Undergraduates who previously have taken an introductory biochemistry course act as TAs for Introductory Biochemistry (Biology 311). TAs meet with the instructor for a two-hour class each week for lectures, presentations, and discussions of teaching and biochemistry. TAs also prepare a report on a recent advance in biochemistry which they present to their peers and the instructor. The major roles of the TAs are to examine the students on their mastery of unit material and to help the students with explanations supplementary to the textbook. At the completion of an instructor-generated written quiz, the student and TA grade the quiz together. TAs learn considerable biochemistry by repeated teachings of unit materials and, in addition, profit from their experience as teachers and evaluators.

    Text:

  • Principles of Biochemistry by Lehninger, Nelson and Cox

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

    BIOLOGY 415. Plant Constituents and Their Functions.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Larry D Nooden (ldnum@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 and one term of organic chemistry. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~ldnum/bio415/415home.html

    Lectures surveying the major secondary compounds in plants, their functions in plants, and their effects on animals. The compounds, which are grouped primarily according to a functional rather than a structural basis, include: pigments, fragrances, hormones, allelopathic agents, toxins (including mycotoxins and carcinogens), medicinal compounds, hallucinogens, plant defenses against pathogens, and others. They are considered in terms of their value to plants, their mode of action, and their evolution or potential use as phyletic markers.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

    BIOLOGY 419. Endocrinology Laboratory.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Sushama Denver (spavgi@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Biol. 418. (3). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Credits: (3).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~www/bio419/

    This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with methods used in endocrinological investigations. The students will learn techniques ranging from the organismal to the molecular level. The course emphasizes hypothesis testing, modern techniques and data analysis. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIO 418 is required to take this course. The enrollment is limited to 12 students. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. The laboratory will meet twice a week (a four-hour session and a two-hour session), however, students should anticipate an additional two or three hours laboratory time at various (and occasionally odd) times in the week. Course assignments include a term paper, quizzes, and other short assignments.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 427. Molecular Biology.

    Section 001 MIDTERM EXAMS WILL BE HELD MONDAY EVENINGS, FEB. 5, MAR. 19, AND APR. 16, 6-8 P.M.

    Instructor(s): Robert B Helling (helling@umich.edu) , Janine R Maddock (maddock@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 305; and Biol. 310 or 311, or Biol. Chem. 415. (4). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Comprehensive coverage of the general principles governing the structures, synthesis, and functions of DNA, RNA, and proteins in the context of the cell. Emphasizes understanding methods and interpretation of data. Topics include genome organization, DNA replication and transposition, chromosome segregation, transcription and translation, the processing of macromolecules, signal transfer, and regulation at various levels. Two lectures per week are supplemented by a 1.5 hour discussion section.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 428. Cell Biology.

    Section 001 MIDTERM EXAMS WILL BE HELD TUESDAY EVENING, FEB. 6, AND THURSDAY EVENING, MARCH 15, FROM 6-8 PM

    Instructor(s): James Bardwell (jbardwel@umich.edu) , Kenneth M Cadigan (cadigan@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 305; and Biol. 310 or 311, or Biol. Chem. 415. Students with credit for Biol. 320 must obtain permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Biology 428 is designed to provide students with a comprehensive overview of the biology of eukaryotes and prokaryotes at the cellular and molecular level. This course is intended for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students. The information is presented at a level that requires students to integrate information from their other biology, chemistry, and biochemistry courses. Topics include: cell structure and function; cell membranes; intracellular organelles and cytoskeleton; inter- and intra-cellular signaling; cell development and cell cycle. Students will be expected to integrate the scientific data presented in class as well as to read and interpret basic research drawn from the current scientific literature. Grades will be based on four exams and the discussion section.

    Contact jbardwel@umich.edu or cadigan@umich.edu if you have questions regarding the course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 429. Laboratory in Cell and Molecular Biology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Eric D Mann (ericmann@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 427 or 428, or concurrent enrollment in Biol. 428. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Biol. Chem. 416 or 516. (3). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Credits: (3).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The course consists of one lecture and two four hour laboratory sessions each week. Additional time outside of scheduled laboratory sessions will be required. The lectures provide the background for techniques used in the laboratory and assume a fundamental knowledge of cell and molecular biology. The laboratory sessions introduce microscopy, mammalian cell culture and fractionation, expression vectors, and nucleic acid and protein electrophoretic techniques. Grades are based on two exams, laboratory practical quizzes, and a group grant proposal. The course can be used to satisfy requirements in the Cell and Molecular Biology Concentration and Microbiology Concentration. It is also appropriate for the Biology Concentration.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 445/Geology 445. Biogeography.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Gerald Ray Smith (grsmith@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162. Historical Geology is recommended. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~grsmith/

    Lectures and discussions explore the evolution of plants and animals in relation to past climates, geography, and ecology. Topics include physical and biotic limits to distribution, response of organisms to global patterns of temperature and moisture, ecology of dispersal, metapopulation theory, paleoecology, effects of ice ages, speciation, extinction, vicariant evolution, phylogenetic analysis, and species diversity gradients. The course will include workshops on application of spatial analysis programs (geographic information systems) and a term paper, which might or might not use GIS tools. Applications to conservation will be explored. Evaluation will be based on two exams and the term paper.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    BIOLOGY 450. Biology of Amphibians and Reptiles.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Ronald A Nussbaum (nuss@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162. (5). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Credits: (5).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Lectures on the evolution, behavior, ecology, and life history of amphibians and reptiles. Laboratory exercises and field trips emphasize identification, life history, adaptations, and field methods.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 4 Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 469. Signal Transduction.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Kenneth M Cadigan (cadigan@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biology 427 or 428. (3). (Excl).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will cover selected aspects of animal signal transduction, focusing on critical reading and presentation of primary research papers. It will also emphasize the importance of combining genetic and biochemical approaches to gain a better understanding of cellular processes. Topics will include TGF and Notch signaling, MAP kinase cascades, and the tumor suppressor APC. Grades will be determined by discussion in class, an oral presentation and two written assignments. The course is intended for junior or senior CMB concentrators (who have taken either Biol. 427 or 428) and graduate students. The class will meet twice weekly for 90 minutes.

    Contact the instructor cadigan@umich.edu with any questions regarding the course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    BIOLOGY 472. Plant-Animal Interactions.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Beverly J Rathcke (brathcke@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biology 281. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    In this course, we will examine the ecology and evolution of the interactions between plants and animals and fungi including herbivory, pollination, dispersal, and resource mutualisms. Current theory, hypothesis testing, and empirical approaches will be examined in depth. The format will include two 1.5 hour lectures with interactive discussions per week. Readings will be from the current literature. No textbook is required. Assignments will include short papers or essays, a term paper with peer review, and an oral presentation. This course is intended for upper-level undergraduate students and graduate students.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    BIOLOGY 473. Aquatic Ecology Project Lab.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): George W Kling II (gwk@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in ecology. No credit is granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Biology 484. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Credits: (3).

    Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

    Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~gwk

    This new Hughes course has an emphasis quite different from the more "cookbook" style of some laboratory courses, and it is structured around student project activities using the most modern research techniques. Some of the classes will be spent learning these techniques, but, very quickly, the students are guided through the process of designing a research project. There is an overall theme to all of the research projects (such as "changes over time in aquatic ecosystems"., and the students implement the research during the remainder of the academic term. They produce reports on their findings, and these reports are then combined and assembled by the students into a synthetic body of information. Thus, the fundamental focus of the course is to provide students with the tools to not only perform relevant research in aquatic ecosystems, but to provide students with the experience of bringing this research to a greater audience through the presentation or publication of results.

    This course is intended primarily for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students. There will be two 3-hour lab sessions per week. Laboratory assignments and projects, written exams, and field trips will comprise requirements for this course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 483. Limnology: Freshwater Ecology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): George W Kling II (gwk@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Advanced undergraduate or graduate standing, with background in physics, chemistry, biology, or water-related sciences. (3). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).

    Full QR

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/~gwk/teaching/limno/lecture/b483syl.htm

    Limnology is the study of lakes, streams, and wetlands. This course focuses on the integration of physical, chemical, and biological properties of aquatic systems in order to understand the structure and function of these systems and their response to perturbations. Some of the topics covered in this course are: the origin of lakes; the ecology of aquatic organisms such as bacteria, algae, zooplankton, benthos, and fish; the biogeochemical cycling of carbon and nutrients; the pollution and eutrophication of lakes; the dynamics and flow of energy in food webs; paleolimnology; and experimental investigations using whole lakes. Lectures provide the student with a basic understanding of biological, physical, and chemical limnology in addition to presenting information from the current literature. Grades are based on exams and problem sets (no term paper). There is a required course pack and no textbook. A laboratory is offered as a separate course (Biology 473). This course fills concentration requirements in the area of Ecology and Evolution.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 487/NR&E 409. Ecology of Fishes.

    Sections 001 and 002, 4 credits; Section 003, 3 credits.

    Instructor(s): Edward S Rutherford (edwardr@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in ecology. (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and lab: 4 credits). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (Lectures: 3 credits; lectures and lab: 4 credits).

    Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~nre409/

    No Description Provided

    Check Times, Location, and Availability


    BIOLOGY 491. Principles of Phylogenetic Systematics.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Arnold G Kluge (akluge@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162. (4). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Biology 491 focuses on cladistics, the most widely accepted approach used to discover species history. All aspects of phylogenetic inference, the philosophical, theoretical and methodological, are reviewed in lecture. Major topics include parsimony, species concepts and speciation, monophyletic taxonomy, vicariance biogeography and conservation, adaptation, and coevolution. In the laboratory-discussion section of the course, relevant microcomputer algorithms are used to test hypotheses from the original literature. There are three essay (take-home) examinations, five laboratory exercises, a term paper, and an oral presentation of the term paper topic. There is no required text; however, all of the many handouts and the original literature that is reviewed constitute the required course pack.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    BIOLOGY 496/NR&E 425. Population Ecology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): James Edward Breck (breck@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: General ecology and NR&E 438; calculus recommended. (4). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.snre.umich.edu/NRE425/index.html

    In this course you will learn the major concepts and models used in understanding the structure and abundance of populations in space and time. Population ecology is a very active area of research, making important contributions to the conservation and management of natural resources. This course is intended to give you an overview of this expanding field and the background to understand future developments. Lecture topics will include exponential population growth, resource-limited population growth, models with age structure or stage structure, individual-based models, metapopulations, spatial models, competition, predation, and patch dynamics. Major themes in the course include life history trade-offs, optimization, consequences of body size, and application of concepts and models to the conservation and management of animal and plant populations.

    In order to learn this material you should apply it to solve problems. A structured set of problems will be assigned in the computer labs as homework. We will use spreadsheets (for example, Microsoft Excel) and mathematical software (for example, MathCad) to solve the problems and display the results.

    Goals. The goals of this course are to:

    • Become familiar with the major concepts and models in population ecology, and
    • Be able to use these as tools to solve applied problems in the conservation and management of animal and plant populations.

    Through the readings and computer labs you will get experience in applying concepts and using analytical methods to help understand the dynamics of populations and help manage animal and plant populations.

    Required text: Gotelli, Nicholas J. 1998. A Primer of Ecology. 2nd ed. Sinauer Associates, Inc., Sunderland, Mass. [Available at the Michigan Union Bookstore; might also be at Michigan Book & Supply, and Ulrich's.] A bibliography is available containing references mentioned in lecture and lab, used in their preparation, as well as some key papers.

    Prerequisites: This course assumes you have taken an introductory course in general ecology and one year of calculus. Some familiarity with computer spreadsheet software (for example, Microsoft Excel) will be helpful. Mathematical software (MathCad) will be introduced.

    Course requirements. You will be expected to:

    • Attend lectures on a regular basis;
    • Complete weekly computer lab assignments;
    • Complete the term project;
    • Take the midterm exam and the final exam.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    BIOLOGY 497. Community Ecology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Deborah E Goldberg (degold@umich.edu) , Earl E Werner (eewerner@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: A course in ecology. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    An examination of current theory and empirical research on ecological communities. Emphasis is on the analyses of patterns in community structure and species diversity, and the mechanisms responsible for generating and maintaining these patterns. Specific topics include the roles of species interactions such as competition, predation, and mutualisms, environmental variation, and biogeography, in community processes. A background in ecology is required. Readings are from the original literature. There are two one-hour lectures and one two-hour discussion per week.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

    BIOLOGY 526/Chem. 526. Chemical Biology II.

    Section 100.

    Instructor(s): A. Ramamoorthy (ramamoor@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 525. Prior or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 402 or equivalent. (3). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See Chemistry 526.100.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    BIOLOGY 532. Birds of the World.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Robert B Payne (rbpayne@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Sixteen credits of biology and permission of instructor. (4). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course is a comparative survey of avian systematics and the world avifauna. It provides systematic training in ornithology, particularly at the species and family level, and utilizes the research collections of birds (study skins and anatomical materials) of the Museum of Zoology. It highlights problems for research in the evolutionary systematics of birds. Testable objectives include an ability to identify birds to family or lower level and discuss their systematic relationships. Methods include lectures, demonstrations of avian diversity with the museum collections, bioacoustic analysis, library readings, and experience in independent research in systematic ornithology. Student evaluations are based on exams and papers.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 3

    BIOLOGY 541/Physiology 541/Psych. 532/Cell and Developmental Biology 541. Mammalian Reproductive Endocrinology.

    Section 001.

    Instructor(s): Theresa M Lee (terrilee@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 310 or 311, or Biol. Chem. 415. (4). (Excl). (BS).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/physiol/541/001.nsf

    See Physiology 541.001.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    Graduate Course Listings for BIOLOGY.


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