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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in English

This page was created at 7:30 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 April 26)

Open courses in English
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ENGLISH

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for English.


For all English classes, registered students must be present at each of the first two meetings to claim their places. Any student who does not meet this requirement may be dropped from the course. NOTE: If you must miss a class due to religious observances, contact the instructor or leave a message for the instructor with the department (764-6330).


ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No one ever finishes learning to write, so this course focuses on helping students further develop their unique potentials as writers, readers, and thinkers. By analyzing texts from a variety of academic disciplines, students will come to understand the conventions writers follow to present their ideas effectively to their chosen audiences. What rhetorical strategies are common in different disciplines and why? How and when might we use those strategies in our own writing? For instance, what writing strategies would we call upon for a lab report, and would we use any of those strategies for a philosophical speculation, a history exam, a love letter? Throughout the term, students will work to identify the writing skills they most need to develop, and they'll invent and refine a personal style of expression that can be adapted to different audiences and purposes. Course requirements include at least 40 pages of writing, including at least 20 pages of revised, polished prose.

For a variety of reasons it may be necessary for instructors to change courses or sections prior to the first day of class, although we try to keep this to a minimum. Revised course descriptions will be posted to this web site as they occur.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 001 Joining the Conversation

Instructor(s): Daphne Swabey (swabey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~swabey/English%20125.htm

The goal of this course is to introduce students to academic writing which can be defined as an ongoing conversation between people who enjoy exchanging ideas, finding out new ways of understanding problems, and developing their own intellectual muscle. Academic writing is therefore conversational, often questioning, frequently skeptical, and sometimes downright exciting. By the end of this course, students will understand how to apply the rhetorical strategies involved in replying to other academics in concise, well-developed, carefully crafted prose. There will be a minimum of 4 papers, as well as a weekly one-page paper on the reading assignments. Revision will be emphasized through the writing and rewriting of drafts. Library visits may be scheduled, as well as a lecture or two. Participation is a vital part of the course, as is consistent attendance, and unflagging spirits.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 002, 040.

Instructor(s): Peggy Adler (adlerp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Writing is a powerful means of individual expression. In this class I expect you to care about your own ideas as you gain the tools you need to express yourself clearly and concisely on the page. Not only are writing skills crucial to your success at the University of Michigan, they will also help you to think critically, formulate ideas, and communicate clearly to others. I can think of no single skill that will serve you better throughout college and long after.

This class will function largely as a writing workshop, which means that you will be critiquing each other's work. You will learn to articulate criticism that rises above the limits of personal opinion and is based on values of craft. Learning to recognize strengths and weaknesses in your peers' writing is essential to your development as your own editor. In other words, learning to be a good reader is vital to becoming a good writer.

The assigned readings will serve as diverse models of essay forms, styles, and modes. These examples will allow us to discuss issues of voice, purpose, audience, content, evidence, and other essential conventions of essay writing. By becoming better readers we become better writers. While these models will provide essential solutions to our writerly problems, your own voice and perspective are your greatest assets. You will be asked to examine how you see, what shapes your lens and what you bring to the page. It is essential that you approach your essays not only with something to convey, but also with something to explore and learn.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 003.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 004 Writing and "The Truth"

Instructor(s): Karin Spirn (kspirn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How do authors use language to manipulate their readers? What can we learn about an author's beliefs from his or her use of language? How can language persuade us even when it does not appear to be "argumentative," such as in a novel? How can we use language to persuade our own readers? This course explores issues of rhetorical persuasion through the examination of essays, novels, and students' own writing. We will consider how texts by a number of authors, including Kurt Vonnegut, Alice Walker, Margaret Atwood, and Richard Rodriguez, shape our understanding of historical and cultural issues through their use of language. The purpose of exploring these questions will be to develop strong critical reading and composition skills. Class time will be divided between discussions about specific texts, lessons in composition, and workshops focusing on individual students' essays. By the end of the term, students should feel comfortable with the writing skills necessary for college composition: constructing arguments, citing texts, creating a clear paragraph structure, choosing vocabulary and formulating an essay topic, among others. Students will write four papers in addition to short weekly writing assignments.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 005.

Instructor(s): Sondra Smith Gates

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 006, 015 Legacies of Memory

Instructor(s): Ingrid Gessner (igessner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Do you remember the Vietnam War? Most likely not. But, of course, you are very aware of it by having read about it, having seen it depicted in the media or having heard talk about it. This writing class will not be about the Vietnam War, but about exploring shared memories that are not necessarily our own. We will read and write about such legacies of memory.

We will focus on analyzing and synthesizing texts that deal with personal memories, cultural legacies of the past, and with constructions of history. You will write reading responses for each article you read. You will improve your writing through self-assessment and the input of your classmates. Thus, the most important text in the course will be your own papers; and active class participation will be important.

In our interactions over the academic term each of you will struggle to become a better reader and thinker and to develop a unique and effective writing voice. Expect to write a total of 20-25 pages of revised, graded prose by the end of the term.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 007 The Practice of Writing

Instructor(s): Stefan J Senders (ssenders@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

(Eight seats are reserved for students from the UROP in Residence Program.) In this course we will approach writing as a complex skill best learned through steady and thoughtful practice. Like learning to play music or excel in athletics, learning to write well requires the development of specialized skills and strengths. To become good writers we need to develop concentration, creativity, endurance, patience, sensitivity and speed. We also need to increase our capacity to take pleasure in language, sound, and knowledge. In this class we will work on these many dimensions of writing using a variety of means, including freewriting, formal writing, reading, editing, and discussion.

In addition to regular homework and essay assignments, students will write three finished and graded pieces, each of which will be prepared in draft, revision, and final forms.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 008.

Instructor(s): Laura Ann Kopchick (lkz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 009.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 010, 067 The City and Society

Instructor(s): Maureen T Aitken (aitkenm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will consider urban culture by examining music, films, and readings about city life. We'll begin with stories defining your hometown, and consider how those relate to urban/suburban values expressed through movies such as "Do the Right Thing" and "My New Gun". We'll study scholarly and popular readings to better analyze the source of urban tensions. Musical influences such as George Clinton, The Velvet Underground, and 2Pac Shakur will help us see how artists are celebrating their environments, while at the same time questioning the status quo. We'll participate in group discussions, critique the writing of other students, and revise papers before turning in the final drafts. Expect to write four Formal Papers totaling 30 pages of revised, graded prose by the end of the term.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 011 The Art of Losing

Instructor(s): Meredith Martin (martinmz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will examine what it means to lose. You can lose your innocence but you can also lose your keys. You can lose your grandmother but you can also lose the NBA championships. Loss means many things in our culture, and we will read poems, stories and essays which examine myriad types of loss. Writing assignments consist of 4 short papers (3-4, 4-5, 5-6,6-7 pages), three response papers (1-2 pages) and almost daily in-class writing. Peer critiques and small group workshops will help us fine tune each writer's ability to read critically and proofread effectively. Do we gain something when we lose? Yes. Do we learn something when we fail? Yes. We will learn from our failures in this course and work toward making each student a confident, diligent, patient, and organized writer.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 012.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 013.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 014.

Instructor(s): Glen VanderPloeg (gvander@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We often long for things that are "natural": We like to get "back to nature" on vacation, or relax in the "natural" environment of the Arboretum. We like "natural food," and we like being around people with whom we can "act naturally." Yet we often feel that we have, as a culture, trampled and abandoned nature, alienating ourselves from the very things we crave.

This writing course explores our troubled relationship with nature, its toll on us as a culture and as individuals, and some possible solutions. Our approach will be interdisciplinary: We will read environmental and cultural history (William Cronon), literary nature writing (uncluding Thoreau, Muir, and Snyder), and environmental rhetoric (including Aldo Leopold and Rachel Carson). Required writing includes five graded essays, which will go through multiple drafts, and a series of short, ungraded, informal essays that respond to readings and ideas raised in class. The required materials include one or two books of essays, a course pack, and a writing handbook.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 015 Legacies of Memory

Instructor(s): Ingrid Gessner (igessner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.006.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 016.

Instructor(s): Barbara Ohrstrom (ohrstrom@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

(Eight seats are restricted to students in the Women in Science & Engineering Program.) This class unites writing and science. Both fields demand creativity, analysis, logic and investigation. Scientists need a vehicle to develop and communicate their ideas, and that vehicle is writing. Scientists who have used writing have changed their nations; e.g., Rachel Carson, a biologist, wrote Silent Spring and ignited the environmental movement.

This class will show you how to use writing to develop your ideas and discuss others' ideas. We will discuss essays from assigned readings from the Science and Technology section of the New York Times, practice writing skills suggested in The Craft of Revision, and analyze our writing collaboratively. I have scheduled class time in each week for peer editing and/or workshop, which means you will present your writing to a partner, and at some point, to the entire class.

By the end of the course, you will learn how a writer transforms 35 blank pages into 35 pages of vibrant prose through the process of writing 4 major essays and weekly 1 page response essays. You will learn how to investigate and relate complex ideas. You will take the same steps professional writers use to create: brainstorm, investigate, plan, draft, and revise, and you will tailor this writing process to suit your own needs. As we go through discovering this writing process, we will relate it to the process you undergo in exploring our world as a scientist.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 017.

Instructor(s): Indra N Mukhopadhyay

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 018, 052.

Instructor(s): Ian Fulcher

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 019 Writing in the Midst of Uncertainty

Instructor(s): Amanda Watson (alwatson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"How do I start to write when I don't know where I'm going?" This is a common question among beginning writers. Some of the best academic writing, however, develops out of a sense of uncertainty or doubt. This course will explore the concept of writing as a process of discovery for writer and audience. through focused in-class writing assignments, paper workshops, and various opportunities for revision, students will learn to question preconceptions and develop an argument beyond the level of the immediately obvious. A selection of classic and modern essays will serve as models for the ways in which good writing encourages critical, original thought. Course requirements will include a total of 20-30 pages of revised prose and enthusiastic in-class participation.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 020, 051.

Instructor(s): Sara Kathleen Talpos

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 021.

Instructor(s): Indra Mukhopadhyay (mukhopad@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

You are now joining a vibrant intellectual community, and in order to be engaged, effective members of this campus and society, you must learn to be better readers and writers. University writing empowers you to be agents of your thoughts. This course will help you develop the skills necessary to be a successful writer in any circumstance. What you learn here will prove indispensable no matter what your major.

The leitmotiv of this course is 'smokin, drinking, and screwing.' Although occasional discussions of these subjects themselves are welcome, the topics are not the theme of the course. This is a composition class. The topics are intended to keep you interested in the reading, and more importantly, in the craft of writing. Regardless of the subject matter, the tools you take away from English 125 will apply to writing for any field. And finally, these topics were chosen to remind you that reading and writing at the college level can be rewarding as well as pleasurable.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 022, 055.

Instructor(s): Therese Stanton (theresem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this class is to help you write better. To achieve this goal, you will explore a variety of ways of getting writing done (freewriting, focused freewriting, public informal writing, collaborative writing, revision) and practice many styles of writing (essay, creative writing, informal persuasion and formal argument, and nonadversarial argument). We will also study a bit of background and theory to help you understand that writing can produce ideas and experiences as well as record them. Each week, some class time will be dedicated to grammar and reasoning. Three seven page papers and one class presentation are required.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 023.

Instructor(s): Janice Leach (leachj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/english/125/023.nsf

This course will focus on making the transition to producing college-level writing. We'll begin by considering our history as writers, what is difficult for us and what comes easily, and what we know about good writing. Together we'll analyze a variety of essays from The Best American Essays (ed. Robert Atwan) to observe what works in them and what we can use in our own writing. We'll also read and comment on the essays produced by others in the class in small group work, in peer editing exercises, and in whole class workshops. Students will write four essays, peer critiques, in-class writing assignments and a collaborative assignment. Some time in almost every class period will be spent either writing or revising. Class participants should expect a high level of interaction as we discuss the assigned texts as well as the work of class members.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 024.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Bachrach Hutton

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 025.

Instructor(s): Scott Melanson (melanson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/english/125/025.nsf

Each of us is most essentially human when we participate in community. When we connect with other human beings, we tap into a source of energy that makes us more than just a collection of individuals. In Bowling Alone: The Collapse and Revival of American Community, Robert Putnam refers to this energy source as "social capital." The more we connect, the greater our social wealth and resources-the greater our social capital. In this course, students examine social capital as both an abstract concept affecting all of us in this society, and, more importantly, as a very real part of their everyday lives. Equipped with this knowledge that building community is an empowering act, students in this course think and write critically about their past and present experiences with social capitalism-the process of building stronger public lives, and therefore stronger communities. The more we connect, the greater our social capital.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 026 Seeing and Writing

Instructor(s): Jennifer Lutman (jlutman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Effective writing is a product of clear thinking, and clear thinking begins with careful observation." McQuade & McQuade, Seeing and Writing (required course text).

Imagine a culture that communicated entirely without images. No photos in advertising, no graphics on websites, no paintings on office walls, no conceptual illustrations in textbooks. And don't forget, of course, the complete absence of film and television. We use visual texts to entertain, inform, explain, provoke, or persuade, and whether you like it or not you are frequently the "audience" for a visual argument a billboard, a tee shirt, a cereal box, a mural, a newspaper photo. What do you have to say about those experiences? What do you find when you "listen" to the message in a picture? This introductory writing course is an opportunity to engage critically with visual texts; we will use images as opportunities to practice skills of critical analysis. We will also consider a variety of written texts, focusing on the possible relationship, or conversation, between the verbal and the visual. While most of our material (images, essays, poems, cartoons, stories) will come from your textbook, some material will come from you; I will ask you to explore, research, and bring in images or "moments of argument" for class discussion. The course will be designed, in large part, as a workshop: students will frequently share their writing with others and receive constructive feedback. Course requirements include class participation (including short presentations), weekly writing installments, and 5 revised essays, 4-6 pages in length.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 027.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 028, 047.

Instructor(s): Kevin V O'Leary

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 029 Defining Community

Instructor(s): Scott J Melanson (melanson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/english/125/029.nsf

(This section is restricted to students from the Michigan Community Scholars Program.) What is "community"? More specifically, how does this society define the term "community"? Does the term take on different connotations for you based on your class? Gender? Race? Ethnicity? Age? In this course, students will put the direct experiences of their first term at Michigan-both on and off campus-to ponder these and various other questions regarding our society's perspective on "community." Furthermore, this section of English 125 is offered only to students enrolled in the new Michigan Community Scholars Program in Mary Markley Hall and will focus on writing within the context of community service. In addition to attending the course and doing course assignments, students will work for selected community groups as part of their Community Scholars Program community service commitment or as an additional commitment. Students will use writing to reflect upon their community service experience, and there will be reading and writing assignments that will ask students to consider community service learning within the context of contemporary American society and higher education. Students should be aware that specifics of the course may change as the Community Scholars Program evolves. Students should expect to write at least 25-30 pages of polished prose during the term.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 030.

Instructor(s): Hill Robert (rshill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

English 125 will equip you with the tools needed to write with clarity, coherence, and intellectual force. I conceptualize this class as a hands-on composition workshop where you will learn and practice strategies that will help you become a successful collegiate writer. Ultimately, you will produce thirty pages of polished prose by term's end. Reading is an integral part of learning to write, and each week you will complete one or two reading assignments from various fields within the social sciences and humanities. There is no central theme to this course. Readings and class discussions will focus on a variety of contemporary topics in American culture. We will begin with Kurt Vonnegut's Breakfast of Champions, a hilarious novel that satirizes American popular culture and explores the vexed relationship between the individual and society. Later on, we will explore issues of social control and surveillance using Michel Foucault's provocative essay, "Panopticism." Other issues and topics may include: the social construction of race; media images of women; cultural constructions of "nature"; and middle class notions of success. Thus, there will be something of interest to everyone in this course.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 031, 044.

Instructor(s): Paul Douglas Barron (pdbarron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 032 Buying Into America

Instructor(s): Madeleine Vala (mvala@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How can we read the American media? What messages do advertisements, film, and music sell to its audience, and what are the underlying assumptions of such messages? How do larger issues in American culture-including education, poverty, and crime-create images of America at home and abroad? This course will teach you how to think, read, and write critically about the culture you inhabit, and provide you with the essential skills for college writing. We will focus particularly on synthesizing good arguments, selecting and supplying appropriate evidence, and editing for style. Peer group workshops constitute a significant portion of this class; they require you to share your writing and demand your active participation. Students will write 4-5 essays, varying from three to ten pages in length, as well as short weekly response papers. Texts will most likely combine readings from different anthologies, including Maasik and Solomon's Signs of Life in the USA, Ackley's Perspectives on Contemporary Issues, and Verburg's Ourselves Among Others. We may also read fiction by Flannery O'Connor and Kate Chopin.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 033, 048.

Instructor(s): Jason Christopher Kirk

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 034.

Instructor(s): Jason Michael Bredle

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 035.

Instructor(s): Fritz Garner Swanson (fgs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is concerned with training you to write. It seems like a simple objective, but it is not. Frankly, when this course is completed, you won't be finished learning. What we will try to do is prepare you to continue learning throughout your college career, and for the rest of your life. The text for this course will be Seeing and Writing by Donald and Christine McQuade. The premise this course will operate under is that everything is worth analyzing, be it a Coke Advertisement, a presidential candidate or a piece of literature. You have opinions on all of these things, and it will be the job of this course to get you to start imagining how to best communicate those opinions on the page. The focus of the writing in this course will be on four papers. You will produce first an ungraded rough draft and then a graded final draft of each of these four papers. The remainder of the work will center on in-class discussion of material from the text book, and the work of your classmates.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 036, 037.

Instructor(s): Enid J Zimmerman (jojess@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This section is restricted to Comprehensive Studies Program students. Contact the CSP office for a permission/override.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 038.

Instructor(s): Sean Norton (spnorton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The act of writing is a process of knowing, or better yet, coming to knowing one's subject matter. This course is based around teaching you how to begin to do this well. With each attempt at thoughtful analysis and investigation an author develops her or his abilities, finely tuning a craft. This process often involves techniques of rewriting and rethinking with the goal of a clearly stated thesis, one able to withstand the pressures and enjoyments of formal expression. There is a lot to experience in developing a definite style, as there is in testing your ideas and assumptions. Both of these will be addressed in this class in various ways. In using the text Seeing and Writing by Donald and Christine McQuade, we'll appreciate that the academic discipline of writing can be used to assess the qualities and merits of many "sources", those from visual and pop culture, as well as poetry, fiction and non-fiction. You will find you are able to generate many ideas on many subjects. The problem of how to narrow those down to a certain, concise and defendable opinion will be worked out over the term by writing four papers. You will produce first an ungraded rough draft and then a graded final draft of each of these four papers. You will also be consistently engaging material from the text, as well as the work of your classmates, through in-class discussion.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 039 Writing Fiction, Writing Non-Fiction: Placing the Self in Context

Instructor(s): George H Cooper (geob@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

(This section is restricted to MCSP students.) This is first and foremost a course intended to help you in the invention, construction, and delivery of your ideas, chiefly in writing. Some aspects of writing well can be taught and learned rather easily, like what a subject of a sentence is, a verb, a verb tense, and so on. As we proceed further, however, some of the teachable and learnable features of writing become more complex. For example, what is an "appropriate" subordinate idea? What is "good" arrangement? How much is "effective" amplification? Writing can be frustrating because of this complexity. The treatment for this frustration is experience, i.e., experience in reading, writing, and language. This course provides such an experience of language. Designed in conjunction with the Michigan Community Scholars Program, this course will grow out of community service activities, and your writing will grow from information you collect by interviewing others. You will be expected to research and write on a variety of topics: race, community service, television, and culture. With some clever and thoughtful choreography (the above-mentioned invention, construction, and delivery), the week-to-week assignments will culminate in a coherent, memorable, and collectable project of writing.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 040.

Instructor(s): Peggy Adler (adlerp@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.002.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 041 Finding a Sense of Place in America

Instructor(s): Herbert Annalissa (babaylan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will explore what it means to live and write in America. We will read essays of many different people who represent the great mosaic of American experience. Also in the process we will learn how to write effective essays and learn how to read and write critically. Therefore, we will examine mostly academic publications in order to understand how scholarly writers build their arguments. We will also work with each other in workshops to help polish our own writing. You should look at this course not as competition but as a long collaboration. By the end of this course you should be able to develop a well-argued, expository essay that is both grammatically correct and well organized. You should also be able to use evidence effectively in developing your own original ideas. Texts: The Writer's Presence: A Pool of Readings, a good dictionary, and a thesaurus. Course Requirements: Weekly journal writing 1-2 pages per week and 4 papers assigned throughout the academic term.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 042, 061.

Instructor(s): Nicole Signe Johnson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 043 Meanings of Freedom in the East and the West

Instructor(s): Charles Sabatos (csabatos@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For much of the twentieth century, the dominant divide in world politics was between the "capitalist" Western countries and the "communist" societies of Eastern Europe. We will look at fiction and nonfiction from a number of major figures from both sides, to determine how their writings defined "freedom" and whether these meanings still hold true for us today. Film versions of these works may also be included. We will read several novels and a number of related essays; authors to be studied may include Franz Kafka, George Orwell, and Milan Kundera. Class assignments will consist of three or four major papers, as well as several shorter response papers.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 044.

Instructor(s): Paul Douglas Barron (pdbarron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.031.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 045.

Instructor(s): Valerie Laken (vlaken@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Communicating well both on paper and in person can be one of your most important assets in college life and in the world at large. In this course you will learn to identify and analyze the components of a persuasive argument, and you'll develop the essential skills for writing critical and persuasive essays at the college level. You will learn to express and support your own opinions in a way that is appropriate to the genre and clear and interesting to the reader. We will closely study the work of established writers as well as the writing of our peers, and workshops and peer critiques will play a central role in this course. Assignments will include four formal, revised essays of varying lengths (3-8 pages), peer critiques, weekly exercises, and readings.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 046.

Instructor(s): Lindsay Ellis (ellislm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What is good college writing? The answer depends upon whom you ask. The standards of good writing are defined within communities. Thus this section will examine the unique rhetorical assumptions and expectations of the University of Michigan in this decade. We will examine a variety of essays, looking for the structural and topical qualities that they share. We will also discuss the slowly evolving rules of standard written English, looking at the advantages and disadvantages of such a standard. Complementing such discussions, students will be expected to improve their writing largely through the practice of revision. The four essay assignments will draw material from students' early experiences, current events and advertising. Classes will include significant work in small groups, and all student writing will be workshopped in both small and large group settings, aiding the revision process.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 047.

Instructor(s): Kevin V O'Leary

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.028.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 048.

Instructor(s): Jason Christopher Kirk

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.033.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 049.

Instructor(s): Sharilyn C Steadman (steadman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This section of Composition 125 will operate as a learning community in which members work together to improve each student's writing skills. To accomplish this goal, every student will participate in a three-member peer essay support/critique group. The class will focus on four major rhetorical styles: definition, cause and effect, comparison/contrast, and argument/persuasion in order to prepare students to successfully compose essays for any department within the university. Works from The Blair Reader will provide examples of these writing styles and foder for classroom discussions. Students will be required to write four major papers, respond in journal form to each assigned essay, write peer critiques for their group members' essays, and lead a class discussion of a student-selected essay.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 050 Writing our Worldviews: The Art of the Essay

Instructor(s): Heather Holleman (brownh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This composition class uses the study of published essays to aid us in our approach to creating sophisticated, polished writing as we develop our ability to think analytically. We will examine the perspectives presented in the essays published in The Best American Essays anthology (and others) and talk about what worldview each writer holds. Worldview, defined as the central set of concepts and presuppositions which order a writer's argument, will become the touchstone of our discussions and our writing. By refining our grammatical accuracy and developing the less tangible concepts of voice and nuance in writing, the course will equip us as we convince others of our authenticity as writers, clarify to our audience our ways of understanding our worlds, and present a clear argument with evidence. There will be a course pack to purchase in this class. At the end of the course, you will have written 4 polished essays (4-6 pages).

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 051.

Instructor(s): Sara Kathleen Talpos

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 052.

Instructor(s): Ian Fulcher

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.052.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 053 Law And Justice

Instructor(s): John Min Kang (johnkang@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

(This is a First Year Seminar section, restricted to first-year students only.) In both scholarly and popular representations, the law can save the innocent, protect the weak, give hope to the powerless, and punish the guilty. It can also mask inequality, exploit the vulnerable, ignore victims, and torture and kill the innocent. In this class, we explore these two contrasting visions in the framework of essay composition, by examining critically how law is represented in literature (for example, Melville's Billy Budd and Camus' The Stranger), film (for example, the Thin Blue Line ) and other discourses (perhaps law cases). Our critical inquiries will take the form of a series of sharply crafted arguments subject to very careful revision. The class thus has two aims: to improve your writing skills and to examine the various guises of law in literature and elsewhere.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 054.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 055.

Instructor(s): Therese Stanton (theresem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.022.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 056.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 057 The Essay as Laboratory: Experimental Reading and Writing

Instructor(s): Joshua E Lavetter-Keidan (jkeidan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we'll be looking at the works of four very different authors. Each of these writings will be experimental: each writer pushes boundaries and conventions as s/he explores different ways to make connections and meaning. As a writer, you'll be challenged to write experimentally, trying on the different techniques these writers display, working with different voices and styles. In addition, you'll perform more conventional writing, as you critique these writers. Expect to be writing at least one paper or revision per week, plus numerous shorter assignments, all of which will become part of the portfolio on which you'll be graded. Plan on re-reading, re-thinking and revising, working with peers to challenge and support one another as writers. Throughout, we'll be considering how we communicate how do the choices we make as writers help make a point, or convince an audience?

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 058.

Instructor(s): Francesca Delbanco (cescadel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce you to essay writing at the college level. Whatever subjects you go on to study, critical composition will constitute a major part of your work here at the University of Michigan. In this class we'll take time to focus on every aspect of the writing process, from choosing a paper topic to revising your final draft. Since reading and practicing are the two surest ways to improve writing, we'll be doing a lot of both over the course of the academic term. Requirements will include four separate, revised essays (totaling between 20 and 25 pages of polished prose), several ungraded in-class assignment, and readings from a wide range of modern masters. Workshopping will play an essential role in this class; by examining and critiquing drafts of each other's work, we will learn to be expert editors of each other and of ourselves.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 059 Writing Well With Quantitative Data: How Not To Lie With Statistics

Instructor(s): Matthew Nolan Beckmann (mnbeckma@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

(This is a First Year Seminar section, restricted to first-year students only.) In contemporary America, we are bombarded with numeric information. In political polls, economic forecasts, nutrition information, "best of" rankings, and many other analytical accounts, quantitative data are frequently employed as justification for one's point of view. Indeed, it is often said that "the numbers don't lie." This course investigates this premise as a means of cultivating critical thinking skills and thoughtful writing. By the course's end, students will be better able to read and produce articles that utilize numbers as evidence. Toward this end, we will consider graphical and tabular presentations of quantitative data as well as essay structure, writing style, proper grammar, and citation. Prospective social science majors should find these skills invaluable.

The readings for this course represent a diverse combination of popular and scholarly works. Readings including quantitative data will often be assigned to help anchor our discussions and assignments. Assignments will include writing and revising 5 papers, a presentation, active (daily) participation, as well as many other smaller writing exercises.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 060.

Instructor(s): Geoffrey M Bankowski (bankwski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 061.

Instructor(s): Nicole Signe Johnson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See English 125.042.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 062.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 063.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 064 Language Facts And Language Myths

Instructor(s): Evanthia Diakoumakou

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

(This is a First Year Seminar section, restricted to first-year students only.) It is a fact that we all speak a language and, more specifically, a particular variety of a language; but is it also a fact that some languages and some language varieties are better than others? We all have certain opinions about and attitudes toward other people's speech. How justified are these opinions? In this course we will read various articles and we will discuss language facts and language myths. We will focus on English, but we will also examine whether our observations will hold for other languages as well. The theme of this course is 'spoken language', and the written assignments (four assignments that will receive a grade as well as brief weekly reports) will be constructed around this subject, but 'writing' and learning to 'write well' about any topic is our ultimate goal.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 065.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 066.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 067 The City and Society

Instructor(s): Maureen T Aitken (aitkenm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 068.

Instructor(s): Anastasia Pratt (alpratt@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

First-Year Seminar

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Writing is one of the most effective and most necessary tools available to members of the University. All disciplines, from literature to architecture, and all assignments, from a science lab report to a business letter, require both clarity and coherence. Although many disciplines require particular styles of citation or individual methods of formatting texts, they all demand a sophisticated ability to read and to write. Over the course of this academic term, we will work together to achieve clarity and coherence. Through reading various texts and completing a variety of writing exercises focusing on images of the past, we will hone our writing skills to be better able to express factual evidence and opinions. Among the authors whose work we will study are Margaret Atwood, John Berger, and Michel Foucault.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 069.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 070.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 071.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 072.

Instructor(s): Clara Kawanishi (kawanish@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will facilitate an awareness of your "writerly self" by helping you to hone your critical thinking, reading, and writing skills. Regardless of your area of interest, you will need these skills in order succeed in and beyond the academy. Gaining self-consciousness about your learning and writing processes will enable you to identify the strengths and weaknesses of your written voice, assess the effectiveness of your rhetorical choices, and to develop a repertoire of useful and powerful writing strategies. Course requirements: 20-25 pages of revised, graded prose which will become part of a final portfolio.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 073.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 074 The Subjectivity of the Student Author

Instructor(s): Timothy Murnen (tmurnen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will look reflexively at the task you have been given: to become a college writer. We are going to explore what that means to composition theorists, to English departments, to the folks who teach college composition courses, and to you who has come to the university and this course with your own expectations of what it means to write at the college level. I operate under the premise that English 125 is more than a mere skills course, but that writing is an act of literacy an action that a thinking individual performs in order to engage the world around herself or himself, an activity which leads one toward self-definition, self-determination, and self-actualization. As the academic term proceeds, I want us to explore how these three concepts are inter-related, and also how they manifest themselves in acts of literacy. You will write four essays of 5-7 pages in length. I will provide a course pack, and you will bring a writer's handbook of your choosing.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 075 Travel and the Self

Instructor(s): Alex Ralph (ralpha@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Marcel Proust has said that the joy of travel lies in learning to see yourself with new eyes. In this course we will examine the essays your own and those of such masters as James Baldwin, Joan Didion, and George Orwell, among others which explore this process of self-discovery. Using the notion of travel the self as a foreigner as our lens, we will concentrate on improving your writing and thinking, and expand your understanding of travel as a broadening experience, be it transoceanic or a trip to Comerica Park. The requirements include four revised essays in a variety of forms and totaling at least 25 pages, active and thoughtful participation, written critiques of fellow students' work, and responses to reading.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 076.

Instructor(s): Nick Harp

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

More than any other social tool we use written language to define, question, transform, and defend our notions of the world, the ideas we're confronted with, and the way we think life feels. This course takes for its most basic precept the assertion that writing is a serious form of art, and that like any kind of aesthetic experience it demands our curiosity, our skepticism, and our intellectual labor. This is a way of saying that we will work hard in this class to improve your skills with language and rhetoric, and we will (by extension) work to bolster confidence in your writing. Regardless of where the university and your career take you, you will need the tools to make yourself clear and heard. This class pledges to teach you those tools. Using a variety of unstuffy media to inspire us and light our way contemporary essays, film, music, television), we will write a handful of essays (some about ourselves, some not about ourselves), revise them, and focus our ideas about what makes effective, convincing writing. Be prepared for hard work, fun (yes, really), and the lasting rewards of time devoted to language.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 077.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Beckham (beckhamj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore some of the intersections between popular culture and the experience of place. Through reading and writing, we will examine the ways in which places, both strange and familiar, come to embody particular meanings for different people. Some examples of questions we might ask are as follows: In what ways do images of Caribbean beaches in a tourism brochure inform ones experience of a Caribbean Island as a tourist or, as a local inhabitant? How does someone develop an understanding of South Central Los Angeles without ever having been there? How does the presence of your belongings give meaning to your dorm room? We will focus special attention on the ways in which these concerns cut across issues of race, class, sexuality and gender. Readings will include academic essays, journal articles, short stories and Paule Marshall's novel, Browngirl, Brownstones.

The chief intent of this course, however, is to help you refine your skills as a writer. To that end, we will devote considerable time to developing revision skills, to reworking drafts and to peer editing and critique. By the end of the course, you will have produced four polished pieces of writing totaling twenty to thirty pages. In addition you will have routine, informal writing assignments responding to reading materials and issues raised during class discussion.

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