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Winter Academic Term 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for Winter Term 2001 on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in French

This page was created at 7:14 PM on Mon, Jan 29, 2001.

Winter Term, 2001 (January 4 – April 26)

Open courses in French
(*Not real-time Information. Review the "Data current as of: " statement at the bottom of hyperlinked page)

Wolverine Access Subject listing for FRENCH

Winter Term '01 Time Schedule for French.


Waitlists

Students who wish to register for a class that is closed should get on the WAITLIST through wolverineaccess.umich.edu, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for handling the waitlist will be explained there.

LSA seniors and Romance Languages concentrators may be given priority over others on the waitlist.

Elementary Language Courses

After the first two meetings of the class, the instructors and course coordinators will give permissions to register to students who have attended the class. Any student who has not attended the first two class meetings may be dropped from the registration list or from the waitlist, and will not be given permission to register.

Placement Tests

Students who intend to continue language study begun in high school must take the Placement Test to determine which level is appropriate for their skills. Students who began language study at another college or university are also strongly encouraged to take the placement test. No preparation is necessary for the placement test – it is intended as a tool to place students in the course where they will gain the most.

The results of the placement test will be communicated to the academic advisors in the student's home college. LSA students should make an appointment with an advisor in 1255 Angell Hall, (734) 764-0332.

Students will be placed in one of the following courses:
101 (Elementary)
103 (Elementary review)
231 (Second year, first semester)
232 (Second year, continued)

Students may also place beyond 232, which means that they have satisfied the LSA language requirement.

Students with questions about their placement should consult the Course Coordinator of the course into which they have been placed.

For a list of Romance Languages Course Coordinators, see http://www.lsa.umich.edu/rll/coords.html


FRENCH 101. Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Students with any prior study of French must take the Placement Test. Credit is not granted for more than two courses from French 101, 102, and 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The sequence of French 101/102 presents the essential elements of French grammar, vocabulary, and culture which are needed in everyday life to understand French spoken at a moderate speed and to be understood by sympathetic native speakers. Vocabulary and structures are practiced in class primarily through communicative activities stressing listening and speaking. Authentic documents are used to develop reading skills and culture. Cultural awareness and listening skills are further developed through listening and video materials. Classes meet four hours per week in sections of 20-25 students. Daily homework assignments involve studying vocabulary and grammar, writing exercises or short compositions, and practice in listening comprehension. There are several quizzes and tests, as well as midterm and final examinations and speaking tests. Class participation is graded.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 102. Elementary French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 103. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See French 101. French 102 is the continuation of French 101. French 102 is NOT open to students who have begun instruction at the high school level. College or university transfer students who have received credit for one term are encouraged to enroll in French 103. It is STRONGLY suggested that transfer students see H. Neu for advice regarding placement in the appropriate course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 103. Review of Elementary French.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 102. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/french/103/001.nsf

French 103 is a course for students with some prior language study in French, and covers the same material presented in French 101/102. Entrance into the course is by placement or with the permission of the course coordinator. Because students are expected to be already familiar with some of the material, the course moves at a rapid pace, and students will need to plan on spending at least 8-10 hours each week preparing daily lessons. The objectives and methods of instruction are similar to those of French 101/102. Quizzes (with both oral and written components) are administered to check students' assimilation of material. There are three hourly exams, a final, compositions, and speaking tests. By the end of the course, students will have a good working vocabulary and strong listening comprehension skills; they should be able to express themselves in French (both in writing and orally) using most of the basic structural patterns in the language. Students will also have a general knowledge of French-speaking cultures. Technology (multi-media, computer-based writing programs, the web) will be used to aid in acquiring listening and writing skills, and cultural competency.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 231. Second-Year French.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 102 or 103; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students whose last French course was NOT at U of M Ann Arbor must take the placement test. French 231 builds and expands upon the work done in French 101/102 or French 103. The primary goals of French 231 are to:

  • develop and refine your listening, speaking, reading and writing skills;
  • provide you with strategies that allow you to communicate and read more effectively;
  • help you review previously learned grammatical structures and acquire new structures and uses;
  • develop an awareness of French-speaking cultures the world over, and to discover both similarities and differences between the way French-speaking people live, think, and express themselves as compared to the way you live, think, and express yourselves;
  • utilize technology to help you in your study of French and to have greater access to Francophone cultural documents.

Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential. Homework consists of CD-ROM activities, writing exercises, and laboratory work, both audio and video. There are comprehensive course-wide tests as well as final examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In French 232, we will use literature, magazine articles, movies, videos and songs to explore the history of France and several other Francophone countries from the 1940's until the present. We will begin by studying life in France during the Second World War. Then, through some videos and the literature of several other Francophone cultures, we will examine the effects of colonization and decolonization on language use, culture and identity. The last part of the course will focus on the politics and social climate in modern French society. Throughout the course of the term, students will be expected to review and learn various grammatical elements and vocabulary in order to participate in classroom activities and discussions. Linguistically, we will focus on supporting opinions, making comparisons, hypothesizing, and composing more and more sophisticated sentences.

Classes meet four times per week in sections of 20-25 students. Since communicative skills are emphasized, daily, regular attendance and active participation are essential and will be included in the final grade. There will be several short writing assignments, two compositions, two tests, and a final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 004 – Contextual Culture.

Instructor(s): Rachael A Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Context dictates our communicative register: situation, interlocutor, and media all require understanding and an ability to adopt the necessary form of written, verbal, or listening communication. For example, when speaking during a job interview, would you use the same vocabulary, body language, tone of voice, or facial expressions that you would use with your best friend in a coffee shop? Definitely not, and neither would the French.

In this course, we will study a wide variety of communicative registers, ensuring that we can both understand and reproduce them in order to communicate efficiently and appropriately. As we will discover, a TV news presenter, for example, employs a precise set of vocabulary and communication techniques very different from a Music Video presenter; students will study the differences and recreate these examples with in-class skits.

During our studies, we will work to improve grammar by using Reprise, applying our knowledge in presentations and written texts within the registers we have studied. The Internet will an invaluable tool as we study its unique cyber-French. We will also study, discuss and produce our own versions of video, film, and TV clips.

The format will center around seven 2-week units:

Politics in France: history, current, recordings of speeches – students write and perform.
Business in France: etiquette, vocabulary, resume, job interview skits.
French Literature: short story/poem to study – students write in literary register.
Daily Life: food labels, operating instructions, recipes, schedules, etc.
Media: newspapers, magazines, radio, and TV.
Internet: Surfer le Web, discuss Americanization of French language.
Social Studies: religious language, entertainment industry.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 232. Second-Year French, Continued.

Elementary Language Courses

Section 014 – Cross-cultural Comparisons and Technology.

Instructor(s): Sabine G Gabaron (sgabaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 231; or assignment by placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 112 or 230. (4). (LR).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/french/232/014.nsf

What is culture? Where and how is it represented? How can the study of a foreign language help in the understanding of the culture it embodies?

The purpose of this technology based course is to confront students with the notions of culture both to appreciate the values of the foreign language even more and to develop cultural awareness and analysis. Via web activities, email exchanges, research on the Internet, videos, and movies students will first reflect on their own culture and then apprehend the foreign culture. We will address topics such as gender representation, interaction with people/the environment, politics, racism, and social issues.

Students will be asked to participate in class discussions and to be willing to use technology both in class and outside of class on a regular basis. Students will also be asked to use Coursetools every day (for schedule and homework assignments).

Requirements:

Four main projects: a comparison of a French movie and its adaptation in English; a comparison of French and American commercials; a cultural presentation on a topic of interest (technology based presentation); and a collaborative writing of a short story.

Quizzes and one final cultural oral presentation.

We will use Reprise as a grammar tool and reference.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001, 002 – Advanced Practice in French Through Contemporary Social Issues

Instructor(s): Yannick A Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in French.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/french/235/001.nsf

This course will be dealing with some of the most recent issues facing today's French/Francophone society through readings, videos and CDs:

  1. The "French Republic"
  2. Europe: The European Union – The European Monetary Union
  3. Transatlantic Relations: Globalization / "Exception française"
  4. Societal Issues: Employment / Social Exclusions / Violence / AIDS
  5. Families: Traditional / PACS / Gay Rights: Adoption
  6. Women: Political Parity / Abortion Laws / Excision
  7. France's multicultural Society: Colonization / Immigration / Islam / Raï Music

Your final grade will be based on three oral presentations (30%), three essays (30%), several written exercises (20%) and very active class participation (20%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 235. Advanced Practice in French.

Other Language Courses

Section 003, 004.

Instructor(s): Roger Eugene Butler-Borruat (rebb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan in French.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/winter/french/235/001.nsf

This course will be dealing with some of the most recent issues facing today's French/Francophone society through readings, videos and CDs:

  1. The "French Republic"
  2. Europe: The European Union – The European Monetary Union
  3. Transatlantic Relations: Globalization / "Exception française"
  4. Societal Issues: Employment / Social Exclusions / Violence / AIDS
  5. Families: Traditional / PACS / Gay Rights: Adoption
  6. Women: Political Parity / Abortion Laws / Excision
  7. France's multicultural Society: Colonization / Immigration / Islam / Raï Music

Your final grade will be based on three oral presentations (30%), three essays (30%), several written exercises (20%) and very active class participation (20%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Courtly Literature and Cultural Values in Medieval France

Instructor(s): Peggy S Mccracken (peggymcc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course focuses on courtly narratives from the twelfth-century and offers an introduction to the literature and culture of medieval France. Courtly narratives, written for and about noblemen and women in the Middle Ages, recount stories of damsels in distress; knights who fight each other to impose justice, but also to win or to keep women; and women who choose lovers according to their beauty and knightly prowess. We will think about the values that these stories endorse and challenge: the importance of battle in establishing a knight's status; the power of women in love relationships; the importance of lineage and legitimacy; the ambiguous relationship between marriage and love; and the status of magic in an ostensibly Christian society.

Texts: Marie de France, Lais; Chrétien de Troyes, Erec et Enide; and selected photocopied texts.

Requirements: a series of one-page response papers; two short (3-5 page) papers; midterm; final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 002 – Rebellious Quests among Modern French Writers: Temptations to leave in poetry, theater, film, and the novel.

Instructor(s): George P Hoffmann (georgeh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Modern movement, which arguably began in Paris, was born out of mixing escapism with provocation. We will study works that call for journeys in which what one leaves behind is at least as important as what one hopes to find. These authors renew the age-old theme of quest in which the "Holy Grail" leads one down unholy trails.

This class aims to provide a thorough preparation for upper-level literature courses by practicing the vocabulary and the methods for writing original essays in French. It introduces various techniques for analyzing pages taken from prose, poetry, and drama. Passages for study come from a wide range of authors including Céline, Yourcenar, Baudelaire, Zobel, Molière, Rimbaud, Proust and Chateaubriand. We will also watch the film Diva, and read the dark and unusual detective novel, Rue des boutiques obscures, in which a private investigator who suffers from amnesia engages in a man-hunt… to find his past self.

Grades will be based upon four papers, two exams, one presentation, exercises, and class participation.

Readings from:
Patrick Modiano, Rue des boutiques obscures (Folio), 2-07-037358;
Peter Schofer et al., Poèmes Pièces Prose (Oxford), 0-19-501643-2; photopacket.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 270. French and Francophone Literature and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 003 – Disease and Community

Instructor(s): David Caron (dcaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will study how various concepts of health and disease have been used throughout French literary, social and political history. What is normal and what is deviant? What are the links between medical science and literature? How was medicine used to define race and sexuality? If disease can be used as exclusion, can it also be used in a positive way? What is the AIDS crisis telling us about French society?

Readings: Montaigne, Chateaubriand, Zola, Maupassant, Barrès, Gide, Dreuilhe.

Film: La bête humaine, by Jean Renoir.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 272. French and Francophone Film, Media, and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Lorsqu'on s'enrhume à Paris, on éternue à Bruxelles: Contemporary French and Belgian Culture. Taught in French. Required Screening Time: W 6-8 p.m.

Instructor(s): Carina Yervasi (cly@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What might this expression reveal about the relationship between France and Belgium? Does Belgium merely follow the example of France? This course asks whether Belgium has its own specific cultural production in literature and film distinct from France.

This course will serve as an introduction to Francophone Belgian cultural expression. It will be a comparative course between French and Belgian history, culture, literature, and film so that we may focus on the interconnections between these two countries. The course concentrates on the contemporary and postcolonial context of the late 20th century in both countries. It will also provide an introduction to media studies as well as to the technique of film analysis. A strong emphasis will be placed on student participation in class discussions, vocabulary development, and writing skills.

Course requirements: Along with keeping a journal throughout the academic term and writing short reaction papers to various texts, there will be a writing assignment or quiz each week, two short oral presentations, and a final project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 274. French and Francophone Societies and Culture.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – The Orient in Modern French Culture

Instructor(s): Alina M Clej (aclej@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232. (3). (HU). May be elected for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will explore an enduring trope in the French social imaginary – the Orient – and its variations during the 19th and early 20th centuries. As a symbolic figure, the Orient is first and foremost a by-product of Western European expansion in Northern Africa and Asia. More than any historical reality, the Orient expresses a colonial desire for a distant world, defined simultaneously as enfeebled and threatening, seductive and repelling. We will study the various cultural forms taken by this obsession with an exotic Other, in travel narratives and poetry, fashion and the arts. From the "egyptomania" inaugurated by Napoleon's expedition in Egypt (1798-99) to the infatuation with Japanese prints ("japonisme") at the end of the 19th century, to the exoticism of the 1920s and 30s, French Orientalism contributes in significant ways to what we call modern "French" culture.

While focusing on individual writers (Nerval, Hugo, Gautier, Baudelaire, Flaubert, Verlaine, Segalen, Loti, Gide, Crevel), we shall also discuss their connection to wider trends in French culture, such as Romanticism, Symbolism, Impressionism, Surrealism. No exams. Evaluation will be based on four short papers and participation in class discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 333. French Phonetics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Helene Neu (hneu@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course, conducted in French, is designed to introduce basic concepts in phonetic theory and to teach students techniques for improving their own pronunciation or that they can use in teaching French to others. We will examine the physical characteristics of individual sounds, the relationship between sounds and their written representations, the rules governing pronunciation of "universal" French, and the most salient phonological features of selected regional varieties of French from within France and from other parts of the Francophone world. In class, but mainly as independent and regular work with audiotapes, students will have opportunities for oral practice in the production of French consonants and vowels, syllabification, intonation, liaison, and deletion/retention of the "mute e".

Homework for each class consists of reading theory, writing phonetic transcriptions using the International Phonetic Alphabet, and oral practice with tapes. Participation, 1-2 oral quizzes, and the final oral exam will evaluate proficiency in pronunciation. Written homework, phonological problems sets, quizzes, a midterm, and a final written exam will evaluate ability to use the phonetic alphabet and knowledge of basic theory. This is NOT a conversation class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 335. Composition and Stylistics.

Other Language Courses

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Yannick A Viers (yannick@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Because written production and textual interpretation can be two very pleasurable activities, this course will offer you to enhance the quality of your writings and of your interpretative skills when reading prose or poetic texts. We will thus concentrate on the acquisition of tools (linguistic, rhetorical, stylistic, narrative, prosodic) indispensable for textual analysis and writing activities (including a survey of basic rules of punctuation in French and usage of monolingual and bilingual dictionaries); on some essential rules of essay composition, and on the analysis of selected literary and journalistic texts.

Your final grade will be based on several written exercises (30%), two quizzes (20%), three 3-4 pages essays (30%) and very active class participation (20%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 342. French and Francophone Film Taught in English.

Courses Taught in English (without language prerequisite)

Section 001 – The French New Wave (in English). Required Screenings: T 6-8 p.m. Satisfies the National Cinema elective for concentrators in the Program in Film and Video Studies.

Instructor(s): Carina Yervasi (cly@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Taught in English. A knowledge of French is not required. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an in-depth exploration of one of the most important film "movements" in French film history: The New Wave. We will concentrate on the development of the New Wave and the history of France from the 1950s through the early 1970s. The first two parts of the course center on the close study of styles of individual film makers and the film "movement" (as perceived by critics), and the last part on the New Wave's contribution to international film culture. While the primary emphasis throughout the course will be on the style and culture of the filmmakers and critics most closely associated with the New Wave, we will also examine this "movement's" sociopolitical dimensions in relation to postwar France. Film makers studied include Claude Chabrol, Jean-Luc Godard, Francois Truffaut, Alain Resnais, Jacques Rivette, Eric Rohmer and Agnes Varda.

Course Requirements:

  • preparation of discussion questions on readings
  • reaction sheets for each film
  • midterm exam
  • one essay 7-10 pages
  • final exam

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 363. Caribbean Studies.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Desiring Across Borders: Métissage, Gender, and Identity in the French Caribbean (in French)

Instructor(s): Jarrod L Hayes (hayesj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Many Caribbean theorists have used the concept of métissage (racial mixing) to describe not only Caribbean racial identity but also the cultural and historical trends that came/come together in the Caribbean to produce Caribbean identities and societies. In this course we shall examine the themes of cross-racial and cross-cultural desire as metaphors and/or allegories of identity as a form of métissage in literary, political, and other cultural discourses. Whereas many discussions of métissage often take a celebratory tone, we shall consider the beginnings of métissage as a practice forced on slaves brought to the Caribbean from Africa, a practice whose weight remains present in contemporary literature. We shall also consider the positive possibilities of a politics of identity as métissage in contrast with an identity politics of purity, which might define communities through exclusion.

A significant portion of our discussion will be devoted to the meaning of race in the Francophone Caribbean as well as the role of racism in French colonialism throughout Caribbean history.

There will be two papers, a journal, and class presentations.

Texts (tentative):
Maryse Condé, Moi, Tituba, sorcière noire de Salem
Mayotte Capécia, Je suis martiniquaise
Frantz Fanon, Peau noire, masques blancs (selections)
Dany Laferrière, Comment faire l'amour avec un nègre sans se fatiguer
Dany Laferrière, Cette grenade dans la main d'un jeune nègre, est-elle un fruit ou une arme (selections)
Myriam Warner-Vieyra, Juletane

films:
La rue Cases-Nègres
Métisse

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 378. Studies in Genre.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Poetry As You Like It/La Poesie Comme Elle Vous Plaire

Instructor(s): L Ross Chambers

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Poetry is a technology of pleasure. That means you'll miss much of the pleasure unless you're prepared to work at it. (Dessert is pleasure without work, at least eating it is. This course is not about dessert.) Because we have work to do, the course will be run as a workshop in reading French and Francophone poetry (mostly of the modern period, roughly 1850-1975). Because it's a workshop there will be no syllabus, just a loose outline.

The technology of French-language poetry, and hence the pleasure of reading it, differs from that of English-language poetry. That's because the languages differ. I'll try to teach you the basics of that technology, that is, how specific features of the French language can be used to make meanings that sometimes support and sometimes undermine what the language "says." We'll concentrate on verse for roughly two-thirds of the course, moving toward vers libérés, vers libres and prose poetry toward the end.

I'll ask you: (a) to prepare specific poems at home, using your store of technical knowledge; (b) to participate actively in small-group work as well as class discussions; (c) to attend regularly (since it's a workshop); and (d) to keep a journal in French, on which – together with your assiduity and participation in class – your final grade will depend. Class work will be in French.

Here's a poem to think about in advance: It's by Guillaume Apollinaire (from his collection, Alcools):

Chantre

Et l'unique cordeau des trompettes marines.

Have fun!

Textbooks (for purchase – available from Shaman Drum):

  • Baudelaire, Les Fleurs Du Mal (Gallimard-"Poesie".
  • Rimbaud: Poesies Completes (Poche)
  • Apollinaire, Alcools (Gallimard-"Poésie")
  • Pong, Le Parti Pris Des Choses (Gallimard-"Poésie".
  • Course pack (anthology), to be supplemented by hand-outs in class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 379. Studies in Gender and Sexuality.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Families: Stories of Sex and Violence

Instructor(s): David Caron (dcaron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232, and 2 courses numbered between French 250 and 299. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

If you were to choose between your family and your friends, who would you choose, and why? When is the family an oppressive structure? When is it a recourse against social and political oppression? What are the links between heterosexuality and capitalism? Is homosexuality inherently subversive? How are the private and the public spheres articulated, and for what purpose?

The focus of the course is the twentieth century and the modern family. In addition to short theoretical texts dealing with the construction of the modern bourgeois family, we will read a variety of literary texts that challenge existing models and/or propose alternative ones.

Readings: Karl Marx, Jean Cocteau, Annie Ernaux, Émile Ajar, Emile Copfermann, Hervé Guibert, Denis Lachaud.

Films: Ma vie en rose, by Alain Berliner, and additional film clips.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

FRENCH 380. Intermediate Business French.

Other Language Courses

Section 001 – Meets with Business Administration 415.

Instructor(s): Rachael Criso (rcriso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 235 and one additional course numbered 250 and above. A maximum of six credits of French 380, 414, and Business Administration 415 may be counted toward a degree. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to familiarize students not only with the language of business transactions in France, but also the differences associated with cultural aspects of doing business in a French-speaking country. We will study both written and spoken commercial French. Themes covered during the class will include various aspects of the business world such as: banking, advertising, claims and disputes regarding products, organization and hierarchy of the enterprise, applying for a job in France, and what to expect if you get one. Writing exercises will concentrate on commercial correspondence and will stress the formal nature of written business French.

We will use some cultural videos to study differences between the U.S. and France in a business setting. The textbooks will be Parlons Affaires and Le français commercial. There will be also be a course pack available at the book stores.

Attendance is mandatory. No auditors. Maximum enrollment is 25.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 391. Junior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Reading of selected works from French literature. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

FRENCH 392. Junior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Reading of selected works from French literature. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

FRENCH 399. Independent Study.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Prerequisites & Distribution: French 232; permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Readings and topical studies relating to French-speaking cultures (in Europe, Africa, North America, and Indian Ocean) not addressed in other courses, as well as to aspects of French and Francophone culture that may require special treatment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

FRENCH 462. Literature of the Sixteenth Century.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001 – Under the Eye of the Court: Scrutiny, Secrecy, and Personal Awareness in the Renaissance.

Instructor(s): George P Hoffmann (georgeh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three courses in French numbered 300 or above. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As the French royal Court grew in size and importance, it became a place of intense competition. If one wished to leave the provinces to make something of oneself, or if one needed the immense resources only available through the Court in order to realize a project, one could not help but be drawn into the sphere of royal influence. Once there, one had to vie in a restricted space with many other aspiring courtiers; simply put, those at the court had to struggle to survive in an environment where the major entertainment consisted in watching and judging one another.

In order to cope under such strain, one needed to become more aware of oneself: for example, the necessity of controlling one's facial expression in the presence of the king and other powerful princes forced one to become more conscious of one's emotions so as to be on guard for one's spontaneous reactions. All agreed that, behind the glitter and refinement, the Court was a "social jungle". life there subjected one to constant scrutiny. To protect one's sense of dignity, many were forced for the first time in the their lives to develop a notion of their self-worth, and cultivating a richer "inner" life became a means by which to let off intense social and psychological pressure.

We will study the birth of the ideal of "sincerity" in this environment where, paradoxically, one had to hide one's intentions and dissimulate one's feelings nearly all of the time.

Grades will be based upon four papers, two exams, one presentation, and class participation.

Readings from:
Norbert Elias, La Société de Cour (Flammarion), 2-08-081144-4;
Castiglione, Le Courtier (Garnier-Flammarion), 2-08-070651-9;
Marot, Adolescence clémentine (Gallimard), 2-07-032405-2;
Du Bellay, Les Regrets (Gallimard), 2-07-032147-9;
Montaigne, Les Essais (Pocket), 2-266-06250-6;
Shakespeare, Hamlet (Folger Library), 0-671-72262-x;
Molière, Le Misanthrope (Classiques Larousse), 2-03-871313-8.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

FRENCH 491. Senior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Supervised independent studies; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

FRENCH 492. Senior Honors Course.

Cultural and Literary Studies

Section 001.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to seniors by permission of the departmental Honors Committee. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Supervised independent studies; a program of selected readings and conferences, term papers, or reports; and written examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: "5, Permission of Instructor"

Graduate Course Listings for FRENCH.


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