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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in English

This page was created at 7:30 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in English
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ENGLISH

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for English.


For all English classes, registered students must be present at each of the first two meetings to claim their places. Any student who does not meet this requirement may be dropped from the course. NOTE: If you must miss a class due to religious observances, contact the instructor or leave a message for the instructor with the department (764-6330).


ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

By connecting the two terms of its title, Writing and Literature aims to help prepare the student to produce the range and quality of expository prose expected in college courses. Works of literature will be considered for their effective use of language and argument. They will serve as reference points for thinking and writing strategies. Characteristically, sections of English 124 will involve the writing of 20-30 pages of revised prose, with considerable attention given to the preparation of drafts and to revision. The literary works which will serve as points of reference will vary from section to section and from term to term.

For a variety of reasons it may be necessary for instructors to change courses or sections prior to the first day of class, although we try to keep this to a minimum. Revised course descriptions will be posted to this web site as they occur.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Belinda Wai Chu Kong (bkong@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Have you ever found poetry difficult, opaque, impenetrable, and then turned to prose fiction with relief? While we often think of poetry as possessing a formally unique structure which requires special reading strategies, we regard prose as comparatively simple, straightforward, and transparent. This course aims to complicate this notion of prose's transparency. We will study a number of works that range from the eighteenth to the twentieth century, though not in chronological order. The juxtaposition of disparate texts texts that you may not usually consider reading "side by side" or in such order can illuminate them as always potentially in dialogue. The primary focus of our discussion will be on the formal aspects of these texts, particularly the ways in which narrative styles and structures give form to rhetorical and thematic content. At the same time, we will explore related issues of how nonliterary assumptions inform, structure, and otherwise sustain various prose genres. Readings may include, but are not limited to: Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, Nella Larsen's Quicksand, Samuel Johnson's The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia, James Baldwin's Stranger in the Village, Stephen Crane's "Maggie, A Girl of the Streets," and selected travel narratives.

Our study of the narrative and stylistic construction of these novels will provide you with the critical basis for thinking about your own writing. This course thus combines two goals: (1) reading prose writing analytically as always a highly constructed form, and (2) developing effective writing skills for another form of prose the essay. Emphasis of grading/evaluation will be on argumentation and structure rather than mechanics. By the end of the course, you will have produced about 25 pages of polished writing.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 002.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 003 Perspective and Perception

Instructor(s): Daphne E Swabey (swabey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~swabey/English%20124.htm

The goal of this course is to advance student writing by examining and analyzing the methods by which famous writers and essayists convey their passion for, and knowledge of, the subjects they write about. How is character created? How does perspective influence the reader? How is our perception of right and wrong guided by the words? And what can we do to make our own writing more eloquent, more persuasive.

Students will be expected to write one weekly response paper, and four longer papers. Student's drafts will be discussed in a workshop setting. Our two texts are as follows: The Eloquent Essay, ed. John Loughery, and Points of View, eds. James Moffett and Kennth R. McElheny.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 004.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey M Bankowski (bankwski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore literature that approaches or presents in many different ways the force that is human desire. This will include poetry and short stories by Robinson Jeffers, Diane Wakoski, Charles Bukowski, Anton Chekov, Flannery O'Conner, Lee K. Abbott, Denis Johnson, and others, and one short novel each by Fyodor Dostoyevsky and William Trevor. Though the majority of our time and energies will be spent exploring what appears to be and often is illness, a breakdown of or confusion about whatever normal inclination we have to survive, I believe this course is largely about health. This is to say that the intention is to come to understand those who have out of a passion for something seemingly lost control, lost vision or perspective of their relation to the world. Through this we will hopefully come to understand something about the nature of a healthy kind or amount of desire. Of course, there is no clear line, such subjects being both relative and complex. We may find, for instance, that even in a best case scenario people or places or things are destroyed by such forces. This then would demand more negotiation and balance than any clear answering of questions. Nonetheless, we will attempt to sift through such complexity, and work to articulate it both verbally and in writing.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Bich M Nguyen (bich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will focus on the idea of innocence in American literature. How has innocence been imagined, desired, lost, regained? How is it changed or influenced by culture and gender? We will be reading Lucy by Jamaica Kincaid, So Long, See You Tomorrow by William Maxwell, The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton, Drown by Junot Diaz, and Bone by Fae Myenne Ng. Four papers are required. Be prepared to share your ideas and work with your peers.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 006 Decoding Media: Advertising Entertainment And Ideology

Instructor(s): Melanie Anne Boyd (maboyd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

(This is a First Year Seminar section, restricted to first-year students only.) We all (admit it!) spend a lot of our time consuming mass media, usually without too much reflection. This class will change all that: we'll analyze various media forms-advertisements, video games, and movies-to uncover the assumptions and ideologies embedded within them. As we read, think and write (and write, and write), we'll be most particularly concerned about the ways each example interacts with cultural stereotypes of gender, race, sexuality and class. Readings will include Robert Scholes on the semantics of beer commercials, bell hooks on the interracial relationships of The Bodyguard and The Crying Game, Susan Bordo on the gender politics of food advertising, Carol Clover on the male teenage viewers of horror movies, and other incisive assessments of popular culture.

Of course, this class is primarily intended to improve your writing skills. You will write weekly response papers, at least four longer essays, and construct your own advertisement; you will revise your writing several times as you put together a final portfolio. Because effective writing is essentially a communication skill, much of your work will be done.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 007 Literature And Loss

Instructor(s): Rebecca M Egger (egger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

(This is a First Year Seminar section, restricted to first-year students only.) This course will examine the ways in which twentieth-century writers have dealt with the issues of loss and death, and with the challenges of living in a world bounded by the fact of mortality. Because all living persons are, by definition, alive (!), writing about death becomes an exercise in probing the unimaginable, the traumatic, and the taboo. By examining the strategies that authors have developed to discuss this most elusive of subjects, we will explore and write frequently about such issues as mourning, memory, human connectedness, and the responsibility of the living to the dead. We will focus our study on three novels (Toni Morrison's Beloved, William Faulkner's As I Lay Dying, and Kate Phillips' White Rabbit) and one nonfictional account (Elie Wiesel's Night). Students will write four papers (4-6 pp.) and revise one. Though our subject is weighty, conversation should be lively and engaged; to that end, students should come to each class prepared to participate in discussion.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 008 Treachery, Othering, and Magic in Women's Writing

Instructor(s): Juanita Cabello

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will read texts that are perhaps new to you and that take place in a different setting. Mexico will be our backdrop as a wondrous and lush but also unknown and potentially treacherous space where women writers and their characters (of many cultural backgrounds)portray sometimes betray key elements of their personalities, identities, vulnerabilities, and passions. Often their acts of writing and telling will occur in relation to an other: other women friends and rivals, another land, or a ruthless public eye. Often they will undergo an eerie transformation. We will contemplate the question: what does language attempt to reveal in these narratives and what new forms must it take? Texts may include Elena Garro's "The Tree," excerpts from Calderon de la Barca's Life in Mexico and Elena Poniatowska's Tinisima, Ana Castillo's The Mixquiahuala Letters, Sandra Cisneros' "Eyes of Zapata," and work by Rosario Castellanos and Nellie Campobello. You will write short weekly response papers that we will revise together to produce three to five polished papers by the end of the term.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 009, 010.

Instructor(s): Sean William Henne

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 011, 027.

Instructor(s): Andrea A Kaitany

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 012.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 013 Sex, Gender and the Body

Instructor(s): Jessica Forbes Roberts (jfrobert@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is the difference between sex and gender? What are their respective relationships to the body? Is either essential? Are both constructed? Who dictates the rules of the gender game? Turning to a diverse group of texts, both written and visual, we will explore the way in which different authors at different times have offered us a variety of answers to these questions. Texts by William Shakespeare, Eudora Welty, Ernest Hemingway, and Toni Morrison, among others, will provide a jumping off point not only for talking about how gender is represented but also for talking about how arguments are constructed critically and creatively. Since this is a writing class you can expect to complete 20-30 pages of revised, graded prose by the end of the term.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 014 Literature and Visual Representation

Instructor(s): Emily Marie Harrington

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In the latter half of the nineteenth century a number of writers became obsessed with the intersection of art and life. Works by such authors as Oscar Wilde, Edgar Allen Poe, and Robert Browning ask where the boundaries are between a painting and what it represents. How do we attach significance and construct meanings for works of art? How do these texts deploy the category of the visual? How do we create an image with words? How are words different from images? After studying the end of the nineteenth century, we will consider the way the early twentieth century approaches the same questions. In this course we will concentrate on the way literature reflects on its own power as it addresses aesthetic responses to visual art. While these questions provide a thematic framework, the goal of the course is to improve your critical thinking and analytical writing skills. Thus in thinking about what language tries to accomplish in the texts we read, we will also address this issue in our own writing. You can expect to produce writing each week in the form of a short response paper, or a draft or a revision of one of four longer formal papers.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 015.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 016 Writing Places

Instructor(s): William Peter Hogan (wph@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/english/124/016.nsf

(This is a First Year Seminar section, restricted to first-year students only.) The important places in our lives help to make us who we are. The city you grew up in, a childhood apartment, a favorite park, a church, school, or neighborhood: we invent ourselves in the context of and in relation to these kinds of significant settings. How have the places in your life shaped your values, your desires, your fears, your friends? Our work this academic term will focus on writing crafted, complex, and vibrant prose about the importance of place in our lives. Expect to produce five revised argumentative essays, brief weekly response papers, and one peer assessment.

Good writing requires deep reflection, and to spur us on in our thinking, we will examine and discuss a range of fictional, poetic, and cinematic accounts of place and its meanings. Possible authors include: Franz Kafka, Ralph Ellison, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, James Joyce, Jamaica Kincaid, Paul Theroux, and Virginia Woolf.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 017 Representations of the City in 20th-Century Literature

Instructor(s): John Stanley Barrett (barrettj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do people in the twentieth century experience urban life? How do writers tackle the challenge of representing the city's chaos, its squalor, its noise, its ecstasies, its opulence, its poverty, its excess? This course will explore the art of crafting vibrant, carefully-written essays (20-30 pages of revised, graded prose) and the related art of reading actively by looking at twentieth-century representations of the city in both prose and poetry. We will read chronologically, observing how authors across the decades and from different social perspectives have understood the effects that rapid modernization has had upon urban life. Texts for this course will include James Joyce's collection of short stories Dubliners; poems and short prose pieces by authors such as Virginia Woolf, Jean Toomer, Marianne Moore, and Vladimir Nabokov; and Thomas Pynchon's novel The Crying of Lot 49.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 018 The Shakespeare Industry

Instructor(s): Jennie Malika Evenson (jevenson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Shakespeare continues to be one of the major influences on Western culture from yearly performances of Hamlet to biographies of Shakespeare and his love life. How and why do actors and directors return to the work of Shakespeare, to create and recreate the plays in various new contexts? How do these plays manage to address themes and ideas that are continually relevant to society? We will be looking closely at three plays from the Renaissance (Shakespeare's Hamlet, Othello, and Richard III ) and one modern play (Stoppard's Rosencrantz & Guildenstern Are Dead ) and thinking about how meanings are shaped and reshaped by varying (re)productions, over periods of time, in different media. To this end we will examine film versions, present and analyze a mini-performance, as well as read closely the written word. The main goal for the term will be to help you improve your expository and analytical writing, as well as to help you learn how to write effectively about challenging literary texts. By the end of the academic term you will have refined your grammar, developed your analytical writing skills, and produced four polished essays.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 019.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 020.

Instructor(s): Carrie Sue Kay Sulzer (kayc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Dedicated to creative, coherent, sophisticated writing and analytical thinking, our course will be time-consuming and expectations will be great. Texts will consist of 20th-century novels, and will include such authors as Pearls S. Buck, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, and Laura Esquivel. We will talk throughout the academic term about various approaches to scholarly writing, working together to discover the art of this form. Three polished papers, weekly responses, and participation in regular peer reviews required.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 021 Storytelling in African-American Literature

Instructor(s): Christie Latissia Mitchell (latissia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Who tells stories? To whom? Why are they told? These are some of the questions we will answer in this composition course. We will use the storytelling motif to approach the audience, content and form of writing. African-American literature is a rich source of stories in a variety of forms (folktales, fiction, plays and poetry) from which we will draw. Our readings will include works by Charles Chesnutt, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, and Toni Morrison. While there will be much spirited discussion of readings, our main focus will be the writing process itself. You will complete weekly reader responses (1 to 2 pages) examining major themes, characterizations and writing styles of the literature; four formal, revised essays (from 3 to 8 pages); and several in-class writing exercises. By the end of this course you should be able to write more clearly and confidently, and with increased complexity, about a range of texts and ideas.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 022.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 023.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 024, 026.

Instructor(s): Kirk Lee Davis

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 025 Rural and Urban America in Literature

Instructor(s): Monika Irene Cassel (micassel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Rural and urban America are often set up in opposition to each other, only for those oppositions to be collapsed: alternately romanticized and maligned, the country and the city continue to act as screens upon which writers project ideals for and dismantle illusions about American people and American life. In this course, we will be reading texts in multiple genres about rural and urban America from the 1850s to the 1990s, travelling from New England to the Southwest. The texts I have selected are intended to help you become more conscious of the choices you make as a writer and the options that are available to you as you develop your writing skills, and to introduce you to some beautiful and important works of American literature. Writing requirements: Four formal papers of varying lengths (2-7pp), weekly informal writing, workshop commentaries. Texts will include Auster, City of Glass, Cather, My Antonia, Silko, Ceremony, selections from O. Henry, James Agee and others, selected poems, and two films, "The Further Adventures of Ma and Pa Kettle" and "Tales of Manhattan."

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 027.

Instructor(s): Andrea A Kaitany

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 124.027.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 028.

Instructor(s): Rona Diane Kaufman (rdk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class is designed to help prepare students for the critical reading and writing necessary throughout college (and beyond). It will require us to call into question (to see and re-see) our experiences with text, with people, with culture and then to articulate those experiences in language, on paper. We'll use our writing and others' writing to discuss issues of evidence, memory, truth, authority, audience, rhetorical strategy, and tone. You can expect to read at least two book-length texts (Tim O'Brien's The Things They Carried and Binjamin Wilkomirski's Fragments ) and many interesting essays and articles; to participate in thoughtful and rigorous discussions and writing workshops; to do a semester-long group project; to write a lot, both in and out of class; and to compile a writing portfolio to be turned in at the end of the academic term.

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 029.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 030.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

Section 031 Representing the Gothic

Instructor(s): Tonya-Marie Locke Howe (thowe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~thowe/124/031

The word 'gothic' has been used to describe certain recognizable features of architecture, clothing, music, literature, even nightlife but what does it mean to call something gothic? What exactly is the gothic sensibility, and how is it used as a mode of representation? As a mode of representation, what purpose does it serve? During the next four months, we will examine several texts that make use of gothic conventions in order to begin (and make interesting) the unending toil of analytical and interpretive college-level thought. This course will be writing-intensive; however, the best things you can bring to our meetings are an open mind and an active desire to read, be challenged, and learn about new things. Readings will include work by Walpole, Shelley, Austen, Freud, Hoffmann, Poe, O'Connor, and others; also on our agenda are some really freaky films, including "Bladerunner," "Metropolis," and "Nosferatu." One critical text will supplement our coursework, andyou will be forced...uh, urged...to choose an additional piece of literature for individual investigation. By the end of the term, you'll have written around 20 pages of revised, polished prose, learne the occult skills of grammar, spelling, argumentation, and style, and initiated your fellow classmates into the realm of the eerie unknown. But what's even more exciting, you'll probably become unfit to hold (a prominent) political office! Joy!

Texts:

  • The Castle of Otranto, Walpole
  • Frankenstein, Shelley
  • Neuromancer, Gibson
  • Short materials available online or in handout form. See links for individual authors.
  • A good dictionary and thesaurus, either material or digital.

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 032.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 033.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 034 Literature of the Outsider

    Instructor(s): John W Fulton (jaus@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    In this course we will ask how society defines and excludes the outsider. What place does the outsider or outcast occupy in society? How does the outsider see society and how does society see the outsider? How do race, class, and individuality shape the outsider? On the other hand, we will also look at how outsiders shape and define themselves as rebels who may change their society and define their culture. Among other texts, we will be reading Native Son, Sula, The Awakening, and Catcher in the Rye. We will be writing and re-writing four five-page essays. In addition, I will assign weekly writing exercises focused around textual analysis. Since this class depends heavily on discussion, you should be prepared to participate and share your ideas.

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 035.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 036 The Love Poem

    Instructor(s): Charles Pierre La Porte (pcl@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Who says the material from English courses won't serve you later in life? Learn persuasive writing from the undisputed masters. We'll study and write about love poetry in a range of its historical forms, from Sappho to Swinburne, from Rumi to Rimbaud to Roethke to Rich, from Housman to Hallmark cards. Expect to purchase small volumes of Shakespeare, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Pablo Neruda. Course requirements will include short assignments, multiple drafts of four essays and participation in workshops.

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 037 American Self-Invention

    Instructor(s): Alexander Luria Ralph (ralpha@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    America has, since its beginnings, held out the rosy lure of self-invention. But from Plymouth Rock to the frontier to Hollywood, the idea of creating a new life has often been propagated at deep social and moral costs. This class will introduce students to formal aspects of novels, short stories, and essays, as well as the larger ideas at stake in our national literature. We'll read from a variety of perspectives, using as our primary texts F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, Mark Twain's Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, and Ralph Ellison's Invisible Man, in addition to short stories and memoirs by John Cheever, Gish Jen, Joyce Carol Oates, and Mary Karr. Requirements will include four papers, an oral presentation, reading responses, and attentive class participation.

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 038.

    Instructor(s): Hilary J Thompson (hthomps@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    The course's aim is to introduce you to college writing through the study of literature. We will discuss different ideas of what literature can be, how it can be read, and what types of responses it can inspire. We will read mainly twentieth-century narrative fiction, and often texts in which fantasy, magic, or some desire to move beyond the traditional limitations of realistic writing is crucial. You'll become acquainted with three major approaches to narrative in the twentieth century: modernism, postmodernism, postcolonialism,and magic realism. Class participation will be absolutely essential. Four essays and occasional short writing assignments will be required. Authors to be studied may include: Poe, Wilde, Mansfield, Melville, Borges, Marquez, Morrison, Esquivel, and Rushdie.

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 039.

    Instructor(s): Sabiha Ahmad (sabihaa@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Have you ever found poetry difficult, opaque, impenetrable, and then turned to prose fiction with relief? While we often think of poetry as possessing a formally unique structure which requires special reading strategies, we regard prose as comparatively simple, straightforward, and transparent. This course aims to complicate this notion of prose's transparency. We will study a number of works that range from the eighteenth to the twentieth century, though not in chronological order. The juxtaposition of disparate texts texts that you may not usually consider reading "side by side" or in such order can illuminate them as always potentially in dialogue. The primary focus of our discussion will be on the formal aspects of these texts, particularly the ways in which narrative styles and structures give form to rhetorical and thematic content. At the same time, we will explore related issues of how nonliterary assumptions inform, structure, and otherwise sustain various prose genres. Readings may include, but are not limited to: Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, Nella Larsen's Quicksand, Samuel Johnson's The History of Rasselas, Prince of Abissinia, James Baldwin's Stranger in the Village, " Stephen Crane's "Maggie, A Girl of the Streets," and selected travel narratives.

    Our study of the narrative and stylistic construction of these novels will provide you with the critical basis for thinking about your own writing. This course thus combines two goals: (1) reading prose writing analytically as always a highly constructed form, and (2) developing effective writing skills for another form of prose the essay. Emphasis of grading/evaluation will be on argumentation and structure rather than mechanics. By the end of the course, you will have produced about 25 pages of polished writing.

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 040 Images of the Rural U.S.

    Instructor(s): Jean Marie Borger (borger@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    Despite the steady decline of rural populations and economies in the twentieth century, pictures of rural life have provided us with some of the most powerful and enduring characters and stories in both literature and popular culture. Authors such as John Steinbeck, Zora Neale Hurston, Richard Wright, William Faulkner, Flannery O'Connor, Rudolfo Anaya, Leslie Marmon Silko, Harriette Arnow, and Barbara Kingsolver have told rural stories of plenty and deprivation, comedy and tragedy, hope and despair. Film and television, ranging from John Ford's stirring Grapes of Wrath to television's farcical "Beverly Hillbillies," have brought us rural victims, exemplars, caricatures, and buffoons, while musical traditions such as blues, folk, bluegrass, and country music have told their own stories of rural life. Drawing its materials from this varied set of images, this course will explore the question of the rural in twentieth-century representation as a vehicle for developing and honing the skills of careful reading, thoughtful interpretation, and critical writing. As we learn to craft essays in response to literature, a host of issues will occupy us. How does literature grow out of, interact with, even create "real life"? What does it mean to represent a particular group of people in a particular way? What makes good writing (here we will think about both the texts we read in class and the texts we write as a class)? And, finally, what counts as "literature" in the first place? Course requirements include 20-30 pages of revised, graded prose and class participation.

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 041.

    Instructor(s): Joseph C Heininger

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 042 Literature And Loss

    Instructor(s): Rebecca M Egger (egger@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    First-Year Seminar

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    See English 124.007.

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 043 Gender and Sexuality in Early Modern Drama

    Instructor(s): Sara Lynn Rubinstein (srubinst@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    In this course we will hone your college writing skills as we undertake an intensive study of gender and sexuality in early modern drama. How do we come to identify ourselves as male or female? What constitutes masculinity and femininity? How do we perform these identifications? How does society dictate which gender identifications are correct for individuals and what desires they are allowed to have and/or express? Throughout the term we will bring these questions to the drama of the late-sixteenth and early-seventeenth centuries in order to more fully understand how early-modern society conceptualized and performed gender difference. We will also focus this critical lens on our own culture, recognizing how ideologies of gender and sexuality in the twenty-first century affect our own lives. Since our texts are dramatic we will discuss how the conditions of early-modern performance affect interpretation and we will study the consequences of modern performance decisions, both in recent film adaptations as well as in our own creative adaptations of the plays. Our texts may include Ben Jonson's Epicene, William Shakespeare's As You Like It and Othello, Christopher Marlowe's Edward II, the anonymous Arden of Faversham, John Webster's The Duchess of Malfi, and Thomas Middleton and Thomas Dekker's The Roaring Girl. Attendance and active participation are mandatory. There will be informal writing assignments due almost every class period. Throughout the term you will turn in four formal essays, for a total of 20-30 pages of revised and polished prose.

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 044.

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 045.

    Instructor(s): Belinda Wai Chu Kong (bkong@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 046 Mythology Revisioned

    Instructor(s): Suzanne B Spring (sbspring@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    This course will explore the way classical myths are wonderfully, fantastically re-visioned and re-written. We'll begin with reading myths in their original form and then branch off into "other" or "new" ways of understanding and re-interpreting these stories and psychologies. The reading load will be moderately heavy. Texts may include RM Rilke's Sonnets to Orpheus, Marguerite Yourcenar's Fires, CS Lewis' Till We Have Faces, and Anne Carson's Autobiography of Red, plus a course pack with Ovid and/or Virgil's versions of the myth and other shorter revisioned literary pieces. The writing load will be intensive. We will hone our writing skills through journal writing, peer critiquing, critical analyses, creative re-visioning of myths or other stories, and creative non-fiction writing. You can expect to write approximately 25 pages of polished, revised prose. Other course requirements concern active participation and presentations in class and close reading and responding to your peers' writing. This class will be demanding but rewarding.

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 047 Sites of Textual Production

    Instructor(s): Krista Lee Homicz (khomicz@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    First-Year Seminar

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    (This is a First Year Seminar section, restricted to first-year students only.) What kinds of forces shape the production of an author's text? What does the author consider when writing the culture, society, and world events of the time; the audience on a local, national, or global level; or the physical capabilities of various text presentation and publishing mediums? How do we look at fiction and non-fiction when they are reproduced in different mediums (like television or film adaptations of classic fiction) or presented in non-traditional sites (like Stephen King's The Plant, available in installments on the Internet)? In this class we will explore answers to these questions by examining the different dimensions of how authors write, produce, locate, and deliver texts to their readers and how readers receive these texts. We will be reading and discussing novels, stories, and essays presented in printed and electronic form as well as producing our own print and electronic texts. Since the class will focus on improving writing skills, students should expect to take an active part in individual and collaborative writing and discussion activities, hands-on workshops, peer review, working with electronic and printed text, and writing and careful revision of 5 formal papers of differing lengths.

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 048.

    Instructor(s): Carrie Sue Kay Sulzer

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 049 American Ethnic Autobiography

    Instructor(s): Joyce A Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    First-Year Seminar

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    ENGLISH 124. College Writing: Writing and Literature.

    Section 050 Film And Society

    Instructor(s): Alan B Howes (ahowes@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

    First-Year Seminar

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

    No Description Provided

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    Graduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


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